Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
8 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 28, 1975)-v. 8, no. 40 (Dec. 17, 1982).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 2, 1976 called v.2, no. 22, but constitutes v.2, no. 1.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: July 28, 1978 called no. 14 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement; Aug. 25, 1978 called no. 16 in masthead and no. 17 in publisher's statement; Aug. 10, 1979 called no. 15 in masthead and no. 16 in publisher's statement; Oct. 22, 1982 called no. 31 in masthead and no. 32 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44607504
lccn - sn 00229550
ocm44607504
System ID:
AA00014311:00172

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
wJewish Flloiriidliai hi
OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
Combining "OUR VOICE" and FEDERATION REPORTER"
m conjunction with The Jewish Federation of Point Beach County
'olume4- Number 13
Palm Beach, Florida Friday, June 30,1978
Price 36 Cents
Israelis Reject
Follow-Up
How Ruth Carter Stapleton LateStPTOpOSal
Snubbed Convert Klatcli
By ANDY EDELSTEIN
"This is my press conference,"
I Ruth Carter Stapleton told the
[crowded room of reporters
Listening to her announcement
Ithat she would not address a con-
Ivention of Bnai Yeshua, a Long
I Island Hebrew Christian" mis-
Isionary group. "No one else is
Isponsoring it."
Mrs. Stapleton, sister of
[President Carter and a prominent
Evangelical Christian, adjusted
r bifocals and smoothed her
each-colored dress. Speaking
_oftly, she continued: "I made
the decision after many sleepless
lights and much prayer. I tried
|to put myself into the mind of
Jesus Christ. What would He do,
[ asked myself."
Ruth Carter Stapleton
N CAPITOL HILL
U.S. Hints Solution On
Way With Veep Mondale
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON -
|JTA) The United States
idicated that it is con-
sidering offering its own
[suggestions" to bring
Israel and Egypt back to
the conference table and
that Vice President Walter
Mondale may convey them
to Israel when he visits
re at the end of the
lonth.
The State Department's chief
uesman, Hodding Carter,
liluded to both possibilities
oday. He also refused to charac-
erize or comment in any way on
response sent by the Israeli
Cabinet to the American
buestions about the future status
|f the West Bank and Gaza Strip.
CARTER NOTED that
Ambassador Samuel Lewis in
Brael and Ambassador Hermann
tilts in Cairo have met, respec-
pvely, with Foreign Minister
Moshe Dayan
authorities."
and "Egyptian
HAVING made her decision,
Mrs. Stapleton came to New
York to hold a press conference in
a ninth-floor conference room at
342 Madison Ave. The location
was chosen to emphasize the
independence of Mrs. Stapleton's
decision.
The American Jewish Commit-
tee had sent a mailgram to the
press announcing her ap-
pearance.
In addition, Rabbi Marc
Tanenbaum, the AJC's director
of interreligious affairs, was
present as a "consultant" to Mrs.
Stapleton. He said he had written
and conversed several times with
Mrs. Stapleton about Bnai
Yeshua.
NONETHELESS, it seems as
if there is one member of the
Carter family who is listening to
Jewish leaders.
Jewish community leaders on
Long Island expressed dismay
when it was learned last month
that Mrs. Stapleton had accepted
the invitation to speak at the
Bnai Yeshua gathering.
Bnai Yeshua is a Texas-based
organization which last year pur-
chased the Stony Brook Girls
Continued on Page 2
Israel has rejected
President Anwar Sadat's
latest proposals calling for
Israel to turn over the oc-
cupied West Bank to Jordan
and the Gaza Strip to Egypt
as a preliminary move toward
a Mideast peace.
Spokesman Arieh Naor said
after a meeting of Prime Min-
ister Menachem Begin's
cabinet that the problem
centers on what the Israelis
view as the "preconditional"
aspect of the plan, that Israel
give up the territories prior to
negotiations on effective
arrangements for Israeli
security.
"ISRAEL rejects without res-
ervation these suggestions by
President Sadat," the cabinet
statement said.
Israel will stick to its own pro-
posal for continued limited Pales-
tinian self-rule with continued
Israeli military presence in the
West Bank and Gaza for a five-
year period, Naor indicated.
After the fifth year, the status of
the occupied territories would be
open for negotiation.
"Israel is willing to discuss any
Egyptian proposal, providing it
is not presented as a precondition
tor negotiations," said Naor.
LAST MONTH, Begin dis-
missed the Sadat proposal after it
was first aired in the news media.
He said at the time that the plan
would require Israel to give up
territories "without negotiations
and without a peace treaty."
Cairo's semiofficial AI A hrman
newspaper outlined Sadat's pro-
posal which includes the
following:
Egyptian and Jordanian
forces would replace the Israeli
military in the West Bank and
Gaza, which Israel took from
Jordan and Egypt in 1967.
JORDAN would assume
responsibility for the West Bank
and Egypt for the Gaza Strip for
a five-year period. During that
time, security measures for Israel
would be discussed as part of
Arab-Israeli negotiations.
The Arab states would nego-
tiate with Palestinians living in
occupied territories so that Israel
would not have to deal directly
with the Palestine Liberation
Organization.
The proposal was to be drawn
up this week and transmitted to
the United States, according to
Cairo's Middle East News
Agency, quoting Egyptian
Foreign Minister Mohamed Ibra-
him Kamel. __________
He hinted that the U.S. might
make its move after "con-
sultations" are completed. He
would not say whether con-
sultations are underway with any
other governments, although
Saudi Arabia is known to have an
overriding interest in develop-
ments and Jordan is expected to
express its views.
(Egyptian Foreign Minister
Mohammed Kaamel was quoted
as saying that his country
regretted "Israel's continued
intransigence and determination
not to respond favorably to the
honest efforts exerted by Egypt
and supported by the U.S.")
ASKED ABOUT the Amer-
ican "option" to offer its own
proposals for resuming the Israeli
- Egyptian talks, Carter said,
"We have said in the past that at
some point the U.S. may decide
to make suggestions of its own on
this issue in order to help the two
Continued on Page 7
Day School Appoints NewDirector
The Jewish Community Day
School has appointed Mordecai
Levow to serve as the school's
director, announced Max
Tochner, president of the school.
Levow will assume the post this
summer.
For the past seven years,
Levow has served as director of
the Milwaukee Board of Jewish
Education, and as a supervisor
and consultant of the Hillel
Academy. He also served as
principal of the Midrasha, the
Milwaukee community Hebrew
High School.
PRIOR TO his service in
Milwaukee, Levow occupied
educational posts in Kansas City,
Mo., Atlantic City, N.J., and in
the Philadelphia area.
"At a time when we are plan-
ning a move to new quarters and
possible expansion into a
Mordecai Levow
secondary school
program,
we
feel fortunate that our new
director comes to us with many
Bonn's Nuclear Role i* Latin America
By ROBERT HELD
Frankfurter AUgemeine
Brazil will have a population of
fore than 210 million by the end
T the century. By then, we shall
now What use the 1975 nuclear
pal with Bonn has proved.
[This long-term view is the
^kground against which the
sit to Bonn by Brazilian Presi-
pt Ernesto Geisel is best seen.
[Economic ties have long been
wk. with Brazil preferred to
IN GERMANY
North America by German in-
vestors.
THIS WAS partly because the
going was tough in North
America, whereas Brazil gave
rise to flights of fancy. Perhaps
not every decision to invest there
was based on rational con-
siderations.
Even in Willy Brandt's days as
Bonn Chancellor, Social Demo-
crats were at pains to maintain
that political unrest in Brazil was
much exaggerated.
The decision to invest in Brazil
has yet to be regretted, while
President Geisel's tenure of office
has given steadily less occasion
for political unhappiness.
BY THE terms of the 1975
nuclear deal, Bonn also set aside
foreign policy misgivings,
running the risk of upsetting
both Brazil's neighbors and the
United States.
The wording of the deal gave
the impression that no one in
Bonn was frightened that
President Monroe's ghost might
still be stalking the international
Continued on Page 5
years of experience in community
education and particularly in day
school supervision," Tochner
said.
Levow is a graduate of
Brooklyn College and the
Teacher's Institute of the
Yeshiva University. He pursued
graduate studies in Social Work
at Boston University and doc-
toral studies in Education at the
Dropsie University (Phila-
. delphia) School of Education.
HE IS a member of the
National Council for Jewish Edu-
cation and has served on its
executive board and has been
president of the Mid-West region.
He is a member of the Jewish
Educators' Assembly and the
Education Council of America,
the professional education groups
of the Conservative and Ortho-
dox movements, respectively.
As a member of the Com-
mission on Teaching of Jewish
Civics, and the Commission on
Teaching of Israel of the Amer-
ican Association for Jewish Edu-
cation, Levow has been involved
in curriculum development for
Jewish schools.
"One of our immediate
priorities is to establish well-
defined curriculum goals and to
provide the human and material
resources to help students
achieve these goals," Levow said.
Levow succeeds Louis Samet,
interim principal of the school.
Mrs. Lee Jacobson continues to
serve as the administrator.


Page 2
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, June so
1978
Convent klatch SnuBBeo
Continued from Page 1
Academy as a center from which
they proseletyze their odd
mixture of Jewish and Christian
customs.
Their office has recently issued
a barrage of press releases (which
"I WOULD NOT associate
myself with any effort that would
seek to undermine the survival of
the Jewish people as a distinctive
religious-ethnic group."
Mrs. Stapleton explained that
AMERICAN SCENE
are mailed in envelopes whose
postmark reads shalom) pre-
dicting that thousands of Hebrew
Christians would attend the June
8 to 10 gathering billed as
Shechinah '78 (Glory of God).
Having Mrs. Stapleton as key-
note speaker, it seemed to most
observers, lent a certain
legitimacy to the Hebrew
Christians' practices which have
been roundly condemned by both
Jewish and Christian groups.
MRS. STAPLETON. however,
said that she was unaware of the
precise nature of Bnai Yeshua.
She told the press conference that
her secretary had made the
appointment without consulting
her. It is the nature of her work,
Mrs. Stapleton maintained, that
she speak to groups of all faiths
to share her "psychological and
spiritual insights."
"I am a Christian and my faith
stems from my perception of
God's love through Jesus
Christ." she said, smiling in a
manner reminiscent of her
brother.
"Yet I have never attempted in
any way to negate the faith and
practices of any sect, however far
they might be removed from my
own personal beliefs, nor would I
ever willingly be used by any
group to attack the faith of
others.
her work as president of Behold,
Inc., a non-profit, non-denom-
inational religious organization,
involves reconciliation and "inner
healing' a complicated
process in which tensions and
pressures are released through
acceptance of Jesus. She main-
tained that she has not now and
never has been actively seeking
to convert Jews.
"Conversion is Bnai Yeshua s
calling. It is not mine," she said.
WAS SHE influenced at all by
her brother?
"Well, the last time I saw
Jimmy was at Billy's daughter's
wedding. He came up to me and
asked me if I was aware of the
Jewish reaction to my ap-
pearance at Bnai Yeshua. And I
told him. quite honestly that I
hadn't."
She smiled again, this time
warmer and more sincere thar
the President's Ultra-Brite grin.
Jimmy, what must I do?' I
asked him. And he looked at me
and he said, Ruth, I've never
told you what to do, and I'm not
going to tell you now. You must
seek your own guidance do
what is right in your heart." "
"Amen." mumbled a member
Harry Lerner (left), president of Congregation Anshei Shalom,
presents a check to Max Tochner (right), president of the
Jewish Community Day School. Lerner praised the school for
its "high standards of scholarship" in Judaic and secular
studies. A t center is Louis Samet, principal of the school.
First Marine
National Bank and Trust Company
582-5641
114 NO. "J" STREET
LAKE WORTH, FLORIDA
Member F.D.I.C.
PHILIP WEINSTEIN.F.D.

