Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
8 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 28, 1975)-v. 8, no. 40 (Dec. 17, 1982).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 2, 1976 called v.2, no. 22, but constitutes v.2, no. 1.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: July 28, 1978 called no. 14 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement; Aug. 25, 1978 called no. 16 in masthead and no. 17 in publisher's statement; Aug. 10, 1979 called no. 15 in masthead and no. 16 in publisher's statement; Oct. 22, 1982 called no. 31 in masthead and no. 32 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44607504
lccn - sn 00229550
ocm44607504
System ID:
AA00014311:00170

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
lewisti floridian
OFPALMBEA CH COUNTY
Combining "OUR VOICE" and "FEDERATION REPORTER"
* con,unction with The Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
Jumber 11
Palm Beach, Florida Friday, June 2, 1978
Price 35 Cents
ael Fumes As Senate Jets Sale
Jewish
lers
igered
FRIEDMAN
IK (JTA) -
Jewish
is reacted with
jnt over the
[support for
ter's proposal
warplanes to
ludi Arabia.
sed the danger
Is security,
the sale of the
Saudi Arabia,
Senate action
ick to Middle
forts.
IFERENCE of
Major American
Bi/.ations. in a
ed by its chair-
Schindler, said
^resident to make
that supplying
the two Arab
[ild encourage the
deration' in the
[and promote the
l Now it is up to the
ping Egypt back to
fcg table and to win
[support of Saudi
renewal of peace
lat Secretary of
jld Brown, in a
L'ttcr to the Senate
itions Committee,
pdis would use their
Bnsive purposes only,
ients Conference
\t "President Carter
himself and his
the White House to
it ion that the F15
pied on Page 12
Weizman
In Gov'
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Defense Minister Ezer Weizman
has denied that there has been
any change in the government's
land policy on the West Bank.
Addressing the Knesset's
Foreign Affairs and Security
Committee, he referred to reports
in both the Israeli and local
Arabic press that the govern-
ment is planning to confiscate
land owned by West Bank Arabs
living abroad in order to enlarge
Jewish settlements in the oc-
cupied territory. Some sources
said certain lands were already
seized.
WEIZMAN did not elaborate
on those reports except to say
they were incorrect. But a
Military Government officer has
been appointed "to check the
allegations that there has been a
change in policy." The Israel
Lands Administration, which is
responsible for administering
Denies Any Change
t West Bank Policy
State-owned land, claimed the
only change has been to crack
down on misused or forged
powers of attorney assigned to
West Bank Arabs by relatives or
friends who have taken up
residence in foreign countries.
Hitherto, the absentee owners
were recognized as the legal
owners of the land provided that
they were not living in Arab
countries. Those who have fled to
Arab lands were considered to
have abandoned their property
and it was taken over by the
State.
Members of the Knesset
committee were critical of the
government's land policies,
mainly because they seem in-
consistent and confused. Yosef
Tamir, a Likud MK, demanded
that the government make clear
decisions on land matters, make
them public and stick by them.
HE CHARGED that with
respect to land, there were now
three "governments" the
democratically elected one, the
"right wing group which distorts
the process of reason by which
the government should abide,"
an allusion to the militant Gush
Emunim, and the left wing
which, he charged, is blowing up
the issue out of proportion to the
detriment of Israel's image
abroad.
The reports of a change in
government land policy coincided
with reports that the Defense
Ministry is considering the large-
scale expropriation of Arab land
to increase the acreage of Gush
Emunhim settlements around
Jerusalem and in Samaria.
Deputy Defense Minister
Mordechai Zipori visited the
Gush settlements last week and
reportedly promised them to look
into their needs.
'Negative
Turning Point'
-Begin
By DAVID LANDAU
And YITZHAK SHARGIL
JERUSALEM (JTA)
A gloomy Israel began
to assess the damage
military and political
done by the 54-44 Senate
vote that opened the way
for the supply of advanced
U.S. warplanes to Saudi
Arabia and Egypt as well
as to Israel.
Prime Minister Men-
achem Begin termed it
"definitely a negative
turning point from the
standpoint of Israel's
defense."
DEFENSE circles said the
American decision will have
adverse effects on Israel which
would now be compelled to
devote special attention to a
possible aerial threat from Saudi
Arabia where no such threat
existed before. Defense Minister
Ezer Weizman was quoted in
Maariv as saying that Israel
fought against the planes deal,
and "I hope we shall not have to
fight against the planes."
Shimon Peres, leader of the op-
position Labor Alignment, said
"It's a sad day in Israel-U.S.
relations." He noted that "It was
the Senate, not the Admin-
istration that voted against us,"
implying that Israel's traditional
strong support in that body was
seriously eroded.
"THE SENATE voted on a
Continued on Page 11

in Appeals to Carter
forrect Mideast Balance
JCC Seniors to Pay Tribute To
Sam Schutzer on his Birthday
?AVID LANDAU
^LEM (JTA) -
iMenachem Begin has
[personally to President
k> correct the military
If power in the Middle
It Israel believes has
i its disfavor as a result
I.S. decision to sell ad-
rarplanes to Egypt and
Tibia.
letter to Carter, the
I expressed his govern-
pismay over the aircraft
deal and asked for
[apparently in the form of
>nal sophisticated
'for Israel.
LETTER followed a five-
Pabinet session devoted
[to the implications of the
Vs sales to the Arab
fs as well as to Israel. The
decided to press the U.S.
Prime Minister Menachem
Begins illness forced post-
ponement of the Cabinet meeting
scheduled for Sunday that was to
begin discussion of the questions
posed by the United States
regarding Israel's peace plan.
It was indicated, however, that
the discussions would probably
require more than one Cabinet
session before the answers are
formulated.
Egypt has submitted new
Middle East proposals to the
United States calling for the res-
toration of Jordan's West Bank
to King Hussein's government,
reportedly appearing in a Cairo
publication. ________^^
for long-term "compensation."
Observers here expect Defense
Minister Ezer Weizman to go to
Continued on Page 11
By JEAN RUBIN,
Coordinator, Comprehensive
Senior Service Center
Jewish Community Center
Sam Schutzer, a resident of
West Palm Beach for 54 years,
will be 90 years young on July 4.
The Tuesday Club of the
Jewish Community Center will be
making him a birthday party on
June 13 and will pay tribute to
this outstanding leader and
organizer of the Jewish Com-
munity of Palm Beach County as
well as in the West Palm Beach
Community. The Ruth Hyde
Group consisting of Lee Duchin,
Ann March, and Ruth Hyde will
present an original program
which will depict his life in
narrative and song.
SAM Schutzer was the
publisher and editor of the only
Jewish Newspaper Our Voice in
Palm Beach County for 42 years,
the first issue being December,
Sam Schutzer
1932. Our Voice reported events
and offered comment on local
Jewish activities. Mr. Schutzer
gathered and wrote the news,
designed the layouts and even
delivered the fine paper for free.
Sometimes he didn't make
enough on the advertisinng to
cover the cost of printing.
"It was a labor of love," he
said simply. Sam Schutzer
published the only Jewish
newspaper in Palm Beach County
for 42 years and on Jan. 16,1975,
Our Voice was "put to bed". It
was merged with the Jewish
Federation Reporter and ex-
panded to the present day Jewish
Floridian.
But Sam Schutzer was more
than an editor. He was a builder
as well. Born in Austria, he
arrived in the United States with
his family at the turn of the
century. They settled in the lower
east side of New York City and
later moved to Newark, N.J.
HIS formal schooling extended
to the sixth grade. He entered the
jewelry business as an errand boy
Continued on Page 3


Page 2
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, June 2,1978
With the # (
Organizations
presented a
NATIONAL COUNCIL
OF JEWISH WOMEN
The Palm Beach section of the
National Council of Jewish
Women installed new officers for
1978-79. who include:
Lila Seidler. president: Gert
Pesacov. vice president com-
munity services: Marcia
Chauncey. vice president mem-
bership; Ann Madier. vice presi-
dent public affairs: Bea Claar.
vice president ways and means:
Edith Wiesenberg. recording
secretary; Tita Kukoff. corres-
ponding secretary-: Marilyn
Goldman, financial secretary:
Martha Nadehnan. treasurer:
Sheila Stark and Rita Sher. two-
year directors: and Rozanne
Rubin and Doris Singer, one year
directors.
Scanley Nelson
fashion show.
UNITED ORDER
OF TRUE SISTERS
A meeting of the United Order
of True Sisters. Palm Beach
County 61. will be held on Mon-
day. June 12 at Holiday Inn.
TEMPLE EMETH
The June meeting of Temple
Emeth Singles will feature a
guest artist who will donate one
of her paintings. This meeting
will take place on Monday. June
12 at 1 p.m. at the temple in Del-
ray Beach. All mature singles are
invited.
CONGREGATION
BETH KODF.SH
The Sisterhood of Beth Kodesh
Congregation of Boynton Beach
held its installation of officers for
".9TS-79 at a luncheon at Ber-
nard's on Wednesday. May 31.
CONGREGATION
ANSHEISHOLOM
The Men's Club of Congre-
gation Anshei Sholom of Century
Village will hold a board meeting
on Monday. June 5 at 1 p.m At
the regular meeting on Sunday.
June 11. at 10 a.m. Joe Turoff
and his Merry Minstrels will
perform. Breakfast will be ser-
ved.
PIONEER WOMEN
The Golda Meir Club of
Women will hold a white
at sale on the premises of
the Atlantic Bank. Okeechobee
Boulevard on Sundav. June 4. all
dav.
The dub will hold a mem-
bership tea at the home of Rose
Winter on Wednesday. June 7 at
12:30 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID
Temple Beth David of North
Palm Beach County, will hold its
annual installation brunch on
June 4 at 10:30 a.m. at the Hilton
Hotel. Singer Island. This is a
joint installation of both the
Temple Board and Sisterhood
Board.
The officers to be installed are
as follows: Temple: President.
Howard Debs: Vice President.
Leonard Gilman; Treasurer.
Gary Samwick: Financial
Treasurer. Fred Berk: Secretary.
Anne Sloop: Corresponding Sec-
retary. Lynn Klinger: Fund
Raising. Leonard Miller: Ritual.
Marsha Wahrman. Publicity.
William Katz: Education. Jack
Kaplan: Membership. Dr. Stuart
Wanuck: Housing. Leon Sch-
wartz; Bulletin. Sheila Debs:
Sisterhood: President. Thelma
Miller. Program. Debbie Gilman
and Merry Kaplan: Membership.
Deena Gordon and Barbara
Stoker, Wavs and Means. Louise
Ross and Sheila Debs: Youth.
Rene Bassuk and Rosalee Bain:
Corresponding Secretary. Karen
Wanuck: Financial Secretary.
Shirley Forstein: Treasurer.
