Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
8 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 28, 1975)-v. 8, no. 40 (Dec. 17, 1982).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 2, 1976 called v.2, no. 22, but constitutes v.2, no. 1.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: July 28, 1978 called no. 14 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement; Aug. 25, 1978 called no. 16 in masthead and no. 17 in publisher's statement; Aug. 10, 1979 called no. 15 in masthead and no. 16 in publisher's statement; Oct. 22, 1982 called no. 31 in masthead and no. 32 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44607504
lccn - sn 00229550
ocm44607504
System ID:
AA00014311:00171

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
Combining "0U VOICE" and "FEDERATION MPMTR"
in con,unction with The Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
Volume 4 Number 12
Palm Beach, Florida Friday, June 16,1978
Price 35 Cents
Jewish Federation Holds 16th Annual Meeting
nmlUITlDTlVnill "rlramoi;," __I.! ______
By RONNITARTAKOW,
Director of
Public Relations,
Jewish Federation of PBC
Over 300 people attended the
116th annual meeting of the
I Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
I County on May 28 at the
[Breakers in Palm Beach.
The meeting, chaired by Steve
[Gordon, was highlighted by a
"dramatic" multi-media
sentation, utilizing newspaper
headlines and photographs. The
program traced the "roots" of the
Palm Beach County Jewish Fed-
eration from its early beginnings,
over forty years ago when it was
known as the Federated Jewish
Charities, to its present status,
serving over 40,000 Jewish
people in Palm Beach County.
(This presentation will be shown
onJSunday, June 18 at 9:30 a.m.
Man
on Mosaic, The Federation-spon-
sored TV program over Channel 5
-WPTV.)
STANLEY B. BRENNER,
president of the Federation, cited
the past year's accomplishments
"The first community mission
to Israel led by Barbara Shulman
and Jeanne Levy, produced 37
enthusiastic people who involved
themselves in the 1978 cam-
Continued on Page 8
vii ounuay, June 18 i
Armu Spokesman S$id
Raid Carried Out to Prevent
lAssault by Palestinian Guerrillas
An Israeli army spokesman
claimed that last week's Israeli
aid on a Palestinian guerrilla
naval base on the Lebanese coast
ne as a result of evidence that
Jthe base was being used to
[prepare for terrorist attacks on
Israel "in the near future."
Seaborne Israeli commandos
land paratroopers stormed the
base and destroyed the outpost
|last Friday, the spokesman said.
TWO ISRAELI soldiers were
killed and eight wounded in the
lassault but an unidentified guer-
jrilla in Lebanon said that guer-
[rilla forces killed seven Israelis.
The guerrilla gave the
{following account of the raid:
. four Israeli boats landed
commandos on the beach and a
number of helicopters, which we
could not determine, landed
another party in an orange grove.
"DESPITE the surprise, we
managed to put up strong
resistance. There was some hand-
to-hand combat. We lost three,
but I think the enemy lost seven
dead. They were cleared away by
helicopters as the attack ended
more than one hour later."
The Israeli army said the
attack was on Dahar el Bouj, six
miles south of Sidon and 20 miles
north of the Israeli-occupied zone
of southern Lebanon. This would
Eut it. 26 miles north of Israel's
order.
The raid came just five days
before Israel was to withdraw its
army from a six-mile deep strip
along the border, the last part of
the southern Lebanese territory
still occupied after the Israeli
invasion on March 15.
A REPORT prepared for the
foreign press quoted military
sources as saying all Israel's
casualties were caused by an
explosion of a Palestinian arms
depot.
The report said the raid started
after midnight when the Israeli 1
force stormed ashore and'
destroyed six buildings of onej
and two stories in the base,
routing a force of 30-40 Pales- j
tinian defenders.
The Israelis also found and
destroyed motorboats, rubber
dinghies, ammunition and
weapons including U.S.-made M-
16 rifles equipped with grenade
launchers, the report said.
\Israeli Scouts Join Camp Shalom Staff
Camp Shalom, sponsored by
the Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County, will open its doors
to over 200 children in the Palm
Beach County community for its
16th consecutive season on
Monday, June 19.
"This summer promises to be
the most exciting and dynamic
season in our 16-year history,"
stated Charles Jacobson. Camp
Committee chairman. "We have
made every effort to provide a
fine quality program in all areas.
W e have always provided an out-
standing day camp service for the
community, and this year will be
no exception."
"WE HAVE many surprises
Planned for our children this
summer," stated Ronni Tarta-
kw, Camp Director. "This
summer we are particularly
'ortunate to have on staff some
very fine qualified professionals
>n the areas of sports, drama, arts
and crafts and Jewish program-
ing. We are hoping to add a
new dimension to our program by
allowing our children a greater
ireedom of choice in the areas
that they wish to participate in."
Mrs. Tartakow stated that this
summer two boy and girl scouts
from Israel will join the Camp
Shalom staff. They are Rivka
Rabinowitz from Bat Yam and
Yilon Farchi from Tel Aviv.
Rivka is an 11th grade
graduate and an eighth grade
leader in her Israeli scout tribe.
YILON is also an 11th grade
graduate. He was born in the
United States and moved to
Israel when he was seven years
old. Both scouts will be living
with families in the Palm Beach
County area for the summer.
"These young people have
always brought the spirit and
excitement of Israel to Camp
Shalom," stated Ronni Tar-
takow.
"In addition to these two fine
young people, Camp Shalom will
be visited this summer by an
Israeli Scout Caravan that is
traveling around the country.
These youngsters will entertain
our boys and girls with songs and
dances of Israel."
THERE are still some open-
ings available for the second
session of camp, which will begin
on July 17. For information
contact Nettie Berk at the Camp
Shalom office.
Rivka Rabinowitz

Kb
Stanley B. Brenner (left), president of the Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County, presents Alan L. Shulman, 1978 CJA-IEF
General Campaign chairman, with a shofar award for his
leadership on behalf of the Jewish people. Shulman assumed
the presidency of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
that evening.
Bus Attack Brings
Complaint at UN
UNITED NATIONS (JTA)
Israel lodged a complaint to
the Security Council last week
over Friday's terrorist bus blast
in Jerusalem which claimed six
victims, five of them youngsters,
and an American aged 30.
The dead are Elianu Lom-
berger, 12; Ruhama Grossberg,
15; Tamar Goutel, 15; and
Aharon Meir Ohrbach, 17, all of
Jerusalem; Arye Scheinfeld, 18,
of Bnei Brak; and Richard Fish-
man, 30, of Washington, D.C.
ISRAEL SCENE
Federation Allocations Pg. 13
In a letter to the President of
the Security Council, Ambas-
sador Mario R. Anaya of Bolivia,
Israel's Ambassador Chaim Her-
zog cited the role of the Palestine
Liberation Organization in Fri-
day's attack and noted that the
terrorist organization has
claimed responsibility for the
recent atrocity.
HE ALSO recalled other atro-
cities of the PLO against inno-
cent civilians and pointed to the
centrality of that organization in
international terror.
He requested his letter be cir-
culated as an official document of
the Security Council.
The terrorist bomb that vir-
tually demolished the vehicle as
it stopped to discharge passen-
gers near Mt. Herzl and the Yad
Vashem Holocaust Memorial,
injured 19 persons, some of them
passengers and others passersby.
The explosion damaged property
and shattered windows within a
300 yard radius.
The police made several arrests
but reported no real progress in
apprehending the perpetrators.
One of the injured persons was
still in critical condition today
and nine others remained hos-
pitalized at the Hadassah Medi-
cal Center. The rest were dis-
charged after treatment of their
injuries.
The blast occurred on the eve
of city-wide celebrations of the
11th anniversary of Jerusalem's
reunification. Mayor Teddy Kol-
lek announced that the terrorist
act would not force cancellation
of the festivities which, he said, is
apparently what the terrorists
wanted.
THE FATAL ride began
sr..rtly after noon Friday at
Nablus Gate outside the Old City
walls. On the long route to Bayit
Vagan, a religious suburb, the
bus picked up many passengers,
most of them students headed for
the suburb.
AT THE first stop there, as
passengers were alighting, an ex-
plosion ripped through the rear of
the bus. Eye-witnesses said the
rear half flew into the air. They
Continued on Page 13








UJW1U
Pge2

The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
----------------------------
Friday. June 16, lw<
K ^jeTenCwnmandments had never been proclaimed,
the MagnaCaria might never have been signed.
The 6th day of the Jewish month
Sivan.approximately 3000 years ago,
marked the beginning of a system of
law and justice upon which western
civilization is based.
For at the time.more than 30 cen-
turies ago.Moses proclaimed the Ten
Commandments to the Children of
Israel and all mankind.
This momentous Revelation first
established the principle that there are
eternal moral and ethical laws govern-
ing human behavior upon which the
foundation of a free society must be
based.
It asserted that unless man-made
laws were rooted in these divinely in-
spired eternal principles.personal free-
dom could not exist: and that with
freedom must come justice.because
without justice.freedom cannot be
preserved.
The Revelation in Sinai was the
inspiration of another great declara-
tion of human rights issued more than
two millenia later.
The signing of the Magna Carta
reaffirmed Man's destiny to be free.lt
evoked the ancient Jewish belief that
tyranny is an outrage against God.
And.it made clear once again that no
individual.even if he be king.has the
right to oppress another human being.
The Jewish Festival of Shavuot
I The season of the giving of the Torah |
commemorates the Revelation of the
Ten Commandments in the Sinai that
established the faith.character and
destiny of the Jews as a free people.
Shavuot reaffirms humanity's
commitment to Divine law.lt celebrates
Man s responsibility to maintain it It
evokes the Jewish tradition to stand
united in the cause of justice for all
humanity.lt recalls the significance of
our Faith and its legacy to mankind.
It b what makes us Jews.
?J.re.e C0Py of the oookleV'It's
What Makes Us Jews"is available at
any Riverside chapel.
MIAMI BEACH: 1920 Alton Road'19thSU
531-1 i:>i
NORMANDY ISLE: 1250Normandy Drirt
531-1151
MIAMI: 1717 S.W.37th Ave.( Douglas Rd
443-2221
NORTH MIAMI BEACH: 16480N.E.19thA.
947-8691
HOLLYWOOD: 2230 Hollywood Blvd.
920-1010 j
SUNRISE: 1171 N.W.61tAve.(Sunet Strip)
584-6060 _..
WEST PALM BEACH : 4714 OkeechobeeBM
683-8676
Kiv chapelt itmif the New York UetropohU"
RIVERSIDE |
Mm.,,.I Owprf. Im./r'uaeral Director.
P*-*-!*.*
>S-*-l*.*
P*-*.J*-7i


Friday, June16-1978
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Pa*e3
Rabbis of 30 Cities Meet in D.C.
Forty rabbis from over 30 U.S.
cities participated in the annual
meeting of the Rabbinical Ad-
visory Council of the United
Jewish Appeal at the Adas Israel
Synagogue in Washington, D.C.
recently.
Rabbi Stanley S. Rabinowitz
of Adas Israel Synagogue, RAC
vice chairman and chairman-
designate for 1979, chaired the
sessions which were devoted to
the study of the social and eco-
nomic problems facing 45,000
immigrant families living in
Israel. Workshops developed
ways for RAC members to lead
congregations and communities
toward solutions through the
forthcoming UJA campaign.
RABBI Rabinowitz will suc-
ceed Rabbi Joseph H. Lookstein,
who is leading the RAC through
1978.
Rabbi Rabinowitz emphasized
that while members of the RAC
represent all denominations, they
are united for a purpose that
transcends the divisions between
them.
"The vital tasks undertaken by
the UJA provide links among
Conservative, Orthodox and
Reform congregations. We are
united by a common deter-
mination to improve the quality
of life for the people in Israel who
desperately need our help as well
as to meet the pressing needs of
Jews elsewhere in the world and
here in our home communities."
THE FIRST day's sessions
included a film depiction of the
adverse living conditions of
300,000 people in Israel; a pre-
sentation by Col. Baruch Levy,
former Prime Minister's Advisor
on Social Affairs, who spoke on
"The Social Gap in Israel: A
Sephardic View"; discussions on
current socio-economic issues in
Israel; and a dinner meeting with
Irving Bernstein, executive vice
chairman of UJA, who called on
the RAC to meet the challenges
of the 1979 campaign.
The RAC met with Prof.
Ephraim Yaar, author and
visiting associate professor in the
Department of Sociology at
Columbia University and senior
research associate at the Center
for Policy Research in New York,
who spoke on "The Socio-
political Structure of Israel:
Implications tor uovernment
Policies," and "Problems of
Creating Successful Housing
Developments."
Melvyn H. Bloom, assistant
executive vice chairman, UJA,
made a slide presentation
analyzing the 1978 UJA cam-
paign and led a discussion on the
influence of rabbinic giving in the
Begin Delays His Reply
To Carter Policy Queries
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
The Cabinet held its
fateful debate Sunday over
the formulation of answers
to two key questions posed
by President Carter to
Prime Minister Menachem
Begin about Israel's peace
plan. ^^^^^^
man had reserved their opinions
until the next Cabinet meeting.
Apparently they intend to hold
private consultations on a formu-
lation to be presented to the full
Cabinet.
Begin and Dayan conferred for
more than an hour at Begin's
residence last Thursday evening
DAYAN WAS said to be pro-
ISRAEL SCENE
\-%JL