evitt memorial chapel
Mil OKEECHOBEE BLVD.. WEST PALM BEACH. FLORIDA
PHONE NO. ttt-BTM
I33M tVCIT Otxif HIGHWAY. MONTH MIAMI. FLORIDA >H(WIM]||
M1 rtHtKOKI HOAO HOLLVWOOO. FLOMIOA 13000 mOMHITNO
P4-M-7I
of Mrs. Stapleton's party sitting
next to me. He absent-mindedly
thumbed through a copy of the
Bible
MICHAEL STOLOWIEZKY,
an Israeli who runs the World
Christian Travel Service in
California, was brought up to the
lectern. A balding, goateed man
in a white safari jacket, he ex-
plained that he was the booking
agent for Mrs. Stapleton's forth-
coming trip to the Holy Land.
"I've been with her constantly
for the past two months, and I've
never heard her mention
anything of the sort that she is
trying to convert Jews," said
Stolowiezky, who added he had
lost members of his family in the
Holocaust.
"Mrs. Stapleton, what would
you do if one of your children
decided to convert to Judaism?"
The question was posed by Frank
Casey, a Black reporter for
WPIX-TV.
MRS. STAPLETON remained
silent for 45 seconds. At that
moment, the light in the room
pointed up the resemblance
between her and her other
brother. Billy.
Seminary Names
Mr. Mandelbaum
Joseph P. Mandelbaum of
Palm Beach has been named to
the board of overseers of the
Jewish Theological Seminary of
America. His election, which took
place at the spring meeting of the
national advisory group, was
announced by Lester Crown of
Chicago, chairman of the
Seminary overseers.
Mandelbaum, first vice
president of Temple Emanu-El of
Palm Beach, has been active on
behalf of the Seminary as a spon-
sor of the annual Seminary recep-
tion held there. He recently
established an educational award
for the benefit of students at the
New York school.
Mandelbaum joins some 300
men and women leaders through-
out the United States and
Canada, who serve in an advisory
capacity to the Seminary.
Column to Appear
Again in September
Stephen Levitt's column,
"Because Someone Cared" will
not be printed during the
summer. Levitt, executive
director of Jewish Family Ser-
vices, is on vacation until Sep-
tember.

Federation Consoles Rothenberg Family
The Board of Directors and staff of the Jewish Federation
of Palm Beach County extend condolences to the family 0f
Benjamin Rothenberg, who died June 18 in West Palm Beach.
Mr. Rothenberg served as a member of the Board of
Directors of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County, and
served as the chairman and honorary chairman of the Century
Village Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
campaign.
Latin America
Alleged War Criminal
Attempts Suicide
By DAVID MARKUS
RIO DE JANEIRO (JTA)
Alleged Nazi war criminal
Gustav Franz Wagner was in the
infirmary of the federal prison in
Brasilia under close watch after
an unsuccessful suicide attempt.
A police medical spokesman said
his health was satisfactory.
A request for Wagner's ex-
tradition has already been filed
by Israel and similar requests are
pending from the governments of
Austria, West Germany and
Poland which say they will file
after receiving the necessary
documentation.
^ WAGNER, who has lived in
Sao Paulo since 1950, was iden-
tified recently by Nazi-hunter
Simon Wiesenthal as the former
deputy commander of the
notorious Treblinka and Sobibor
concentration camps. He has
denied the charge.
His attorneys, one of them of
Arab extraction, have filed a
writ of habeus corpus with the
federal Supreme Court in
Brasilia. They are asking for
Wagner's release from detention
and rejection of all extradition
requests.
The lawyers claim that
whatever Wagner may have
done, he acted solely as a German
patriot. "There was only one man
in Nazi German responsible for
the war crimes: Hitler," the law-
yers contended.
THEY CHARGED that Jem
have created a publicity machine
that distorts the facts about
Wagner.
Meanwhile, the Rio branch of
the Association of Polish
Resistance Fighters has called for
Wagner's extradition to Poland
on grounds that the law requires
that he stand trial in the ter-
ritory where he committed his
crimes."
Inasmuch as Israel has filed
the first official extradition
request it is expected to be acted
on first by the federal Supreme
Court.
Investln
Israel Securities.
STATE OF ISRAEL BONDS
BOUGHT & SOLD

Were Specialists In Israel Securities.
Transactions Daily
Via Telex To Israel Stock Exchange.
LEUMI SECURITIES CORPORATION
\Suhsidiarvof ftinkLeumile-krueVB VI ^^
l Ml Sit oci. Vu Wk. YY. lP..2l2i',yMJU. NASD
REAL ESTATE LICENSE COURSE
Including Required Educational Course
Salesman License Course Begins
Miami-South Miami Springs Fort Lauderdale
July!
7:00 P.M.
TWICE WEEKLY
Madruo* Building
ISM.dru|.Av..,No IH
Coral Gablei
Auoust M
l.MPM.
ONCE WEEKLY
Miami Sprints
Villas
500 Dear Run
AufuilN
7:MPJM.
TWICE WEEKLY
SIM Building
SIM N. Federal Hinway
Suit* No 1?
For registration and further information write or call loll free
Bert Rodgers Schools of Real Estate
Incorporated
1550 Madruga Avo. Sutt 100
Coral Qabtaa, Florida
Plsona (305) 600-3340
P-M-7|
P-4-M-7I


Friday. June 30,1978
___The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 3
With the
Organizations
Skokie and the ACLU
LABOR ZIONIST
ALLIANCE
The Labor Zionist Alliance of
Palm Beach County recently
honored its president, Sidney
Falik, and his wife Mollie, pre-
senting them with a set of silver
Kiddush cups.
Geometric paintings by Aaron
Rosen were displayed at the West
Palm Beach auditorium during
the celebration of Israel's 30th
anniversary. Esther and Joe
Molat donated a cake for the
celebration.
Glorian and Harold Pearlman
hosted a Golden Anniversary
wedding party for her parents,
Lena and Irving Kossoff. Mr.
Kossoff served as the first
president of the Palm Beach
County Alliance. Attending the
celebration were four generations
of the Kossoff family, including a
brother and sister-in-law from
Argentina.
HADASSAH
Shalom group of Hadassah will
participate in a four-day Thanks-
giving weekend, Nov. 23-26,
sponsored by the West Palm
Beach chapter of Hadassah, at
the (kosher) Saxony Hotel in
Miami Beach. Flora Schwartz
and Bea Brealow are in charge of
reservations.
The arts and crafts group
meets Tuesday afternoons at
Southampton Pool. Lillian
Schack is in charge of in-
formation
The Executive Board of
Shalom Hadassah met at the
home of Lillian Yelowitz.
president, to discuss plans for the
coming year. Lee Golden,
Jeanette Green berg and Lil Yelo-
witz are in charge of information.
The Bat Gurion Palm Beach
chapter of Hadassah is planning
a luncheon and theater party on
Wednesday, July 26 at noon, at
the Royal Palm Beach Theater in
Boca Raton. The musical / Do! I
Do! will be presented.
Marcia Chauncey is in charge
of information.
TEMPLE BETH EL
Temple Beth El of West Palm
Beach is conducting registration
for religious school. Classes will
be held from 4 to 5:45 p.m. on
Tuesdays and Thursdays, begin-
ning Aug. 29 and continuing
through next June 7.
Michael Chen, principal, is in
charge of information and in-
dividual appointments.
PIONEER WOMEN
The Golda Meir club of Pioneer
Women will sponsor a luncheon
and card party Tuesday, July 11,
from 11:30 a.m. 3:30 p.m. at
Pagliacci's in Century Corners.
Elizabeth Rudnick is handling
the arrangements.
SISTERHOOD
Sisterhood Anshei Sholom's
next musical, We've Got Rhyth-
m, will be presented at the syna-
gogue next January.
The musical is written and
directed by Norma Sirota.
Auditions will be held after Labor
Day.
By HENRY GROSSMAN
The appearance of Nazis in
uniform on the streets of Skokie
(or Chicago) is an assault on
Jews, especially on survivors of
the Nazi regime. It is as definite
an assault as would be a frontal
attack with clubs and pistols.
Concentration camp survivors
Jews are safest and most secure
when personal freedom and
security are secure. Conversely,
when civil rights are invaded
Jews have usually been the first
to suffer.
FOR THESE reasons there is a
temptation in the Jewish com-
munity to uphold ACLU's action
in winning for the American Nazi
CRC Update
Carolyn J. Ring (right) was recently installed president of the
North Palm Beach chapter of Women's American ORTby Ann
Cohen (left). Also, that evening, Mrs. Cohen was installed to a
second term as president of the Palm Beach County Region of
Women's American ORT.
don't just feel threatened by the
anticipation of the Nazi march;
they react as if they had been
assaulted. The results are actual
physical, emotional and mental
illness. It is for this reason alone
that the Nazi party should be
outlawed and members indicted.
WHEN A Jew meets a Nazi, he
gets the message! The message
clearly is, "I have killed and per-
secuted Jews to the limit of my
ability, and shall continue to do
so. I am going to kill you at the
first opportunity."
I have met Nazis on one or two
occasions, and I can attest to the
fact that I, who never trod on
German soil, definitely felt
assaulted and was sick for a long
time afterward. The thought still
makes me ill.
Now comes the American Civil
Liberties Union, ACLU, an
organization heavily supported
by Jews, and aligns itself with
support of the Nazi march in
Skokie because the means being
used by the town to prevent thisi
march would constitute a threat
to Civil Liberties in the United
States. Therefore, says ACLU,.
we must go to bat for the Nazis,
much as we hate them.
UNFORTUNATELY, villains,
murderers, common criminals,
embezzlers and venal public
officials often hide behind the Bill
of Rights to protect themselves
against prosecution.
In Skokie (or Chicago) we have
another example of this type of
abuse. Would, that some legal
genius could develop a means of
keeping the protection of the Bill
of Rights for decent people and
removing it as a safe haven for
malefactors. The Jewish com-
munity would welcome this
warmly, for it is obvious that we
have an enormous stake in sup-
porting civil rights and pro-;
tection of personal freedom.
History has taught us that!
party the right to march, in full
regalia, in the streets of Skokie.
The ACLU legal position has
been upheld by the Supreme
Court of the United States. How
can we argue with that?
The point is. we can argue with
\feshin^tonFcdcral
offers UnbeatableRates
andafiecGifttoo!
f /j|L more than U.S. Treasury Bill Yield
/4 Six month Savings Certificate
$10,000 minimum Compounded Daily
Information on minimum deposits,
certificate term, early withdrawal
penalties and earnings based on daily
compoundins available at all Washington
Federal offices in Dade, Broward and
Palm Beach Counties.
Washington
Savings Certificates
Annu*
**te
8.00%
7.75%
750*6
6.7516
6 50%
5 7516
Annu*l Minimum Account
YWld Deposit Type
8 3316 11.000 8Y8 CEftTlflCATl
8 0616 S 1,000 6Y.CKTIflCATt
7 7916 J',000 4VH CEHTIflCATE
6 9816 S 1.000 30 MO CEftTINCATC
6 7216 11.000 HMO CtTtCATI
5.9216 H.O0O 3MO.CETlflCATE
Interest compounded daily from day
of deposit to day of withdrawal.
Certificates subiect to substantial
penalty for early withdrawals.
JACK D. GORDON
President
FSLK
ARTHUR H. COURSHON
Chairman of the Board
that! ACLU would have gained
, far more credibility, membership
and financial support if it had
publicized the legal issues and
then refused to participate on the
Nazis' side because of the
assaultive nature of such an
appearance on Skokie's streets.
ACLU could further put its
legal beagles to work, spurring
bar associations on the ways to
I devise legislation needed to deny
I the protection of the Bill of
Rights to Nazis and other
criminals, while protecting the
rights of decent citizens.
By this type of action, ACLU,
in the long run would have done
much more to strengthen
American democracy than it has
done in the past by its insistence
on the letter of the law.