Marilyn Samwick: and Sec-
retary. Rose Davis.
HADASSAH
The Tikvah group of Hadassah
installation of officers included
Frances Rose, president: Jeanne
Raskin. Martha Sheffrin.
Florence Steckman. Ida
Shumsky and Ruth Stein, vice
presidents: Frances Yaeger.
treasurer: Sarah Euman. finan-
cial secretary: and Rose Novick
and Leah Liebman as recording
and corresponding secretaries.
Terry Rappaport was install-
ing officer and entertainment was
provided by The Goldalkrs.
A Tikvah re-evaluation
meeting will take place Monday
June 19 *at Temple Anshei
Sholom at 12:30 p.m. The next
board meeting of Tikvah will take
place Thursday. June 8 at
Chatham E-119 at 10 a.m.

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First Marine
National Bank and Trust Company
582-564'
114 NO. "J" STREET
LAKE WORTH. FLORIDA
Member F.D.I.C.
Shalom Hadassah is
ing its second annual
sponsor-
four-day
Thanksgiving weekend. Nov. 23-
26. at the kosher Algiers Hotel.
Miami Beach. Call Flora Sch-
wartz or Bea Breslow.
At the Florida Region Con-
ference. Shalom achieved the
maximum number of ribbons
awarded. It also earned the Silver
Bowl, along with two Palm Beach
County Hadassah sister groups.
At a recent Tamar Hadassah
meeting held at the Ramada Inn.
the following officers were in-
stalled by Ann Hopfan. president
of the Palm Beach chapter:
Frances Freiman. president;
Rhoda Meister. treasurer:
Martha Pincu. program vice
president: Irene Burns, fund
raising vice president; Florence
Cooper, membership vice presi-
dent; Matty Burton, education
vice president: Molly Rosenberg,
corresponding secretary; Vera
Tittler. recording secretary; and
Rosa Ginsberg, financial sec-
retary.
FREE SONS
OF ISRAEL
Free Sons of Israel Palm Beach
Lodge 221 elected the following
officers to serve for 1978-1979:
Louis Dickstein. president:
Ben Weingard. first vice presi-
dent: Mac Rosenthal. second vice
president: Robert Keuis. finan-
cial secretary: Ann Davis,
recording secretary:
Clara Title, treasurer: Edward
Kaplan and Joe Katz. tylers:
Milton Gootbkut. chaplain: May
Streiter. three year trustee; and
Milton Livingston, honorary past
president.
Formal installation will be held
at meeting of Sept. 21.
WOMEN'S
AMERICAN ORT
The North Palm Beach chapter
of Women's American ORT will
sponsor a dinner-dance at the
home of Dr. and Mrs. Robert
Burger in North Palm Beach on
June 24. The event will feature
gourmet dining, disco dancing, a
live orchestra and floor show. For
reservations, contact Harriet
Fine in Palm Beach Gardens. For
further information call Enid
Kaufman or Cecile Golden.
Women's American ORT. Cen-
tury chapter will meet on Wed-
nesday. June 7 at 1 p.m. at
Temple Anshei Sholom. Follow-
ing the installation of new of-
ficers by Shirley Traum. national
vice president of programs, will
be the entertainment by Mildred
Birnbaum and the "Musical
Clefs. A card party will be held
in June.
The 17 chapters comprising the
Palm Beach Region of Women's
American ORT. Delray. held
their annual Honor Roll Lun-
cheon recently at the Breakers
Hotel. There were 525 people
present at the kincheon. 60 of
which were members of the
Delray chapter and their six
guests.
Guest speaker was Nathan
Gould. national executive
director of Women's American
ORT Eleanor LaForge was
accompanied on the piano by
Warren Broom*
DEBORAH HOSPITAL
FOUNDATION
The next meetaig of Deborah
Hospital Foundation is scheduled
for Wednesday. June 21 at 12.30
pjn. at the Salvation Army Cita-
del A strawberry festival is
planned
TEMPLE BETH EL
OF BOCA RATON
Temple Beth El Brotherhood
w* hold a hoakfait meeting
Sunday. June 4. together with
Southeast Florida Brotherhood
Federation There wal be no other
ptugiam.
Tenpk* Beth El Brotherhood
wffl hold a breakfast meeting, for
membtn only, on Jmae 25. That
wJ be a huw marine wKh a
program to be developed for that
group. Contact Morty Hentunger
for reservations.
B'NAI B'RITH
Frank Kessler, chief of the
appellate division of the Palm
Beach County Public Defense
Office, was elected president of
the Palm Beach Lodge 1146,
B'nai B'rith, at its dinner
meeting at Temple Israel.
Others elected were: Gary
Zwickel. Shep Lesser and Marty
Colin, vice presidents: Edward
Fine, secretary; and Everett
Stone, treasurer.
President Kessler announced
that a picnic is planned for June
with the date being set later.
B'NAI B'RITH WOMEN
B'nai B'rith Women Mitzvah
Council's newly installed officers
are:
Freda Bompey of Boynton
Beach, president; Shirley Bloom
of West Palm Beach, admin-
istrative vice president; Rose
Rosen of Delray Beach, member-
ship vice president: Raye Fein-
stein of West Palm Beach, pro-
gram vice
Marks of Palm Beach Garden/
president; Bett'
i
fund raising vice president;
Estelle Bauman of West Palm
Beach, communications vice
president: Ethel Kaplan of Boyn.
ton Beach, corresponding sec-
retary ; Helen Sickennan of West
Palm Beach, recording secretary
Helene McCauley of Palm Beach
Gardens, financial secretary; and
Sophie Dickson of West Palm
Beach, treasurer.
Installing officer was Ruth
Wallace of Daytona Beach, chair-
man of B'nai B'rith Women
Southcoastal Region.
Awards were presented to the
Council and members by Ruth
Goldberg, executive director of
B'nai B'rith Women South-
coastal Region. Ruth Hyde, Anne
Marsh and Lee Duchin of West
Palm Beach entertained.
Mitzvah Council is made up of
the six B'nai B'rith Women's
chapters in Palm Beach County
Boynton Beach, Masada
chapter, Medina chapter,
Menorah chapter, Naomi chapter
and Ohav chapter.
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Lfcy.June2.1978
TheJewishFloridian of Palm Beach County
Page 3
First Comprehensive Guide To
Jewish Endowment Funds Published
NEW YORK The first
Jomprehensive manual in the
Kwish philanthropic field on
Indowment fund development
Ls been published by the
|ouncil of Jewish Federations for
te by constituent Federations in
he United States.
Endowment funds have
lecome an increasingly critical
nancial resource for Federations
I support high standards of local
fcrvice while responding to the
tntinuing series of crises abroad
luring the past decade.
THE NEW CJF guidebook
iovers all aspects of endowment
Irogramming local,
Irganizational and operating. It
' targeted to the needs of smaller
communities, but provides key
information for effective en-
dowment fund development in
every community.
CJF President Jerold C.
Hoffberger has stated that en-
dowment funds represent the
"sustaining reservoir for
Federation's future." In his
keynote address at the last CJF
General Assembly, he said that
aiding local Federations in
establishing or expanding their
endowment funds must be a high
priority area of activity for the
Council.
Options for endowment
programming which can be best
adapted to the resources of
smaller cities are emphasized in
the new CJF manual. These
ICC Seniors to Pay Tribute To
Sam Schutzer on his Birthday
options are Letter of Intent,
Philanthropic Funds, bequests
and life insurance policies.
THE Letter of Intent is a
statement expressing the in-
tention of the signers to con-
tribute in some form to the
Federation endowment fund.
The Philanthropic Fund is a
gift creating a named fund for
which the donor or those
designated by him may make
periodic recommendations
regarding the distribution of
capital or income, subject to the
approval of the Federation.
Federations in the United
States and Canada currently hold
a total of approximately $75
million in Philanthropic Funds,
out of a grand total of nearly $300
million in endowment funds.
BEQUESTS and life insurance
policies are traditional and well-
known endowment fund options.
The Council's manual provides
detailed explanations of these
options, along with tax and legal
considerations. Also included are
guidelines for organizing an
endowment program through a
committee structure consisting of
various operating committees.
The handbook is largely a
response to a new and growing
interest on the part of smaller
communities in initiating en-
dowment programs. It was used
as the basis for the first seminar
for smaller cities on endowment
development at the recent CJF
Quarterly Meeting in New York.
Chaired by Norman A. Sugar-
man, chairman of the Council's
Endowment Development
Committee, the meeting was
attended by 36 representatives of
27 Federations.
SIXTEEN of those cities
are now actively planning to initi-
ate endowment funds. Others are
expected to follow. The manual
has been made available to
presidents, executive directors
and Endowment Committee
chairmen of smaller cities. For
further information, contact CJF
Consultant Louis A. Novins or
Nathan Weisman in New York.

Alexander Myers
Myers Installed As
Beth El President
Alexander (Sandy) Myers was
recently installed as president of
Temple Beth El.
Myers served for several years
on the Board of Trustees and on
the temple's executive com-
mittee.
He was born in Brooklyn, N.Y.
He received his BA degree in
journalism from the University of
Denver in 1967 and his JD degree
in law from Stetson College of
Law in 1970.
He is now a partner in the law
firm of Christiansen, Jacknin &
Myers in Palm Beach.
Continued from Page 1
become vice president of the
International Jewelry Workers
pnion he helped to organize.
In 1924, he brought his wife
Tina and his two children to West
[aim Beach, planning to work in
his brother-in-law's hat shop. He
fescovered that the Jewish
ommunity gathered at the
Vomen's Club and was disap-
ointed to find only seven per-
|ons there. This was the
eginning of the impact Sam
chutzer was to make on the
Jewish community of Palm
each County.
He knew he had to do
|omething to bring the Jewish
ople together and that he did.
le organized Temple Beth
Bholom in Lake Worth and
temple Beth Sholom in Belle
blade. He played an important
Die in forming the local Chapters
tf B'nai B'rith, Hadassah and
B'nai B'rith Women. He even
pent as far as Fort Lauderdale
nd Fort Pierce to organize
ouses of worship as well as
elped to found Temple Anshei
Jhalom in Century Village.
FROM 1939-1959 he was the
executive secretary and director
of Federated Jewish Charities,
the predecessor of the present
day Federation, whose address
was the home of Sam Schutzer.
Over those years close to $1
million had been raised in Pahn
Beach County for the United
Jewish Appeal and other worthy
causes, from small group con-
tributors.
Upon his retirement he was
elected honorary secretary for
life. He put it in his own words,
"There wasn't a thing that
happened in the Jewish com-
munity that didn't come through
my fingers."
SAM Schutzer is an in-
spiration to all of us. Despite his
lack of personal transportation
(in the past as well as the
present) he is always present at
Friday night services, meetings
and various activities. He is
vitally interested in all that is
happening in the world today and
is always ready to share a joke,
sing a song, or tell a story. West
Palm Beach is indeed a richer
place because Sam Schutzer
passed our way. Happy birthday,
Sam!
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Page 4
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Terror at Orly
The latest attack at Orly Airport demonstrates to the
French, once and for all. that pandering to the Palestine
movement will not leave it immune from terrorism.
For the first time, even the French are angered not
for the reason that they have been betrayed in their hopes
for immunity, but for the reason that terrorism is an
attack on human decncy wherever it may occur and in no
matter what name.
Up until now. the French have paid only lip service in
their expressions of regret so long as terrorist activities
took place elsewhere.
But if we are particularly tough on the French here,
we must be tough on other nations, as well, all of which,
including our own, have been moved to do little more than
pay Up service to terrorist activities.
It is about time that the international community
took itself in hand to help put an end to terrorism once and
for all. That it does not do so stems from a number of
things, not the least of which is that the United Nations is
a capon whose business is controlled by the Communists'
and the Third World.
Both of these entities are. themselves, either actively
terrorist-involved or else utterly sympathetic to terrorist
aims and actions.
Another, and this one hits Uncle Sam the hardest, is
that to insist upon international terrorist restraints would
be to touch the core of the petrodiplomacy of the American
government.
Until we stop thinking greedily, and start thinking
humanely. Orly terrorist actions may be expected to
repeat themselves.
Keeping Our Rostrums Free
It is reasonable to believe that some people agree with
what Sen. Lowell Weicker had to say at a meeting of the
American Israel Public Affairs Committee in Washington
so far as the Carter Administration generally and the
President's National Security Adviser Zbigniew
Brzezinski. specifically, are concerned.
The amount of applause that greeted Weicker's
repeated allegations that Brzezinski is an anti-Semite
certainly supports this assumption.
On the other hand, it is also reasonable to believe that
others do not agree either with what he said or that
Weicker had a right to make of his AIPAC rostrum a
platform on which to air issues in what may best be
described as a "cheap shot" way.
The American Jewish community is in for a long
political battle with this Administration. The President
and his subordinates, including Brzezinski. have all
declared their support for the security of Israel. But as
Rabbi Israel Miller, interim president of the American
Zionist Federation, said recently, the Jewish community
wants not just the right words, but correct deeds. And
this has not been forthcoming.
But in seeing that the Administration does perform
these deeds, the just cause of Israel is done no service by
irresponsible name-calling against Administration of-
ficials either by Jewish officials or public officeholders who
use Jewish forums. The cause of Israel is too important to
sink to this level.
A Slur Against Jews
Our attention has been called to an advertisement in
the local press from the First Citizens Municipal Cor-
poration of Atlanta. Ga.. run during the recent Passover
holidays.
The ad. touting municipal bonds at a high tax free
interest rate, features a cartoon of a bearded and skull-
capped Jew holding what appears to look like a
Haggadah.
The punchline of this tasteless production reads:
"Don't Passover This Tax Free Investment."
We are appalled.
We consider this an affront to Jews and Judaism. Its
implications are rooted in the ancient canards of anti-
Semitism that only Jews are wise in the ways of money
and would be clever enough not to pass up the kind of
offer that the ad describes.
Political Anti-Semitism on Tap
Jewish Floridian
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In conjunction with Jewuh Federation of Palm Beach County. Inc
Combined Jewuh Input
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Stacev Lesser Secretary Brute Darnels. E.ect.ve Director Norman
Sch.melmar Submit material for publication to Ream TartMow. Director of Public
26 IYAR-5738
Number 11
A GOOD friend called over the
weekend to remark that surely I
was engaging in dramatic hyper-
bole in my last column when I
talked about "our coming
despair" and that, as Jews, we
are headed for "bitter times in
America."
I told him I was not. I honestly
believe this, or I would not have
said so. He was shocked, and his
reaction reminded me of two
instant cliches: the supreme self-
indulgence of the Jews of Ger-
many 'before the rise of Hitler and
the Sinclair Lewis satire. It Can't
Happen Here.
I DO NOT have in mind such
cynical instances as occurred in
the Florida State Legislature the
other day when Rep. Edmond
Fortune (D., Pace) and Sen.
Dempsey Barron (D., Panama
City) engaged in anti-Semitic
witticism about the jewfish, each
wondering "if the jewfish is
found around the bank."
Both men, apart from being
nauseous pork-choppers who
once again have their greedy
thumbs on the windpipe of South
Florida's (read Jewish) fortunes,
are classical bigots with a
penchant for unintelligence.
Particularly, when I think of
Sen. Barron, I think of a reptile
with the lidded eyes of its low
estate from which it is inex-
tricably bound never to rise by
the ill-fortune of evolution.
IS IT NOT Barron who, by his
shenanigans in the Legislature,
continues to doom South Florida
to automobile insurance no eco-
nomically middle class person or
lower can afford? Does Barron
not engage in these shenanigans
as a greedy, self-interested repre-
sentative of the trial lawyer's
breed who profit enormously
from inequitable rate structures
and immoral insurance practices?
Barron knows a thing or two,
then, about banks himself and
ought to feel quite comfortable
around jewfish reckoned in terms
of his own anti-Semitic frame of
reference.
But this frame of reference is
classical Christianity, and it is
not what will bring us upon the
"bitter times in America" I
talked about here last week.
WHAT I have in mind is a
political rather than a religious
anti-Semitism rooted in the
American Jewish community's
solid identification with Israel
even when Israel is no longer the
fair-haired child of American
political doctrine.
Political anti-Semitism is, of
course, rooted in religious anti-
Semitism which lost its
respectability for Christians
when Israel was reborn in 1948
against every Christian principle
that the Jews must remain
Mindlin
doomed to exile, wandering and
contempt until they accept the
Jesuitical messiah.
The rebirth shook Christianity
because it raised doubts about
the truth of this New Testament
dictum. There can be little dis-
belief that the ecumenism of the
1960's was a genuine first effort
on the part of Christians of good-
will to reconcile their dogmatic
faith concerning Jews, a faith
suddenly shown to be absurd,
with the realities of the Jewish
political renascence.
THE GROWING political iso-
lation of Israel these days, most
readily explained by petro-
politics, is now being seized upon
by old line religious anti-Semites
to revive their trust in their old
line religious dogmas.
Should Israel go down the
tubes, then they can believe that
they were never wrong from a
religious point of view in the first
place except perhaps to be
shaken briefly in their anti-
Semitic faith for which they can
say some mea culpas and be
quickly exonerated.
But the way to achieve this end
is through political manipulation,
not religious assault, and that is
why "our coming despair" will be
political in nature.
I HAVE in mind the recent
comment in a column by Garry
Wills (Universal Press Syn-
dicate) that some of the signs
that Jimmy Carter is finally
beginning to score a degree of
success in his administration
must include, among other
reasons. "the 'even-handed'
approach to the Middle East
(he has achieved) that other
Presidents yearned for, inef-
fectually, because of the political
importance of American Jews."
Or take Alaska's Sen. Mike
Gavel, who declared during the
course of the heated Senate
debate on the joint jet sale to
Israel. Egypt and Saudi Arabia,
a debate the administration won
and that anti-Israel forces
consider a major defeat for the
entrenched Israeli lobby":
Despite pressure from Jewish
constituents, his own vote. Gavel
said, was "the litmus test" for
Friday, June 2.1978
Volume 4
many Jewish individuals
groups. "This vote, if it j,
done properly, kisses away int
future all kinds of
(Jewish) support 1 thinJTt,
will be the watershed year a
Jewish influence in this country"
ALL THESE, and one can,
dozens to them, illustrate
principle well: warnings tn
allegedly politically
5S J.ewi9h commune
that the tide is turning aaSSj
- that the reassessment do*
reassessment downward of
American Jewish con
itself.
A man I detest on pr.^
Sen. George McGovern(D.^sl
spelled it out all too clearly wh,
he took to the Senate floor 1
debate the jet sale: "IsraelJ
most outspoken American 1
cates" better not get too
bunctioua "to the point wh
America loses its capacity
influence the Arab leaders^
toward the peace table
could set in motion a ba__
both in the Middle East and j
the U.S." (italics mine).
The irony here there
always irony in anti-Semitism
is that American Jewish politi
power is a myth, much
Dempsey Barron s story wb.
implication is that all Jews 1
rich, is a myth.
IF THE Nixon administrit_.
did nothing else, it proved thai/
President can be elected wit]
significant Jewish support
run a Judenrein administrati
without any mishap to him 1
than those he called down up
himself that had nothing to 1
with Jews as a source of all
political power.
Unless, of course, you taket
view that Watergate was a f
Jewish intrigue to dis
Nixon.
In fact, I will always reme
Richard Nixon for houndingIfcJ
Justice Fortas from the
leaving the U.S. Supreme 1
without a single Jewish me
the last before him ha
Mr. Justice Goldberg
who was asked by Presid
Johnson to resign to take
allegedly higher duties as
ambassador to the Un
Nations.
IN ORDER, after that. Nil
appointed Thurgood Marsh
Warren E. Burger as
justice, Harry A. Blackmu
Lewis F. Powell, Jr.. and Will
H. Rehnquist, leaving the I
Court as free of Jews as he 11
it when he hounded Fortas out j
Fortuitous? I don't
What single President in 1
years had the opportunity
make so many appointment* I
the Supreme Court? That '
fortuitous, but naming so 1
with nary a Jew among
when there was no other on I
bench after the shameful Foil
episode, that was not fortuiu
That was intentional
But Nixon's own twu
psyche apart, you call thisr
a record achieved with imp
Jewish political power?
YET THE myth of Je
political power persists,
does so increasingly these c
set up a strawman to 1
American Jews out of en
privilege they don't enjoy in
first place.
Look to Mein Kampf and i
aftermath. That testament
garbage was the ghost ship*
which Germany set forth
avenge "betrayals' comnw
against her in World War 1
it did so by taking from the i
the freedom allegedly to "'"
mine Germany's will
vengeance and'ultimate tnu
over Versailles.
The principle is the
Political anti-Semitism in/
ca will be the ghost ship'
keups the U.S. afloat onf"
foreign oil.


Friday, June 2, 1978
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 5
Past Accomplishments Not Enough
EDITOR: The Jewish Floridian,
My husband and I arrived in
1969 to spend our first winter in
Century Village. It was new and
beautiful and our people felt we
were entitled to rest and to leave
the solution of all the problems
to the younger generation. We
couldn't understand the great
changes taking place the
Hippies, the war, the divorces,
the intermarriages, the moral
values, etc.
Soon we realized that our
accomplishments of the past were
not enough to sustain us and
there was much still to be done.
We were Jews living among non-
Jews and we missed our
synagogues and organizations, so
the "workers" forgot about
retirement and went into action.
In those early days, it was no
easy task to inspire and en-
courage people to believe and
invest in dreams, but we suc-
ceeded far beyond our ex-
pectations.
WE have set a fine example for
other development and have
helped whenever possible to get
congregations started. Our
Anshei Sholom is known all over
for our outstanding attendance at
daily and Sabbath services. We
make visitors feel welcome and
for many it is a new experience to
come into a Shul.
Our Sisterhood is most
generous m providing refresh-
ments every Friday night, which
helps create a warm and friendly
atmosphere If the Christians can
spend millions of dollars to
convert Jews to Christianity we
must surely try to convert Jews
to Judaism with patience and
tolerance.
Over 300 senior citizens attend
education classes because of the
devoted efforts of Rabbi
Schechtman and the teachers.
Our Passover Yiskor donations
will help the Jewish Community
Day School provide scholarships
for needy children. Our Shevuoth
Yiskor donations will help the
Jewish Theological Seminary
provide scholarships for rab-
Poll Shows 'Holocaust' f!
Shed Light on Hitler Era
"Let Thy Words Be Brief
Koheleth lEcclesiastes)
binical students and future
Hebrew teachers.
THIS past season we sold
over $181,000 in Israel Bonds at a
time when Israel is fighting for
its life and needs our help.
May G-d grant all of us good
health and the will to keep
serving humanity because "We
shall pass this way only once."
SHIRLEY FLEISHMAN,
Founding Sisterhood President,
Anshei Sholom
| NEW YORK Three out of
every five viewers of the recent
television dramatic series
Holocaust feel that they un-
derstand better what happened
to the Jews under Hitler as a
result of the program.
The impact of Holocaust was
one of the major findings of a
viewer poll, which were made
public here at a news conference
in connection with the American
Jewish Committee's 72nd annual
meeting at the Waldorf-Astoria
Hotel. Richard Maass, president
of the American Jewish Com-
mittee, presided at the con-
ference.
MILTON Himmelfarb,
director of AJC's Information
I and Research Services, made
public the preliminary results of
the nationwide sampling. The
poll, commissioned by the
American Jewish Committee,
was compiled by the professional
polling firm of Response
Analysis, of Princeton, N.J.
Alfred Vogel, vice president of
the concern, gave a technical
analysis of the data compiled.
In reporting on the educational
effect of the drama series,
Himmelfarb pointed out that 59
percent of those polled said that
they understood better after
seeing the programs what the
Nazi persecution of the Jews was
all about.
Further, he declared, 85
percent of the viewers thought it
a good idea to remind Americans
of the Nazi persecutions and 72
percent thought it sensible to
teach children about the
Holocaust.
SEVENTY-SIX percent of the
viewers expressed the opinion
that the programs gave an ac-
curate picture of the Nazis'
treatment of the Jews.
Himmelfarb pointed to the
replies to a number of questions
as "indicating a humane, sen-
sitive and realistic attitude on the
part of most Americans on what
had happened to the Jews in
Germany, and on the possibilities
of similar occurences happening
elsewhere in the world today."

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Page 6
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, Jupe 2,1973
U.S. Jewry Cautioned Against Paranoia
NEW YORK The executive
head of the American Jewish
Committee cautioned the
American Jewish community to
moderate its "public paranoia"
and not to try to go it alone.
"We know very well that we
need friends and allies, but we
won't make friends or keep them
unless we moderate our public
paranoia," Bertram H. Gold,
executive vice president, stated
in his keynote address at the
Committee's 72nd annual
meeting here. "Certainly we must
stand firm on issues that are
important to us. But everyone
who disagrees with us is not
automatically 'the enemy,' and
every time we are called upon to
trade off one goal for another is
not the end of the world.
GOLD SPOKE two days after
the U.S. Senate had voted not to
block the Carter Administra-
tion's plane package deal, in
which the sale of planes to Israel
was joined to sales of planes to
Saudi Arabia and Egypt. The
American Jewish community in
large part has been highly critical
of the arrangement.
In a far-ranking talk on "What
is Troubling American Jews,"
Gold gave particular attention to
"dissent," which he said was
creating the gravest amount of
strains and tensions.
He told his audience, made up
of delegates from across the U.S.,
that American Jews, on the basis
of surveys taken by the Com-
mittee, seemed to hold few
qualms about dissenting from
various American policies, in-
cluding those affecting Israel.
Predicting that if the general
American public were to perceive
American interests and Jewish
interests to differ, the American
Jewish community could rn-
ticipate increased attacks on
Jewish lobbying efforts.
"IT WILL be our job," he
continued, "to point out that
ethnic lobbying is as legitimate
as business lobbying, union
lobbying, regional lobbying,
veteran lobbying, aged lobbying,
and any other kind of lobbying.
The truth is that ethnic lobbying
has always played a far greater
role in the rpyl""g American
foreign policy than those who run
our foreign policy are willing to
admit. So we do not, and should
not, hesitate to dissent and to
criticize American foreign policy
when we disagree with it."
Gold went on to say that the
American Jewish community
seemed "less surefooted" when
public dissent from Israeli
policies were involved.
"I am equally disturbed," he
added, "by those who view any
dissent from Israeli policy as
treason," and by those who
consider such dissent
'courageous' and 'heroic' Both
groups perceive the American
Jewish community as rigid,
controlling, and monolithic. And
such a perception and, if there
is any substance to it, such a
reality must be thoroughly
resisted."
"What is important," he
stated, "is that the American
Jewish community is unified in
its essential support for Israel.
We're Not Clear On
Our Need of Israel
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) In the opinion of
several former American
military and diplomatic
leaders, the Carter
Administration and many
Americans in general do
not adequately appreciate
Israel's strategic value to
the United States and its
contributions to American
intelligence gathering
agencies.
Those views were ex-
pressed here by former
Undersecretary of State
Eugene Rostow; former
Ambassador William
Kintner; Adm. (Ret.) Elmo
Zumwalt, former Chief of
Naval Operations; and
Maj. Gen. George F.
Keegan, former Chief of Air
Force Intelligence.
THEY participated in a
discussion of current U.S. policy
in the Middle East and the Soviet
threat to that area at a sym-
posium sponsored by Foreign
Policy Perspectives, a Boston-
based group that ""JM U.S.
involvement in international
affairs.
Two other participants. Lt.
Gen. (Ret) Arthur S. Collins.
former deputy commander in
chief of the U.S. Army in Europe
and Lt. Gen. (Ret.) Benjamin O.
Davis, former deputy commander
of the U.S. Air Force Strike
Command, expressed views in
favor of the Administration's sale
of F15 aircraft to Saudi Arabia, a
project roundly condemned by
the others.
Kintner. who is director of the
Foreign Policy Research
Institute in Washington, and
served as moderator, described
Israel as "a strategic asset in a
region necessary in defense of
NATO" and as "an offset to
Soviet military power" there.
"LOTS of Americans look at it
(Israeli as a net strategic loss,"
he said. "They are unwilling to
recognize the strategic advantage
from our association with Israel
even though at times it presents
challenges and difficulties such
as coming to Israel's support in
the Yom Kippur War."
Zumwalt said the U.S. is in-
capable of successful military
activity in the Middle East
without Israel's support. He
pointed out that only the threat
and for safe and secure boun-
daries that go beyond minor
rectifications' in 1967 borders^
and is overwhelmingly opposed
to an independent Palestinian
state It is only within this vast
consensus that differences exist.
GOLD SAID that this greater
unity had stemmed from the
American Jewish community s
new consciousness 01
peoplehood" and "the needs of
Israel" and that "this in turn
created pressures for the con-
centration of power in fewer
sources."
"But a unified Jewry does not
call for a single voice or a single
power center," Mr. Gold con-
tinued. "Changing Jewish needs
and aspirations have led to
changing functions of Jewish
organizations."
Yet, he added, "the seamless
nature of Jewish needs makes all
its components interrelated, and
the so-called purity' of
'scrupulousness' of
organizational purpose is no
longer if it ever waa viable
There is no one 'right' person in
the Jewish community to meet
with the President of the United
States, and no one 'right'
organization to concern itself
with the quality of Jewish life."
GOLD EXPLAINED to the
delegates that the American
Jewish Committee had recently
polled 1,100 American Jews from
across the U.S. as to what was
concerning them most u
Americans and as Jews. The
survey found two kinds of
worries, he reported:
t About external security, as
evidenced by the existence and
survival of Israel, fear of crime
inflation, and threats of an anti-
Semitic revival;
About internal security -
the Jewish family, Jewish
identity, and the quality of
Jewish life.
"The worries are deep and
pervasive," he added, "yet Jews
are not pessimistic. Two-thirds of
those interviewed said they were
optimistic about the future of the
American Jewish community."
of Israeli intervention stopped
Syria from attacking Jordan in
1971 when King Hussein was
battling Palestinian terrorists.
KEEGAN challenged the
Pentagon's description of the F15
warplane as a "defensive
weapon." He called that
description "one of the most
misleading" statements the
Pentagon has ever made. He
denounced the President's air-
craft package as injudicious
because it has the effect of
weakening Israel and thereby is
detrimental to U.S. interests.
But Davis observed that Saudi
Arabia, which will receive 60
Fl5s in the package endorsed by
the Senate Monday, is "pro-
West" and the package, he said,
will allow Israel to retain military
superiority in the area. Collins
said the U.S. could not have
supplied Saudi Arabia with
aircraft of lesser quality because
the Saudis are a "proud people"
and would regard such treatment
as an "insult."
Rostow said "no effective"
Middle East policy is possible
without peace between Israel and
its Arab neighbors that ensures
Israel's strength and
sovereignty. He contended that
"President Carter has taken a
position blaming Israel for the
absence of peace. This is almost
inexplicable. Israel isn't the
obstacle."
Washington Welcomes
Israel's Earlier
Withdrawal Date
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
The State Department welcomed
Israel's announcement this week
that all of its forces would be
withdrawn from South Lebanon
by June 13.
Commenting on the Israeli
Cabinet's decision. Department
spokesman Tom Reston noted
that when Prime Minister
Menachem Begin was in
Washington earlier this month,
he promised Secretary of State
Cyrus Vance that the Cabinet
would decide on a final date for
withdrawal "and that is what the
Israeli Cabinet has done."
WITH RESPECT to the quee
tions put to Israel by the U.S. for
clarification of aspects of its
peace plan, Reston told reporters,
"We have no time deadline in
reviewing or getting those an-
swers back." The Israeli Cabinet
had been expected to discuss the
matter at its weekly session
Sunday but instead deferred it to
a later date.
WILL BE OPEN FOR THE HIGH HOLY DAYS
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This summer you have the opportunity to have a vacation at the
unusually low prices that we offer and still have the best of
everything, quality food, quality accommodations and quality
service at considerable savings.
Once again, this summer we will offer breakfast, a snack at
lunch and a full course dinner at our low low summer prices.
In addition to all of this we will also have arts and crafts
for adults, entertainment nightly and we will also offer for
the children a day camp six (6) days a week.
Take advantage of this tremendous vacation opportunity and let
us hear from you in the immediate future.
Sincerely yours.
W^tt^
Samuel M. Rosner
P.S.
For information and plane reservations
call (305) 866-0121
Realty Course
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nnr Incommtteri


,y, June 2,1978
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 7
<*
The Jewish Community Center
|A few spaces are still
vailable in the C.A.P.A.
ogram. Call the Center before
lgist*ring.
Kren orr community
he-school
I Registration is open for
Lptember 1978-79 season Pre-
Ehool, Pre-Kindergarten and
Lndergarten. Check the ad in
Is week's paper for complete
[formation and registration
Irm
IILDREN'S PROGRAM
Ichildren's after school
ograms will resume in the fall.
[intact the Center to be placed
l the mailing list.
SENS & TWEENS
|Evening sessions will continue.
en & Tween worker is Ron
fennison.
DO WED-TO-WIDOWED
3RKSHOP
iThere was a Workshop ex-
sion to the Fort Lauderdale
aseum of Fine Arts, with over
participants who viewed an
hibit of figure sculpture and
bntings with works by Degas,
[lore and more. Future trips
theater parties are planned
workshop members. Call
orkshop President Charlotte
blind at the Center, or Sue
|nn Levi, JCC staff coordinator
ask to be put on the special
tdowed Workshop mailing list.
IMMER HEBREW ULPAN
six week refresher course for
yone studying Hebrew will be
jilable at the Center beginning
week of July 24 through
Igust 28. The instructor is Sue
Vi.
ay School Children
I Conduct Services
The children of the Jewish
imunity Day School of Palm
ach County, Inc., last month
kducted the entire Kabbalat
pbbat and Maariv Services at
ngregation Anshei Sholom.
They also participated in the
kdle lighting ceremony at the
1st Palm Beach Auditorium on
ly 7 in connection with Israel
lependence Day. On May 9,
|y performed before the
lusand members of the Yiddish
Iture Group of Century
lage, singing Yiddish and
Drew and English melodies.
:andlelighting
TIME
7:49
26 IYAR-5738
immmmmmmmmmm
$
12th Season
Lei Hall
Tennis & Golf
Camp for Teens
(Co-Ed)
TntFinwtQolfATannto
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hi
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Qrart Food Trip* to
Victor Jacotaon. Ate RAin
Doug Ford. Jr PGA
Sabring, Ra 33*70
RaS1-35-0151
SENIORS
Call the Comprehensive Senior
Service Center for transportation
to doctor appointments, treat-
ments, hospitals, social service
agencies, shopping or other
places. Funding comes from a
federal government grant to
service the area from 45th Street
to Southern Blvd. and from the
ocean to the Turnpike. Call the
Center and ask for tran-
sportation.
Classes
Theater Workshop: Tuesday,
10-11:30 a.m., instructor,
Michael Soil.
Cooking for One: Wednesdays,
10-11:30 a.m., instructor, Brian
Rich. Learn to cook and prepare
economical meals for one.
Consult Your Doctor: June 8,
Dr. Bruce Kramer, 1:30 p.m.,
Podiatrist. June 15, Dr. Ralph
Keen, 1:30 p.m. Dermatologist.
Investments: Bryn Sheen,
instructor; Wednesdays, June 20
and June 27,1:30 p.m.
Transaction^ Analysis: Mini
Course with instructor, Jean
White. "I'm O.K. Your O.K."
Mondays, June 19, 26, 1-2:30
p.m.
On Thursday, July 6 there will
be a trip to the Jungle Queen and.
lunch at Patricia Murphy's. Call
Pauline Brimberg for reser-
vations.
Mr. Alfred Golden
Mr. Joe Rubin
Happy Shavuoth
To The Jewish Community
The Second
Month Club
Tuesday, June
celebrate Sam
birthday. An
Tuesday of the
will meet on
13 at 1 p.m. to
Schutzer's 90th
original musical
The
KOSHER
HOTEL
presentation will be presented by
the Ruth Hyde group consisting
of Lee Duchin, Ann March and
Ruth Hyde.
Artist of the Month for June
will be Saul Berke. Berke is a
retired salesman who has always
painted, though he never had a
lesson. He has acquired some 20
ribbons and has sold more than
100 paintings. His works are on
display in the Comprehensive
Senior Service Center, Monday -
Friday, 9 a.m. 5 p.m.
OCEaWRONT
40th to
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Services by Cantor LEIB RASKIN
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PlMl2
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Page 8
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach Coun.j
Friday, June 2,1978
ami- Zionism mask hioes BRitain's national fRont
By ROBERT WISTRICH
LONDON The October War
of 1973. with its resultant trend
towards the moral and political
isolation of Israel in the inter-
national arena, has reinforced
this feeling of interdependence.
Israel is today perceived by the
mass of diaspora Jews (even
those indifferent to Zionist
ideology) as a force within the
Jewish people, and not some-
thing apart from it.
Similarly, in Israel itself, there
has been a parallel process of
Judaization, a greater awareness
of the common features in the
Israeli and Jewish destiny. This
intertwining of the Jewish and
the Israeli fate makes it almost
impossible to distinguish bet-
ween anti-Zionism and anti-
Semitism, even though from a
logical standpoint such a dif-
ferentiation might be desirable.
THE FACT is that the sur-
vival of Israel is the core-issue for
most Jews today because it has
been broadly accepted as crucial
to their own existence and self-
definition. It is not simply one
political issue among others, but
the issue in terms of which the
future of the diaspora itself is
envisaged.
Hence, anything which tends
to diminish or weaken the
viability of the Jewish State is
seen as an assault on Jewish con-
sciousness in its innermost being.
For the first time in modern
Jewish history, anti-Zionism is
perceived by a broad consensus
of Jewish opinion as a major
threat to Jewish identity.
UNDER THE impact of the
Holocaust, Zionism became the
expression of a Jewish will to
independence which would no
longer be determined by defini-
tions imposed from outside. In
this respect, anti-Zionists operate
with an anachronistic concept of
Jewish aspirations, applicable at
best before 1939, and even then
highly unrealistic.
Moreover, they forget that
their own anti-Zionist rhetoric
has itself become a convenient
substitute for the unfashionable
and politically discredited anti-
Semitism of the Fascist era.
In the Soviet context, aca-
demic distinctions lo3e their
relevance anti-Zionism and
anti-Semitism are in practice
identical. Beneath the thin veneer
of Marxist Leninist verbiage, it
is not difficult to detect the
resurgence of the pogrom
tradition of the Tsarist autocratic
State.
SIMILARLY, in the Moslem.
Arab world, latent Islamic anti-
Judaism has been mobilized for
decades in the service of the
political struggle against
Zionism. The territorial conflict
over Palestine has been greatly
exacerbated by the introduction
of atavistic, religious motifs and
the anti-Semitic myths of Euro-
pean racialism (the Protocols of
Zion, etc.) which have colored
Arab perceptions of Israel.
In spite of President Sadat's
initiative, the radical Arab States
reject not only Israel's right to
Zionism spilled over into anti-
Semitic discrimination against
the Jewish minorities in Arab
lands.
Even in the West, events have
IN BRITAIN
exist, but also its essence as an
independent Jewish State exer-
cizing sovereignty over what
they regard as "Moslem"
territory. As in the Soviet bloc
countries, governmental anti-
shown that anti-Zionism as a
general ideological label can be
used against Jewish citizens,
especially where the government
adopts a pro-Arab policy. De
Gaulle's notorious reference to
the Jews at his 1967 press con-
ference was perhaps a signal.
INSINUATIONS of dual
loyalty against Jews supporting
Israel and the growing emphasis
on the importance of the Jewish
lobby in the United States are
further cases in point.
The rise of a vociferous New
Left opposition in the West after
1967, which aggressively ad-
vocates the abolition of Israel as
a "racist," Fascist State, has
posed a further threat to the
security of diaspora Jews.
In Britain, the extreme Left
have largely spearheaded the
anti-Zionist assault on campuses,
which has led to the banning of
some Jewish societies and
restrictions on the free speech of
Jews supporting Israel in the
universities.
All these facts are indisputable
and undermine the claim that one
can sharply distinguish between"
anti-Zionism and anti-Semitism
For this purpose it is quite un-
necessary to assert that Zionism
and Judaism are identical, as
some defenders of Israel have
done.
ZIONISM and Judaism are
related, but not synonymous.
There are Orthodox Jews who
reject Zionism in its present
political form just as there are
secular Jews who are indifferent
to Israel, and Israelis who feel no
affinity for Judaism. There have
been, and still are, many Gentilijy
supporters of Israel and Zionism
who would not dream of con-
verting to Judaism, just as there
are Jewish and Israeli an-
tagonists of Zionism who do not
deny their origins.
In short, not all Jews are
Zionists and not all Zionists are
Jews. To equate Zionism and
Judaism is to fall into the anti-
Zionist trap of presenting Jewish
nationalism as an undif-
ferentiated, monolithic entity
rather than an intensely diverse
and pluralist movement.
NEXT ISSUE: Radicals ,
attack basis of Jewish
attachment to Zion.
ispaei's new ppesi&ent navon is man of the people
JERUSALEM "Don't
abandon me when I move the
President's residence." This was
the plea made to his friends and
acquaintances by President-elect
Itzhak Navon, who took over
from President Ephraim Katzir
at the end of last month.
Itzhak Navon has always been
a man of the people, and now that
he is due to become their formal
representative, he does not want
to be cut off from them by cere-
monial and the duties that fall to
Israel's first citizen.
DAVID BEN-GURION, Is-
rael's first Prime Minister, whose
secretary and adviser Mr. Navon
was. predicted many years ago
that Navon would one day
become President of Israel.
Today, the country's newspaper
columnists are saying that he
was "born to be President."
Many people are expecting
great things of him. As he
himself says: "Expectations of
what I shall be able to do are
running so high, that my original
Itzhak Navon is a
Sephardi sabra. His
father's family was prom-
inent in Jerusalem and
throughout the country
for three centuries, and he
numbers notable rabbis
among his ancestors.
President Navon
Ofira Navon
6av ftpeams of theip 6esipe
elation is now tinged with much
trepidation."
However, he is not a man to be
daunted by challenges. He has
suffered several setbacks in his
political career and has learned
that caution is an important part
of successful strategy.
AT THE same time, he has
brought to public life a disarming
openness, considerable charm
and a high degree of
sophistication.
Itzhak Navon is a Sephardi
sabra. His father's family was
prominent in Jerusalem and
throughout the country for three
centuries, and he numbers
several notable rabbis and other
leading figures among his an-
cestors.
His maternal grandfather was
one of the sages of Moroccan
Jewry before leaving to settle in
the Holy Land when Navon's
mother was still a child.
The President elect was born in
the Nachlat Shiva quarter, in the
In 1946, he left his educational
work on the instructions of the
Hagana and took over its Arabic
department in Jerusalem. (Prof.
Katzir was one of his com-
manders in the Hagana at that
time.)
BEFORE JOINING the Ha-
gana, Navon was for a short time
a member of another under-
ground group Irgun Zvai
Leumi which was headed by
Menachem Begin, now Israel's
Prime Minister. Navon left the
Irgun because he disagreed with
its ideology.
After statehood in 1948, Navon
held a number of diplomatic
posts in Latin America. From
1952 to 1963, he was one of Ben-
Gunon's closest advisers
heading the Prime Minister's
Office. He then spent a period in
the Ministry of Education.
He was first elected to the
Knesset in 1966. as a member of
the Rafi group, which broke away
from Mapai, the Israel Worker's
heart of Jerusalem, 57 years aim ?&' w reioinl Mapai,
and trained as a teacher w, un>ted with Achdut Avoda
to form the Israel Labor Party.)
HE REMAINED a Knesset
member for the Labor Party until
his election as Israel's President.
During his time in the Knesset,
he has been a Deputy Speaker
and chairman of the Foreign
Affairs and Security Committee.
For the past five years, he hm'
also been chairman of the World
Zionist Council.
He is fluent in a number of lan-
guages, including not only
Ladino and Yiddish, but also
Arabic. He is also an accom-
plished folklorist. and has written
a play based on Sephardi folklore
Spanish Romansero.
It is the general opinion that
Navon, the first Sephardi and the
first native of Jerusalem to 1
President of Israel, will be .
popular head of State. And his
attractive wife, Ofira, will be a
popular first lady.
LIKE HER husband, Ofira
Navon is a sabra, though of
Russian background. Her father
is an architect, and for some
years she followed in his foot-
steps.
She is also a qualified clinical
psychologist and a professionally
trained teacher. She has worked
with handicapped children for
many years.
Ofira Navon, who was voted
"Miss Sabra" in 1966, shares
with her husband a love for the"'
theater and music. She is also, at"
42, the mother of two children,
Nira, 5, and Erez, 4.
The Navons will be the first
Presidential family to move into
the official residence in Jerusalem
with young children.


June 2,1978
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 9
lerniceS. Tannenbaum, national president of Hadassah, presents petitions with over
\5,000 signatures collected by members of Hadassah in every state to Senators Clifford P.
Case (R., NJ.) and Floyd K. Haskell (D., Colo.), who will transmit the appeals forAnatoly
fharansky and other imprisoned Soviet Jewish Prisoners of Conscience. Because Soviet
Officials have refused to receive the president of Hadassah and other American leaders in
he past, the Senators have offered to present this appeal for human rights to Soviet
[mbassador Anatoly Dobrynin. Eighteen Soviet Jews are being held in prison camps and
\bout 160,000 Jews have applied for exit visas.
Formidable Arab Money Weapon
i A Senate subcommittee study which analyzed
kerns of petrodollar investments concluded
It the Arab nations have acquired a powerful
^billion "money weapon" that could be
Idea against the United States and its
Stern allies in the event of another Middle
\t war or other crisis. This money is in short-
bank deposits and government notes which
be withdrawn and transferred quickly from
i money market to another.
[Conceivably, the Arabs could suddenly dump
r securities or shift their dollar holdings to
|ther currency, inflicting severe damage to
the U.S. economy and the world's financial
em. U.S. Treasury officials and bankers,
^ifying before a Senate panel, said that such
ien transfers would be inconsistent with the
generally conservative investment
ivior, but they could not rule out the pos-
lity that the Arabs would consider these
psun's during a political crisis, as they did
i the oil embargo in 1973.
rl must bring my children to see this mag-
lent place," declared Jacqueline Onassis on
(first visit on May 16 to the John F. Kennedy
ce Memorial and Forest planted by the Jewish
|onal Fund near Jerusalem.
Irs. Onassis inspected the bronze bust of
|ident Kennedy and the eternal flame in the
nor of the monument, and inscribed her name
pe guest book on the page dedicated to the
aedy family. She then planted a pine tree near
planted by other members of the Kennedy
ly who have visited the memorial.
|he Kennedy Memorial, which was
jrated on July 4, 1966, is designed in the
Blanche Ross has been reelected
ient of the New York Association for
iAmericans at the agency's 29th annual
fng. A beneficiary of the UJA-
iation Joint Campaign, NYANA offers
flement assistance to Jewish im-
tnts in the Greater New York area.
shape of a trunk of a tree, felled before its prime,
symbolizing the truncated life of the slain youth-
ful President.
Support of affirmative action programs to
insure equal opportunities for minority groups
but firm opposition to "rigid racial quotas" was
reaffirmed by the Carter Administration's top
domestic policy adviser.
Stuart Eizenstat, Assistant to the President
for Domestic Affairs and Policy, addressing a
luncheon session of the American Jewish Com-
mittee's 72nd annual meeting in New York,
pointed out that the administration had ex-
pressed this view in its brief submitted to the
Supreme Court in the Bakke case.
The Court is expected to rule soon on the case,
in which Allan Bakke, a white male student, was
denied entry to the University of California
medical school although Blacks with lower ad-
mission test scores were admitted under a quota
reserved for members of minority groups.
Pointing out that the results of past dis-
crimination could be overcome only through a
system of flexible targets, Eizenstat warned that
the establishment of a quote system would defeat
the purpose of equal opportunity in education,
employment, and other areas of public concern.
The oil-producing United Arab Emirates are
being charged by the American Jewish Congress
with violating the New York State anti-
discrimination law by requiring job applicants to
state their religion.
In a formal complaint filed with the State
Division of Human Rights, the Congress cited a
full-page advertisement in the Wall Street
Journal of Feb. 17, 1978, recruiting "professors,
associate professors and assistant professors" for
the academic year 1978-79 in arts, political science
and management, education, science and law.
In response to the advertisement, Martin
Hochbaum a PhD in political science and a
former faculty member at Brooklyn, Hunter and
Lehman Colleges, Long Island University and
New York University sent a letter requesting
an application form to the United Arab Emirates
embassy in Washington, D.C.
A leader of the American Jewish Congress in
New York gave the House of Lords in London a
copy of the Saudi Arabian blacklist and said an
examination of the entries confirms the "essential
anti-Jewish core" of the Arab boycott of Israel.
Will Maslow, general counsel of the American
Jewish Congress, told a Select Committee of the
Lords that the Saudi blacklist had a separate
section for British firms numbering 100 pages
containing the names of more than 1,100 British
companies and their affiliates.
He said the phrase, "Zionist tendencies,"
appears in Arabic alongside about 20 percent of
thefirms listed, including such companies as
Great Universal Stores, Marks & Spencer and
S G. Warburg. Fifteen Jewish organizations
with no commercial interests also appear on the
list, including the fraternal order B'nai B'rith.
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OF THE PALM BEACHES INC.
IS NOW ACCEPTING REGISTRATION FOR
our MEREN ORR amittTY PRE-SCHOOL
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PRE SCHOOL! 2Vj YRS)
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PRE KINDERGARTEN! ) KINDERGARTEN( )
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^5*
Page 10
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, June 2
1978
m
I
**" aabbiniral *__.
co-ordinated by the
fflfi Palm Beoch County Rabbinical Council ., ... .,
Ed devoted to discussion of themes and issues
Rabbi HyrnanFishman rokvlt to Jewish fife past and present
The Festival of Shavuot
accepted by the nations of the
world today. There is so much
evidence of this refusal to accept
God's moral law. When hundreds
of thousands of our brethren in
Russia are denied freedom and
are being persecuted; when many
of our bretheren in Russia are
denied jobs, when their children
are turned out of schools, when
some of the brightest Jewish men
and women are consigned to
prisons and mental institutions
God's moral laws are at a very
low ebb. By helping them to
escape, we act as champions of
God's moral law.
By Rabbi Nathan Zelizer
There is a very strange passage
in the Talmud (Sab. 88a)
regarding the events leading up
to the giving of the Ten Com-
mandments at Mt. Sinai. The
rabbis speak of the reluctance on
the part of many nations to
accept the Torah.
The nations of the world re-
fused to accept the Ten Com-
mandments because they did
not want to renounce murder,
envy, idolatry and such other
laws would have meant a change
in their ways of life. Even among
the emancipated Israelites, there
were many who were not overly
anxious to assume the
obligations of the Com-
mandments.
THERE was only one alter-
native God "forced" the
commandments upon our
forefathers. Say the rabbis
"The Holy One. blessed by He,
tilted the mountain over them
like a bowl and said to them
"If you accept the Torah, it is
well; if not. there shall be your
sepulcher ".
There is more to this statement
than the mere fact that "God just
wanted to get rid of the Ten
Commandments ". The statement
infers that the acceptance of the
moral law. is not subject to whim,
that one can take it or leave it.
The acceptance of the moral law
is an inescapable mandate of
conscience: that the moral law is
a voice that cannot be silenced;
the moral law cannot be rejected
and that it must be accepted. For
life to have any meaning, for life
to leave earth-bound limitations
and to reach greater heights, it
must be lived in accordance with
moral laws.
By accepting the Ten Com-
mandments. Israel became the
Priest people to mankind and
consecrated itself to serve as
God's champions of
righteousness, truth and justice.
For thirty-five hundred years the
Jewish people have served as the
Champions of God in a hostile
world which knew not and which
still does not know the law of
Holiness.
WHAT price our people have
paid in order to disseminate the
spiritual truths, designed to
illumine various civilizations
under which man lived. Our
people are called servants of the
Lord" because we have been
God's chief instrument in the
Divine plan for the survival of
mankind By celebrating the
festival of Shavuot. we Jews
today rededicate ourselves to the
Rabbi Zelizer
same task which was imposed on
our forebears on that first
Shavuot at Mt. Sinai.
This is the meaning of our
struggle to remain Jews and to
help preserve our people and our
Faith. It is a glorious respon-
sibility. Jews are the guardians of
mankind. The laws of the Ten
Commandments are still not
WHEN Jews from other
countries, especially those under
Arab domination, appeal to us for
help, and we respond by opening
our hearts and our pocket books.
we act as champions of God's
moral law. When we volunteer
our time and our efforts to lift the
level of human existence
everywhere, we are the true
servants of the Lord.
TV Highlights
Mosaic, the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County-
sponsored TV program, aired weekly over
Channel 5-WPTV on
Sunday mornings at 9:30 a.m.
June 4 Helen Fagen
June 11, Israel Tourist Bureau
SYNOPSIS OF THE WEEKLY TORAH PORTION
Behukkotai
But if ye will not hearken unto Me I will bring the
land into desolation And you will I scatter among the
nations (Leviticus 26.14, 32-33).
BEHUKKOTAI-"If ye walk in My statutes, and keep
My commandments, and do them; then I will give you
rains ,n their season, and the land shall yield their
a a '.. eat your bread untU ye have enough
and dwell in your land safely------And I will have respect
unto you and make you fniithll and multi
will establish My covenant with you. But if ve
shall reject My statutes, and if your soul abhor Mine
ordinances so that ye shall not do all My commandments,
til ~ / covenanf I will chastise you seven
times more for your sins. ... And you will I scatter
among the nations and I will draw out the sword after
you; and your land shall be a desolation. When thV-
are in the land of their enemies. I will not reject
S3* r^Tk My covenant with them, for I am the
Lord their God. These are the statutes and ordinances
and laws, which the Lord made between Him and the
rLev^f26S3ra4e6)m mUnt ^ by *" hand <* Moses"
SSmmm m^mj Jmm* *"" a***tm .*
Jewish Community Day School
,..,,. c, *a,m B*ch County, Inc.
2815 N. FlagletDme, West Palm Beach, Florida 33407
is now accepting applications for
Telephone Pre-School-Full or Half Day
832-8423 4 Kindergarten-Full Day
Grade l-Grade Vl-Elementary School
Grades Vll-VIII-Junior High School
Transportation throughout Palm Beach County
Admission Tests Required
ABeneftoieryAgencyof the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
"J3;tr:;*r-
ISRAEL
4 WEEK LEISURE TOUR
ENJOY A RELAXED, 4 WEEK HOLIDAY AT A SEASIDE
RESORT- SPECIALLY PLANNED FOR SENIOR CITIZENS
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19'8 Departures
septembrr October & November
$1575.00 per person (Double Occupancy)
FOR DETAILS CALL COLLECT
MASSADA LEISURE TOURS
(305) 458-8700
TRAVEL AGENT INQUIRIES INVITED
Synagogues in
Palm Beach County
REFORM
CONSERVATIVE LIBERAL
TEMPLE ISRAEL
1901 North Flagler Drive
West Polm Beach, Florida
33407
833-8421
Rabbi Irving B. Cohen
Sabbath Worship Services
Friday at 8:15 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL OF
BOCA RATON
333 S.W. Fourth Avenue
Boca Raton, Fl. 33432
391-8901
Rabbi Norman T. Mendel
Cantor Martin Rosen
Sabbath services, Friday at
8.15 p.m.
TEMPLE ETERNAL LIGHT
THE FREE SYNAGOGUE
P.O. Box 3
Boca Raton, Florida 33432
368-1600 391-1111
Rabbi Benjamin Rosayn
Fridays at 8:15 p.m.
at: Boca West
Community UMC
8900 Boca West GLADES) Rd
(1 Mile West of
Boca Turnpike)
CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION
ANSHEI SH0L0M
5348 Grove Street
West Palm Beach, Flo. 33409
684-3212
Rabbi Harry 2. Schectman
Cantor Arthur B. Rosenwasser
Services: Friday 8:30 a.m.,
5p.m., 8:15p.m.
Saturday8:30o.m., 6:30p.m.
Da. Iy8:30a.m. ,7:00 p.m.
CONGREGATION
BETH K0DESH
Boynton Beoch, Flo.
732-5147
Sabbath Services
Friday at 8:15 p.m.
Saturday at 9 o.m.
Congregational Church
115N Federal Highway
TEMPLE BETH EL
2815NorthFloglefDr.ve
West Polm Beoch, Florida
833-0339
Rabbi Asher Bor-Zev
Sabbath services Friday at 8:15
p.m.
Saturday at 9:30a.m.
Daily Minyan at 8:15 o.m.,
Sunday at 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOL0M
315 N. "A" St.
loke Worth, Florida 33460
585-5020
Robbi Emanuel Eisenberg
Cantor Jacob Elman
Services. Mondays and
Thursdays
at 8:15a.m.
Friday at 8:15 p.m.
Saturday at 9 a. m
TIMPtf BETH DAVID
Sabbath services, Friday at 8
p.m.
At Westminster Presbyterian
Church
10410 N. Military Tra.l. Palm
Beoch Gardens. 321 Northlok.
Blvd.. North Palm Beach. Flo.
845-1134
Rabbi Hyman Fishman
Cantor Nicholas Fenakel
TEMPLE BETH SK0L0M
N.W. Avenue "G"
Belle Glade, Florida 33430
Jack Stateman, Lay Leader
Sobbath services, Friday ol
8:30 p.m.
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB
275 Alemeda Drive
Palm Springs, Florida 33460
Sabbath services, Friday at 8
p.m.
Saturday at 9 a.m.
President Jacob Front- 964-
0034
Mondays ond Thursdays at 9
a.m.
Services held at Faith United
Presbyterian Church, Palm
Springs
B'NAI TORAH
CONGREGATION
1401 N.W. 4th Ave.
Boca Raton, Florida 33432
392-8566
Rabbi Nathan Zelizer
Sabbath services: Friday at
8:15p.m.
Saturdays at 9:30 a.m.
TEMPLE EMETH of tfcf
DELRAT
HEBREW CONGREGATION
5780 West Atlantic Avenue
Delray Beoch. Florida 33446
276-3536
Morris Silbermon, Rabbi
Leonard Price, Cantor
Sabbath services: Friday at 8
p.m. Saturday at9a.m.
Daily minyans at 8:45 a.m.
and 5 p.m.
TEMPLE EMANUEL
190 North County Road
Palm Beoch, Florida 33480
832-0804
Cantor David Dardoshti
Sobbath services. Friday
8:30 p.m.
Saturday at 9 a. m._________
at


^y, June 2.1978
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 11
JEWISH FAMILY AND CHILDREN'S SERVICE
An outstanding prole?;onal counseling agency serv.ng fhe Jewish
community of Palm beach County Professional and confidential
help '$ available for
Problem* ,ne 9'n9 Monlol counseling
Consultotion and evaluation service* Parem-ch.ld conflicts
Vocational counseling Personal problems
\vote Offices: 2411 Okeechobee Blvd.
West Palm Beach, Fla. 33409
Telephone: 684-1991
Or
3200 North Federal Hwy. Suite 206-
Room 12, Boca Raton, Fla.
Telephone: 395-3640
Moderate fees are charged in family and individual counseling to
those who con pay (Fees ore based on income and farriily size)
The Jewish Family and Children's Service is a beneficiary agency of
the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County.
Israel Fumes as Jet Sale Passes Senate
June Calendar
June 3
Temple Beth David Sisterhood installation 8 p.m.
June 4
Temple Beth El Brotherhood Boca Raton annual elections
! Temple Emanu-EI Men's Club Breakfast 10 a.m.
June 5
Brandeis University Women Boca Raton Board Women's Amer-
ican ORT regular meeting Jewish Community Day School Board
- 8 p.m. Temple Israel Dinner and Man of the Year Award
Temple Emanu-EI Sisterhood Board 10 a.m..* Congregation
Anshei Sholom Board 9:30 a.m.
June 6
Delray Hebrew Congregation Board 6 p.m. Women's American
ORT- Lake Worth- 1 p.m. Temple Beth El Board 8 p.m. 'Temple
Israel Men's Club 6 p.m. Women's American ORT West Gate -
Noon
June 7
National Council of Jewish Women Boca Raton Board 8 p.m.
Jew,sh Community Center Board JEWISH FEDERATION WOMEN'S
DIVISION -EXECUTIVE- 10 a.m. Jewish War Veterans-7:30 p.m.
Women's American ORT Region Executive 9:30 a.m. Temple
Beth Sholom Sisterhood Strawberry Festival -12:30 p.m.
June 8
Temple Beth El Sisterhood Board Boca Raton 10 a.m. Temple
Beth Sholom lake Worth Board 9:30 a.m.
June 10
Jewish Community Center Jewish Community Center Women's
League
June 11
Temple Beth El Men's Club
June 12
Women's American ORT Regular Meeting Boca Raton Women's
I American ORT North Palm Beach Board 9:45 a.m. Women s
[ American ORT Palm Beach Board Temple Emanu-EI Board 7:30
p.m. Temple Israel Congregational 8 p.m. United Order True
Sisters Board 10 a.m. United Order True Sisters 12:30 p.m.
Hadassah Chai Board 10 a.m.
June 13
Temple Beth El Boca Raton Board 8 p.m. B'nai B'rith 2939 7:30
j p.m. B'nai B'rith 2969 Board 7 p.m. B'nai B'rith Women -
Masado Board 8 p.m. B'nai B'rith Women Menorah 1 p.m.
Hadassah Henrietta Szold Board 1 p.m. Temple Beth El-Social
Sets Board 8 p.m. Temple Emanu-EI Sisterhood Board 'emple
Israel Young Adult Board 8 p.m. Women's American OKI -
Delray- 12:30 p.m.
June 14
B'nai Torah Congregation Board Boca Raton 7:30 p.m. JEWISH
FEDERATION EXECUTIVE 8 p.m. Jewish Community Center -
Women's League 7:30 p.m. Women's American ORT CentuJrV-
Board 9:30 a. m. Women's American ORT Region Board V: JU
a.m. Women's American ORT Region Planning 9:30 a.m.
Pioneer Women Golda Meir 1 p.m. Temple Beth David Sister-
hood Board 8p.m.
June IS
Hadassah Rishona 1 p.m. Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Board -
i Noon Free Sons of Israel 7 p.m. Temple Beth El Sisterhood -
I Boca Raton 10 a.m. Temple Israel Men's Club Board 8 p.m.
Women's American ORT Evening Board 8 p.m.
SHAiow memobtal past:
Palm Beach County's
Only All J9wl*h Camotary
COMPLETE PRE-NEED ARRANGEMENTS
^061 Okeechobee Blvd. W. -**i;%"
'.Palm Beach, Fla.33409 DeUty-427-3220
Continued from Page 1
security issue that will have
serious implications for the
balance of power in the Middle
East," he said. "The American
weaponry changes the whole
situation."
Peres, and his Laborite col-
leagues, angrily castigated the
Begin government for its clumsy
handling of the whole matter.
The government "Stammered"
instead of speaking out strongly
against the planes sales to the
Arab states, they said.
They demanded to know why
Begin failed to raise the issue
with President Carter when he
was in Washington two weeks
ago.
BEGIN, who briefed the
Knesset's Foreign Affairs and
Security Committee, told
reporters afterwards that the
Cabinet would discuss the air-
craft sales issue at its regular
session and announce "the way
we will proceed."
He expressed "deep regret"
over the Senate vote and charged
the U.S. with reneging on its
"undertaking" to Israel in
September, 1975 to supply it with
F16 war-planes on an "entirely
unconditional" basis.
The undertaking was made in
return for Israel's agreement to
make further withdrawals in
Sinai under its second interim
agreement with Egypt.
THERE WAS "certainly no
justification" for the Admin-
istration to tie the present air-
craft sales to Israel to sales to
two Arab countries that are still
in a state of war with Israel,
Begin claimed.
While Israelis of all parties
were dismayed by the American
decision, angry political recrim-
inations were developing here
with unpredictable repercussions
for the Begin government. Even
before the outcome of the Senate
vote was known, knives were
being sharpened for the
inevitable bloody postmortem.
MOST INFORMED observers
were by then resigned to the
various government ministries
Begin Appeals
To Carter
Continued from Page 1
Washington shortly to seek
acceleration of the "Matmon-C"
program which calls for an
American commitment to supply
Israel with about $1 billion in
arms each year for the next 10
years. The precise details of what
Israel will be requesting is
classified information.
Some political observers ex-
pressed hope that President
Anwar Sadat's overwhelming
victory in the May 22 referendum
on dealing with Egypt's domestic
crisis will prompt him to resume
peace talks with Israel. Israeli
officials are still waiting for
Sadat's reply to Israel's request
for "counter proposals" to the
Begin peace plan on which
negotiations can be based.
MEANWHILE, it remained
unclear if and when the Cabinet
will discuss the key questions
posed by the U.S. for clarification
of Israel's peace plan. Those
questions were put to Begin and
Foreign Minister Moehe Dayan
by Carter and Secretary of State
Cyrus Vance last month, and the
Americano appear to regard
Israel's answers as crucial to the
resumption of the Middle East
peace process.
Israel was asked whether the
sovereignty issue on the West
Bank will be resolved after the
five-year period of "self-rule"
proposed by Begin and if so,
how; and how Israel proposes to
allow the West Bank Arabs a
voice in determining their own
future, inasmuch as the Begin
government has flatly rejected
the American idea of a "limited
referendum."
and departments were searching
for shoulders other than their
own on which to lay the blame for
Israel's political fiasco.
A writer in Haaretz faulted
Begin, Foreign Minister Moshe
Dayan and Defense Minister
Ezer Weizman especially the
latter for not speaking out
more forcefully and at an earlier
stage against the linkage of sales
to Israel with those to Arab
states.
THE BATTLE was joined in
the Knesset's Foreign Affairs
and Security Committee where
Peres bitterly criticized the
government for failing to present
Israel's case properly to the
Senate and American public
opinion. He said former Labor
governments had been much
more effective in doing so.
Committee chairman Moshe
Arena, of Likud, accused the
former Labor-led governments of
having delayed the development
of Israel's own advanced jet
combat plane, the Kfir, which
would have made Israel less
dependent on American
equipment.
Arens, a professor of aero-
nautics and a former top official
of Israel Aircraft Industries
which produces the Kfir, urged
the government to commit
greater resources to develop new
warplanes for the eighties.
The reaction of the Israelis in
general was that oil has once
again triumphed over logic,
friendship and ideology.
We are seeking the
services of a Rabbi
Part Time, either for
entire year, holidays
included, or for high
holidays only.
Congregation Beth Kodesh
Boynton Beach, Fla.
732-5147
737-0378
YOU CAN FIND IT ...HERE
AT
CAMP SHALOM 1978
At our spacious lfracre site we offer children from all sectors of the com
munlty and of all origins, races and religions the opportunity to en,oy the
Summer months In a safe, wholesome and enrlehlng^.nvljro^t and pro-
gram. The program is designed tor each age group to Promote Pjvtical. so-
cial and cultural growth and the acquisition of new skills and Interests.
Healthy self-expression Is nurtured within an atmosphere of respect for
others and awareniss of responsibility both toward the Individual and the
group.
THIS YEAR, theelght week camp season will be from June l^August 11.
The first four week session Is from June l-July 14, and the second four-week
session from July 17 August 11.
PROGRAM AND SCHEDULE
Camp Is conducted Monday through Friday, ftW a.Wt._lj4 P-m.
Campers are assigned to units by school grades, age. ***LZPXlZ
grams and activities are directed and supervised by a ********
activities include athletics, music, drama, arts 2t?l\^l"JSS-
fled swimming instruction and nature Study. Jejejg_ertMllei Include
bowling, roller skating, trips to beaches and places of interest.
in keeping with the camp's sponsorship and objectives. Jewlsh,hjs'r1v
and customs are Introduced through music and drama, arts and crafts, noli
day festvals. and "he traditional welcoming of the Sabbath. These programs
we supervised and directed by our Judaic Education specialists and our Is-
raeli Scout Staff.
TRANSPORTATION
Campers are picked up by buses at central or convenient pick up points
on establlshedcamp bus routes to be announced.
CAMP FEES
PreSchool. Elementary Divisions
8 weekj $225 + $40 Registration and Activity Fee.
4 weeks $125 ? $20 Registration and Activity Fee.
(For each additional child trom same family:
8 weeks $205 ? $40 Registration and Activity Fee.
4 weeks $115* $20 Registration and Activity Fee.)
FEES INCLUDE transportation, snacks, a Camp Shalom "T" Shirt, insurance and
special activities.
MINIMUM ENROLLMENT one 4-week session
Enrollment is open to children ages 3-12.
REGISTRATION and ACTIVITY FEE MUST BE PAID WITH APPLICATION lit
cancelled by June 1. one half ot this fee will be refunded I
TOTAL FEES MUST BE PAID IN FULL PRIOR TO EACH SESSION unless
arrangements have been made for later payment. Reduced fees and scholarship aid
are available based on need.
For further information, please call or write:
JEWISH FEDERATION OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
2415 Okeechobee Boulevard 689 5900
West Palm Beach. Florida 33409 |


Page 12
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, Jun
e2,ij
U.S. Jews Angered by Sale
Continued from Page 1
fightr-bomber will never be used
against Israel.
MEANWHILE, he noted.
"Israel remains at war and under
siege, its security dangerously
imperiled by the Carter
package." the Schindler
statement said.
"If there is to be peace, and if
Israel is to be secure, our country
must redress the dangerous arms
imbalance resulting from the
President's arms package. our
country's original commitment to
provide a full complement of
arms to Israel must now be
honored."
B'nai B'rith President David
Blumberg said the sale to Egypt
and Saudi Arabia "will adversely
affect the security of Israel."
HE SAID that "in light of the
first sale of offensive military
planes to Egypt (50 F5Esl, it is
imperative that the White House
and State Department encourage
President (Anwar) Sadat to
return to the peace table"
He added that the sale of the
F15s to the Saudis "gives the
United States the right to seek
greater moderation" from them.
In a harsh statement, Rabbi
Joseph Sternstein, president of
It Was Israelis
Who Killed
Terrorists
By Edwin Eytan (Paris) and
Yitzhak Shargil (Tel Aviv)
Jewish Telegraphic Agency
Passengers on an El Al flight
from Paris who had been targets
of an Arab terrorist machinegun
attack at Orly Airport, arrived at
Ben Gurion Airport in the early
hours May 21 with eyewitness
accounts of the shoot-out.
They claimed that had it not
been for the alertness and instant
response of Israeli security
guards, the Lod Airport
massacre of May 30. 1972. would
have been reoeated.
THE THREE terrorists were
killed in a hail of bullets near the
El Al boarding gate, but not
before one of them fatally shot a
French policeman. Two other
policemen and three passengers
waiting to board an Iberia Airline
flight to Malaga from an ad-
joining gate were wounded.
The arriving El Al passengers
credited Israeli security guards
with gunning down the terrorists.
Reports from Paris said French
police opened fire killing the
terrorists seconds after they drew
their weapons. The eye-witnesses
landed at Ben-Gurion Airport at
2 a.m. local time, many hours late
because their departure from
Paris was delayed by the attack.
There were only about a dozen
passengers in the El Al jumbo
jet. Originally a tourist party of
over 200 French insurance agents
was to have made the flight, but
the group canceled their trip after
the shooting.
THE ARRIVING passengers
said this was because three of the
group were wounded, but reports
from Paris said the casualties
were Iberia Airline passengers
and that no El Al passengers
were hurt.
Two of the French tourists,
Claude and Miriam Haddad.
made the trip anyway. Haddad
said he convinced nine others to
stay with the flight despite the
shock of the attack. Itzhak
Amram. of Tel Aviv, an Israeli
returning from Paris, said there
was chaos at the Orly terminal
when the shooting began. He said
there was no one to direct the
passengers until French police
arrived at the scene.
Another returning passenger
was Labor Minister Israel Katz.
He said he was certain the attack
was not directed at him because
he booked on the flight at the last
minute after reaching Paris from
N ice.
the Zionist Organization of
America, charged the White
House with "turning America
away from its commitment to a
proven ally, '.he democratic State
of Israel."
HE CHARGED that "it is
clear that the Administration has
succumbed to Arab petrodollar
pressure and this new and
dangerous factor is now shaping
American foreign policy."
He added that Israel cannot be
blamed now for having doubts
about the reliability of U.S.
guarantees.
Howard Squadron, president
of the American Jewish
Congress, declared that "the
Senate vote is a setback to the
cause of peace" He said the sale
of the planes to the two Arab
countries "will justifiably
heighten Israel's fears for its
security and increase its concern
for territorial protection against
renewed Arab attacks."
He stated that the AJ
Congress was "disappointed" by
the President's intensive lob-
bying for the sales "particularly
in view of the campaign promises
he made about rejecting Arab oil
blackmail and slowing down the
arms race.
WE ARE equally chagrined by
those Senators who for many
years publicly professed their
deep concern for peace and their
personal abhorrence of the
proliferation of arms sales in the
Middle East and nevertheless
voted for the Carter package"
Burton M. Joseph, national
chairman of the B'nai B'rith
Anti-Defamation League,
stressed that "since it is the
Administration's position that
the plane package deal will make
the peace process easier, it is now
encumbent upon President
Carter to urge Egypt to return to
the peace table"
He said the Saudis should also
"urge President Sadat to be less
intransigent and more for-
thcoming." Joseph declared that
"the burden of proof is now on
the Administration to move the
Saudis and Egypt to take
meaningful steps toward peace"
Harry S. Taubenfeld, na
chairman of Herut-USA. ch
that "Israel stands alone,
victim of an American f0
policy which considers no U
promise binding and no pled*
enforceable" Taubenfeld said th,
"lesson" of the Administration,!
victory yesterday is that "qZI
again can the Jewish Statd
retreat from her borders in retunJ
for American guarantees.''
^r
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your financial needs
sins
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First American Bank,
OF NORTH PALM BEACH
VILLAGE MARKET PIAZA
5095 Okeechobet Fjlvd
Wesl Palm Beach Florida 33409
(305) 616 6616
Come m wid
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onederful bant


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