Rabbi Stanley S. Rabinowitz (right), UJA Rabbinical Advisory
Council vice chairman and chairman-designate for 1979, greets
Irving Bernstein, UJA executive vice chairman at the annual
RAC meeting held recently in Washington, D.C. Rabbi
Rabinowitz told the rabbis, assembled from over 30 U.S. cities,
that "The vital tasks undertaken by the UJA provide links that
transcend the divisions between Conservative, Orthodox and
Reform congrega tion s."
community. Mark Talisman,
director of the Washington, D.C.
office of the Council of Jewish
Federations, talked on
"Strategies for Government
Funding of Synagogue and Fed-
eration Projects"; and Michael
Avnimelech, Consul for Eco-
nomic Affairs, Government of
Israel, spoke on "Israel's
Housing Problems."
IN A session with Hanon
Baron, Minister of the Embassy
of Israel in Washington, D.C,
current issues of importance con-
cerning the relationship between
Israel and the United States were
discussed.
The meeting concluded with a
unanimous declaration by the
rabbis to bring the facts and
issues discussed to their com-
munities.
South Florida rabbis attending
the meeting included Ralph P.
Kingsley of North Miami Beach;
Max A. Lipschitz of North Miami
Beach; and Solomon Schiff of
Miami.
The questions concern
the sovereignty issue on the
West Bank after the five
year period of "self rule"
and the means by which Is-
rael intends to grant poli-
tical self-expression to the
Palestinians.
CABINET SECRETARY
Arye Naor said, after the ses-
sion, that the debate will be con-
cluded at the next session on
Monday, June 12. The Cabinet
will not meet next Sunday be-
cause of the Shavuoth holiday.
He also disclosed that Begin,
Foreign Minister Moshe Dayan
and Defense Minister Ezer Weiz-
posing "new ideas" and is
believed to favor a greater role
for Jordan under the proposed
"self rule" plan. But he told
reporters, after his meeting with
Begin, that he had not suggested
any substantial changes.
The debate marked the return
of Begin to government affairs
after his bad cold of the previous
week, which postponed the
debate. The Prime Minister had
earlier attended the inau-
guaration of Israel's new Presi-
dent Yitzhak Navon, where he
seemed reserved and not
especially vigorous, although
medical reports emphasized that
there was no relationship be-
tween the Begin indisposition
and his ongoing coronary prob-
lems.
Use Library to Trace Jewish Roots
By ELSIE LEVITON
Temple Israel Library
Are you curious about you
"Jewish" roots in these com-
munities and about your neigh-
bors? Other people are, and
Jewish histories have been
written and are available to you
on our library shelves.
AMONG recent additions to
this ever growing collection is
Maxwell Street, which has the
same nostalgia for Chicago that
World of Our Fathers has for
many people whose parents
settled on the lower east side of
New York.
American Jewish Landmarks'
by Postal, published in 1977, is at
unique guide to almost every city
in the United States and Canada.
It identifies people, sites and
institutions and tells the story of
over three centuries of Jewish
life. You can have an exciting
time whether you are a traveler
planning a trip anywhere in the
United States, or plan to take
only an armchair journey.
The books are available at
Temple Israel free community
library, West Palm Beach.
Engagement
Lmsky-Holin
Mrs. Blance Linsky of
Miami and Palm Beach an-
nounces the engagement of
her daughter, Patti, to Rabbi
Elliot J. Holin, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Simon Holin, of
San Francisco.
Invest In
Israel Securities.
STATE OF ISRAEL BONDS
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We're Specialists In Israel Securities.
Transactions Daily
Via Telex To Israel Stock Exchange.

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Home: 622-4000
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H
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$10,000 minimum Compounded Daily
Information on minimum deposits,
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penalties and earnings based on dairy
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Washington
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Annual Annual Mnmum Account
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Certificates subject to substantial
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SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION
ASSETS EXCEED $800,000,000
JACK D GORDON
President
FSLIC
ARTHUR H. COURSHON
Chairman of the Board



The Jewish
ofPwtm
Canary
Friday. J

Jewish Floridi an
or- f*ui bcacm couwrr _
i -oua vc*.~ art -KAToi iimr
J.1978
Chiiif Decision Evokes Memory
K
PALM BEACH BOCA RATOKOPTICS
> J An Boca Racj
(net use wast-
TEAKS AGO.
far
\ ?-* ~k '.. i -: 7>< .
:.BH > : 3_
*.. ia9 ATES LACA' ATM Oa* *A- -PS rH
:s i
iMttTMiwiii
i I. aaeaaw. vw 1* wIti Or
l-at Dr Uwwwi Kaj rmit
Ml 3rar J Dwaam Ii
s
unuiied
Nixon Abnuuususuon.
The porahar thing about that
perad m by hat b that it took on
jest a teach of paranoia. I feh I
coald never be aore that my
cnwasaa would be fouad anchored
iu usual Sunday inorning
if its mam
Richard Sizoc
Friday. Jane 16.178
V0BW4
II 5IVAN-5T3f
Ni
the
BBl
~r ;:
: tmM
A Dead Issue
The United States vacs anpabeoclr far Israel's repfj
to President Carter s qriwtiom about the Israeli view of
the West Bask and Gaza.
First, there was Prase Mister Begot's illness which
prevented debate of the questions on then* receipt from
Washington. Nov. Israel has declared that no answers
will be fonhmanrag until after Shavooth next Monday.
We wish Washington were as i-yTn with the
nkniem Arab terrorist attacks on Israel as it is with the
Israec delays Pruskiw Carter may hare called the
bombing of a boa last Friday in which six persons were
loafed cowardly and any other Hgfw^np.< ic
thing.
Bat sweet words do not deal with the terrorise, no
- -. :r^- Cartes i mwmH -... mm Imam to jawasaa tea
Just what can Prescient Carter expect m reply? To
oeg= w-.th. the questions were predicated on the Admin-
istration s predetermined view of what a Middle East
-..----. --?: bl '^~*c m -.UM-aii ;.: Ha prel^:"
I- Dai end the answers most be predicated on just
'-be Administration s predetermined view is petro-
duai malic hokxun It most be predicated on the terrorism
itself relentless, cruel and a statement on why the pre-
- M ~ oorders are a dead issue: as dead as the six victims of
' mliifin i
OF COURSE
aiwars teas there
never sure *os I
my fevered awad a crew who by
specs! iaauueoon were taking
ecizor^l axea to bit piece to chop
the pubesher s rep-
wouida t consider
ia a-v latest asti-Nixoc
Aawa e_ they
el and did I
aaaaO> _
Mindlin
One favorite memory of mine
needs a simple fact explained to
appreciate its foil flavor I am
no longer paranoid about it and
afford it as a favorite
in width, except for p*^ rf
time later oa when they hor
tened the column by tevertt
inches and began putting th
answer to the Sunday crossword
puzzle at the bottom of my j^r
It strikes me now that ttan
might have been a sublimkul
t in this.
For some reason, the length of
the column extended from the top
of the page to the bottom, rough-
ly 22 inches in length by 4 inches
Israel to Build Top
Flight Fighter Plane
JERUSALEM Frustrated
and angry a: the Senate s vote
Israel receiving of
to the .Arabs, the Israel:
Government is now expected to
approve plans to manufacture a
new home-produced jet that
would be equal to the Unaed
State F-15.
The ooacasapaued plane, a two-
year old design now undergoing
Btaa 11 mti i wind-taaaai teats, is
known as the AneA. or Ltoc
Waae hznited iBiisBaaiun has
been disclosed about the Arise,
other than that k would match
the performance of the F-15.
I the world's top fighter
the important fftw of
weald be as use of a
-j~: bo: *r .AmssasVa" |a]
meat that Israel can t rely oa the
U-S
The chairman of the com-
mittee. Prof. Moahe Areas,
reacted to the Senate vote by
reiterating an view that Israel
should push ahead with the
Anek Prof .Areas, farmer head
of the aerodynanaca faculty at a
k-srtmg Israeli tmrhmirmt anstitn-
uon. characterized as a very
grave event the vote approving
the package sale of jeta to Saudi
.Arabia and Egypt and Israel
PBBHAPS THAT safcnfe
ous display was an accolade I
don't know. Or maybe it was ,
demonstration of editorial
"objectivity", something ifc,
spinach which you eat. not be.
cause you like it. but because it $
supposed to be good for you.
But one day. I dropped anouw
Nixon piece on my editor's desk
and when it finally appeared, the
length of the column hadn't
changed at all. only the quantity
of ha content. There were the 22
inches all right, all neatly boxed
in by an artistic border, except
that the editorial axes had
hacked so much out of it. that the
column could fit into 10 inches
easily, maybe 8.
But damned if they didn't
spread the balance of the
chopped-up copy out over the
"normally committed" 22 inches
(leas crossword puzzle answer it
the bottom I. Weil. sir. vou could
have shoved a couple of'Sherman
tanks into those wide and airy
open spaces and had room
enough left over for a wing of B-
29 s at my age. I still speak
the lingo of World War II My
paranoia had finally come home.
THE EDITORIAL object was
to pretend that nothing strange
or unusual had occurred between
my typewriter and their printing
press a commitment to them
selves that blew up in their faces
because, that very day. or there-
abouts, the publisher of the paper
took to his nationally-syndicated
column to accuse me of being in
persuasive alliance with Alger
Hiss. Who else, in his dis-
tinguished view, would be t
Richard Nixon enemy?
I recall these things with a
chuckle now because this very
paper is today leading a freedom
of the press crusade against the
Continued oa Page 13-A
Save A Homosexual for Jesus
THIS ISRAELI
made clear by Daft mi M
Exer Weszman when he was m
the United States ia March.
"We want Aria* to be as net
mm DOwMwOflC lxQQl f H ra at wfai1 IDtCsT*
farenee:-- he said at that tkne
Uaked States actioa ia bkxkiag
the sale of Israel Kfir tighten to
Ecuador The United States has a
veto power because the Kfir. or
Lion Cab. uses the General
ElectrkJ-79 engine
The Kfir, which played a
prominent role ia the 1973 Arab-
Israel war. ia pi wasted by the
Israel Aircraft
'LAI.i which also
would be the builder of the An*L
Aa kihialiBg factor of Israels
producing iu own jeta has beet
the huge cost of such a project.
The Israeli Air Force has in the
past opposed the A nth program
It has feared that the project
would impede ita goal of getting
the maximum number of F'16's
from the United States as soon as
passable to go along with the
deadlier but costlier F-15 s.
THE ARIEH project has been
the subject of intense debate ia
Israel since last summer. Prof.
Arens. who was once a senior
official of Israel Aircraft, hiwling
the pro-Aries forces aad aar farce
The debate began .hen Prof
Anas asad ia Parliament, that
purchase of the F 16 would be a
very bad axsstake from every
pos>* of view. It would be a death
blow to the design and develop-
ment potential of I.AJ.." he
A FEW weeks ago the
Defense and Foreign Policy Com-
mittee of the Israel Pashament
recommended full scale develop-
ment aad construction of the
aircraft. But the Cahinrt has not
as yet laapoadad However the
action by the State has now
iafhswaad the Israeli Govern-
On the opposite ssde. Air Force
Commander Maj. Gen. Pi nj asses
Peled was quoted as having said
that he refused to take a chance
by relying on a local aircraft that
saagnt prove to be a conglo-
meration of various new tecb-
I reject any suggestion that
the millions of dollars .Anita
Bryant plans to raise to create
"Save a Homosexual for Jesus"
centers will be used for anything
bat to continue doing Gods
work." as she so often has an-
nounced.
That articles have appeared
over the years which cant a
shadow of suspicion on the finan-
cial aspects of some evengeusu
ao the course of "doing God's
work is no reason to suspect this
latest local manifestation of
Christian good works.
IP HUSBAND Bob Green has
risen from the status of ruggage-
carrier to spokesman for the one-
time singing personabty. it is all
part of God's will, we presume.
The reward for giving up tHt
eerier career should be com-
memsurate with the arduous sWas"
of putting together a few million
dollars, building centers and
hiring the Christian staff that
will do the yob of de-homosexial-
uing the fallen.
The concern a number of our
focal rabbis i ipuassd bast ysar
over homosexual teachers, neigh-
bors and the like should be al-
leviated by the Bryant-Green
proposal.
For while they never did ex-
press, publidy. any concern for
saving homosexuals from their
misspent lives, one can discern
their compassion by the itwn
of any resereiae to the Biblical
penalty for homosexual acts
AS PUT forth by Bob and
Anita, the millions of dollars to
be raised wil be spent to open
dozens of counseling centers
throughout the United States."
Beginning first, of course, with
such a center in Miami where it
all started thanks to alert
Christians like Bob and Amu
But not all were Christians, as
some rabbis attested in agning
an advertisement that was paid
for by "Save Our Children. Inc
Bob Green, Treasurer," during
the anti-gay ordinance Wtion
last June.
Treasurer Bob Green has a
message for them which this
umn feels should be delivered
bare: Send us your homosexuals
far any who seeks help "no
matter what his religious prefer-
ence will be taught Christian
values, said Bob Green. Bryant s
husband, according to last Sun-
day s Miami Henld
THE RABBIS may have, dif-
fkult time with members of Con-
gegeuon Eu Chaim. the gav
Miami synagogue Thev persist
m maintaining their belief in
Judaism and could very well
resist being converted to Chris-
tian values as represented by Bob
and Anita and her kind, even as
Jews for Jesus. Some of the rab-
bis may even have a difficult time
with themselves as transmission
belts to the wonderful world of
.Anita Bryant.
On the other band a huh
pilpul might be useful here: If we
send these ho moan rush we don't
want to the Anita-Bob camps and
they became Christians. weU. she
did ssy in that Playboy interview
that unless Jews accept Jesus
they are going to face the fires of
heli. So. k might not be a bad
thing after all if she's right. For
I say with siacesitj that writ-
ing "ramps" to ilsarrihr tat
counseling centers hi the para-
graph above was aa anmasckat
act that I mast assume comes
from my sense of Jewiah history.
BUT I cannot help react with
thoughts of the Nazi camps when
I read that Bob Green hop-.
Ultimately to have ranches
and farms so that they (hoino-
sexualsl can change la^styks
that they've become addicted
to."
Whan we begin shipping the
homosexuals to ranches and
farms, it may be too late to stop
the bigota and fanatics. If *
Jews haven t learned that tj
fires can consume us here, as weU
as in the Christian bell for on-
belivers. then our fate will be
repeat the tragedy of the Holo-
caust. I believe that.