Peace Movement Leaders
Draft Letter to Sadat
JERUSALEM (JTA) Leaders of the Peace Now
movement have drafted a letter to President Anwar Sadat of
Egypt making it clear that while they believe the Israeli
government must be more forthcoming in its peace positions,
they are opposed to peace terms dictated by Egypt.
THE LETTER was prompted by a speech by Sadat in
which he praised the Peace Now movement, apparently mis-
interpreting their differences with the government of Prime
Minister Menachem Begin as tacit support for Egypt's
positions.
The letter expresses appreciation for Sadat's "historic con-
tribution to peace" but calls on him to return to the negotiating
table with patience and readiness for mutual compromise.


THE JEWISH CCrfUUTY CEN1B
OF THE PALM BEACHES INC.
IS NOW ACCEPTING REGISTRATION FOR
our KREN ORR amWITY PRE-SCHDOL
SEPTEMBER ltTS-7*
Pf*E-SCHOOL(2Vi YRS)
l:M.m.-l:Hp.m.
8:30a.m.-3:00p.m.
fcMa.m.-S:Mp.m.
PR E-SCHOOL (3 YRS)
l:30a.m.-l'Mp.m.
8:30a.m.-3:00p.m.
:Ma.m.-S:Mp.M.
PRE-KINDERGARTENM YRS)
S7S PER MONTH
KM PER MONTH
SIM PER MONTH
S7j PER MONTH
SIM PUR MONTH
SIMPER MONTH

8:30a.m. 1:00p.m.
8:38a.m.-!:*0B.m.
8:30 a.m. S:30p.m.
KINDERGARTEN (3 YRS)
8:30a.m3:00p.m.
S:30a.m.-5:30p.m.
S7J PER MONTH
SIMPER MONTH
$125 PER MONTH
111* PER MONTH
$135 PER MONTH
SPACE IS LIMITED .. MEMBERSHIP REQUIRED ..TRANSPORTATION
AVAILABLE...
St DC POSIT ... REGISTER NOW AT 0W-77M ..
IRIS MURRAY, CHAIRPERSON .. THE JCC IS A BENEFICIARY
AGENCY
OF THE JEWISH FEDERATION OF PBC ..
REGISTRATION PORM
CHILD'S NAME.
BIRTHDATE___
ADDRESS______
ZIP CODE______
TELEPHONE.
ENCLOSED PLEASE FIND MY CHECK IN THE AMOUNT OF $.
KINDLY ENROLL MY CHILD IN THE 1V7B-70 KEREN ORR PRE-
SCHOOL.
PLEASE CHECK THE FOLLOWING:
PRE-SCHOOL2Viyr< ) PRE-SCHOOL lyr( )
PRE KINDERGARTEN! ) KINDERGARTEN( )
KINDLY MAKE CHECKS PAYABLE TO:
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER OP THE PALM BEACHES. INC.
J15 Okaachobaa Blvd., Watt Palm Batch, Fla. 13400
.


Page 4
. _. ..
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Frithy, June 30,1978
^Jewish Floridian
OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
Comb.mna "OUR VOICE and "FEDERATION REPORTER'
In conjunction with Jewi* Federation of Palm Beach County. Inc.
Combined Jewish Appeal
PALM BEACH BOCA RATON OFFICE
13S0NW 2 Ave.. Boca Raton. Fla 33432 Phone 368 2001
Printing Office 130 N E 6th St Miami. Fla SSI 32 Phone 373 4606
FREDK SHOCHET
Editor and Publisher
SUZANNE SHOCHET
Executive Editor
RONNI TARTAKOW
News Coordinator
Friday, June 30,1978
Volume 4
25SIVAN-5738
Number 13

Some Carter Hokum
Now that Prime Minister Begin and his Cabinet have
sent another "unsatisfactory" explanation to President
Carter of Israel's future policy in the occupied territories,
pressure will mount for the President and the State
Department to take a more active stance in imposing a
peace settlement on the Middle East.
This is something that the Administration says it
didn't want to do. Bunk.
What was the Carter jet deal jointly concluded but
further pressure on Israel to come to terms with the Arabs
more favorable to the Arabs than to the Israelis?
In fact it is precisely this jet deal, contributing to an
already gross inequity in the Middle East arms balance,
that has made Israel more determined than ever not to
telegraph its decisions on the territories to be made five
years hence.
President Cater has long ago given up his role as
honest broker between the contending parties. Why the
hokum about being sad that he must now "abandon" it?
New Era in Congress
The defeat of Sen. Clifford P. Case in the New Jersey
Republican Primary removes from the Senate one of Is-
rael's most ardent and effective supporters. The absence
of Case from Congress after 24 years in the Senate and
before that in the House may signal a new era for Israel's
relations with Congress.
The loss of the 74-year-old Case at the hands of
Jeffrey K. Bell, a 34-year-old political unknown, had
nothing to do with Israel. Bell presumably will support
Israel as does his Democratic opponent, former New York
Knicks basketball star Bill Bradley.
And, of course, despite the Senate approval of Presi-
dent Carter's sale of jet planes to Egypt and Saudi Arabia,
the overwhelming majority of the membership of both the
House and Senate support Israel and its right to live in
peace and security.
The Senate still will have such stalwart supporters of
Israel as Frank Church (D., Idaho), Henry Jackson (D.,
Wash.) and Bob Packwood, (R., Ore.). There are also
freshmen Senators coming along all the time: to mention
just two, Joseph R. Biden (D, Del), who introduced the
resolution to reject the Mideast plane package, and H.
John Heinz (R., Pa.).
But Case, along with Sen. Jacob Javita (R., N.Y.),
who is also 74 and up for reelection in two years, and the
late Hubert H. Humphrey, held a special status. The three
of them had dealt with the issues concerning the State of
Israel from the beginning. Their experience and prestige
provided immeasurable aid both for American Presidents
working out their Mideast policies and to the Israelis in
their dealings with the U.S. government and Congress.
Full Text of Israel's
Statement on West Bank
JERUSALEM (JTA) The Cabinet sent a
three-point reply to the United States Sunday in
response to the questions posed regarding the future
status of the West Bank and Gaza Strip. It read as
follows:
1. The Government of Israel considers it vital to
continue the peace-making process between Israel
and its neighbors.
2. The Government of Israel agrees that five
years after the application of the administrative
autonomy in Judaea, Samaria and the Gaza District,
which will come into force upon the establishment of
peace, the nature of the future relations between the
parties will be considered and agreed upon, at the
suggestion of any of the parties.
3. For the purpose of reaching an agreement, the
parties will conduct negotiations between them with
the participation of representatives of the residents
of Judaea, Samaria and Gaza as elected in ac-
cordance with the administrative autonomy.
'Right to Life' a Pretense Only
MORTON GILBERT Advertising Representative
The Jewish Klortdiaa Does Not (.mrulrr The Kaahnrth
Of The Merchandise Advertised la I ta Columns
FORM 3579 returns to The Jewish Floridian.
______ 1580NW 2 Ave. Boca Raton. Fla 33432
}. SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) On* Year l&.io, or by membership fo
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County. 24l5C*eechobee Boulevard. Weit Palm
Beach. Fla. J.MO*. Phone at 5W (Out o Town upon Request)
Federation officers President. Alan L. Shulman; Vice Presidents Dr Richard
Shugarman. Dr Howard Kay. Kenneth Scherer. Joanne Levy. Jerome Tlshman
Treaaurer: Staci Leaser: Secretary: Bruce J. Daniels Executive Director, Nor-
man J Schlmelman Submit material for publication to Ronni TartaJtow Director
of Public Relations
Any pretense to humaneness
that the misnomered "Right to
Life" people have is belied by the
anti-life bills they are urging
upon the Congress of the United
States at this time.
We are about to witness a re-
peat of the 1977 battle over
abortion which held up passage
of the vital Health, Education
and Welfare appropriation until a
compromise was struck in the
final hours which pleased no one.
THAT THE House of Rep-
resentatives could get bogged
down on such an issue again and
again attests not only to the
venality of a majority of the Con-
gressmen but to the dogged
determination of the Catholic
Church to impose its morality on
America.
It also tells us something
about the people like Rabbi
Phineas Weberman who claims
that being against abortion is not
a religious issue but one of
human rights.
Here are some of the things the
"human rights" people have in
mind in the first moves in the
House of Representatives which
would limit Medicare funds only
to cases in which a woman's life
would be endangered if she went
through a full-term pregnancy:
9 If the pregnancy resulted
from rape, it would be elim-
inated:
f If the pregnancy, even of a
child, resulted from incest, no
funds could be provided for an
abortion;
If the pregnancy would
result in severe and long-lasting
physical damage to the woman,
there would be no funds.
THESE WERE the com-
promises of last year which the
"Right to Life" people would not
end. But they have some other
prohibitory amendments which
show their true colors, the ones
that go beyond abortion.
An example is use of family-
planning funds for abortions.
Legal services, funded by the
government, prohibit attorneys
helping poor women to secure
non-therapeutic abortions.
In that monstrosity of a bill,
S1437, the mailing of information
on abortion facilities is made a
felony subject to five years in jail,
a $100,000 fine, or both.
BUT THE really mean one of
those concerned with "human
rights" is the rider attached to a
Senate bill intended to guarantee
medical benefits and job rights to
pregnant women. That amend-
ment would allow employers to
withhold the benefits from
women who have abortions.
LIKE IT or not, and I am in
disagreement with any number of
recent Supreme Court decisions
this nation is still guided by
those interpretations of constitu-
tional rights.
And, of course, the bottom line
is really whether the dogma of
the Catholic Church or that of
Orthodox Judaism is to be
foisted upon those of us who do
not accept their faith. In their
efforts to deny human rights for
women, as their actions reveal
they lose any claim to honesty in
their labeling themselves as an
organization favoring "Right to
Life."
The loving concern these
people profess for the unborn
fetus and it begins for them, as
I have heard stated in public,
when the sperm meets the egg in
the womb looks like sheer
hypocrisy by their intended
actions against living, breathing,
troubled women and children.
The Catholics and some funda-
mentalist religious groups, in-
cluding the Orthodox Jewish
rabbinate, insist that their law
considers the killing of a fetus
within the mother's womb as
homicide. In its historic 1973
decision affirming the right of a
woman to have an abortion in the
early stages of pregnancy -
which is what the "Right to Life"
people are seeking to overturn in
these devious ways the Su-
preme Court could find no clear
answer to this question in philo-
sophy, theology, science or
justice.
Leo fRank Case 6ismteRRe6 in Atlanta
By STUART LEWENGRUB
Southeastern Director,
Anti-Defamation League
ATLANTA Recently, the
telephones at the ADL office in
Atlanta were ringing off the
hook. The reason for the flood of
telephone calls was the Atlanta
Constitution's five-part series on
the Leo Frank case.
Most, but not all, of the callers
were angry that the newspaper
was again bringing up a series of
events that has left some very
deep scars on Atlanta Jewry.
Some were fearful that the ver-
batim repetition of the anti-Sem-
itism of the Frank trial might
lead to incidents of anti-Semitism
today. Several people asked,
"What can you do?"
THE REACTION, especially
those who were in Atlanta
during that period, was under-
standable. Someone like myself
who did not live through the trial,
who did not experience the fears
and anxieties of the Jewish com-
munity, or the sending of women
and children to other com-
munities for their safety, can
nevertheless appreciate the bitter
taste that remains with those
who did, as well as the desire not
to have the memories rekindled.
Moreover, there i< no absolute
assurance that people consumed
with hatred of Jews would not be
incited by this series to vent their
hatred in some destructive way.
What, indeed, could or should
have been done?
ADMITTEDLY, I would have
preferred not to see the Frank
case serialized, especially on the
front page of the major daily
newspaper. But we have neither
the right or the responsibility for
telling a newspaper what
historical events they should or
should not print.
Like it or not, as ugly as it was,
this trial and the events sur-
rounding it. do fall into the
category of "famous Georgia
trials." As we all are fully aware,
the history of our people and of
our State contains some grue-
some as well as pleasant chap-
ters.
Moreover, once the tirst
episode had been published, a
sudden cessation would very
likely have created many more
problems than it would have
solved.
I. FOR ONE, would rather be
in a position of supporting the
innocence of Leo Frank and con-
demning the anti-Semitism that
convicted and murdered him,
than of trying to justify why the
series abruptly ended. In ad-
dition, it is highly likely that any
request to the newspaper to
"stop the series" would have
been met with a firm and
resentful negative response.
We have learned that one of
the surest ways to prompt the
printing of a story or series is to
ask an editor not to do so, unless
there is a compelling reason or
danger in running it.
Secondly. Celestine Sibiey is
talented, competent journalist. It
was our judgment that inasmuch
as the newspaper had chosen to
run the series, we at least should
wait and see how Ms. Sibiey
treated it. Was she going to be
accurate, fair, and sensitive?
I HAVE now read and reread
all five articles, and it is my con-
sidered judgment that with one
exception, Ms. Sibiey did. indeed,
provide an account of Mary
Phagan's murder, of Leo Frank's
trial, and of the events ac-
companying both in a competent,
sensitive, and fair manner.
Any reasonably fair-minded
reader would conclude that Leo
Frank was the victim of the worst
kind of anti-Semitism, and that
the overwhelming evidence
suggests that he was innocent of
the crime of which he was ac-
cused
The courage and principle of
Gov. John Slaton and the con-
trasting bigotry of Tom Watson,
Continued on Page 5


Friday. June 30,197
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 5
Bonn's Nuclear Role in Latin America
Continued from Page 1
political scene.
Even less attention seemed to
have been paid to the latter-day
custodians of the Monroe
Doctrine.
The nuclear cooperation agree-
ment was a hunk of realpolitik
modeled more along French than
German lines by present-day
yardsticks.
THE EQUATION was tempt-
ingly straightforward. Neither
country has oil, but Brazil has
uranium, and this country has
the know-how to use it.
Perhaps due to these con-
venient circumstances, the treaty
text sounded a surreptitiously
jubilant note, perhaps even a
sensational one.
leo faank Case dismtepRefc
Continued from Page 4-A
a man whose expressions of intol-
erance was directed against Jews,
Blacks, and Catholics, were high-
lighted as they well should be in
reviewing this case.
I regretted that there was no
mention of the reported death-
bed corfession of Jim Conley. It
is a shame that Judge Arthur
Powell's letter waa never pub-
lished, because it almost cer-
tainly would have once and for all
cleared Leo Frank's name and
pointed to the true murderer of
Mary Phagan.
NONE of us want bad
memories to be resurrected. The
Frank case is among the worst of
memories. It reminds us how
mindless bigotry can surface and
can be used to destroy a man and
strike fear and divisiveness into a
community.
It reminds us that public
officials and personalities can
stoop so low as to cause the
taking of a man's life to further
their own careers, using religious
bigotry as the vehicle. Thank-
fully, Celestine Sibley did remind
us of those things.
Personally, I would still prefer
not to see this 65-year-old in-
cident replayed over and over
again. That part of me which is
cynical says, the prejudice of the
bigot will be reinforced, the
rationality of the logical man will
be offended by this event. The
scars will remain with those who,
young as they may have been,
experienced terrible fear just
because they were Jews.
Peres Reveals Sadat Said
He Would Okay Border Changes
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Labor Alignment Leader Shimon
Peres, revealed that President
Anwar Sadat of Egypt told him
be might countenance minor
border changes on the West Bank
and the stationing of Israeli
troops across the border after
peace was reached.
Peres made the disclosure after
sharply criticizing the cabinet's
response to the American ques-
tions on the future of the West
Bank and Gaza Strip.
HE SAID that he had secured
Sadat's agreement recently,
through a third party, to reveal
details of their two-hour talk in
| Salzburg, Austria, last February.
Peres said that Sadat recog-
Inizes Israel's genuine security
problems on the West Bank and
also recognizes the distinction
between the international border
[between Israel and Sinai, which
I is a universally accepted line, and
the uncertain legal status with
respect to the West Bank borders
and sovereign rights.
Sadat expressed readiness for
minor changes in 1967 lines on
the West Bank and for the main-
tenance of Israeli strongholds
across whatever borders are
finally agreed to in a peace settle-
ment, Peres said.
HE SAID Sadat sought a joint
declaration of principles that
would facilitate Jordan's entry
into the peace negotiations.
Peres' apparent purpose in
making his disclosure was to
bolster his argument that Israel's
acceptance of the principle of ter-
ritorial compromise on the West
Bank would open the way to re-
sumption of peace talks with
Egypt. He is also seeking to
refute Prime Minister Menachem
Begins contention that there is
no distinction between Israel's
security needs and its claim to
retain the West Bank.
But the words not the music
upset the U.S. State Department.
Dr. Kissinger was first to
complain, and still retains his
misgivings.
FIRST THE deal was clinched,
then the foreign policy rami-
fications were dealt with.
Washington is still not at ease,
although the two sides in 1976 at
least came to show greater un-
derstanding of viewpoints.
The 1975 agreement was sal-
vaged in foreign policy terms in
1976, but had Bonn been in a
weaker position in its dealings
with the United States last year
the nuclear deal would hardly
have survived President Carter's
non-proliferation zeal.
Brazil's immediate neighbors,
initially upset by the nuclear
jingoism of Brazilian national-
ists, have also been pacified
especially Venezuela, so sensitive
on this issue that it even con-
ferred with the military leaders in
Argentina.
TIES WITH Brazil, otherwise
non-existent (at least, in
treaties), have suddenly assumed
importance in world affairs.
This is unlikely to have taken
first place on the agenda of Presi-
dent Geisel's talks in Bonn
except perhaps in an attempt to
coordinate trilateral ties between
Brasilia, Washington and Bonn.
Given that the Brazilian sys-
tem of government differs so
widely from this country's one
main object of the visit was to
maintain mutual confidence.
Brazil must be assured that
this country will not submit to
pressure and unilaterally amend
the treaty. While Bonn can only
stand firm as long as it feels sure
that Brazil will not play with
nuclear fire and hanker after a
nuclear arsenal of its own.
CERTAINTY in both respects
can undoubtedly be fostered by
close and cordial personal con-
tacts.
The nuclear treaty with Brazil
represents a new stage in Bonn's
foreign policy, a coming of age, a
new leeway in dealings with
Germany's allies.
This advance is still in the
experimental stage and Bonn is
still learning its new role It is,
moreover, dependent on three
aspects of U.S. policy:
9 Non-proliferation and all it
entails, which is also backed by
Moscow; N
Washington's policy on
Latin America;
The commercial intents of
U.S. industry.
A Yiddish Word
Book for English
Speaking People
by Samuel Rosenbaum
Now when you hear or read
English spiced with Yiddish,
you'll be able to understand
and talk back. A real metnah.
a real "find" indeed, this book
provides a world of Yiddish-
translated carefully, explained
pearly, spelled phonetically.
I' s as much a |oy to browse as
'' 'S a dependable reference.
';vtf 2,000 tremlatiom
j 1 words, aiprassionf, provarbs
EnrtthViddtah croat (,.
D WO tramMcrationi O and mort
S9.95 at aoofciaaWi
KHKT"0
135W5dhSt.NY.NY10D20
12th Season
Harder Hall
Tennis* Golf
Camp for Teens
(Co-Id) -Ages 11-17
The Finest GotfaTennto
Camp ki the Wortd
Jum2loAua17
1 lo 7 waa* program.
SPECIAL
1-Wea* fr9f rams
Am. 3 and Aue. ?
vcw Jacobaon Aba R*m
Doug Ford. Jr PGA
Sato-.og Fla 33870
na.ai3-MS-*l9l
THE UNITED STATES is so
insistent on nuclear non-prolif-
eration that Bonn can hardly
hope to repeat the nuclear deal
with Brazil with a further
customer.
U.S. policy on Latin America is
in a state of flux, on the other
hand. The outcome is unclear but
will probably approximate to
European respect of the inde-
pendence of other countries.
Yet Europeans would do well
to remember that in Latin
American eyes, which means
Brazilian ones too, the U.S.A.
remains an overwhelming neigh-
bor. The United States may at
times be hated, but it is in-
variably admired.
However much Washington's
1 motives may be mistrusted,
Latin Americans still tend to
regard the United States as No.
1.
THIS COUNTRY, and
Western Europe as a whole,
cannot evolve an independent
policy on Latin America. It must
coordinate policy with Washing-
ton, not in abject passivity, mind
you, but only inasmuch as
Washington will deign to do so.
The fight for markets and raw
materials is bound to remain
unrelenting, so there is every
reason to clasp a hand proffered
in friendship.
yteader Praises JCC Staff's Efforts \
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
I wonder how many people in
West Palm Beach are aware of a
little gem of a building in West-
wood called the Jewish Com-
munity Center? They really care
about people all kinds of
people pre-school children,
teen-agers, widows and widowers
and senior citizens.
They take elderly people to
doctors and shopping when they
have no means of transportation.
They provide entertainment for
lonely people, lectures for inter-
ested people, classes, courses, all
programs of enrichment of their
lives and their self-esteem.
The staff is small, the quarters
small, but the dedication is big
indeed. Quite a few grateful
people who benefit from their ser-
OUR
ReaoeRs
wRite
Li I' 11 < I B, Brii '
. '. u iles I
vices donate time and effort to
the hard-working staff. The
building is small, but the activi-
ties going on there are unbe-
lievably big and most rewarding
to the community.
SHOSH AN A FLEXER
West Palm Beach
-ORIENTAL RUGS WANTED-
THE NATIONAL COLLECTORS GUILD
has a representative in your area.
HIGHEST PRICES PAID for your Oriental Rugs
Call SUSAN GROSSMAN
TOLL FREE 1-800-621-3868
Low CQll -srf
flights to Israel
$ $ Save Hundreds of Dollars $$
PURCHASE 4S 60 DA YSINAD VA NCK
nwxo srcrra
Travel Service
"Ask for Nechemia Rothenberg"
1140 Broadway, New York, N.Y. 10001
TOLL FREE 800-223 7676
EVERYTHING YOU NEED FOR A
REAL ESTATE LICENSE
FOR SALESMAN OR BROKER
INCLUDING THE REQUIRED
EDUCATIONAL COURSE
IS JUST A PHONE CALL AWAY.
jjj Bert Rodgers Schools of Real Estate, Inc.
1919 Premier Row Orlando, Florida 32809
Local Classes Throughout Florida
CALL TOLL FI^EE 800-432-0320
In Orlando Call (305) 855-5441