Friday, June 16,1978
Letters to the Editor
Rabbi Protests Federation's Action
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 5
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
May I enter a strong protest
against the Federation's un-
believable action, in reducing the
already small allocations to the
three great National Institutions
of Judaism in America (from
$500.00 to $100.00 each).
That the Federation has never
raised their appropriations in all
the recent years of its
phenomenally multiplying cam-
paign incomes, is a sad enough
commentary, on its sense of
concern for the oldest, largest
and greatest Seminaries in the
world and for the equivalent lay
organizations that stand by their
sides.
THESE institutions, Reform,
Conservative and Orthodox, bear
the overwhelming responsibilities
in America for rabbinic, cantorial
and pedagogic training, for
religious youth education, leader-
ship and camping programs, for
Jewish book publication, social
action and interfaith un-
I dertakings.
And these are merely the
I highlights of a long list of funda-
mental Jewish identity activities
carried onward by these in-
stitutions, activities that impinge
upon the quality of the Jewish
lives of the entire oncoming
generations. Hundreds of
thousands, even millions of
American Jews are touched in
their own lives by the proud
efforts of these monumental
institutions.
That they suffer equally from
the financial stress facing all
agencies in these difficult times,
you know as well as I. That they
should have been more than
entitled to some increase in
largess from Palm Beach
County's overwhelmingly
successful campaigns, you also
know as well as I. How then can
intelligent leaders not shrink
with shame at their own inde-
fensible reduction (by 80 percent)
of the already miniscule
allocations?
IF YOU were not favorably
influenced by the propriety of the
long list of communities, many
smaller than our own, whose
support you must know (from
your own usual sources far
exceeds our own, then it probably
will not faze you either that more
than 25 communities (many
much smaller than our own)
actually see fit to allocate bet-
ween $1,000 and $5,000 annually
to a single one of these three
vibrant institutions.
Indeed, is it really incon-
ceivable that responsible leaders
ought ever conclude, that any
multi-million dollar National
Jewish Agency of unquestionable
value and repute should be
supported by an allocation of so
insignificant an amount aa $100,
from a two million dollar com-
munity campaign?
It is absurd on the face of it, to
afford such treatment to the
Reform Jewish Appeal (including
the Hebrew Union College and
the UAHC) or to the Jewish
Theological Seminary (and its
own lay adjunct) or to the
Yeshiva University. What kind
of financial responsibility do you
call this? (Not even to mention
now utterly inane it is to ap-
propriate twice that amount for
the (midget, by comparison)
Synagogue Council of America.)
THE PALM BEACH County
federation deserves every com-
mendation for the magnificence
of its fund raising in recent years,
out its fund allocations in
no way reflect an equivalent
measure of effectiveness. You
have recommended allocations of
close to a quarter of a million
dollars ($232,000) in a single year
; r three local beneficiaries, two
which are still embryonic and
benefit only a few hundred
Persons. In the face of this un-
latnomable patronage, how can
anyone toss a single one hundred
dollar bill toward the preser-
vation of the three Jewfeh giants
of faith, tradition, education and
survival? Rabbi Irving B. Cohen
Temple Israel
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
We are witnessing a novel
paradox in world history; the
vanquished are demanding con-
cessions from the victors.
Guilty of unjustified aggres-
sion and directly responsible for
at least three major wars, Egypt
now has the unmitigated gall to
demand full return of territories
which they lost, offering no
concessions. Oh yes! They
condescend to recognize the State
of Israel which the UN had done
years ago by Resolution 242,
which by majority vote obligated
all members including the Arab
members. This resolution would,
of course, also apply to Israel to
comply with the agreement to
return all occupied territory
gained by force.
WE HAVE the temerity to
pose this question: "What if
Israel had lost the war?" I can
think of these possibilities: 1)
They would have been
slaughtered (driven into the sea);
2) Israel would have been com-
pletely occupied and enslaved as
did the Egyptians in Biblical
days.
Under the latter condition, can
anyone imagine (the defeated)
demanding concessions and the
return of all occupied territory,
which they would have to do
under Resolution 242?
WHEN President Sadat made
his courageous and noble trip to
Israel, I wrote him a letter ap-
plauding his act and with hope in
my heart that now we have a
solution for peace in the Mideast.
I was shocked and bitterly dis-
appointed when he broke off
negotiations using as an excuse a
few settlements in Sinai.
Assuming Prime Minister
Begin's reasons for so doing were
unjustified, what possible threat
could these few miniscule settle-
ments present surrounded as <
they would be by two and a half
millions of Palestinians? In my
judgment this was a lame excuse
to halt such a brave beginning,
considering the end result was so
vital to world peace.
Millions are heartsick at this
turn of events and can only lose
confidence in the people who run
our respective governments. As
one writer expressed it: "a pox on
our inept politicans and stupid
bureaucrats the world over."
W. W. WACHTEL
West Palm Beach
China is Out to Zap
IsraelRep. Lehman
Rep. William Lehman
(D., Fla.), who recently re-
turned from a White
House-sponsored mission
to the People's Republic of
China, said that he en-
countered considerable
hostility toward Jews and
Israel on the part of Chin-
ese leaders.
Lehman reported that a
Mr. Hao, president of the
Chinese Institute of For-
eign Affairs, condemned
"Israeli aggression."
THE CHINESE spokesman
maintained that his country
would reassess its diplomatic
position on Israel only after
peaceful relations were estab-
lished between Israel and Egypt.
At an important meeting be-
tween members of the American
delegation and Chinese officials,
Lehman pointed out that true
normalization of relations bet-
ween China and the United
States must be based upon
mutual respect for the special
friendships which each nation
holds with other countries.
In light of the long-standing
relationship between the United
States and Israel, the Florida
Congressman observed that
China might wish to reconsider
its anti-Israel policy.
KENG PIAO, a Vice Premier
working in the foreign affaire
area, responded to Lehman's
remarks with a curt, "You are a
Jew! So you have a special con-
cern about Israel." He quickly
changed the subject.
Lehman said that although
Israel was the first nation in the
Middle East to recognize the
Peking government in 1950, con-
tacts between the two countries
were severed after the Chinese
Premier Chou En-lai met with
Egyptian President Gamel Abdul
Nasser at the 1965 Bandung
Conference of non-aligned na-
tions.
Subsequently, Mao Tse-tung
denounced Israel as a "base of
imperialism," and China became
the first country outside the Arab
world to recognize the Palestine
Liberation Organization and to
offer it material and political sup-
port.
IN REPORTING the Mar. 11
Arab terrorist attack on a civilian
bus near Tel Aviv, headlines in
the Chinese press read "Arab
Freedom Fighters Destroy Two
Israel Military Vehicles."
C !' i ll'NOtOS toccoco*
choose
smoke!
"Why kid anyone? I smoke
because I enjoy it. I'm the kind of guy
who gets pleasure out of a cigarette.
But I'm not deaf to what's being said
about tar.
"So I searched out a cigarette
that would give me taste with low tar.
And two years ago I found it in
Vantage. Vantage has all the taste I
enjoy yet, surprisingly, much less tar
than my old brand.
"Why did I choose Vantage?
Because I like it."
Michael Epperson
Miami. Honda
5iSfi
Warning: The Surgeon General Has Determined
That Cigarette Smoking Is Dangerous to Your Health.
Regular,
Menthol, nnd ^han
UHWBje 100s
FILTER: II mg. "itr. 0.7 mg. nicotmi, MENTHOL 11 mg."!ir".
0.8 mg. nkoiine. tv pet cigarette. FTC Report AUG 77;
FILTER 100's 111 mg. "V. 0.9 mg. mcoiint iv per cigarette by FTC method



Page 6
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, June 16,1978
Charming Vanessa
Boycott Jewish Actors, Israel
By JENNI FRAZER
London Chronicle Syndicate
LONDON Actress Vanessa
Redgrave, who recently won an
Oscar for her role in the film
"Julia."' and who is a leading
member of the Workers' Revo-
lutionary Party, is to put forward
a resolution this month calling
for actors' sanctions against
Israel.
Leading actors have con-
demned the motion and have
declared their intention of at-
tending the AGM and voting
against it.
The resolution on the order
sheet und.T the "External
Policy" section, reads: "The
brutal invasion and terror
bombing of South Lebanon is one
more attempt by the Zionist
regime to destroy the rights of
the Palestinian people to national
self-determination and the liber-
ation of Palestine. It was aimed
at the destruction of the Pales-
tine Liberation Organization, the
only representative of the Pales-
tinian people, which leads the
fight to defend basic democratic
rights of all workers in the Arab
States, whatever their religion."
IT THEN continues: "This
Johannesburg people are wat-
ching her at the Bioscope. She is
totally lacking in credibility.
Timothy West and Gemma
Jones, the stars of Harold
Pinter's The Homecoming.
toured Israel for two weeks in
'First' for US Nyvy
Jewish Prayer Pennant
Hoisted at Sea
Vanessa Redgrave
USS MOUNT WHITNEY (At
Seal The first Jewish Worship
Pennant ever to be flown by a
United States Navy warship at
sea was hoisted here by the
Norfolk-based amphibious
command ship, USS Mount
Whitney, while the ship was
participating in the joint service
exercise Solid Shield 78 in the
western Atlantic.
On hand for the historic oc-
casion was Naval Reserve
Chaplain (Rabbi) Bruce E. Kahn,
who later conducted the first
Torah service on Mount Whit-
ney.
"IT WAS one of the most
thrilling experiences of my life."
said the 32-year-old Rabbi from
Richmond, Va. "I was invited to
the White House recently for a
reception honoring Israel's 30th
anniversary. I thought that was
quite an experience, but it was
not near as thrilling as watching
the Jewish Worship Pennant
being raised for the first time
aboard a ship at sea," he added.
The Jewish Worship Pennant
was dedicated on October 20,
1976. during ceremonies held
in Norfolk aboard the amphibious
assault ship, USS Guam. The
ceremony was attended by Rabbi
Joel Balsam, then director of the
Commission on Jewish Chap-
laincy, the Navy's Chief of Chap-
lains, and a host of other religious
and lay leaders.
Like the Church Pennant, the
Jewish Worship Pennant is
triangular, and the tip of the fl>
is rounded instead of coming to a
sharp point. It consists of a white
field charged with the Tablet of
Law and the Star of David in
place of the blue Latin Cross.
"NO OTHER flags or pen
nants shall be placed above, or if
on the same level, to the right of
the national flag," states Navy
regulations. "The only exception
to this rule is during church
services conducted by naval
chaplains at sea for personnel of
the Navy, when the Church or
Jewish Worship Pennant may be
flown above the national flag."
Although the Jewish Worship
Pennant became available for
Continued on Page 12
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(Irlhnilov
kll K.iMn salra
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deniury
THE MOST
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14 Sun
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you re sightseeing m New Orleans anytime
from May 28th-Sept 5th your family can
stay m a deluxe room with two double beds
for $38 a day* right in the French Quarter at
the New Orleans Marriott' And Marriott is a
sightseeing sight itself 41 stones high, roof-
top restaurant and lounge, a fountain filled
swimmmg pool and restaurant right off the
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New Orleans Louisiana 70140/; 504158 M 000
Or Cai: Toil Free (BOO: 228-9
JEWISH playwright ja
Rosenthal, whose plays would
come under the ban if the motion
went through, aays: "Vanessa
ought to know how wrong it is to
ban art of any kind anywhere. We
WORLD OF ART
AGM demands that Equity
Council ban the sale of all taped
and filmed material to Israel,
cancel all tours to Israel, that
Council instructs all members
working in Israel to terminate ;
their contracts and instructs the ;
membership of Equity to refuse
all offers of work in Israel.'' (
Though formal presentation of
an Equity motion demands that
it be moved on behalf of a mini-
mum of 20 members, this motion
has 73 signatories. The Workers'
Revolutionary Party, of which
Vanessa Redgrave is a spokes-
man, has tabled at least 15
motions out of the 53 due to be
discussed at the annual meeting.
Jewish actor Ron Moody says:
"I hope to be there to vote
against everything Vanessa Red- .
grave stands for. This is out-
rageous crypto-fascism." He feels
that there is a great deal of sym-
pathy within Equitv for Israel.
ACTOR Dennis Quilley states:
"It seems to me to be an ap-
palling idea, and I wouldn't
dream of voting for it. I'm not a
Zionist myself, but I think it is
appalling. I absolutely abominate
using Equity to propagate
political views which are not all
relevant to what Equity is
doing."
Jewish actress Miriam Karlin,
who is herself active on the
Equity Council, condemns Miss
Redgrave. "If Vanessa would put
her money where her mouth is
she would not allow her films to
be shown in places where she
regards herself as persona non
grata. If she really meant what
she said, she would insist that her
films are not shown in South
Africa or Rhodesia, but she
knows very well that in
April sponsored by the British
Council. Timothy West says that
to support a motion of this nature
is to "leave oneself open to a
charge of anti-Semitism which
one doesn't want to do or feel.
One wouldn't want to demon-
strate against the people one was
coming to work with. This policy
could mean not just that one was
critical of the Israeli Govern-
ment's policy but that one ac-
tively supported the PLO, which
I do not."
Though this was West's first
visit to Israel, he has expressed a
strong desire to return "I
loved the country and the people
are wonderful."
went through a war based pre-
cisely on this 30 years ago. This
suggestion is like the burning of
the books at Nuremburg."
Both Rosenthal and his actress
wife, Maureen Lipman, said that
they would alert as many people
as possible to attend the AGM
and vote against the meeting.
While it is estimated that
WRP support in Equity extends
to about 300 people, it is widely
felt that this motion will not be
passed. The Shaftesbury Theatre
here, in which the AGM will be
held, holds about 2,000 people,
while the total Equity member-
ship is around 24,000.
YOU CAN FIND IT...HERE