Please send me information concerning:
a Salesman License Course
o Broker License Course
NAME
ADDRESS
JAP CODE
CITY
.STATE
TELEPHONE


*
Page 6
*.- .
The Jewish Pbridian of Palm Beach County
Friday. Jaw 3Q, 197g
The Jewish Community Center
MUSIC LESSONS
TSe Jewish Community Center
will offer private music kanntii
for children. Dorothy Kioder will
teach piano and voice and Paul
Bryant will teach clarinet, flute
or oboe.
Each ffwffti is 30 minutes
long Classes will be held Mon-
days or Tuesdays at 3:30 pa at
the Center.
SUMMER ULPAN
Diane Soil will conduct classes
for children entering al and
third grade, and who know the
Hebrew alphabet. Classes will be
held twice a week for eight weeks,
on Tuesday and Thursday from 4
to 5 pm. Class sixe is limited.
TEENS. TWEENS
Both groups will meet during
the summer. Information is
available at the Center.
PRIME TIME SINGLES
A happy hour is held every
Friday from 5 to 7 p.m. at the
Nags Head Pub in West Palm
Beach, for single adults (40-60
years old' Hal Farancz is com-
mittee chairperson for the happy
hour.
A house party is scheduled for
Saturday. Jury 18 at 8 pan. at
Glends's. Singles will meet at the
Hilton Hotel on Singer Island.
Sunday. July 16 at 9:15 pjn A
house party wil be held Satur-
day. Juhr 29 at Bea's. and a bar-
beqoe wil be head at Lake Worth
Park on Sunday. July 30 at 4
PRESCHOOL
Pre school registration is being
conducted.
Singles win meet at the Hilton
on Singer Island on Sunday.
Aug. 6 Donald Curry will lecture
on rotfkig on Sunday. Aug. SO at
7:30 pjn.
ADULT CLASSES
Mindy Weaver wul teach s six
the
KINDERGARTEN
The JCC has
formation of a kindergarten i
for the 1978-79 school
Registration is being rondnrted
for the class, which wul be 'inl
Fran Win is in charge of
Registration for pre-kmder-
gartes is being conducted.
HUMAN SEXUALITY
The JCC Women s League is
*po"woring a Human Sexuality
Weekend. Saturday and Sunday.
Aug 12 and 13 at the Jupiter Inn
Proceeds will benefit children's
programs at the Center.
Speakers who will address the
conference include Ray Kennedy
of West Palm Beach: Libby
Tanner from the University of
Miami and Pamela Nestiiuren.
WIDO WED-TO-WIDOWED
A summer trip is plannwl for
Sunday. July 23. The outing will
include an evening meaL Char-
lotte Berime, workshop presi-
dent, is in charge of information.
She can be reached at the Center
offices on Tuesdays and Thurs-
days
week studio drawing course far
students at all levels. Classes
begin Jury 13 and meet each
Thursday through Aug. 17. from
7:30 to 9:30pjn.
DISCO DANCE
R Schenberg will teach disco
dancing Thursdays at 7 pjn. for
beginners and 8 pjn for persons
more advanced in basic steps
The six week classes begin June
29.
ULPAN REFRESHER CLASS
Sue Levi will conduct in-
dividual instruction of Hebrew to
students at all levels of pro-
ficiency. The class begins July
17. and will meet each Monday
from 2:30 to 4:30 pjn through
Aug. 21.
SECOND THURSDAY
The Second Tuesday Club will
sponsor a card party Sunday.
Aug 27 from 1 tc 4 pjn.
Information is available at the
Center A meeting is planned for
Tuesday. July 11 at 1 pjn.. ac-
cording to Sam Rubin.
TRANSPORTATION
The Comprehensive Senior
Service Center is in charge of ax-
rangmg transportation for senior
adults. Seniors who live in the
area from 45th Street to Southern
Boulevard and from the ocean to
the turnpike, are eligible. Trans-
portation requests must be made
at least 24 hours in advance.
CLASSES
"Consult Your Doctor": Mel
Grant will discuss "Hearing and
You". Thursday. July 13 at 1:30
pjn.
'Cooking for One : Brian Rich
will instruct the class on Wed
neadays from 10 to 11:30 a.m..
through July 19.
' "Hypertension Screening":
The Health Department will
check blood pressure at the
Comprehensive Senior Service
Canter on July 27 from 1 to 4
p.m. Claire Uhfetder will be
present to answer questions.
TRIPS
Omni Shopping Center. Mi-
ami: Aug. 1. Jungle Queen and
hunch at Patricia Murphy's: July
6 Pauline Brimberg is in charge
ofi
Felix Gomez, a member 0f
the cleaning crew at the Sun
and Surf in Palm Beach
walked into the Itrael Bond
office recently and handed
someone a $5 bill Gomez ex-
plained in broken English
that he feU "eympatico-for
Israel. He said he wants to
contribute $5 every month
for the people of Israel
Artists Jack Kant and Ms.
Erica Carmel will display their
works at the Senior Center
during July and August.
JCC Players Workshop and
seniors participated in an inter-
generational Oneg Shabbat
recently. Participants included
.Allan Greene, executive director;
Monica Kaye and Roy Levi
The Players performed at the
County Home and Lakeside
Nursing Home recently.
O.R.C.
EMBASSY
KOSHER STEAK HOUSE
GIATT
And Restaurant
E
L
I
C
A
T
E
S
S
E
N
1417 Washington Ave.. Miami Beach
Opening June 27
Serving Luncheon & Dinner
In A Tasteful A Intimate Atmosphere
Serving Hot Forshpeis A Salad Bar for Dinner
Pesach Goodman. Tour Ambassador Of RNE HMO
Formerly ol the Sea GuH Kosher Steak House
For Information Call 538-7550
T
A
K
E
O
u
T
F
O
o
D
ALL ABOARD
Fridoy, July 7 thur Friday July 21

= S = =.E '.C.\ ~Z =
HIGH HOLY DAYS
: r AY SPECIAL'
pc- -*'* candor fv Oct. 1lo Oct. 12
ON THE OCEAN AT iMh STREET
miami beach. fla. 33139
mam 538-7811
KOSHER
^ m ft** tr Hnaa
I O '"MAW.
^ UNlll
laWJOfS 2 MEALS MAT
5- : Z *', .im
-jndaf SabbMci
5^ae. von
Revoer v*cs*c-
-Oa<-r Complete
-Ot*vm Fu<> Course
D*w*r
**" M**s Sftaobos
YEAP1LY RATES
AVAILABLE!
HaverhillOff.ee
.....
fHaSaS A detailed map of Palm
SOUVENIR friST
fllFTfi Uncl* Sam Hat bottle cap
* aw Drop in.sa> hello and boti
gifts are yours
y
MBIT OUR
MAIAflEB
Mrs Beat iwjck laaks
latj
FREE GIFT
PREMIUMS
FOR NEW
CHECKING
&SAVINGS
ACCOUNTS
PRINTS-P9INTS-PPINTS
*te sute you tptt t* ou
selection ot tnditionj, md
COfiMMporaf, pnM, ^
ot us It ttiMU ,ou tor ooefW<| t n*.
tccount Bith ib AirouhmtodDii
C0W|infj-
1 Open a new Checking
Account for $250 or
? Open a Regular Savings
Account for $500 or
3 Open one-year Golden Passbook
Account for $1,000 (6\)
8PK1A1> 6BAID OPBilM DlAWOe
BfimtKwt fJmm.~^'___._.___77 iwat BWJ
Fntrruv
MAGNAVOX
COLOR TV
FKE CHECKIW FOt
SEHIOR CITIZEAS
(3) Thd Ptves
DELUXE 3 PIECE
LUGGAGE SET
Second Prve
DELUXE 5 PIECE
LUGGAGE SET
f5l Fourta Pnres
LUGGAGE
TOTE BAG
t TMLwSOAt
jrvioSPM
raVU0i
t *M lo ) fM
ipm h>pv
unavMt
t W lo I fM
M^MnamWAttSWnniiilnij.ii lj_|___
us I Man -
A First &
Amencan--
Of MOTH PAIM BEACH
^"/(JillllMSU


June 30,1978
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 7
?ulzin Urges End to Agency Friction
L MAURICE SAMUELSON
3NDON (JTA) Immi-
ots to Israel should be cared
. in the future by a joint
Uority of the Jewiah Agency
Tthe Absorption Ministry as a
to end the longstanding
ron between theee two
flies, Leon Dulzin, the Jewish
jency acting chairman,
sed here.
Israel Bonds
Honor
Dr. Leviton
Dr. Lawrence Leviton of Palm
,ach will receive the Mai-
snides Award at a State of
ael Bonds testimonial, at 6:30
a. Thursday, June 29, at the
leakers Hotel.
Jr. Albert Sabin, first
Eipient of the award, will
(sent the award to Dr. Leviton.
Dr. Leviton is among the first
| recipients .of the award Israel
sents to physicians.
r. Leviton helped found the
ntal Health Society of Palm
County. He has served as
lical director of the Palm
ch County School Health
n and medical director of
| Head Start Program. He also
honored by the Urban
ue last year for service to
ivantaged citizens.
|hairmen of the event are Drs.
ot Klorfein and Richard G.
|garman.
U.S. Hints
Solution
Continued from Page 1
L-ernments move the process
Livard and obviously reach an
eement. We used the process
reach an agenda for the
usalem meeting in January."
le also said, in response to
festions. that "no decision has
kn taken (as to) what American
|gestions might be put for-
at some point." However,
kdded, "this carries with it the
Uication that obviously con-
pration has been given to the
I for such action by the U.S."
taked whether Mondale's up-
ning trip to Israel would be a
kbstantive trip or a good will
pion," Carter replied that the
President "always carried
bstantive weight." Officially,
I is going to Israel June 29 to
ticipate in the continuing
kivities marking that coun-
ts 30th anniversary.
A NEW ERA
in -Ao.iL'
I aterina
FOR ALL SOUTH FLORIDA
y&j%
Under the plan, which is
currently being considered by
Prime Minister Menachem
Begin, the new authority would
be headed by the Absorption
Minister but the Jewish Agency
would have day to day respon-
sibility for dealing with absorp-
tion problems. The Ministry
would be responsible for coor-
dinating housing, education and
jobs for the newcomers, Dulzin
told a press conference here.
DULZIN, who is also chairman
of the World Zionist Organiza-
tion Executive, is in Britain to
see Jewish and Zionist leaders.
He said the Jewish Agency wants
to take over responsibility for
some of Israel's overseas broad-
casting to the United States and
Latin America.
Although the Agency paid
IL 30 million a year to the Israel
Broadcasting Authority for this
purpose, the result was "very
unsatisfactory," he said.
For three years, the broad-
casting staff had refused to
broadcast programs during the
night and an expensive trans-
mitter, bought especially for that
purpose remained unused. A
report by a working committee,
under the chairmanship of Eli
Eyal, would soon be ready for
implementation, Dulzin said.
J^.
Win umouAiiio
It. Catering lor yovf
Wd4mg. Boi AAiliw* IteeplKMi.
f 9<>"'.-aiional Meeting. Dmwr Of IvMtMO*
Mai UaeeMu
N.O.V.H.
kklthMkafr*
"* Ttl.pl..,. MO-0197
rward SC1-3SO0
.?** eh S42-2SS9
ON SOVIET Jewry, Dulzin
expressed alarm at the rising
proportion of those who
"dropped out" from Israel pre-
ferring to go to the U.S., Canada
or Australia. Until two months
ago, 60 percent of the Soviet
Jews were still going to Israel.
But in March and April, the pro-
portion of those going to Israel
had dropped to 42 and 46 percent
respectively.
This partly reflected the fact
that the latest emigrants come
mostly from the large Soviet
cities such as Moscow, Odessa,
Kiev and Kharkov, and had been
cut off from Jewish life for
decades.
Since 1973, too, Israeli broad-
casts to the Soviet Union had
been jammed. The only other
foreign broadcasts heard by
Soviet Jews were the "pro-Arab"
BBQ and the Voice of America
"which sells beautiful America,"
Dulzin said.
HOWEVER, Dulzin's main
complaint was against the activ-
ities of HI AS and the Joint Dis-
tribution Committee in the U.S.
in readily assisting new arrivals
at Vienna who announced that,
although allowed to leave the
Soviet Union for Israel, they now
preferred a different destination.
In his latest talks in the United
States with theee organizations,
Dulzin had warned that if the
"dropout" rate continued, the
entire emigration from the Soviet
Union could be endangered, since
the struggle to leave was carried
out only in the name of aliya to
Israel. He said he would be
having further talks with these
bodies in Jerusalem at the end of
this month, when the Jewish
Agency Assembly will also be
meeting.
In the last six months, the
Soviet Union has been allowing
between 1,900 and 2,000 Jews a
month to emigrate. However,
this had to be compared with the
200,000 outstanding affidavits
which had been sent to Soviet
Jews from Israel to facilitate
aliya. These affidavits were being
sent at the rate of 4,000 a month.
ADMITTING that the Agency
could have stopped sending so
many affidavits as a way to
staunch the flow of Jews who by-
\On Soviet Jewry, Dulzin
expressed alarm at the
(rising proportion of those
who 'dropped out' from
' Israel, preferring to go to
' the U.S., Canada or Aus-
' tralia. Until two months
ago, 50 percent of the
Soviet Jews were still
| going to Israel.
passed Israel, Dulzin said they
did not want to take "one-sided
steps."
In^ his meeting with fund-
raisers here, Dulzin discussed the
five-year project to raise M00
million in the diaspora to
rehabilitate 45,000 Israeli
families living in slum conditions.
Of the $48 million budget author-
ized this year, two-thirds was to
be raised in the United States
and the rest in other countries.
I nda-r Hirli-I
(>rlh.iiln\
*MI|HT\ !'
rOI H;iiiN Nairn
THt HCM IVAGf
(Zenfur?
VHrml^MmT
iaj -ira
illi OK EE CHOSE E BLVD WEST PALM BEACH
lt.'ln-n Miht.it\ lt.nl .V II.n. Hull In tin- Mini Mull
THE MOST MODERN 4 COMPLETE KOSHER SUPERMARKET
Open 1
Mon Thuts
$ Fn.
8 Sun
CiotediJi
The totes coat...pack it away for a
rainy day! Let the wind and the rain
blow...you'll feel sunshine bright in a
hooded greatcoat you can tote around
town or on your travels. Choose either
windand-rain resistant nylon taffeta or
Trisilla' nylon to protect you from the
elements! You've seen this British tan,
powde. or Mediterranean blue or
classic naw narkable laincoat on TV!
Sizes 8 16. Trisilla"1 nylon. $42
Nylon taffeta. $30
Rainwear, at all jm stores
It's a breeze to shop with a jm credit card!
Jmarsn
A uflrt ot A".f1 Stmt-s
I


^^
Pe 8
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, Jun,
30,i
Synopsis of the Weekly Torah Portion
Shelah
"And they came unto the valley ofEshcok and cut down
. one cluster of grapes, and they bore it upon a pole"
(Num. 13.23).
SHELAH At Kadesh, in the wilderness of Paran, the
children of Israel asked Moses to send forth scouts to
reconnoiter the land of Canaan. When God consented,
twelve spies were dispatched, one from each tribe, with
specific instructions. Forty days later, the spies returned
bearing the fruit of the land, as evidence of its fertility.
But most of them came back with a pessimistic report: the
natives of Canaan were mighty men, the cities strongly
fortified. It was a land that "eateth up the inhabitants
thereof" (Numbers 13.32). Of all the spies, only Joshua,
the son of Nun, of the tribe of Ephraim, and Caleb, the son
of Jephunneh, of the tribe of Judah, declared there was
nothing to fear from the natives of Canaan. The Israelites.
frightened by the fearful majority report, cried tearfully:
"Were it not better for us to return to Egypt?" (Numbers
14.3). God grew wrathful at this lack of confidence in Him,
and would have destroyed the entire congregation, were it
not for Moses' intercession. However, He vowed that
before the Israelites might enter the Promised Land they
would wander in the desert for 40 years, until the entire
rebellious generation those above 20 years of age
should perish.
(The recounting of the Weekly Portion of the Lew Is extracted and baud
upon "The Graphic History of the Jewish Horitafo," edited by >. Wollmen
Tsamir. $15, published by ShengoW The volume Is available at 75 Maiden
Lane, Now York, N.Y. 10031. Joseph Schlang If president of the society
distributing the volume.)

Art Work Erected
in Technion Yard
By DANIEL GREBLER
HAIFA The Breastplate of the High Priest
Aaron (HaChoshenf" has been erected in the
courtyard of the Ohel Aharon Synagogue at the
Technion-Israel Institute of Technology. The
work, a massive rectangle of flat Hebron stone
inlaid with bronze, is by Israeli sculptor Zvi
Aldouby, whose sculptures are to be found
throughout Israel as well as in Europe, Australia
and Canada. It was commissioned by Ludwig
Jesselson of New York, who also sponsored the
construction of the campus synagogue.
"In my childhood when I came to the
description of Aaron's robes, I was inspired by
the beauty and splendor of the breastplate of the
high priest, which contained two stones of
mystery called Urim and Thumim," said the
artist, describing the personal significance of the
sculpture's theme.
"THE BBEASTPLATE which the high priest
wore over his heart was adorned with twelve
precious stones, each one different, symbolizing
the twelve tribes of Israel. The motif I was asked
to design was, therefore, acceptable to me. For in
ancient times the breastplate was a part of the
religious ritual, symbolizing the unification of the
tribes of Israel into one people.
"In our own times, the breastplate of the high
priest might serve as a symbol and a hope for the
unification of the Jews living in Israel and for the
unity of the Jewish people everywhere.''
Protruding from the two parallel surfaces of the
rough-hewn stone are twelve rectangles of bronze
arranged in four vertical rows of three,
representing the stones on the breastplate of
Aaron. Each rectangle fixed into the stone ap-
pears to be the continuation of the opposing one
on the other side.
THE SCULPTOR described the challenges
involved in producing the work: to create a
sculpture effective in its monumental simplicity
and to integrate it harmoniously with the modem
architecture of the synagogue.
The Ohel Aharon Synagogue was built on the
Technion Mount Carmel campus in 1969 and
named in memory of Jeesebon's brother, Albert.
Dr. Jose A Torres M.D. PA.
Family Medicine
Announces the opening of his new office
Suite 500
500 Spanish River Blvd.
(Spanish River Plaza)
Boca Raton, Fla. 33431
Phone: 392-3877
House Calls Accepted,
:&:
:Sft
^ labbmical O30rmr
co-ordinated by the
Palm Beach County Rabbinical Council
Editor
Is Jewish identity Alone, Enough!
_. ..I,U in trninAfi we Can look nnaituin _J ___ ^T
By Rabbi Emanael Eisenberg
Most of the Jewish people here
and throughout the country have
adopted the philosophy of life
that the Jewish people will be
able to survive ^without the in-
stitutions of Judaism syna-
gogues, seminaries, etc., and
Israel...
Those people who maintain
that they can remain Jews
without the practices and
standards of Judaism have also
adopted the belief that "Jewish
identity" alone will be sufficient
for the survival and the
preservation of Judaism.
THERE ARE some who pro-
fess loyalty to their "Jewish
heart" or identify themselves as
Jews with false loyalties, by
saying, "I am not a practicing
Jew and I do not believe it it is
necessary to attend temple
services." They reject the belief
that in being religious they must
follow the biblical and traditional
injunctions. Their excuse for dis-
liking Judaism and its traditional
observance is that it is too
demanding.
Yet we often complain about
the growth of assimilation, mixed
marriages, family breakdowns,
and all is laid at the steps of the
synagogues and the clergy. The
sad part of all this is, that too
many of our people refuse to
study or attend adult education
classes, to better understand
their faith, and their heritage.
They are always ready to criticize
the temple, the rabbi and the
teachings of Judaism without
taking time to acquaint them-
selves with its practices.
There are the few who find the
temple convenient for their
needs, but fail to support it, and
when a small fee is charged for
some services they cry that
religion is a racket. It is said that
a temple is nothing more or less
than the quality of the people
who call it their own. It can be a
den of robbers or the scene of
holiness. It is the home address
of kindness, and decency.
THE NEED is strong far a
reappraisal of our Jewish
traditions and the true meaning
of Judaism as a religious faith by
which to live. We cannot apprec-
iate spiritual influence if our
religion remains an occasional
event, by invitation only. It
cannot and will not do its best for
us unless it becomes a habit a
pert of our lives for more than
three times a year. We must
accept it, become involved with
it, and sacrifice for it.
Abraham was asked by G-d to
sacrifice his son Isaac, and the
lesson we gain is, that only
through sincere sacrifice and
devotion can we accomplish our
goal