AT
CAMP SHALOM 1978
At our spacious IS-acre site we offer children from all sectors of the com
munity and of all origins, races and religions the opportunity to enjoy me
summer months in a safe, wholesome and enriching environment and pro
gram. The program is designed for each age group to promote physical, so-
cial and cultural growth and the acquisition of new ski lit and interests.
Healthy self expression is nurtured within an atmosphere of respect for
others and awareness of responsibility both toward the Individual and the
group.
THIS Y EAR, the eight week camp season will be from June 19-August tl.
The first four-week session is from June 19-July 14, and the second four week
session from July V August 11
PROGRAM AND SCHEDULE
Camp is conducted Monday through Friday, 9:15 a.m. to 3:45 p.m.
Campers are assigned to units by school grades, age, and or maturity. Pro-
grams and activities are directed and supervised by a trained staff. Special
activities include athletics, music, drama, arts and crafts. Red Cross certi-
fied swimming instruction and nature study Special activities Includt
bowling, roller skating, trips to beaches and places of interest.
in keeping with the camp's sponsorship and objectives, Jewish history
and customs are introduced through music and drama, arts and crafts, holi-
day festivals, and the traditional welcoming of the Sabbath. These programs
are supervised and directed by our Judaic Education specialists and our Is-
raeli Scout Staff
TRANSPORTATION
Campers are picked up by buses at central or convenient pick up points
on established camp bus routes to be announced.
CAMP FEES
Pre School. Elementary Divisions
8 weeks $225 ? $40 Registration and Activity Fee;
4 weeks $1 25 $20 Registration and Activity Fee.
IFor each additional child from same family
8 weeks $205 $40 Registration and Activity Fee.
4 weeks $115 $20 Registration and Activity Fee I
FEES INCLUDE transportation, snacks, a Camp Shalom "T" Shirt, insurance nd
special activities
MINIMUM ENROLLMENT one 4w*ek session
Enrollment is open to children ajes 3 12
REGISTRATION and ACTIVITY FEE MUST BE PAID WITH APPLICATION lit
cancelled by June 1. one half of this fee will be refunded I
TOTAL FEES MUST BE PAID IN FULL PRIOR TO EACH SESSION unless
arrangements have been made to- later payment Reduced fees and scholarship >d
a-e available based on need
For lu.the- information. p!Mte call or write
JEWISH FEDERATION OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
2415 Okeechobe* Boulevard 689 5000
West Palm Beach Florida 33409


Friday, June 16,1978
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Pe 7
With the '
Organizations
B'NAI B'RITH
WOMEN
The final meeting of B'nai
B'rith Women was chaired by the
new president, Kay Siegel.
Honored guests were Ruth Gold-
berg, executive director of BBW
South Coastal Region; Ruth
Wallace, chairman of BBW
South Coastal Region; Rosalind
Omstein, member of the national
executive committee of B'nai
B'rith; Freda Bompy, president
of Mitzvah Council of Palm
Beach County; Shirly Bloom, ex-
president of BBW Masada
chapter of North Palm Beach,
administrative vice president,
Mitzvah Council.
National B'nai B'rith Women
awards were presented by past
president Ethel Kaplan. Mrs. B.
Feldhauhn presented humorous
transliterations of Yiddish and
English poetry. .
B'NAI B'RITH
Kings Lodge 2966 B'nai B'rith
will hold its next meeting
Tuesday, June 20 at 7:30 p.m. at
Temple Emeth in Delray Beach.
Guests will be Judge Harold
Cohen, who will speak on the
"Palm Beach Court System" and
Anthony Galie, hypnotherapist,
whose subject will be hypnosis.
CONGREGATION
ANSHEISHOLOM
The Men's Club of Congre-
gation Anshei Sholom will meet
on Sunday, June 18 at 10 a.m.
HADASSAH
The Arts and Crafts group of
Shalom Hadassah will be
meeting on Tuesday afternoons
at Southampton Pool. For in-
formation contact Lillian Schack.
Henrietta Szold Group of
Hadassah will hold a dessert and
card party, Tuesday, June 20 at
the Lakeside Village Auditorium
at 12:30 p.m. Purchase tickets in
advance.
WOMEN'8
AMERICAN ORT
Installation of Royal Chapter
of Women's American ORT was
held recently at the Greenway
South Recreation Hall with Ann
Cohen of Palm Beach Region
serving as installing officer.
Bea Mishkit was collation
chairman and Irving Bloom
entertained on the piano.
Officers elected include
president, Lillian Frank; vice
presidents, Min Bard, Sylvia
Biller, Ruth Goldman and
Blanche Jungreis; corresponding
secretary, Helen Resnick; finan-
cial secretary, Jane Silverman
and Bea Mishkit; treasurer, Ruth
Goldman and Bernice Magram;
and recording secretary, Alice
Effrat.
Delegates from the Palm
Beach County Region of
Women's American ORT at-
tended the third Biennial Con-
vention at the Hyatt House in
Orlando recently. The convention
was attended by 500 leaders from
nine southern states representing
over 20,000 members in district
The increasing pressure for
quality education in the United
States, with special emphasis on
vocational education and the
increased need for expansion of
ORT's facilities overseas were the
special topics covered. A par-
ticular highlight of the con-
vention was the recent opening in
New York of the new Bramson
ORT Training Center, the first
school of its kind in the United
States.
Royal Women's American
ORT is sponsoring an evening of
dining and entertainment,
Sunday, June 24 at 6 p.m. at the
Musiciana Supper Club. For
reservations call Min Bard or
Lillian Frank.
TEMPLE BETH DAVIU
Temple Beth David will hold
brief July Sabbath services, with
a celebration of Havorah after
each service. Havorah is ob-
served by singing, dancing and
discussions.
The membership committee is
planning a coffee on Sunday,
June 25 at 8 p.m. Contact Stuart
and Karen Wanuck if interested.
Slepak Dragged From Apartment
NEW YORK (JTA) The
Student Struggle for Soviet
Jewry has reported that Soviet
Jewish activist Vladimir Slepak
was arrested in his Moscow
apartment after he and his wife
hung a sign from their balcony
demanding the right to emigrate
to Israel to join their son.
The sign drew a hostile crowd
which cheered when Slepak was
dragged from the building by
plaincloth.es police and thrown
into a police lorry. His wife was
not seen.
SLEPAK'S ARREST was
confirmed by the National Con-
ference on Soviet Jewry here. The
50-year-old electrical engineer
first applied for an exit visa eight
years ago and has since been in
the vanguard of Soviet dissidents
seeking human rights and the
right to emigrate. Until his
arrest, Slepak was the last mem-
ber of the unofficial Helsinki
Final Act monitoring committee
still at large.
Meanwhile, the 25 Jewish
women placed under house arrest
for protesting the denial of exit
visas, demonstrated from the
windows of their Moscow apart-
ments, joined by their 17 chil-
dren, according to reports from
theNCSJ andtheSSSJ.
The women had planned to use
the occasion of National Chil-
dren's Day to demonstrate at the
Lenin Library near the Kremlin.
THE SOVIET authorities re-
fused permission and the women
shouted from their windows that
they wanted to emigrate to
Israel. Foreign correspondents
who gathered near the apartment
complex were surrounded by
KGB agents who beat on the
windows of their cars shouting
"Go away, you are not wanted
here."
Earlier, the women issued a
statement declaring "We will
protest against the illegal deten-
tion of our families in the USSR "
Fla. Regional Mission to Israel
The Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County, in conjunc-
tion with the United Jewish Appeal, will sponsor a Florida
Regional Mission to Israel from Nov. 26 to Dec. 6,1978.


Pictured are members of Royal Palm Beach Women's American
ORT chapter at recent intallation of officers meeting at the
Greenway South Recreation Hall.
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A CENTURY OLD TRADITION

-
For over 125
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In it, you'll find everything from
traditional favorites to delicious new food
ideas. There's even a special section on major
Jewish holidays, with appropriate menu sug-
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To get your copy, send 75# plus the label from a
32 oz. jar of Hellmann's*or Best Foods'Real
Mayonnaise (or $1.00 without the label), along
with your name and address to: "Beyond
Chicken Soup",Dept.BCS-M.Box 307,Coventry,
CT 06238, or use this convenient coupon.


mm
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
*J.Jmi<>
.1978
Federation's 16tl
. 'J.;;^s :*.( ;~-* :.\~...^.
Fed-
..'". BfocJi Coast*
t\ Gordon coordmur, sr.d
P'vff.te.: .:*: audis-i isuat
.-. V":" tracing the history
taW Federation frown its
: (gin nings. Oi members of the Jewish Fed-
eration attended the meetine
Bette Gilbert 'left) a past president of the Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County, presents a stained glass auiard to Stanley
B. Brenner, as he completed his two-year term as president of
the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County 1976-78.
Robert S. Levy delivered the
invocation at the Federation's
16th annual meeting.
i
rimt
J. P Listick, Sc-<~
:'.( -.-> H OHktu i Division Cam-
paign

Rabbi Zelig Chinitz. resident
reprtsentatwt of the United
Israel Appeal was the install-
fficer for the new board of
directors and keynote speaker
-he evening. Rabbi Chinitz
discussed concern over the
United States government's
decision to sell F-15 fighter
planes to Saudi Arabia: "the
one piece of hardware which
us. three million Jews in
Israel, some sense of security.
I MUM of qualitative super-
surrounded by 100 mil-
I NORMS."
MauaWn '' :nt Wmmmm'i Division 197S
Campaign Cabinet wc~< ^cognized for out-
f-T^rutinc a.-Kie;>ement on behaif of the Jew-
i m| They are I seated, left to right I
Joan Torhner. Joyce Robinson. J P.
Listtck. South County president Gladys
M pins hank and Diana Daniels 'Standing
-nu one i Lorraine Yishup. Mara Scherer.
Ruth Wilensky. Cynnit List. Lynn Persoff.
Charlotte Robinson. Berenwe Rogers. Char-
lene Shall Sheila Engiestein. Carole Klein,
.'(unite Levy, president; Anne Faivus. Bar-
bara Shulman. Campaign chairman 'Stand-
ing rou twoi Sharon Lopez. Ruth Lifshitz.
Ilent Kowalsky. Stan Lesser. Marily Lam-
pert. Judy Waltxer. Barbra Lifshitz. Xaomi
Jacobson, Detna Kay and Penny Beers
Contiaaed fnm Pag, .
paign; an Endowment Fund hu
been established to provide
additional revenue for fatnri
special projects in the con.
munity; we established a Council
on the Aging under the direction
of Berenice Rogers and Detr.
Ksy. which has begun planning
for a home and health care center
for Jewish senior citizen?. and
the JCC has become a beneficiary
agency of the Federation.
The center has provided
many services to the comrr: unity
and we plan to fund them so that
they can continue to grow and
provide the types of programs **
so desperately need," Brenner
stated.
In addition. Brenner men-
tioned the following highlights of
the 1977-78 season a Com-
munity Relations Council con.
ference on the Middle East, the
expansion and development of
the Boca Raton community, the
attendance of a large contingent
of young leaders from the com-
munity at the UJA Washington
conference and the National
Public Relations award received
by the Federation for the
Women's Division "Miracle That
Is You" program. Brenner con-
eluded by stating he was "step-
ping down, but not out." He
charged the new board of
directors to participate, ask to
serve on committees and share
your skill and talent."
Campaign Reaches Record Total
"WE HAVE done well in our
philanthropic efforts." stated
Alan L. Shulman. 1978 CJA-IEF
General Campaign chairman,
"because we recognize from the
start trial the strengthening of
Jewish life is the province of Jews
that Jewish destiny must be
in Jewish hands, and that the
ultimate decision about our
common future is ours.
Shulman announced that i
record total of S2.050.000 hu
been raised to date with an
anticipated 100.000 still out-
standing: a 75 percent increase
over last year, and the largest
percentage increase of any
Federation in the country this
year." He praised the work"of the
hundreds of men who par-
ticipated in the campaign,
stating "a successful campaign is
dependent upon the efforts of
many volunteer workers who give
numerous hours in the solici-
tation of gifts."
Barbara qiqww Women's
Division Campaign chairman,
reported that the Women'i
Division raised S560.000. the
largest figure in its history,
which represents 25 percent of
the overall campaign This also
represents an increase of 75
percent over last years total,"
she stated "Our Palm Beach
County Woman have certainly
demonstrated their commitment,
dedication and caring t.irough
this critical campaign year "
'IZTi/T '^"i *""*" f "'omen Division, pre-
sents Barbara Shulman. Women* Division campaign chair-
gaqteaayy ^ -1 ^o^,,
A special tribute was given to
the five Pateataoa pre-school
teachers by Pre-School Con-
mittae Chairman Star: Lesser.
She nnounred that the Fed-
eration Pre-School was
mmatmgits aurvice* to the com-
munity, and that the JCC would
be mapnaubar fur the operation
of the pre-school program m the
ooaununitv Awards were pre-
sented to taachers Elizabeth
Calowav. Sandra Konigsburg,
Ruth RirachaaT. Harta Pederson
and Director Paytbs Morgan. W
then- contributions to the hit*
quality of pre-achool education
the ennsnunita .*"
Fi )....... I I '_*
Awards ware praaantad to Get***
Golden. Charfane SboO anc Uu


Friday, June 16,1978
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 9
nnual Meeting

L for outstanding service
Jewish community.
IMAN J Schimelman,
jve director of the Jewish
lion, discussed the need
htinued involvement and
bation of all members of
nmunitv in all aspects of
^ration. "A Jewish corn-
consists of more than
a number of Jewish
sharing a geographic
. rather it is a linking
[ individual with the whole
Jewish people, a bond
- an individual and
\, one family and another
[tighten this bond is the
ll task of our Federation
Calls for skills, resources,
Iment and above all,
participation."
nan Accepts Presidency
Sherwin Isaacson,
i of the nominating corn-
presented the slate of
, and board members for
Lion as follows: President,
ihulman; Vice President,
Ichard Shugannan; Vice
knt, Dr. Howard Kay; Vice
jit, Kenneth Scherer; Vice
knt, Jeanne Levy; Vice
fcnt, Jerome Tishman;
er, Staci Lesser; Sec-
IBruceJ. Daniels.
I members of the Board of
J>rs selected for three-year
jvere as follows: Abraham
\r. Sheila Engelstein, Dr.
tnselberg, Heinz Eppler,
Jeffrey Faivus, Arnold
Vt, Cynnie List, John
Myron Nickman, Dr.
Robinson, Berenice
Barbara Shulman. The
Bin were selected to fill
tea of one-year terms:
he Sholl and Dr. Peter
The slate was
pously approved.
I ACCEPTING the new
Inc. of the Jewish Fed-
Alan L. Shulman
led, "You have placed me
osition of trust, trust of
I to demonstrate a
pn and purpose which
jouch all of our lives .
i Jew is to act in concert
I Jews. We must act col-
ly towards our survival
i must affirm and reaffirm
to all our people here in
each County, in the State
lei, wherever our Jewish
tri are in need and
i the oneness, the partner-
|Jews everywhere."
linitz Discusses Sale
ofF-15's
^i Zelig Chinitz, resident
ntative of the United
Appeal, was the keynote
He discussed his "dis-
^ment" with the United
government decision to
|5s to the Saudis: "Why
^ave to be the F-16? the
! of hardware which gave
lillion Jews in Israel, some
pi security, some sense of
tive superiority, sur-
I by 100 million enemies."
lit? spoke of his "para-
concerning this decision,
fxamples in history where
ere persecuted, when their
right to exist was
tied."
LL ME why is it taken for
I in so many circles," he
"that Palestinian Arabs
right to national self-
ation and national self-
but the Jews in the
of Auschwitz, after 30
'Israel, have yet to justify
world that we too have a
live in peace and with
Jrity."
oncluded by stating that
pssage to all Jews in
p? was that without their
"Israel could not sur-
Norman Schimelman (right), executive director of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach County, presents special campaign^
awards to the co-chairmen of the 1978 South County CJA-IEF
^^^^^^^^TT7 jm T*mn*rt campaign. Pictured above is Dr. Gerald Robinson. Not pictured
Special campaign awards were presented to Arnold Lampert T**"***. Fn (left) and Jerome Hartman (center) for leadership in the 1978 is Dr. Karl Enselberg.
CJA-IEF campaign. Presenting the awards is Alan L. Shulman
(right). General Campaign chairman.
Staci Lesser (left), chairman of the preschool
commitee, presented the teachers of the Jew-
ish Federation's Community Pre-School with
special awards for outstanding service to the
community in the area of preschool educa-
tion. They are pictured (left to right), Ruth
Kirshner, Elizabeth Calloway, Herta Peder-
son and Phyllis Morgan, preschool director.
Stanley Brenner (right), presents the Federation's Community
Service Award to (left to right) George Golden, Charlene Sholl
and Max Tochner.


Page 10
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, June 16
The Jewish Community Center
The Jewish Community Center
announces the formation of a kin-
dergarten class for the 1978-79
school year. Registration is now
being accepted. The class will be
limited in size. Call the Center
and ask for Fran Witt for any de-
tails.
Registration for pre-londergar-
ten and preschool is now being
conducted.
JCC PLAYERS
The JCC Players Workshop,
under the direction of Michael
Soil and accompanied by Rhona
Lustig presented selection from
Oliver recently at the JCC Teen
Lounge.
The performers included
Roneet Weingarten, Roy Levi,
Merideth Consor, Monica Kay,
Nancy Kripitz, Gil Waldman,
Scott Stone and Mara Goodman.
C.A.P.A.
The JCC C.A.P.A. Summer
Program will be presenting two
productions this summer. There
are still a few openings left.
TWEENS & TEENS
Evening sessions will continue
with the new JCC sports co-
ordinator Ron Dennison. Call the
Center to have your child partici-
pate.
DISCO DANCE
Disco Dance classes will be
forming this summer. Call the
Center.
WIDO WED-TO-WIDOWED
WORKSHOP
A Summer Sunday Brunch is
scheduled for 11 a.m. Sunday,
June 18. Philip Weinstein, work-
shop chairperson will host a bagel
breakfast for workshop memoes
and friends. Following, partici-
pants will hear Robert Gisoff giv
talk.
Gisoff, a specialist in financial
planning for the retired and wid
owed, will discuss wills, planning
for future supports, tax, free in
vestments, reinvesting to sim-
plify finances and growth stocks.
HEBREW CLASS
Hebrew students at all levels of
instruction can call Sue Levi at
the Center offices concerning a
six week refresher class begin-
ning Mondav. Julv 17 through
Aug. 21 and meeting once a week.
Participants will review material
and reading themselves for the
fall semester. Emphasis will be
on reading and writing skills.
DRAWING FROM LIFE
COURSE
A special six week Summer
Studio Drawing Course is being
offered on Thursdays from 7:30
to 9 p.m. beginning July 13th
through Aug. 17. Participants
working in the sketching media
(pen and ink, charcoal and
pastels) will work from live and
still life models.
Mindy Wagner, artist and
studio and art history graduate,
will teach the class. Students at
all levels of development are eli-
gible.
TRANSPORTATION
Contact the Comprehensive
Senior Service Center for trans-
portation to doctor appoint-
ments, treatment centers, hos-
pitals, social service agencies or
shopping. Funding comes from a
federal government grant and
serves the area from 45th Street
to Southern Boulevard and from
the Ocean to the Turnpike. Ask
for transportation at least 24
hours in advance.
CLASSES
Consult Your Doctor: June 22,
Dr. Roger Rosenstock, 1:30 p.m.
Investments: Wednesday,
June 20 and June 27, 1:30 p.m.
Instructor, Bryn Sheen.
Hypertension Screening:
Tuesday, 1-4:30 p.m. Given free
by the Health Department, June
27.
Artist for the Month of June is
Saul Berke. His works can be
viewed Monday Friday, 9-5 p.m.
SPECIAL SERVICES
An Intergenerational activity:
Eight members of the young
theater group the JCC Players
Theater Workshop (ages 10 to 13)
presented musical selections from
Oliver recently at the Palm Beach
County Home directed by
Michael Soil.
TRIPS
Sam Rubin, president of the
Second Tuesday Club, and his
wife Marion, report the following
upcoming trips:
Jungle Queen Boat Ride with
lunch at Patricia Murphy's
July 6. Call Pauline Brimberg.
Trip to Omni in Miami; bus
leaves from Century Village 9:50
a.m., from Center at 10:10 a.m.
and returns to Center at 6 p.m.
Aug. 1.
Lido Spa in Miami, Nov. 19-22.
Call JCC for information.
The Second Tuesday of the
Month Club celebrated the 90th
birthday of Samuel Schutzer,
leader, organizer and resident of
West Palm Beach for 54 years.
The Ruth Hude Group dedi-
cated an original musical
presentation depicting events in
the life of Mr. Schutzer. Jewish
Federation provided the birthday
cake. The Council of the Second
Tuesday Club were the hosts for
the afternoon. President Carter
also sent birthday greetings to
Mr. Schutzer, as well as Paul
Rogers.
Eckerd Fires
Aide for Slur
An aide in the Jack Eckerd
campaign for the governorship
was fired last Friday after
making what had been inter-
preted as an anti-Semitic remark.
Remembering the backlash
reaction to an ad in the final days
of his campaign for United States
Senate against Richard Stone, in
which Eckerd compared his reli-
gious affiliation with Stone's as a
seeming plus for him, Eckerd
moved swiftry to fire Glenn
Anderson, a Winter Haven attor-
ney and chairman of the Polk
County campaign.
Statewide
Eckerd's opponent, Florida
Attorney General Robert Shevin,
is Jewish, and this time out he
seemed especially careful to nip
in the bud any negative reaction
to Anderson's quote in The
Miami Herald that "let's face it,
he's (Shevin) Jewish."
Anderson listed this as the
second of two hurdles that
Shevin would have to overcome if
he hopes to win. "First of all,"
Anderson declared, "he is from
Miami."
realities that influence an
tion."
He compared the "religion,
issue" in the Shevin-Eckwdl
race to John F. Kennedy's beL!
a Catholic in his 1960 bid r
Richard Nixon.
Anderson admitted that tkl
Clearwater headquarters
Eckerd urged him to resign, I
when he refused, he was fired.'
we can't discuss our politic
system without fear of offendim
somebody or some group, we^l
in bad shape," he declared.
Referring to Anderson's i
marks, Eckerd declared that
abhor this statement. I am si
dened by it. I don't think
intended it to be an anti-Semii
statement, but I can certainly i
how it would have that bdd
ance."
12th Season
Harder H_
Tennis & Golf
Camp for Teens
(Co-Ed)
TheFIntGoMATe*|
Camp in the World
*-
GOP candidate Eckerd said he
Wanuck Will Address I.O.O.F No.88 On Healthwas not aware of A^erion'a
comment until it was pointed out
to him by a Hallandale resident.
He promptly fired Anderson.
The Palm Beach Odd Fellow
Lodge 88 will sponsor a Senior
Health Care Lecture in down-
town West Palm Beach on
Wednesday, June 21, at 6:30
p.m. West Palm Beach Doctor
Stuart L. Wanuck will talk on the
subjects of prostates, bladders,
kidneys, urology, and senior sex.
A question and answer session
will also take place. All I.O.O.F.
Brothers are invited.
Dr. Stuart L. Wanuck
Anderson responded by declar-
ing that Eckerd had "over-
reacted" to what he called a sim-
ple "political fact" in his assess-
ment of Shevin s prognosis.
"1 never said, or indicated, how
I personally felt," Anderson was
later quoted in the Herald, "and I
resent strongly that 1 can not
sneak honestly about political
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y, June 16,1978
The Jewish Ftoridian of Palm Beach County
Page 11
Behind the new Anti-Zionist in Briuiti
n ROBERT WISTRICH tflMril-t.1 -nil u ...:,. -_J D...:_:._ j____a.
By ROBERT WISTRICH
last in a Two-Part Series
I THE RADICAL anti-Zionist
Lav attacks not only the Israeli
jjt to national self-determ-
lation (while upholding the
L-ogressive" character of Pales-
^,ian Arab nationalism), but
[so the whole basis of Jewish
Itachment to Zion.
f Again, the argumentation is
Whronistic. based on the
fcsimilationist premise that
Jewry has only a spiritual,
Eligious or purely symbolic link
Jith Palestine. It is the physical
(turn to Zion which is negated
ong with the concrete solidarity
diaspora Jewry towards the
ate of Israel.
I Anti-Zionism attacks this
lentification because its very
Lence is the denial of Jewish
ttional rights in Palestine. Any
L who today asserts this self-
tident right may find himself
anded as a racist.
| THIS MIGHT be unobjec-
j>nable if the enemies of Israel
[ere prepared to attack the
Igitimacy of every nation-State
the world and brand every
fctional movement, without
jtceplion. as "racist"; but such
[not the case.
I This blatant double standard
Iposes the demagogic character
contemporary anti-Zionism,
hich. for all its anti-racialist and
Mi-imperialist rhetoric, has
fcreasingly borrowed the
let hods, style and slogans of
assic anti-Semitism.
llNSTEAD OF the individual
Iw or the "Jews" as a dispersed
Immunity, it is the collective
presentation of the Jewish
fcple the State of Israel
|hii-h is the chosen target. Its
krsonality and identity are
(monologized in the obsessive
Vie of the anti-Semite carica-
nngthe Jew:
llsrael is the alien intruder in
region, the oppressor, the
pitaliM exploiter, the dis-
peritor of an indigenous Arab
lasantry and the agent of a
Tiister conspiracy to enslave the
(rid.
|Anti Zionism would be of less
ncern were it not evident that it
| now operating in a favorable
ternational environment.
Irhaps the most striking sign of
Is has been the mobilization of
fcird World nations against
rael in the name of a global,
(ti-imperialist front.
JNDER Communist leader-
pp and inspiration, the Jewish
bte has been presented to
Iveloping nations as a
|ngerous obstacle to the world-
de process of decolonization.
> doubt, if Israel does opt for an
A NEW ERA
in -Ko.snir
L, uteri ng
FOR ALL SOUTH FLORIDA
ClfttS UNlOUAUtD
(jfrMi/irr
'.. Cattniig lor JfOui
'.Vtdomg. (0, M,voh Rtcrplior.
Jiijo,....,i.ono| m,,,^, D.ooi or lunchten
< t, i,m,H. ttntmwm. n.o.v.m.
0*4* Tclrphon, 940 0197
reward S61-3S00
* expansionist policy, it will lend
credence to tr.is campaign.
No doubt, too, Third World
anti-Zionism has also been fueled
by the promise of petro-dollars
and is a side effect of increasing
Arab influence. But it is dis-
turbing that the flood of
defamatory anti-Zionist liter-
ature in Third World countries
has created the seeds of anti-
Semitism where it was previously
and Palestinian demands.
ANTI-ZIONISM in the 1970s
has been able to capitalize on the
general crisis of the international
economic and political system
and turn it against Israel. The
branding of the Jewish State as
"racist" by a majority of the
United Nations in November,
1975, would have been incon-
ceivable without this general
change in the international
political environment.
HUMAN RIGHTS

unknown. The stereotype of
Israel as an imperialist enclave in
the heart of the Afro-Asian world
gives a global resonance to anti-
Zionism which is decidedly
ominous.
Similarly, the link between the
Arab-Israeli conflict and the
energy crisis, as well as the issue
of detente between the super-
powers, gives anti-Zionists the
possibility of presenting Israel as
a major obstacle to world peace.
The dependence of the West on
Arab oil has led to a general
mood of inclining towards the
appeasement of extremist Arab
Throughout the centuries, anti-
Semites, like the chameleon, have
always known how to adapt their
colors to a changing environ-
ment. The crusade against Israel
has given them a wonderful
opportunity to re-emerge under
the cover of international respec-
tability and approbation.
The terminology may have
changed, but in its demagogy,
unscrupulousness an destructive
ambitions, contemporary anti-
Zionism has provided a new ideo-
logical framework for the
resurgence of anti-Semitism in
the post-1945 world.
'. and they say his income is in the Jackie Onassis marriage
bracket'' The Argus

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*.- ....*- I
Pag12
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday. June 16, m
Jewish Prayer Pennant Hoisted at Sea
Continued from Page 6
distribution to fleet snipe in late
1976, "there is not been an oc-
casion to use the Pennant until
now. said Kahn.
"This apparently stems from
the fact that only one percent of
the Navy is Jewish, and there are
so few Jews serving aboard any
one ship that it is not practical to
assign a Rabbi." he added.
AT THE present time, there
are only seven Rabbis on active
duty in the Navy, and they are
traditionally assigned to shore
establishments. Chaplain Kahn.
Rabbi of Congregation OR Ami in
Richmond, was on two-weeks
active duty with the Navy and
was one of 47 chaplains partici-
pating in Solid Shield 78 which
included more than 28,000 Army,
Navy and Marine Corps, and Air
Force personnel.
"I hope my experience aboard
ships in Solid Shield establishes a
precedent that will enable other
Rabbis to be assigned to ships,"
says Kahn. who is currently
serving as chaplain aboard the
amphibious landing ship dock,
USS Shreveport, during the two
week exercise.
"THE ROLE of a Rabbi
chaplain," says Kah, "is not just
to serve Jewish personnel.
Instead, he has a very important
function in any religious program
because of his training and back-
ground which enables him to be
superbly qualified to counsel,
conduct Bible studies, and preach
at religious services."
Aboard Shreveport, Chaplain
Kahn participates in televised
interfaith dialogues with
chaplains of other denomina-
tions, conducts daily Bible study
classes (the size of the class has
doubled since the first day), and,
by special request, he also
teaches a course in Hebrew. "I
don't have any teaching aides
with me, so I have to create them
as I go along," he said.
AS A civilian, Kahn is the
Rabbi at an experimental
synagogue in Richmond. "It's
called Creative Judaism," he
explained, "and it is the only one
of its kind in the world. Its
purpose is to get back to the
basics of the Jewish religion
which is to provide a person with
the ability to find salvation as a
Jew," says Kahn.
In his capacity as a chaplain
in the Naval Reserve, Rabbi
Kahn is a member of the Fleet
Religious Support Activity in
Norfolk, where he trains two days
each month. "It's great," he
says. "I conduct Jewish lay
leader classes as well as seminars
both at the Norfolk Naval Base
and at Fort Story in Virginia
Beach. I'm also trying to
revitalize the Jewish lay leader
program within the Atlantic
fleet."
Asked if he has considered
returning to active duty in the
Navy, Kahn said he might
consider it but only after his work
at the experimental synagogue is
complete.
Begin Proposal Under Sharp Attack
By GIL SEDAN
And YITZHAK SHARGIL
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Prime Minister Menachem
Begins peace proposals were
under sharp attack last week
from two former Labor Prime
ministers Golda Meir and
Yitzhak Rabin. Mrs. Meir spoke
in an hour-long interview on
Israel TV. Rabin spoke at the
the Jewish amnrnr cenib*
OF THE PALM BEACHES INC.
IS NOW ACCEPTING REGISTRATION FOR
our IOTIORR OTUNI7Y PRE-SOCOL
SEPTEMBER l*7R,7
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UMPER MONTH
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AVA^LARL**,TKO MeMi"*M,P *OU,", TRAHSPORTATIO*
S DC POSIT REGISTE R NOW AT tM-77M ..
THE JCC IS A BENEFICIARY
IRIS MURRAY, CHAIRPERSON
AGENCY
OF THE JEWISH FEDERATION OF PBC
REGISTRATION FORM
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IRTHOATE____
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ENCLOSED PLEASE PINDMY CHECK IN THE AMOUNT OP S__________
KINDLY ENROLL MY CHILD IN THE 1Wa,7 KEREN ORR PRE-
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KINDLY MAKE CHECKS PAYABLE TO:
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Ul S OlBtodMBea My*.. Wast Palm Baach. Fla. SMt*
Shiloah Center for Middle East-
ern Studies at Tel Aviv Univer-
sity.
Mrs. Meir, strongly defending
Israel's foreign policy during her
term as Premier, said that while
she had no reason to doubt
Egyptian President Anwar
Sadat's sincerity in seeking peace
with Israel, arrangements had to
be made for the defense of
Israel's borders in case Sadat was
replaced by a "less friendly"
leader.
FOR THAT reason, she said,
she objected to Israel's total
withdrawal from the Sinai and to
Begin's peace plan for the West
Bank. She contended that
Begin s plan for administrative
autonomy in the West Bank could
lead very easily to the creation of
a Palestinian state and was a
threat to the basic goal of a state
with a clear Jewish majority. She
commented "some people give
too little too late. Begin has given
too much too early."
Rabin asserted that the Begin
government had inadvertently
fallen into a trap and had agreed
substantially to withdrawal from
all Arab areas occupied after the
Six-Day War and to the estab-
lishment of a "Palestinian en-
tity" linked to the kingdom of
Jordan.
Rabin asserted that the
original U.S. goal was to seek a
peaceful solution in the Middle
East by mutual agreement with
the Soviet Union bat that Ameri-
can officials eventually realized
that the Soviets aim only at
fostering tensions.
RABIN SAID the Soviet aim
is to encircle Europe via the Mid-
dle East, which is Europe's
source of energy, and via Africa,
a major source of Europe's raw
materials. Rabin said the United
States has usually been on the
defensive in response.
Mrs. Meir said also that except
for Sadat's visit to Jerusalem last
November, nothing has changed
in the Egyptian policy toward
Israel. Calling Sadat's demands
for total Israeli withdrawal from
occupied areas an "ultimatum,"
Mra. Meir said there was cur-
rently no momentum in the Mid-
east negotiations.
She said her government had
never missed any opportunity to
negotiate with the Egyptians.
She said that when Israel sug-
gested, in the early 1970s, a
partial withdrawal from the Suez
Canal, at the initiative of then
Defense Minister Moshe Dayan,
the Egyptians offered nothing in
return.
' """-*
l!
Iff I
Naval Reserve Chaplain, Lt. (Rabbi) Bruce E. Kahn of Rich
mond, Va., salutes the national flag as he observes the hoistiiu
of the first Jewish Worship Pennant ever to be flown 6yi
United States Navy warship at sea. The event took place o*
May 19 aboard the amphibious command ship, USS Mounl
Whitney.
Two Israeli Fighters Collide;
Air Force Pilot Killed
TEL AVIV (JTA) An Israel Air Force pilot
killed last week when two Air Force planes collided i
mid-air over the Sharon Plain. Hia name was not disclo
pending notification of next of kin. An Air Force announceme
said the other airmen involved in the accident were safe.'
Air Force commander has appointed a special commission I
investigate the tragedy. The type of planes was not identified |
Dr. Jose A Torres M.D. PA\
Family Medicine
Announces the opening of his new office
Suite 500
500 Spanish River Blvd.
(Spanish River Plaza)
Boca Raton, Fla. 33431
Phone: 392-3877
House Calls Accepted
INTRODUCING
ravivA
nunoR;
B

mm
to
A Center for Skilled Nursing
Core and Rehabilitation ...
-------------- -- w w
WITH THE OPENING Of TH DOORS TO AVTVA MANC* SOUTH FlOtlWANS *Mjj
offered superi skilled nursing care coupleo with highly individuaiU
PATIENT PROGRAMS IN A TRULY LUXUR.OUS SETTING
PERHAPS MOST IMPORTANT WE HAVE THE EXPERIENCE THE DEVOTION AND U
IRlY INDIV,0,J*t *TMICH "ADS US TO PtOVlOE AN IDEAL ATMC
FOR THE PHYSICAL SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL WELL BFING Of OUR RESIDENTS
Ptow ll let* to Family Owned ft
Family Oparatad
STRICTLY KOSHER
"avivA nunon,
3370 Northwasf rty-$vnth T
LoudardoU Lakas, Florida 3M|
Talaphona: Iroword 73?


hy, June 16,1978
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 13
Mindlin
Court Decision Evokes Memory
Continued from Page 4-A
Lpreme Court's majority ruling
8t would give the police the
ht, in unexpected intrusions,
search out and seize evidence
rainst persons suspected of
riminal activity.
As traditional community
ratchdogs of government, news-
apers have tons of stuff relevant
) criminals and criminal activity
dch they gather through secret
iformers and other sources.
Investigative reporting is one
Complaint at UN
such source which, particularly
since the Watergate era, has be-
come a profession all of its own.
THE SUPREME Courts
ruling in effect strikes down the
newspaper's and the reporter's
First Amendment guarantee of
freedom from such searches and
seizures. If their sources of in-
formation about persons in high
places can not be protected, the
newspaper and the reporter are
henceforward effectively neu-
tralized as a watchdog of those
who would govern us, tyrannize
Continued from Page 1
eported seeing dismembered
odies lying in the street. "Like a
attlefield," one witness said.
three persons walking on the
fcdewalk were injured.
The American victim, Richard
frishman, had been a student at
University of Maryland
ledical School at Baltimore,
Ad., until last summer when he
lecided to come to Israel for two
ears before resuming his medi-
studies. According to Yediot
\chronot he was the son of Fred
fishman, a Federal Judge.
His father told Yediot that his
son had received a secular educa-
tion but adopted a religious life-
style at the age of 23 and became
strictly Orthodox. Judge Fish-
man was quoted as saying that
he had warned his son not to ride
buses in Israel, except in Jeru-
salem. According to Yediot, the
father was unhappy with his
son's plans to go to Israel be-
cause he believes Israel is a
dangerous place. "It may be
allright for people to run away
from certain countries, but not
for those who enjoy freedom as
we do," the newspaper quoted
the elder Fishman as saying.
FEDERATION BOARD APPROVES DISTRIBUTION OF
S2,052,fM FROM 1*71 CAMPAIGN
The Board of Directors has approved the distribution of $2,052,954 from
pledges raised in the 1978 campaign. The Budget and Allocations Committees
reviewed the requests of the local, national and overseas agencies and sub
mitied their recommendations to the Board for final review and approval.
Dr Richard Shugarman served as Chairman of the Budget Committee,
responsible for local agencies, and Rabbi Hyman Fishman chaired the
Allocations Committee which reviewed all national and overseas requests.
I. OVERSEAS
United Jewish Appeal $1,250,000
Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society 2,500
Eiras Torah Fund 50
American Israel Cultural Foundation 250
Federated Council of Israeli Institutions ______200
Total $1,253,000
II. NATIONAL HUMAN RELATIONS AGENCIES
American Jewish Committee
American Jewish Congress
B'nai B'rith Anti-Defamation League
Jewish Labor Committee
Jewish War Veterans
National Conference on Soviet Jewry
National Jewish Community Relations
Advisory Council
Synagogue Counc il of America
American Academic Association for
Peace in the Middle East
III. NATIONAL CULTURAL, EDUCATIONAL AGENCIES
Jewish Cultural Appeal
American Association for Jewish Education
American Jewish Archives
Dopsie University
Herziiah Jewish Teachers Seminary
Jewish Chautauqua Society
Jewish Theological Seminary
Reform Jewish Appeal
Yeshiva University
Jewish Telegraphic Agency
Fellowship in Jewish Education Leadership
IV. NATIONAL SOCIAL SERVICE AGENCIES
National Jewish Welfare Board
| Council of Jewish Federations
Media Service
B'nai B'rith Youth Service
North American Jewish Students Appeal
Jewish Braille Institute
Association of Jewish Family
& Children's Agencies
conference of Jewish Communal Service
2,350
1,200
2,150
400
350
350
850
200
500
Total 8,350
450
500
ISO
100
100
250
100
100
100
400
500
2,750
$1,400
500
400
400
300
150
V. REGIONAL SERVICES
B'nai B'rith Hiiiei Foundation
I of Florida
Central Agency for Jewish Education
of Miami
I VI. LOCALAGENCIES
J1ew!1!! F""'V Children's Service
Jewish Community Day School
Jewish Community Center
Jewish Federation Administration
Federation Campaign
|VII. JEWISH FEDERATION SERVICES
11.
h,
Total 3,200
6,350
350
Total 6,700
90,000
5.000
57,000
3*3,656
56,041
<
15
I6
17
Community Rotations Council
Floridian Newspaper
River Garden Horn* for
, Aged (Jacksonville)
Jewish Education Committee
Leadership Development
Mission Programs
Refugee Resettlement
Social Services
Mosaic TV Program
Public Relations Special Projects
Endowment Fund
Community Contingency Fund
1 *rael Independence Day
Loan
CAMP SHALOM
Maintenance
fapitai improvements
surance
Total 671,704
4,000
20.000
6,500
1,650
4,000
1,000
0,000
1,500
1,500
5,500
20,000
4,600
2,000
10,000
Total 90,250
1,000
5,000
4,000
Total '7-
over us, deprive us of our basic
rights.
This is serious business, and
the newspaper I once wrote for
has every right to be concerned.
But it is here interesting to note
that of the five justices who
voted for this abomination last
week, four are Richard Nixon
appointees.
This puts me on solid ground. I
have been an avowed Nixon
enemy since his daze in the Con-
gress of these United States.
HIS ASCENT to the
presidency horrified me, and his
performance in office fulfilled my
worst expectations of him.
(Should I say here that I don't
even know Alger Hiss?).
The Supreme Court blow
against the First Amendment
rights of a free press are only to
be expected of Nixon BDDointees.
This search-and-seize mania is
precisely the impulse that guided
Nixon's own career to its tur-
bulent conclusion at Casa
Pacifica what an absurd name
for an absurd one-time American
leader!
It is a mania whose legacy
Nixon left us all. It rattles like a
ball and chain around the ankles
of a nation already dazed and be-
numbed by Nixo manic fever
long after the man himself is gone
to his well-deserved exile, leaving
behind him suspicion and dis-
cord.
IT SPAWNED the latest High
Court decision. Others are yet to
come, and their grubby grafitti-
like handwriting is already on the
wall.
This is the stuff I warned
about in those columns I wrote
for that newspaper years ago.
This is the stuff to which they
took their editorial ax with little
gentleness of soul and less con-
cern for the First Amendment.
Richard Nixon was their hero
then, and so to hell with freedom
of the press for one single
columnist who didn't agree.
AND NOW, they've got the
gall to bemoan the fact that our
First Amendment guarantees are
being jeopardized by the Nixon
Supreme Court.
Now, they've got the gall to
declare in a column that it is "not
hard to imagine what Nixon,
never an admirer of the press,
might have done with a Supreme
Court doctrine allowing warrants
to search newspaper premises."
They contributed to the break-
ing of the First Amendment
guarantees by their relentless
championing of this alien from
humanity. Now, they are un-
settled by the seed.
I DO NOT recall this memory
here just to say "I told you so."
The paper to which I refer is
fierce and proud and just in its
concern for our First Amendment
rights, and I am equally proud of
their stand. But there is another
issue among us these days which
also slowly but inexorably links
its ball and chain about the na-
tion's ankle.
That issue is bilingual ism, and
it is not an issue "merely" in-
volved with the enforced teaching
of Spanish to "Anglos," a word I
detest as the contrapuntal warn-
ing to this twisted cultural
pluralism campaign.
Hi lingual ism is a political
bomb, as well. Still, there is
power to be achieved in its advo-
cacy, and so once again, the erst-
while Nixon comrade advocates
bilingualism when, in fact, it
ought now to be doubly measured
in its perceptions. Has not the
shortsighted Supreme Court de-
cision on freedom of the press
finally taught the lesson that the
lust for power and playing the
role of communal watchdog are
incompatible?
For more on this, another
time .
aJP* MMRI iMOei. a*.
KOSHER
H0TCL
RESERVE NOW FOR
HIGH HOLY DAYS
12 DAY SPECIAL!
Prominent cantor services
Oct. 1 to Oct. 12
ON THE OCEAN AT 19th STREET
MIAMI BEACH, FLA. 33139
MIAMI 538-7811
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Served from 5 to 8 P M
For Reservations Phone 1 "538*9045
29

The Bagel Break.
A lot has changed
since Poppa Lender
began baking bagels.
From a little local bakery
in Connecticut, Lender's
has grown to become
the only national bagel
bakery in America. But
one thing remains the
same. Lender's has
never broken with
tradition. The quality
and goodness is still
baked into every
Lender's Bagel. That's
because the Lender
Family is still running
the bagel bakery.
Now your landsleit
throughout the country
are taking a Lender's
Bagel Break. That's
because Lender's
Frozen Bagels are so
convenient for noshing
in plain, egg, onion,
and more. For breakfast,
lunch, snacksanytime
have a bagel break
with Lender's.
r'FREE!"
Here's a break on us
a FREE coupon. Enjoy!
Please send me a coupon lor a
tree bag ot Lender's Frozen
Bagels I'm enclosing my name
and address and 2 empty bags
trom Lender's Bagels Dupli-
cates or copies o'lhis lorm will
not be honored Limit 1 coupon
per tamily
Name_____________________
Address
City
State ___
iip-
Maii to Lender's Bagei BaKery
PO Box 181 Fan Haven Station
New Haven Conneclic.,l065'3
__I


Page 14
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, June 16,
Seasick
Rand Daily Mail
June Calendar
June 17
B'nai Torah Congregation Boco Raton Dinner 8 p.m.
June 18
Temple Beth Sholom Lake Worth Breakfast-9:30 a.m. 'Women's
American ORT Evening Picnic
Women Naomi 12:30 p.m. Temple Emanu-EI
June 19
B'nai B'rith
Sisterhood.
June 20
B'nai B'rith Women Menorah Board 10 a.m. B'nai B'rith
Women Tzedakah Board 8 p.m. Hadassah Henrietta Szold -1
p.m. Congregation Anshei Sholom -1 p.m.
June 21
B'nai Torah Congregation Women's Group Boca Raton 8 p.m.
JEWISH FEDERATION WOMEN'S DIVISION CAMPAIGN CABINET 8
p.m. Jewish War Veterans Auxiliary 406 1 p.m. Temple Beth
Sholom Sisterhood Board -10:15 a.m.
June 22
Hadassah Bat Gurion
June 24
Women's American ORT Party
June 25
Temple Beth El Social Sets Picnic 2 p.m.
June 26
B'nai B'rith Women Boynton Board 1 p.m. B'nai B'rith Women
- Naomi Board 1 p.m. Women's American ORT Palm Beach
Women's American ORT West Gate Board noon Hadassah -
Chai- 12:30 p.m.
June 27
B'nai B'rith Women Tzedakah 8 p.m. Women's American ORT-
Lake Worth Board Temple Beth El Executive 8 p.m.
June 28
JEWISH FEDERATION BOARD 8 p.m. Women's American ORT -
Century noon Pioneer Women Golda Meir Board Temple
Beth David Sisterhood 8 p. m.
June 29
Jewish Community Center Executive Temple Beth El Men's Club -
Board 8 p. m.
I
BE
* labbtmcal orntt
devoted to discussion of themes and issues
relevant to Jewish life past and present
v::
:::: co-ordinated by the
:;::: Palm Beach County Rabbinical Council
:::: Rabbi Hymon Fishman
Honor Thy Parents Year Round
Rabbi's Son, Son-in-Law Ordained
Rabbi Alfred L. Goodman of
Temple Israel, Columbus, Ga.,
recently observed as bis son,
Stephen Wise Goodman, and his
son-in-law, James D. Cohn, were
ordained as rabbis by Hebrew
Union College Jewish Institute
of Religion, the institution which
ordained him 33 years ago. The
ordination, by Dr. Alfred Gotts-
chalk, president of the college,
took place at commencement
exercises in Cincinnati's Isaac M.
Wise Temple.
Also witnessing the ceremony
was Mrs. Elizabeth Goodman
Cohn, wife of James Cohn and
sister of Stephen Goodman, as
well as Mrs. Rayna Goodman,
mother and mother-in-law of the
two ordinees, and Glen M. Good-
man, brother and brother-in-law.
Another member of the family
was on hand, too: Mrs. Dora
Goodman of Cleveland, now in
her mid-eighties, is the mother of
Rabbi Alfred Goodman and
grandmother of Rabbi Stephen
Wise Goodman.
Rabbi Cohn, whose parents,
Dr. and Mrs. Jess V. Cohn, reside
in Boca Raton, is a graduate of
Fort Lauderdale High School. He
did his undergraduate study at
New College of the University of
South Florida, majoring in the
humanities, and earned the
Bachelor of Arts degree in 1973.
By RABBI HYMAN FISHMAN
Temple Beth David
The custom of celebrating one
Sunday a year honoring father (in
June) and another honoring
mother (in May) has become an
American tradition. Is there a
parent that would not be dis-
Rabbi Fishman
appointed should a child forget a
card or some gift for these days?
Comedians have new subject
matter about the presents
received by Dad and Mom and
everyone, especially those com-
mercial establishments that cater
to these special days, is very
pleased. Another year has gone'
by, parents have been remem-
bered and business was good.
MY CONCERN is not neces-
sarily the commercialization of
these two days. I believe that on
the American scene all holidays
are commercialized. We tend to
buy gifts, cards, and spend all
kinds of monies trying to buy the
affection we should have, when a
kiss and a hug, repeated more
often, might be appreciated much
more.
How do Dad and Mom feel
when they are remembered on
these days and forgotten at other
times? How many lonesome
people live in this area whose
children live elsewhere and have
been put out of sight and mind?
In Judaism the fifth com-
mandment of Honor They Father
and Mother deals with 365 days a
year. This commandment was
considered so important that the
love and honor was to continue
not only in life and old age but
even after death.
THE ENTIRE concept of
Kaddish and Yizkor is based on
the fifth commandment. We are
even told when saying something
learned from our parents we are
to mention from whom it was
learned. Honor, respect and love
of parents are fundamental
teachings of Judaism and have
t
CANDLELIGHTING
TIME
7:56
11 SIVAN-5738
TV Highlights
Mosaic, the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County-
sponsored TV program, aired weekly over
Channel 5-WPTV on
Sunday mornings at 9:30 a.m.
jJu^lS Jewish Federation -
much to do with perpetuating it
throughout the ages.
Our neglect of this command-
ment may be the reason for many
of the problems that exist in
modern Jewish life. The family is
no longer the same unit it was
years ago. It no longer holds
people together and does not
transmit the Jewish heritage
from generation to generation.
Without a strong family unit
even the religious schools ai
unable to properly transmit A
love and understanding of ourl
people's faith.
The entire fifth commandment I
reads: "Honor thy father and I
they mother, as the Lord thy Gojl
commanded thee, that thy dayil
may be long, and that it may |
well with thee upon the lai
which the Lord thy God give
thee."
Synagogues in
Palm Beach County ^W
REFORM coNMvnwt wmi
TEMPLE ISRAEL TEMPLE ETERNAL LIGHT
1901 North Flogler Drive THE FREE SYNAGOGUE
West Palm Beach, Florida P.O. Box 3
33407 Boca Raton, Florida 33432
833-8421 368-1600 391-1111
Rabbi Irving B. Cohen Rabbi Benjamin Rosayn
Joel I. Levine Fridays at 8:15 p.m.
Associate Rabbi at: Boca West
Sabbath Worship Services Community UMC
Friday at 8:00 p.m. 8900 Boca West GLADES) Rd. 1
(1 Mile West of
TEMPLE mi FI M Boca Turnpike)
BOCA RATON
333 S.W. Fourth Avenue
Boco Raton, FI. 33432
391-8901
Rabbi Norman T. Mendel
Cantor Martin Rosen
Sabbath services, Friday
8:15 p.m.
at
CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION
ANSHEI SHOLOM
5348 Grove Street
West Palm Beach, Fla. 33409
684-3212
Rabbi Harry Z. Scheclman
Cantor Arthur B. Rosenwasser
Services: Friday 8:30 a.m.,
5p.m., 8:15p.m.
Saturday 8:30a.m., 6:30 p.m.
Daily8:30o.m., 7:00p.m.
CONGREGATION
BETH K0DESH
Boynton Beach, Fla.
732-5147
Sabbath Services
Friday at8:15 p.m.
Saturday at 9 o.m.
Congregational Church
115 N. Federal Highway
TEMPLE BETH EL
2815 North Flogler Drive
West Palm Beach, Florida
33407
833-0339
Rabbi Asher Bar-Zev
Sabbath services Friday at 8:15
p.m.
Saturday at 9:30 a.m.
Daily Minyan at 8:15 a.m.,
Sunday at 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
315 N. "A" St.
Lake Worth, Florida 33460
585-5020
Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg
Cantor Jacob Elman
Services, Mondays and
Thursdays
at 8:15a.m.
Friday at 8:15 p.m.
Saturday at9a.m.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID
Sabbath services, Friday at 8
p.m. i
At Westminister'Presbyterian
Church
'0410 N. Military Trail, Palm
Beach Gardens. 321 Northloke
Blvd., North Palm Beach, Fla
33408 845-1134'
i

Rabbi Hyman Fishman
Cantor Nicholas Fenokel
TEMPLE BETH SK0L0M
N.W. Avenue "G"
Belle Glade, Florida 33430
Jack Stateman, lay Leader
Sabbath services, Friday
8:30 p.m.
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB
275 Alemeda Drive
Palm Springs, Florida 33460
Sabbath services, Friday oi 81
p.m.
Saturday at 9a.m.
President Jacob Front%4-|
0034
Mondays and Thursdays at?I
a.m.
Services held at Faith United
Presbyterian Church, Palm
Springs
B'NAI TORAH
CONGREGATION
1401 N.W. 4th Ave.
Boca Raton, Florida 33432
392-8566
Rabbi Nathan Zelizer
Sabbath services: Friday 0
8:15 p.m.
Saturdays at 9:30 a.m.
TEMPLE EMETH of tk|
DELRAT
HEBREW CONGREGATION
5780 West Atlantic Avenue
Delray Beach, Florida 33446
276-3536
Morris Si Iberman, Robbi
Leonard Price, Cantor L
Sabbath services: Friday o"|
p. m. Saturday at 9 a.m.
Daily minyans at 8:45 o.]
and 5 p.m.
TEMPLE EMANUEL
190 North County Rood
Palm Beach, Florida 33480
832-0804
Cantor David Dardashti
Sabbath services, f<*1
8:30p.m.
Saturday at 9 a.m.


=lriday.J"!iii!!i

The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 15
Nazi Skokie March Set for June 25
CHICAGO (JTA) -
Che Skokie Village Council
bproved the permit sought
,V Chicago's tiny
/ationalist Socialist Party
o stage a march June 25 in
1977, a day after the Nazis an-
nounced plans to stage a march
in Skokie.
THE ORDINANCES require
applicants for marches to post
$350,000 in public liability and
AMERICAN SCENE
jburban Skokie, home of
1,000 Holocaust survivors.
But the Council also
Innounced it would file a
quest before the United
States Supreme Court for a
ay on the march, the Jew-
[h United Fund of Chicago
^ported.
A JUF spokesman said that
Ittomeys for the Skokie Village
Council were still working on
egal papers for submission to the
Supreme Court for an appeal
ram a ruling by the Seventh Cir-
uit Court of Appeals in Chicago
fhich held that the village could
ot ban the march.
The Skokie officials plan to ask
Dr a stay on the march pending a
tiling by the Supreme Court on
heir appeal from the Circuit
jourt ruling.
The Circuit Court cleared the
^ay for the march by declaring
nconstitutional three ordinances
dopted by the village on May 2,
property damage insurance.
Another bans demonstrations by
political party members wearing
military-style uniforms.
The third bans distribution of
material that incites hatred
against persons because of their
race, religion or national origin.
The Nazis have been represented
in the court actions by the
American Civil Liberties Union.
Whether the march will take
place on June 25 or any other
time in the near future remained
uncertain, despite approval of the
permit. Frank Collin, head of the
Nazi group, has said repeatedly,
in media statements, that his
Nazis would not march until all
court challenges have been
settled.
ASIDE FROM the appeal to
the Supreme Court planned by
Skokie Village, there are a
number of other prospective
court actions being planned. Sol
Goldstein, chairman of the com-
mittee on individual liberty and
Jewish security of the Public
Affairs Committee of the JUF,
filed with the Illinois Supreme
Court a request for a ban on the
proposed march on grounds it
would cause "grave physical and
emotional stress tor him and the
other Skokie survivors.
The State Supreme Court has
twice declined to hear Goldstein's
request and he plans to take an
appeal directly to the U.S.
Supreme Court. He expects to file
within the next week, the JUF
spokesman said.
Sandy Says:
Nazis Must
Not Have OK
To March
By SANDY DIX
Throughout the years since its
inception, the First Amendment
to our Constitution continues to
SANDY
Struggle Against Permit
Has Not Been Halted
JEWISH FAMILY AND CHILDREN'S SERVICE
An outstanding profer.: onal counseling ogency serving the Jewish
community of Palm &eo"h County Professional and confidential
help is available for
Problems of the aging Marital counseling
Consultation and evaluation services Parent-child conflicts
Vocational counseling Personol problems
^N
Private Officei: 2411 Okeechobee Blvd.
West Palm Beach, Fla. 33409
Telephone: 684-1991
Or
3200 North Federal Hwy. Suite 206-
Room 12, Boca Raton, Fla.
Telephone: 395-3640
Moderate fees are charged m family and individual counseling to
those who can pay (Fees aie based on income and family size)
I The Jewish Family and Children's Service is a beneficiary agency of
the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County.
CHICAGO (JTA) The
Public Affairs Committee (PAC)
of the Jewish United Fund of
Chicago, which is coordinating
the Chicago Jewish Community's
opposition to a proposed Nazi
march in Skokie, has rejected any
possible "deal" to enable the
Nazis to march elsewhere in the
area, Raymond C. Epstein, PAC
chairman, said here.
The PAC adopted unan-
imously late last week a
statement responding to recent
press statements by Frank
Collin, head of the tiny band of
Chicago Nazis, that he might
cancel plans to march in
suburban Skokie, home of some
7,000 survivors of the Holocaust
if the Nazis were allowed to
march in Marquette Park in
Chicago.
THE AREA has been the site
of confrontations between Blacks
and whites opposed to Blacks
moving into the area.
The PAC statement said that
the PAC, which represents 34
major Jewish organizations in
Chicago, "will not in any manner
condone, aid or abet the
promotion of Nazi or any
otherracist doctrine in Skokie or
any other community.
The PAC thus categorically
rejects any arrangement, agree-
ment or deal, tacit or otherwise,
which might imply consent to the
use of Nazi doctrine in any part of
the community against any
group." This was understood to
be a reference to Black residents
in Marquette Park.
The first statement said "we
cannot in good conscience permit
the pain of the Jewish com-
CHICAGO
munity to be transferred to other
targets of Nazi hatred to satisfy
either the whim or the fear of
local Nazi adherents. We shall
continue to join with all other
Americans of goodwill to fight
against Nazism and racism where
or whenever it appears."
THE OFFER by Collin to
cancel the Skokie march set for
June 25 was made contingent on
agreement aimed at banning the
march. State Senator John
Nimrod and Howard Carroll,
sponsors of the legislation,
rejected any agreement with
Collin.
Their two bills, which have
passed in the State Senate and
are before the House, would
empower local public officials to
deny parade permits for demon-
strations which would defame a
group because of race, creed,
color or religion or cause "reason-
able apprehension" or concern for
violence by display of quasi-mili-
tary uniforms.
stir controversy in America. It is
time that we finally place this
legislation in its proper perspec-
tive. The American Civil Liber-
ties Union has twisted out of all
proportion the reasonable inten-
tions of our Bill of Rights framers
with its simplistic defense of the
fanatic. Lately, Amendment One
has been abused by the ACLU
and others who spout its word on
behalf of American Nazis. To me,
the Nazi march through Skokie,
111., is not a civil liberties issue
but a direct affront to Jews
everywhere.
What do you say?
Ike Goldemberg, builder,
Surfs id*:
"True, such a march helps the
integral philosophy of racism
flourish. It is an affront not just
to Jews but to other ethnic
minorities and the fiber of demo-
cracy itself."
Linda Bog in, travel agent,
Miami Beach:
"Yes, it is appalling that such
an insult could be allowed at all."
t Frederick Jacobs, investor,
Miami Beach:
"I agree; this march should
never take place, as it only incites
riots and confrontation. For the
good of the community, Chris-
tians and Jews alike, it must be
stopped.
Rosetta Ehrlich, housewife,
Bay Harbor Island:
"I agree with that completely.
There are limits to which trouble-
makers should be permitted to
go. The rights of Jews living in
Skokie are to be respected too.
After viewing Holocaust on TV,
most Christians in the area would
agree too. Justice must be
tempered with mercy and free-
dom with judgment."
Refusenik Covered With Lice
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Recently-sentenced Prisoner of
Conscience Dr. Grigory Gold-
Telephone
1832-8423 / 4
Jewish Community Day School
Of Palm Beach County, Inc.
2815 N. Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach, Florida 33407
Is now accepting applications for
Pre-School-Full or Half Day
Kindergarten-Full Day
Grade l-Grade Vl-Elementary School
Grades Vll-VIII-Junior High School
Transportation throughout Palm Beach County
Admission Tests Required
k
13/ tpus'
stein of Tibilisi, a Jewish
emigration activist and member
of the Georgian Helsinki Watch
group, was "covered with lice,
and looked ghastly and
emaciated," his brother, Dr. Isai
Goldstein, who was permitted to
see him for 45 minutes through a
glass partition in a transfer
prison in Ryzan a few days ago,
reported.
According to the Student
Struggle for Soviet Jewry and
Union of Councils for Soviet
Jews, who received the news.
Grigory has been in transit to a
labor camp near Archangel since i
Mar. 24 four days after his
"parasitism" trial.
IN MOSCOW, the SSSJ and j
UCSJ said, six-year refusenik
Lev Gendin. who has already
spent over 130 days in various
retaliatory imprisonments, has
declared that "my turn has now
come to be the victim of the all-
devouring Molech the Soviet
Secret Police.
"Two cars of KGB men are
parked nearby home around the
clock. Four agents follow me,
never leaving me out of their
sight, among them men who have
harassed me since 1972 and those
who arrested Anatoly Sharansky
last year. But nothing will make
me give up my dream to go to my
historic homeland in Israel and
reunite with my wife Aviva."
Leningrad refusenik Alex*
Meikson, 22, has been forcibly
placed in a hospital by Soviet
authorities, the Long Island
Committee for Soviet Jewry has
learned.
OFFICIALS told him they
wanted to check if he indeed is ill
enough to avoid a punitive Red
Army draft, ignoring his medical
exemption certifying that he has
a hereditary blood vessel disease.
JEFFER '
FUNERAL HOMES. INC.
BMCTORS
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munMt m few *rt and itaoughoui
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A Beneficiary Agency of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
SHALOM tfeMOBTAL PJUW
Palm Beach County's
Only All Jewish C+m9fty
COMPLETE PRE-NEED ARRANGEMENTS
5061 Okeechobee Blvd.
W. Palm Beach, Fla. 33400
W. Palm-664-2277
Delray-427-3220


uje .u
Page 16
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Fridy, June
W.l8
Come in and get yxir
free grand opening gift
at V\tehington Federal^
newcfficein
In the Mini-Mall at 4766 OKEECHOBEE BOULEVARD
(At the intersection of Okeechobee Boulevard & Haverhill Road)
Unbeatable
Rates and
a BONUS
Gift* too!
FREE GIFTS available for deposits
in excess of $50. Many to choose from.
No gifts mailed. Limit one per family.
V4
**
6 MONTH CERTIFICATES
0/ MORE than the average yield on
/O US.Tk^MuryBills.Compounded
Dally. Minimum $10,000.
SAVINGS CERTIFICATES
(Mtfwmjm deposit $1,000 Interest compounded deity)
ANNUAL YIELD TERM ANNUAL RATE
8.33% 8 YEARS 8,
8.06% YEARS 7.
7.79% 4 YEARS 7,
6.98% 30MONTHS6,
6.72% IJMONTHSg,
5.92% 3 MONTHS 5,
00%
,75%
50%
75%
50%
75%
AJJ *OMt special rates on Savings
Certificates of $100,000 and over.
A substantial interest penalty is required tor
early withdrawals from all Savings Certificates.
SAVINGS ACCOUNTS
5 2 ^% /n per annum 'merest compounded from
^ ** W ^y of deposit to day of withdrawal.
10 J3-0 Annual Yield) Minimum deposit of $50 to earn interest
witnarawals can be made any day without loss of interest.
Washington Federal
Convenient Offices
serving you In
Dade, Broward and
Palm Beach
Counties.
In the Mini-Mall 4766 OKEECHOBEE BOULEVARD, WEST PALM BEACH Phone: 686-7770
HOURS / Lobby: 9:00AM- 3:30PM / Walk Up: 9:00AM- 4:30PM Ij^Be-J V^fc
JACK D. GORDON. President. ARTHUR H. COURSHON. Chairman of the Board
LTeNDbS


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