We will not have a Jewish
revival if we expect onr children
to learn, and practice Judaism in
the Hebrew and religious school,
while in the home we violate
every Jewish standard and
custom. We can expect nothing
from our children, when we
practice hypocrisy and live a
hypocritical life.
THE SAME holds true of our
charitable organizations, who
believe that through the work of
the secular organizations alone
they will keep Judaism alive. It is
said, Kee Metzteyon Tayzey
Torah, out of Zion cornea Torah
Jerusalem." Without Torah and
the word of God, there will be no
Jews and Jews cannot survive
without the Torah.
As long aa we have Torah
lnstitutuiona and oj-oAMnhe, and
seminaries whan rabbis and
scholars are trained we can look
forward to a future in America.
Without it, there is no future.
Judaism can be a living religion
and a strong faith, even in the
midst of freedom and plenty. It
does not need a ghetto or anti-
Semitism to survive.
Perhaps Judaism is too easy
for the majority of us. We must
insist on more dedication,
devotion and responsibility to
Judaism. Let us reevaluate our
position and work for t
strengthening of Judaism *?
optimism and faith.
CANDLELIGHTING
TIME
7:57
25 SIVAN-5738
Synagogues in
Palm Beach County
REFORM
COMSfRVnTlvuiBtHl
TEMPLE ISRAEL
1901 North Flogler Drive
West Palm Beach, Florida
33407
833-8421
Rabbi Irving B. Cohen
Joel L. Leyine
Associate Rabbi
Sabbath Worship Services
Friday at 8:00 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL OF
BOCA RATON
333 S.W. Fourth Avenue
Boca Raton, Fl. 33432
391-8901
Rabbi Norman T. Mendel
Cantor Martin Rosen
Sabbath services, Friday
8:15p.m.
TEMPI! ETERNAL LIGHT
THE FREE SYNAGOGUE
P.O. Box 3
Boco Raton, Florida 33432
368-1600-391-1111
Rabbi Benjamin Rosoyn
Friday* ot 8:15 p.m.
at: Boca West
Community UMC
8900 Boca West GLADES) Rd
(1 Mil* West of
Boca Turnpike)
at
CONSHVAWt
v
CONGREGATION
ANSHEISH0L0M
5348 Grove Street
West Palm Beach, Flo. 33409
684-3212
Rabbi Harry Z. Schectman
Cantor Arthur B. Rosenwasser
Services: Friday 8:30 a.m.,
5p.m., 8:15p.m. "^
Saturday 8:30 a.m., 6:30 p.m.
Daily 8:30 a.m., 7:00 p.m.
CONGREGATION
BETH K0DESH
Boynton Beach, Flo.
732-5147
Sabbath Services
Friday at 8:15 p.m.
Saturday at 9a.m.
Congregational Church
115N. Federal Highway
TEMPLE BETH EL
2815 North FloglerDr.ve
West Palm Beach, Florida
833-0339
Rabbi Asher Bor-Zev
Sobbath services Friday at 8:15
p.m.
Saturday at9:30a.m.
Daily Minyan at 8:15 o.m.,
Sunday at 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SH0L0M
315 N. "A" St.
Lake Worth, Florida 33460
Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg
Cantor JocobElman
Th"^ M0nd"
at 8:15a.m.
Friday ot 8:15 p.m.
Saturday at 9 o.m.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID
Sobbath services, Fridoy at 8
p.m.
cUST*" ***""
104K) N. Military Troll. Palm
och Gardens. 321 Nortfiloke
BlvcL North Palm Beach, Flo.
845-1134
Rabbi Hyman Fishman
Cantor Nicholas Fenakel
TEMPLE BETH ST.0L0M
N.W. Avenue "G"
Belle Glade, Florida 33430 .
Jock Stateman, Lay Leader
Sabbath services, Fridoy ot
8:30 p.m.
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB
275 Alemeda Drive
Palm Springs, Florida 33460
Sabbath services, Friday ot i
p.m.
Saturday at 9o.m.
President Jacob Frant-964-
0034
Mondays and Thursdays ot '
a.m.
Service* held at Faith United
Presbyterian Church, Palm
Springs
B'NAI TORAH
CONGREGATION
1401 N.W. 4th Ave.
Boca Raton, Florida 33432
392-8566
Rabbi Nathan Zelizer
Sabbath services: Friday ot
8:15 p.m.
Saturdays at 9:30 a. m.
TEMPLE EMETH of *
DB*A|T
HEBREW CONGREGATION
5780 West Atlantic Avenue
Delray Beoch, Florida 33446
276-3536
Morris Silberman, Rabbi
Leonard Price, Cantor
Sabbath services: Fridoy ot 8
p.m. Saturday at9a.m.
Doily minyans ot 8:45 am.
and 5 p.m.
TEMPLE EMANUEL
190 Norm County Rood
Palm Beoch, Florida 33460
832-0804
Cantor David Dordashti
Sabbath services, Fridoy
8:30 p.m.
Saturday ot 9 o.m.


June 30
1978
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 9
in and get your
ree grand opening gift
ewofficein
test Pah Bench
In the Mini-Mall at 4766 OKEECHOBEE BOULEVARD
(At the intersection of Okeechobee Boulevard & Haverhill Road)
Unbeatable
Rates and
a BONUS
Gift* too!
FREE GIFTS available for deposits
in excess of $50. Many to choose from.
No gifts mailed. Limit one per family.
6 MONTH CERTIFICATES
0/ MORE than the average yield on
/O U.S. Treasury Bills. Compounded
Daily. Minimum $10,000.
V4
SAVINGS CERTIFICATES
(Minimum deposit $1,000 Interest compounded daily)
ANNUAL YIELD TERM ANNUAL RATE
8YEARS 3
6YEARS 7,
8.33%
8.06%
7.79% Y"Rs 7
6.98% 30 MONTHS g
6.72% 12MONTHS6
5.92% 3 MONTHS 5
,00%
,75%
,50%
75%
.50%
.75%
Ask us about special rates on Savings
Certificates off $100,000 and over.
A substantial Interest penalty is required tor
early withdrawals from all Savings Certificates.
SAVINGS ACCOUNTS
5r) J5LO/- par annum, interest compounded from
aae aaf /O day of deposit to day of withdrawal.
(5 39% Annual Yield) Minimum deposit of $50 to earn interest
Withdrawals can be made any day without loss of interest.
***
Washington Federal
{Convenient Offices
serving you in
>ade, Broward and
Palm Beach
Counties.
SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION
ASSETS EXCEED $800,000,000
In the
Mini-Mall 4766 OKEECHOBEE BOULEVARD, WEST PALM BEACH Phone: 686-7770
HOURS / Lobby: 9:00AM- 3:30PM / Walk Up: 9:00AM- 4:30PM
JACK D. GORDON. President ARTHUR H. COURSHON. Chairman of the Board
ilEtSlt
I0UAIN0USMC
LENDER


Page 10
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Priday.June
30..
Pilotless Plane to Offset Arab Advantage
TEL AVIV To offset
the vast amount of arma-
ments which the Arab
countries are amassing,
Israel has come up with a
miniature pilotless drone
aircraft, small enough to
escape detection by most
radar units and fast enough
and large enough to deliver
bombs into any of the
neighboring Arab coun-
tries.
This was unveiled for the
public here this week and
will be displayed at an ex-
hibition of military com-
munications and electronic
equipment opening in
Washington next month.
THE PILOTLESS plane,
manufactured by the Tadiran
Company, an Israeli producer of
electronic and communications
systems, is intended for use by
the Israeli Air Force and for sale
abroad.
Tadiran says a package unit,
consisting of six drones and
monitoring equipment, will sell
for $500,000, about a quarter the
price of similar units manu-
factured in other countries. The
entire package, called the
"Mastiff," represents four years
of research and development and
an investment by Tadiran of $4.5
million.
The drone carries a video
camera and is designated of-
ficially as a reconnaissance plane.
But it has other potential uses
that remain classified.
Officials here pointed out that
the pilotless plane can.be con-
trolled from the home base, and it
will help to offset the quantity of
planes and pilots which the
Arabs possess.
ACCORDING to UN Israeli
Ambassador Chaim Herzog, the
Arabs have 3,000 more tanks and
700 more combat aircraft than
NATO.
"By 1980," he said, "the air
power of the Arab states will
equal the combined Warsaw pact
forces and constitute double the
air power of NATO and three
times that of the People's Repub-
lic of China. In terms of ground
forces, the Arab states have
almost as many tanks as the
U.S.A. and more artillery than
the U.S.A. From every per-
spective, regional, global, eco-
nomic, these figures are
staggering.
"Since 1967 the Arab states
have ordered arms to be supplied
by 1980, in the amount of $35
billion of which $24 billion rep-
resents arms ordered by Saudi
Arabia alone. jwlh Pret
One oflsrael'i
Best Senate
Friends
Beaten at Polh\
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
NEW YORK (jtai ,
Clifford P. Case, one of U,
leading supporters in th.
grass, was defeated June 6 j> |
New Jersey Republican r>Z
in his bid for renomination I
fifth term in the Senate.
Case lost in a close contest
34-year-old comparatively
known candidate, Jeffrey K 1
a conservative whose main M
paign theme was a 30 percent
in the 1 ederal income tax.
BELL WILL face (,
November general election
Democratic candidate, ]
Bradley, a former New V
Knicks basketball star m
Rhodes scholar. Bradley *,
landslide victory over five
ponents in the Den
primary.
In 1950, our promise to you
was to pay the highest interest
the law allows. Always.
Mfe've kept that promise.
ANNUAL YIELD
8.33%
8.06%
7.79%
6.72%
5.92%
5.39%
8-10 YEAR
CERTIFICATE
6 YEAR
CERTIFICATE
4 YEAR
CERTIFICATE
1-2 YEAR
CERTIFICATE
90 DAY
CERTIFICATE
REGULAR
SAVINGS
INTEREST RATE
8.00%
7.75%
7.50%
6.50%
5.75%
5.25%
($10 MINIMUM)
MINIMUM CERTIFICATE DEPOSIT $1000
T-Bill 6 month Certificate of Deposit.
Pays /4%more than current Treasury Bill rate. ($10,000 minimum)
r .. $K,000 Certificate of Deposit.
Call American Sav.ngs for new and higher prevailing rates and other details.
All computations bosed on 365 doily compounded interest
At American Savings we pay the
highest interest rates the law allows.
W? always have.
Think about it. Perhaps its time
to move your money. Of course
there is no charge to transfer your all of the interest v,
money from anywhere in the United geuing Y *
States to American Savings. Stop After all ifun.,r
in at any of American Savings 21 earn the l*"Ty ?n ?,WayS
convenient office, and streaming t^bJ^SST^ **

AMERICAN!*
SAVINGS*
Where people keep coming bock for more.
NOWMD: DEERF.ELD BEACH. FORT SuDE^ALE HAL^NDALETohK^ M,AMI BE*CH
PEMBROKE LAKES, PLANTATION. POMPANO BEACH "^KK^^"*HU- MARG*TE.
Yoo, ^n,, lnMw^ te ,40,000 ^ m Ag-||cy ^ ^!*j<^^ ovinfl, ce..,Co.e

FSUC






y, June 30,1978
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 11
finantanamo: The Jewish Connection
By TONY DE MARCO
IfiUANTANAMO BAY, Cub.
Mild-mannered and
..liming. Howard B. Schero
"Xhill. Fla the beaded
n lay leader of the
awling U.S. Naval Baae at
jantanamo Bay, Cuba, speaks
j soft voice.
[This has been a great week for
jhereinGitmo."
it wasn't Chanukah or
sach.
[the Navy rabbi from Norfolk,
was visiting the baae, the
U.S. military facility on
prnmunist soil. A rabbi hadn't
sited Gitmo, as it is commonly
lied, in years.
0 MILLIONS of Jews
oughout the world, seeing the
3i is a weekly routine, but for
avyman Schero and his 25
How worshippers, this was a
i memorable occasion.
| Schero, the son of Mrs. Joan A.
hero, of 3330 Spanish Moss
ace in Laudernill, escorted
rabbi. Lt. Cmdr. John
senblatt, on his visits with the
i of Guantanamo Bay.
| "Chaplain Rosenblatt con-
ucted a prayer service for us and
a tremendous help and in-
piration to me," says the 1969
aduate of Coral Gables Senior
School. Plans were also
ade to hold a Passover Seder
|ith the Jewish community.
!IN ADDITION to his lay
lader duties, Operations
cialist Schero is a radar
visor at the Guantanamo
- Anti-Air Warfare Center
VAWC).
I The United States leased the
luanlanamo Bay site from Cuba
1903. In 1934, the treaty was
^negotiated giving the U.S. a
prpetual leased which can only
I voided by abandoning the area
by mutual agreement between
U.S. and Cuban govern-
ents.
Located on the southeastern
of Communist Cuba, this
>-square-mile piece of property
14.4 square miles is water)
[insists of palm trees, rocks,
ind. cactus, scrub brush and
uanas, 17 miles of cyclone fence
nd an active land minefield.
SPEAKING OF Gitmo, as it is
kmmonly called, Schero says,
This is my second tour of duty
AAWC. I was here from 1971
1973, when I met my wife-to-
Coleen. She lived here with
tr folks who arrived in Guan-
knamo in 1956. They were
Lilian employees who liked it
decided to stay. I'm glad
ey did."
|Although the native Floridian
as tight-lipped about the
specifics of his job, he states,
Our primary function is base
defense early warning."
High atop a hill overlooking
the base, the bay and the Carib-
bean Sea, amid an array of
whirling antennae* and electronic
consoles, Schero and his radar
Xrators are "on watch." They
try monitor the skyways
around them so that the 6,200
military and civilians living on
base can conduct their daily
routines in a relaxed manner.
A ROUTINE statement of the
center's mission reveals that men
and women working there pro-
vide radar air surveillance with-
in 100 nautical miles of the
Guantanamo baae, a key defense
mechanism necessary to ensure
protection of the site. This
function, in turn, lets the base
carry out its mission of support
to the ships of the fleet through
training.
Although small and compact in
its own right, the naval base
serves as headquarters for men
and women engaged in a massive
training program designed to
hone the skills of crewmen
serving aboard warships of the
U.S. Atlantic Fleet.
Nearly 100 ships a year
complete the rugged training
program under the watchful eyes
of Navy Fleet Training Group
instructors from Guantanamo
Bay.
THEIR training operations are
conducted in a 14,000-square-mile
ocean area south of here and
include such shipboard functions
as navigation, gunnery, damage
control and general seamanship.
Petty Officer Schero married
Coleen in September, 1973, and
moved to Miami for duty at the
Naval Reserve Training Center.
While there, both Scheros at-
tended the University of Miami
on a part-time basis.
Two years later, he transferred
to the Norfolk, Va.-based am-
phibious assault ship USS Guam,
and visited Spain, France, Italy,
Kenya, Egypt and Greece.
In 1977, the 27-year-old sailor
reenlisted and requested duty
"back home in Gitmo."
WEIGHING the pros and cons
of duty here, he comments, "I like
the climate, the location and the
recreational facilities plus the
fishing's great. You can also save
a lot of money because the cost of
living is considerably less than in
the States. Sometimes the
dependent wives here with their
husbands complain about the
lack of conveniences and big
shopping centers, but Coleen is
here with her folks, so she's really
happy."
JEWISH FAMILY AND CHILDREN'S SERVICE
*n outstanding proles*.-ono/ counseling ogency serving fhe Jewish
ommunity of Palm Beoch Counfy Professiono/ and confidential
|*ie/p n available for
problems of the aging Marital counseling
[Consultation ortd evaluation services Parent child conflicts
[Vocational counseling Personal problems
Is
Private Offices: 2411 Okeechobee Blvd.
West Palm Beach, Fla. 33408
Telephone: 684-1991
Or
3200 North Federal Hwy. Suite 206-
Room 12, Boca Raton, Fla.
Telephone: 395-3840
Jerote fees ore charged in family and individual counseling to
nose who can pay (Fees are based on income and f ami ly size)
! Jewish Family and Children's Service is a beneficiary agency of
"i Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County.
Schero is quick to note that aa
with any isolated duty station,
travel and home visitations are
very limited.
While Guantanamo Bay may
not offer the day-to-day luxuries
of life that Schero enjoyed while
living back in the United States,
he's not living in total isolation.
GUANTANAMO IS self-
supporting and has been since
1964 when the Castro govern-
ment cut off the water and elec-
tricity supplied by Cuba. A
seawater conversion plant,
capable of producing 2.3 million
gallons of fresh water daily, also
produces 23,000 kilowatts of elec-
trical power.
The base also has a modern,
fully-equipped hospital, dental
services, a color television
station, AM and FM .radio
stations, a bowling center,
several free movies daily, res-
taurants, one commissary
(supermarket) and two base
exchanges (retail stores).
Schero says he's looking
forward to an R & R (rest and
relaxation) trip for his wife and
two-year-old daughter, Jennifer.
"It'll be a good change of
scenery."
Navy Operations Specialist Howard B. Schero spends some off-
duty time with his wife, Coleen, and their daughter, Jennifer.
Remembering Berlin and Gen. Clay
policy was clearly military with-
out being martial.
He demonstratively underlined
the right of America and Western
allies to free access by ordering
troop movements along the tran
sit autobahns.
By LISELOTTE MULLER
Hannoversche Allgemeine
Lucius Clay, former American
Military Governor in Germany
and organizer of the 1948 Berlin
airlift, is dead.
The people of West Berlin owe
their freedom to his uncomprom-
ising attitude during that crisis.
The Federal Republic of Ger-
many too has much to thank him
for. He helped speed up her inte-
gration into the Western nations
after the terrible crimes of the
Hitler era.
LUCIUS CLAY will go down
in history as the man who won
one of the great battles of the
Cold War without the loss of a
single life. Three years after the
war, the Soviet Union blockaded
West Berlin and the people of the
city were faced with the choice of
starving or capitulating.
President Truman asked Gen.
Clay, the American Military
Governor in Germany, if he could
get supplies to Berlin by air.
Clay's answer was a simple
"Yes."
The Berlin airlift began. For
ten months, the two-and-a-half
million people of Berlin were sup-
plied with necessities by the air-
lift, one of the major technical
and organizational achievements
of modern times. Berlin was
saved from Soviet rule.
THIS WAS undoubtedly the
height of Clay's career. The son
of a Georgia senator, he started
his military career at the famous
West Point Academy. As a
young officer, he was fascinated
by technology. He became an ex-
pert on building airports, ports
and dams.
During World War II, he or-
ganized the invasion supply lines.
He made a name for himself out-
side military circles when he got
the port of Cherbourg, which had
been destroyed, back in working
order in a short time.
Gen. Lucius Clay
His post-war career reflected
the changes in German-American
relations.
Clay returned to the U.S. in
1949 and retired from the army.
Twelve years later, after the Ber-
lin Wall was built, President
Kennedy sent him back to Berlin.
AS SPECIAL Commissioner
in West Berlin, his task was to
personify the United States'
readiness to defend the city. His
Clay also underlined the U.S.
right to a presence in East Berlin
according to the Four Fower
status of the city. When the GDR
attempted to limit the allies'
right of access to East Berlin,
Clay ordered tanks to Checkpoint
Charlie in Friedrichstrasse.
A FEW DAYS later. Clay re-
ceived orders to withdraw them
because Washington feared this
kind of military pressure would
reduce the chances of a diploma-
tic solution to the Berlin crisis.
By then the purpose of the
show of strength had been
achieved. Clay had forced the
Soviet Union into a countter-
demonstration and an ack-
nowledgement that the Soviet
Union and not the GDR was re-
sponsible for East Berlin.
Just over six months later Clay
told President Kennedy that his
mission was completed. The pall
of fear had lifted from the city.
I Board Member Rothenberg Dies |
Telephone
1832-8423 / 4
Jewish Community Day School
Of Palm Beach County, Inc.
2815 N. Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach, Florida 3340T
Is now accepting applications for
Pre-School-Full or Half Day
Kindergarten-Full Day
Grade l-Grade Vl-Elementary School
Grades VM-VIII-Junior High School
Transportation throughout Palm Beach County
Admission Tests Required
la/cpnir
A Beneficiary Agency of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
Benjamin Rothenberg, a mem-
ber of the Board of Directors of
the Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County, died June 18 in
West Palm Beach.
Mr. Rothenberg was a coun-
selor and sales representative for
Shalom Memorial Park. He was
active in the Jewish community
for many years, serving as presi-
dent of the Queens Jewish Cen-
ter, Queens Village, N.Y. from
1949 to 1951 and from 1962-1964.
Mr. Rothenberg served as
campaign chairman for the Cen-
tury Village Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
drive from 1970 to 1974, and was
named honorary chairman of the
Century Village campaign in
1975.
Since 1952, he has received a
yearly Award of Merit from the
United Jewish Appeal. In 1964 he
received a citation for dis-
tinguished service from the Jew-



Mr. Rothenberg
ish Theological Seminary in New'
York, and in 1974 he received the
Leadership Award ofem the
United Jewish Appeal.
Mr. Rothenberg is survived by
his wife, Martha and a son,
Nathaniel.
----------------------1--------

2TULDW MCMOBTAL PARK
Palm Beach County'a
Only All Jewish Cemetery
as
COMPLETE PRE-NEED ARRANGEMENTS
5061 Okeechobee Blvd.
W.Palm Beach,Fla. 33409
W. Palm-684-2277
Delray-427-3220


#.- _-.- #*
Page 12
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Frid>y. Juneao, ii
The child who drew this dream house...


...lives in a shack in Israel.
Cash can make the difference.
Please pay your pledge. j
Give to the
COMBINED JEWISH APPEAL-ISRAEL EMERGENCY FUND
of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
2415 Okeechobee Boulevard, West Palm Beach, Florida 33409 Telephone: 689^5900
.


Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EEY2YV3D2_7AF59Z INGEST_TIME 2013-06-10T21:30:18Z PACKAGE AA00014311_00172
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES