Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

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Material Information

Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
8 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 28, 1975)-v. 8, no. 40 (Dec. 17, 1982).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 2, 1976 called v.2, no. 22, but constitutes v.2, no. 1.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: July 28, 1978 called no. 14 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement; Aug. 25, 1978 called no. 16 in masthead and no. 17 in publisher's statement; Aug. 10, 1979 called no. 15 in masthead and no. 16 in publisher's statement; Oct. 22, 1982 called no. 31 in masthead and no. 32 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44607504
lccn - sn 00229550
ocm44607504
System ID:
AA00014311:00160

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
wJewish ncridiain
OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
Combining "0U VOICI" and "FEDERATION REPORTER"
in conjunction with The Jewish Federation of Palm Bench County
,'olume 4 Number 1
Palm Beach, Florida Friday, January 13,1978
Price 35 Centa
Beach County
^idents Participate In
Mim-Misswn to Israel
Campaign Reception Held For
Hi-Rise Division Chairmen
By ROBERT D. KAPLAN
UJA-Jewish Agency
Correspondent Jerusalem
[JERUSALEM Upon
Bving the United States for a
jm-mission to Israel sponosred
the Jewish Federation of Palm
bach County, General Cam-
fign Chairman and Mission
ader Alan L. Shulman said
at he "envied" the rest of the
group, because "they were going
for the first time, an experience
that I will never have again."
Shulman'8 envy proved well
justified as the seven men from
Palm Beach County lived out a
week-long odyssey that added
layers of depth to their under-
standing of the Jewish State and
American Jewry's partnership
Continued on Page 16
The Leadership of the Hi-Rise
Division of the 1978 Combined
Jewish Appeal Israel Emer-
gency Fund Campaign met
recently for a reception in the
home of Alan L. Shulman,
general campaign chairman. The
evening, the first of its kind for
the Palm Beach County cam-
paign, was designed to give the
individual Hi-Rise chairmen the
opportunity to meet chairmen of
other Hi-Rises around the
county.
Shulman, recently returned
Alan L. Shulman (left), General Campaign Chairman for *he
Jewish Federation's 1978 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund Campaign, and his wife Barbara, Women's
Division campaign chairman, hosted the reception for the
chairmen of the Hi-Rises in the Palm Beach County area.
Pictured with them are Mr. and Mrs. George Golden (center)
and Mr. and Mrs. Mortimer Weiss. Mr. Golden and Mr. Weiss
are co-chairmen of the Hi-Rise Division.
'landing in front of the Knesset on their
I'cent mini-mission to Israel, sponsored by
\ln-Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
ire (left to right) Alan L. Shulman, General
"hairman for the 1978 CJA-IEF campaign
uid co-leader of the mission, David Shulman,
Dr. Abe Szmukler, Dr. Howard Kay, co-
leader of the mission, Norman Layton, Dr.
Richard Shugarman, Dr. Henry Saiontz, Dr.
Jeffrey Faivus, Arthur Yeckes, and Dr. Tom
Davidoff. ___________^^
from his third trip to Israel in the
last three months, discussed the
excitement in the Middle East
with regard to the prospects for
peace
"THE MOOD is exhilarating
everywhere in Israel," he stated.
"However," he cautioned, "the
peace procedures will take years
to implement. There won't be
peace on Tuesday, when there
was war on Monday."
He discussed the role of
American Jews in partnership
with Israel. "Our brothers and
sisters in Israel look toward
American Jewry to help sustain
the quality of life there. The State
of Israel and the Jewish Agency
do not have sufficient funds to
educate their youth beyond the
ninth grade and there are over
45,000 Israeli families who live in
substandard housing conditions.
"There are six million Jews in
the United States and three
million Jews in Israel," Shulman
continued. "We have the ability
to give 15 to 20 times more to
Israel than the average Israeli
and yet American Jews con-
tribute one-sixth of what the
Israelis contribute to that
country."
Mort Weiss and George
Golden, co-chairmen of the Hi-
Rise Division, spoke of the
growth of the community.
"WE BEGAN organizing the
Hi-Rise Division just five years
ago," stated Weiss. "In less than
three years we have doubled our
numbers." Golden compared this
to the increase of Jewish
population in Palm Beach
County stating, "In 1965 we had
4,500 Jews living here; today we
estimate 47.000 and by 1985 we
will have 80,000 Jews, more than
Continued on Page 5
Have Sadat and Hussein
[Come to Secret Agreement?
Zionist Information Service
CAIRO There are reports that President Sadat and King
| Hussein concluded a secret pact during the King's visit to Cairo and
will discreetly coordinate policies during the next round of Middle
I-ast diplomacy. While Jordan will not be formally represented at the
< aim talks, Sadat will maintain direct contact with Hussein as the
< onference gets under way.
According to reliable sources, Sadat and Hussein reached agree-
ment as to what should be demanded of the Israelis with respect to the
West Bank and Gaza Strip.
HUSSEIN WAS assured in Cairo that Sadat has some degree of
backing from the Saudis and the Gulf States. The same discovery may
have been made the hard way by Syria's President Assad as he toured
Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Bahrain, Quatar and the United Arab
Emirates.
They found no sympathy for Syria's decision to join the
rejectionista" of Libya and the extremist Palestinians in a front
against Sadat. Instead, King Khalid is said to have rebuked Assad for
Ilis continuing military dependence on Russia.
SO ASSAD now finds a formidable line-up of raised eyebrows
directed at him: Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Kuwait, Bahrain, Quatar,
Oman and the rest of the Gulf States, Morocco, Tunisia, Sudan, North
Yemen and Somalia.
Syria's only certain allies are Libya, Algeria, South Yemen, the
PLO and the Soviet Union. And although the Iraauis take the most
radical line of all, they are no friends of Assad, and have been deeply
implicated in plots to overthrow his regime.
JFCSLaunches Chore Service
The Board of Directors of the
Jewish Family and Children's
Service (JFCS) voted on Dec. 16
to initiate an innovative new
program to help members of the
Jewish community of the Palm
Beaches during periods of illness
and recuperation.
Stephen Levitt, executive
director, stated that the JFCS's
Chore Service Program will
enable the agency to help the
elderly who have health problems
and are unable to clean their
houses or apartments by them-
selves. The agency has received a
grant totaling nearly $20,000
from the Comprehensive
Employment Training Act, Title
6 (CETA), which will "enable the
agency to dispatch three maids to
assist our elderly as well as
others who feel they need this
service," Levitt emphasized.
ACCORDING to Levitt, the
Chore Service workers "will be
able to spend between two to
three hours in a person's apart-
ment or home doing those chores
which family members cannot do.
This could include a cleaning of
the bathroom or perhaps
vacuuming and dusting. These
kinds of services are presently
not covered by any home health
Continued on Page 16
Stephen Levitt, executive director of the JFCS (left) and
Bobbie Taffel, president of the JFCS, sign the contract from the
Comprehensive Employment Training Act, Title 6, which will
"enable the agency to dispatch three maids to assist the elderly
as well as others who feel they need this service."
3


Page 2
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, January 13,
1978
With the
Organizations
ORT
The Sixth Annual Mother tc
Another Luncheon of the Palm
Beach Chapter of Women's
American ORT will be held or
Thursday, Jan. 26 at noon at the
Breakers Hotel in Palm Beach.
Guest of honor, Mrs. Nathaniel
Levi (Betty) is the "Mother of
the Year." Guest speaker at this
event will be Shirley Traum,
national vice president of
Education of ORT.
The program for the afternoon
will be the Habimah Players who
will dance and narrate.
Proceeds for the luncheon goes
to ORT for its Social Assistance
Program. Chairpersons for the
luncheon are Mrs. Irving Gould
(Sylvia); co-chairperson. Mrs.
David Colby (Sylvia); and
reservations, Mrs. Edward
Schreiber (Sally).
Honor Roll Credit of $25 will be
received.
HADASSAH
The Tamar Group will meet on
Monday. Jan. 23 at the new Civic
Hall Building in Royal Palm
Beach at about 12:30 p.m. The
program planned is called "Turn-
about." The men will conduct
this meeting.
The Youth Aliyah Luncheon
and Show, Hankypanky" will
be Jan. 25 at the Showtime
Theatre in Fort Lauderdale. Call
Ruth Crandell for reservations.
Yovel Hadassah will hold its
regular meeting at Congregation
Anshei Sholom on Thursday,
Jan. 19 at 1 p.m. The film With
These Children will be presented
by Mary Rodd, Youth Aliyah
chairman. The film highlights the
progress and accomplishments of
Youth Aliyah to date.
On Jan. 25 the group's annual
luncheon and card party will take
place at Sweden House from
11:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. For reser-
vations, contact Ruth Heyman.
The Rishona Group of the
Palm Beach Chapter will hold its
regular monthly meeting on
Thursday, Jan. 19 at 1 p.m. at
the North Palm Beach Public
Library.
The program will be two
movies: Edna Hibel, The World I
Love, and Hibel on Porcelain.
The next regular n eeting of
Tikvah will be held on Monday,
Jan. 16 at 12:30 p.m. at Temple
Anshei Sholom A paid-up
membership entertainment will
be offered.
The Tikvah study group will
meet on Saturday, Jan. 14 at 2
p.m. at Chatham L-241. Phone
ahead if you are coming.
Shalom Hadassah will hold a
general meeting on Monday, Jan.
16 at 12:30 p.m. at Salvation
jArmy Citadel. Ruth Moss of
Palm Reach Chapter will present
asWtonHMO.
Bat Gurion Group is having a
Youth Aliyah Luncheon honoring
their first president, Staci Lesser,
on Thursday, Jan. 19 at noon at
the Challenger Country Club,
Poinciana Place, Lake Worth
Road, Lake Worth. Chairman for
this event is Barbara Tanen.
Contact Sheila Engelstein for
information.
SISTERHOOD
The third Festival of Arts
series of Temple Emanu-El
Sisterhood is scheduled for
Monday. Jan. 16 at 12:30 p.m.
and will feature our "Petite
Buffet."
Art enthusiasts can view "The
Masterpiece Tour of the Her-
mitage," prepared by Nat E.
Levi.
Under the direction of Norma
Sirota and producer, Ruth
Presser. the Drama Group of
Anshei Sholom Sisterhood of
Century Village will present
Them Were the Days," a vaude-
ville presentation, on Jan. 28-30
at 8 p.m. and a Jan. 31 matinee.
Tickets are available at the syna-
gogue before noon. Phone Anne
Strobin for information.
NATIONAL COUNCIL
OF JEWISH WOMEN
The Palm Beach Section of the
National Council of Jewish
Women still have openings for
any senior citizen who cannot
shop or prepare their own meals,
in their "Meals on Wheels"
delivery service.
Anyone interested or knowing
anyone interested should contact
the Federation and ask for the
"Kosher Meals on Wheels"
program.
The Welcome Wagon service is
available for new members of the
community.
On Feb. 19 from 1 p.m. to 10
p.m., the Council will have its
annual art show at the Flagler
Museum. Artists, sculptors and
jewelers will be showing their
works.
Anyone interested in being a
donor is welcome.
National Council of Jewish
Women. Okeechobee Unit, will
meet on Thursday, Jan. 19 at 1
p.m. Shoshanna Flexer, guest
soloist, will entertain with inter-
national songs. For information,
call Ruth Gottdiener.
Council tours provide tours for
members. To quote Esse Salkind,
tour chairperson, "Have you seen
the Western Wall in Israel?
Cruised the fascinating Greek
Islands? Visited the exciting
Orient or absorbed the beauty of
Scandinavia? These are just a few
of the many wonders of the world
for you to enjoy." Contact her for
information.
MEN'S CLUB
The Men's Club of Congre-
gation Anshei Sholom will
present on Sunday, Jan. 22 at 8
p.m., David Schoenbrun,
American commentator who has
won professional awards in every
major field of communication and
the first reporter for the Voice of
America after Pearl Harbor. He
was Intelligence Officer for Gen.
Eisenhower and chief correspon-
dent for CBS News.
^Muk <& 9i!ecboi/i
REGISTERED REAL ESTATE BROKER
ACREAGE-HOMES- LOTS-APARTMENTS-INCOME PROPERTY
ttt \ KOYAI. PALM WAV
PALM BEACH, FLORIDA
office: ao-ma
RE8: 3K-1M
5
-1 .
r
I N
Office: 848-9753
Home: 622-4000
1 _l
Realtor*
DON VOGEL
700 U.S. Hwy. 1, No. Polm Beoch
The Men's Club of Temple
Emanu-El began weekly
duplicate bridge games on
Tuesdays at 7:45 p.m. in the
Social Hall of Temple Emanu-El
in Palm Beach.
The Bridge Committee, with
Henry Milner, chairman, assisted
by Dr. Kalman Apfel, will be in
charge of all the arrangements.
Al Kaye, a professional certified
director, will direct the plaving.
PIONEER WOMEN
The Golda Meir Club of
Pioneer Women will hold a white
elephant and cake sale on
Tuesday, Jan. 24 at the Ramada
Inn on Palm Beach Lakes
Boulevard.
B'NAI B'RITH WOMEN
The annual "Queen for a Day"
donor luncheon, sponsored by
five chapters of Mitzvah Council,
B'nai B'rith Women in Palm
Beach County, will be held
Tuesday, Jan. 24 at noon in the
Venetian Ballroom of the
-Breakers Hotel in Palm Beach.
The international service
organization is celebrating its
80th year, and through the years
has grown to a membership of
over 150,000 women throughout
the world.
Participating in this year's
donor luncheon are Boynton
Beach Chapter, Masada and
Medina Chapters of West Palm
Beach, Menorah Chapter of
Century Village, and Naomi
Chapter of Delray Beach. The
donor luncheon committee in-
cludes Mrs. William Fischer,
chairman, Mrs. Sam Siegel, co-
chairman, Mrs. Morris Gewirz,
honorary chairman, Mrs. Harold
Schapiro, Mrs. Max Starr and
Mrs. David Stern, honorary co-
chairmen, and Mrs. Sam Siegel,
reservations chairman.
Following the luncheon, which
includes entertainment, the
annual "Queen for a Day" will be
chosen from someone attending.
PHILIP WEINSTEIN.F.D.
HENRY KLEIN. F.D.
evitt memorial chapel
5411 OKEECHOBEE BLVD., WEST PALM BEACH. FLORIDA
1336 WEST DIXIE HIGHWAY, NORTH MIAMI. FLORIDA PHONE M3I0
1*21 PEMBROKE ROAD. HOLLYWOOD. F LOR IDA 33020 PHONE ttl-7200
P-l -lJ.Jg
Attention Mastectomce Women i
Visit "New Woman of Florida, a
Mastectomee Boutique" Largest
collection ol full coverage swim
suits (852) Sleepwear
Loungewear with our exclusive
new Bra less Prosthesis. I67s2
'J.E.4thCt., N.M.B. (305)651 7885
PIANIST WANTED
To play for Sunday
School Class. Call
Temple Israel, W.P.B.
833-8421
p_j.Tj.7l
AMERICAN JEWISH
COMMITTEE
GEORGE GOLDEN
George Golden, a member of
the Board of Trustees of the
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County, who is chairman of its
Israel Mid-East Task Force, will
be the guest speaker at the dinner
meeting of the Palm Beach
Chapter of the American Jewish
Committee, to be held at Holiday
Inn, 100 Datura, West Palm
Beach on Thursday, Jan. 19.
Dinner will be served at 6:30 p.m.
The program will begin at 8 p.m.
with seating provided for those
who come after dinner.
Golden, a native of Cleveland,
Ohio, had a career in law and in
his family business prior to
coming to the Palm Beach area in
1973, where he resides in the
Land of the Presidents. He is a
graduate in law from Western '
Reserve University.
AMERICAN JEWISH
CONGRESS
On Jan. 17 at 1 p.m. tne
American Jewish Congress will
hold a regular meeting at the
Salvation Army Citadel.
Abraham Gittelson is guest
speaker.
Tour meetings will be held with
Betty Alderson at the Breakers
Hotel at 10:30 a.m. and Century
Village Holiday Inn at 2:30 p.m.
A lunch and seminar will be
held Jan. 23 at Temple Beth
Shalom in Miami Beach. Contact
Esther Froelich for information.
ODD FELLOWS
The night of Jan. 18 at 7 p.m.
will be the installation cere-
monies of all 1978 officers of the
Palm Beach Odd Fellows Lodge
88 in their Temple Hall Building
in downtown West Palm Beach.
The assembly is exclusively for
Brother and Sister members of
IOOF in West Palm Beach and
adjacent areas. Arrangements
have been made for a collation,
immediately following the
evening's activities.
Continued on Page 3
SECRETARIAL HELP NEEDED
for Jewish Federation office. Secretary, excellent
stenography and typing skills. Must be able to work
independently. Good benefits. Salary commensurate
with experience and ability. Please phone the Jewish
Federation offices at 689-5900.
The assurance
of service. In the
Jewishtradition.
At Riverside, we take full responsibility
for the performance of our service in a manner
consistent with the expectations of the
community and the high standards
demanded by Jewish Law and Custom. For
this reason we do not allow our name to be
represented by any other organization. Each
chapel is exclusively a Riverside Chapel.
Our staff of Riverside people consists of
the largest number of Jewish professionals
employed by any funeral director in the State.
They are people who understand Jewish
tradition and honor it.
Since 1935, these policies have been
our assurance to a family of service that
respects their needs and the dignity of Jewish
funeral ritual.
It's a trust we've never taken lightly.
4714 Okeechobee Boulevard, West Palm Beach
683-8676
Other Riverside chapels in the Greater Miami area:
Sunrise, Hollywood,North Miami Beach,
Miami Beach and Miami. Five chapels serving
the New York City Metropolitan area.
H Riverside
Memorial Chapel. Inc./ Funeral Directors
For generations a symbol of Jewish tradition.
*--1J-7i


Friday, January 13. 1978
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 3
JNF to Plant Jewish Childrens Forest
In Israel to Celebrate 30th Anniversary
Knesset Member to Speak
At CJA-JEFReception
Under the patronage ol
Dresident Ephraim Katzir of
Israel and of Prime Minister
Menachem Begin, the Jewish
National Fund is launching a
vast Jewish Children's Forest in
celebration of the forthcoming
30th anniversary of Israel's
independence in May.
The forest will be planted by
the JNF on an area of 7,000
dunams of land at Goren in
western Galilee, some 26
kilometers east of Nahariyah.
The forest will not only help to
reclaim and beautify this hitherto
neglected Galilee region, but will
serve as a joint effort of Israeli
and American Jewish students to
commemorate Jewish children
who perished in the Holocaust
and, more recently, at the hands
of the Arab murderers at
Ma'alot.
TO IMPLEMENT the Jewish
Children's Forest, Israeli
students will write to Jewish
youngsters in this country in-
viting them to participate with
them in this endeavor. Together,
each pair of students will plant
three trees: one for each of the
participants, and the third in
memory of the fallen child.
Institutions and educational
organizations, schools and com-
munity centers will be asked to
take part in this endeavor which
also has been officially endorsed
by the Israeli Ministry of Edu-
cation, together with the
Teachers' Association for the
Organizations
Continued from Page 2
BRANDEIS WOMEN'S
COMMITTEE
PROF. STEVEN ROSEN
Halm Beach East Chapter of
Hrandeis University National
Women's Committee is planning
a University Day luncheon on
Monday, Jan. 16 at noon at the
Holiday Inn on South Ocean
Boule\ ard in Palm Beach.
Prof. Steven Rosen of the
Department of Politics will speak
on The Middle East Conflict in
its Global Setting."
For reservations call Vera
Levine.
MR. AND MRS
JACK DOROSHKIN
The Jan. 31 program of the
Yiddish Culture Group will be
dedicated to Mr. and Mrs. Jack
Doroshkin, founders of the
Yiddish Culture Group in
Century Village, who will
celebrate their sixty-fifth wed-
ding anniversary and Yankel
Doroshkin's eighty-fifth birth-
day.
Florence Sharp from Golden
Lakes will sing, accompanied by
Ruth Steindorf at the piano.
A string quartet consisting of
Jacky Lorber, Phil Herman and
Sam Finkenthal on .violins and
Helen Penka at the piano, will
play Yiddish and English
compositions.
On Jan. 17 the group will
present Mildred Birnbaum and
her group, "The Musical Notes,"
with a selection of English and
Yiddish songs. Shirley Fleichman
will read excerpts from Yiddish
author Avrom Raisin. Tony
Vacaro will play selections on the
electric guitar.
On Jan. 24, the group program
will present Maxim Brodyn and
his wife Zelda Zlotin. They ap-
peared here last year. The
program consists of singing and
monologue. The duo of David
Altman on concertina and Sam
Korsun on guitar will play a
series of Hebrew and Yiddish
songs.
TEMPLE BETH EL
Temple Beth El of Boca Raton
will present an art show and sale
of original works including art,
sculpture, paintings, ceramics,
jewelry and home accessories
from Feb. 11 to 16, in the new
temple building in Boca Raton.
A champagne reception
honoring artists and patrons will
open the show on Saturday
evening, Feb. 11.
Contact Augusta Driel, fine
arts committee chairman.
JNF.
Upon completion, groups of
children in the Diaspora will be
invited to participate in tree
planting in the new forest. The
Youth and Education Depart-
ments of the Keren Kayemeth in
Jerusalem and the JNF in New
York have prepared a wide
variety of interesting, attractive
and educational materials to be
utilized in the promotion of this
unique forest tribute.
IN announcing the planting of
the forest, in which hundreds of
thousands of children will par-
ticipate, Meyer Pesin, president
of the JNF of America, said,
"This forest is expected to forge
new and stronger bonds between
the children of Israel and Jewish
children the world over. The
Jewish Children's Forest will not
only be an American project, but
children from many countries
throughout the world will be
invited to share in this evergreen
and enduring memorial to the
defenseless children who suffered
a bitter fate at the hands of
savage oppressors."
UM Offers Latin-American
Jewish History Class
The first course in Latin-
American Jewish History will be
offered at the University of
Miami during the Spring 1978
semester.
The three-credit course will be
oriented towards the entire
Greater Miami community, as
well as students majoring in
Judaica and Hispanic Studies. It
is relevant for teachers at schools
where Jewish studies are empha-
sized, as well as those interested
in the Jewish communities in
Latin America.
THE COURSE is designed to
Provide an overview of the
U>ry, sociology and antro-
Dolojry of the Jews in Central and
South America from 1500 to
1977.
The course begins on Thur-
sday. Jan. 16 from 7:25 to 9:45
p.m. Registration will take place
Jan. 11 for undergraduates and
graduate students in the Richter
Library.
Limited scholarships are avail-
able through by contacting Drs.
Shamir and Ersoff.
THE instructor for the course
is Seymour B. Liebman. an
authority on the History of the
Jews in Latin America, author ot
several books on the subject and
a former resident of Latin
America.
Former Prime Minister Golda
Meir was in Beilenson
Hospital in Tel A viv this week
for tests following a sudden
illness brought on by a
stomach disorder. Israeli news
reports said Meir had been
brought to the hospital in
shock following the loss of
blood caused by a burst ulcer.
Beilinson physicians insist
there is no indication of
cardiac difficulties.
Milton R. Cohen, chairman of the
Lands of the President Com-
mittee for the Jewish Federation
of Palm Beach County's 1978
Combined Jewish Appeal Israel
Emergency Fund campaign,
announced that an International
Dessert Reception will be held for
residents of that condominium on
Thursday, Jan. 26, 8 p.m. at the
President Country Club.
Dr. Josef Rom, member of the
Knesset and a key adviser to
Israel's Prime Minister
Menachem Begin, will be the
keynote speaker.
DR. ROM holds a Ph.D. in
Aeronautical Engineering from
the California Institute of Tech-
nology. In the past he has been
professor of aeronautical
engineering at the Technion -
Israel Institute of Technology.
Haifa, Israel, and Dean of the
Department of Aeronautical
Engineering. From 1958-1977 he
served as head of Aerodynamic
Laboratories. He serves as con-
sultant to the Israeli government
and to the Israeli Industry on
Research and Development.
In 1977, Rom served as a
member of the Likud election
Campaign Committee and chair-
man of the Government Tran-
sition and Government
Reorganization Committee
following the elections of May,
1977.
Presently, as a member of the
Knesset, he serves on the Foreign
and Defense Committee and is
chairman of the Subcommittee
for Arms Purchasing and Pro-
duction. He also serves on the
Immigration and Absorption
Committee and is a member of
the Central Committee of Herat,
MILTON R.COHEN
in charge of Youth and Young
Members Group.
THE program will be followed
by an International Dessert
Reception featuring pastries from
around the world. Special
arrangements for the reception
are being coordinated by Co-
chairmen Lee Stein and Ruth
Wilensky. They are being
assisted by Lenore Block.
Members of the Lands of the
President Campaign Committee
are Milton R. Cohen, chairman;
Jack Atkins, Norman Bauer.
Irving Bernstein, Arnold Black,
Irwin Brainen, Philip Doppelt,
Ted Feinstein, Dave Gerstein,
George Golden, Irving Ingber,
Sol Kronovet, Morris Ladge,
Stuart Landis, Leonard Laser,
Jack Libman, Sol Marks, Joseph
Punch, Jack Shaprow, Milton
Simmons. Harry Stein, Louis
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Page 4
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, January 13,1978
EDITORIAL
The New Settlement
The Begin government's decision to establish eight
new settlements in the northwestern Sinai peninsula will
certainly have an unsettling effect in Washington and the
Arab capitals on the peace negotiations currently un-
derway between Israel and Egypt.
These Jewish National Fund settlements follow on
the heels of other such JNF-engineered para-military
settlements on the West Bank and. from a U.S.-Arab, let
alone Egyptian point of view, raise questions with respect
to just what Prime Minister Begin means when he talks
about vacating the Sinai or bringing the West Bank into
the framework of a Palestinian entity as steps toward the
achievement of peace.
Actually, these questions are gratuitous. The fact is
that Egypt's President Sadat has been raising the ante on
his Mideast peace package ever since his historic
presentation before the Knesset in Jerusalem last
November not in the sense that he has been adding
demands for concessions, but in the sense that he has
become increasingly inflexible as a spokesman for
Palestinian interests.
During his appearance in Jerusalem, while he no
doubt made pointed reference to these interests, President
Sadat's major emphasis was on resolving the conflict
between Israel and Egypt as a primary and fundamental
building block for peace in the Middle East.
On the other hand. Prime Minister Begins response
to Sadat's Knesset talk was predicated on principles he
has enunciated for years principles that finally gave
him the Prime Ministership in his stunning victory last
May: Judea and Samaria {Biblical, not West Bank, which
is contemporary Palestinian jargon) are not expendable.
Neither are certain areas of the Sinai peninsula.
The reasons for Sadat's growing intractability are
obvious: his desire to reestablish himself as leader of the
moderate Arab camp hence his hedging on the more
modest scope of his intentions in Jerusalem last
November.
But the new Sinai and Judea-Samaria settlements
should startle no one. They are consistent with what
Menachem Begin has stood for all along.
White House Mum on Letters
To Carter from Sadat
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
The White House has refused to
discuss the secret handwritten
letters from President Carter that
Egyptian President Anwar Sadat
said prompted him to initiate
peace moves with Israel. Neither
would the White House comment
on Egypt's severance of dip-
lomatic relations with five Arab
countries that assailed his peace
initiative at the Tripoli, Libya
meeting.
"We best serve at this point,"
by not going into the Carter
letters to Sadat, Depity Presi-
dential News Secretary Rex
Granum said.
He replied, "certainly" when
he was asked whether Secretary
of State Cyrus Vance and
National Security Affairs Ad-
viser Zbigniew Brzezinski had
been informed of the President's
letters.
ASKED WHETHER Carter
had by-passed diplomatic
channels for a period of weeks in
his letters to Sadat, Granum did
not reply directly. He pointed out
TMS
OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
Combining "OUR VOICE" and "FEDERATION REPORTER"
In conjunction with Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County. Inc
Combined Jewish Appeal
PALM BEACH BOCA RATON OFFICE
1880 N.W. 2 Ave.. Boca Raton. Fla 33432 Phone 368-2001
Printing Office -120N.E. 6th St., Miami. Fla. SS1S2 Phone STS-460B
the purpose was to continue dis-
cussion of Middle East settle-
ment discussions.
An Associated Press dispatch
from Cairo had reported earlier
that in an interview with the AP,
Sadat said he got the idea for his
Jerusalem trip about two months
ago after corresponding with
Carter. "He didn't propose it
all," Sadat said.
"At the precise moment when I
received his personal letter in his
own handwriting that no one
knew except me and him, then I
started thinking" about the trip.
SADAT SAID the hand-
written letters were sealed with
wax and delivered outside normal
diplomatic channels by a special
envoy, according to the AP
dispatch from Cairo.
Carter may have been referring
to the letters when in an inter-
view published in the New York
Times, he told columnist James
Reston in reply to whether he
knew about the Sadat trip to
Jerusalem in advance: "Sadat
and I exchange communications
frequently."
FRED K SHOCHET
Editor and Publisher
SUZANNE SHOCHET
Executive Editor
RONNI TARTAKOW
News Coordinator
MORTON GILBERT Advertising Representative
The Jewish Floridian Does .Not Guarantee The KashruUi
Of The Merchandise Advertised In Its Columns
FORM 3879 returns to The Jewish Floridian
1880 N.W. 2 Ave., Boca Raton, Fla. 3M32
Published Bl Weekly Second Claas Postage Paid at Boca Raton Fla.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) One Year-*/**., or by m.mtar*hip nj
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County. IlS Okeechobec Boulevard, West Palm
Beach. Fla 3J40* Phone M 5W0 (Out of Town upon Request)
federation officers, president, Stanley Brenner, Vic* Presidents, Rabbi Myman
Fishman, Dr. Howard Kay, Kenneth Schorer, Dr. Richard Shuoarman. Treasurer
Stacey Lessor; Secretary, Bruce Daniels; Executive Director, Norman
Schimelman Submit material lor publication to Ronni Tartakow I Director of
Public Relations.
Books?-They're for Burning
JEWS ARE known as the
Nation of the Book, no doubt
because of our relationship to the
Bible and our nurturing of that
relationship through many mil-
lennia of torturous stewardship.
Out of this unique role has
come another the Jewish pre-
dilection for books generally, and
for education generally, although
our stunning successes in the
non-theological word, in the fields
of non-theological literature and
academic scholarship, are
relatively recent, in fact as recent
as the Haskalah itself.
And for good religious reasons:
we have been enjoined from
making graven images and from
using our sacred language for
profane purposes. It took us a
long time to get around these
prohibitions to move from the
world of the Yeshuvnik to. say.
the world of Franz Kafka.
jiiiiiii
mmmmmmmmmm
Leo
Mindlin
Stew *
ALL OF which is germane to
my own childhood memories of a
house chock-full of books in many
languages Hebrew, Yiddish,
Russian, F.nglish, German and
of the reverence I was taught to
hold for them.
Over the years, in my own
home, our library has grown by
leaps and bounds. It is nowhere
near as exotic as was my father's,
being mainly in English and, as
the Haskalah has ordained,
mainly non-theological, but it is
far more voluminous.
What is worse, books are
space-consuming, and the more
of them you get, a member of the
Nation of the Book or not, the
more you begin being plagued by
perverse dreams about how (
relieving it would be if only you
could make a gift of them to some
worthy institution.
No, not all of your books, of
course. Just some of them.
A FEW years ago. in just this
selfless spirit of wanting to share
our heritage with others, I
packed up a dozen or so cartons
and dropped in at the college
library. Would they send a truck
around to pick them up? There
was in those cartons. I assured
them, some very valuable stuff.
It would be a boon to everybody,
including the Foreign Language
Department.
The librarian, a fellow pro-
fessor and old curmudgeon,
shrugged. Bring em by, if you
care to. and we'll take a look-see.
Generally, we don't care for gifts
of books."
But I don't have a truck." I
complained, shocked at his indif-
ference. "How can I bring them
byt It's not just a few paper-
backs I'm talking about. And
what do you mean, you don't care
for gifts of books? What's your
stock-in-trade here anyway,
vacuum cleaners?"
THE HELL with him. I
thought. What can you expect
from goyim anyway?
I promptly made a rapid
mental survey of the Jewish
institutions that would jump at
my books thrift shops, aged
homes whose residents were
simply dying for something
worthwhile to read, hospitals
with libraries for their patients,
synagogues, youth centers The
possibilities were endless.
My first call was to a thrift
Continued on Page 13
Problem of Single Jewish Parents
Friday. January 13,1978
Volume 4
5 SHE VAT 5738
Number 1
Last September I found a New
York Times editorial stating that
one-third of the nation's children
are being raised by only one
parent difficult to believe. But I
also had problems accepting the
astonishing statistic of Jewish
poverty when that was first
revealed several years ago and
events have proved how accurate
that was.
Determined to discover for
myself how real this was among
American Jews I have been
convinced by investigation, as
well as by colleagues in syna-
gogue administration and other
knowledgable people, that there
is indeed a problem of no small
dimension for us as Jews and as
human beings. I do not have the
resources for a statistical study
so I am pleased that the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation has
developed a questionnaire on
single parent families in the
synagogues of the area which
indicates a determination not to
avoid this problem any longer.
BUT IT is an uncomfortable
fact that only about 30 percent of
Miami's Jews are affiliated with a
synagogue. A goodly percentage
of them are older persons without
dependent children which is
really what the Federations -
and the synagogue's present
concern is all about. How does
one reach the unaffiliated. those
who for many reasons, but too
often economics (the report 0f the
Carnegie Council on Children
shows that one-fourth to one-
third of all children live under
conditions of poverty) do not
belong to a synagogue? This is a
problem that the Jewish com-
munity must address itself to if it
is to survive Jewishly. And
without too much delay.
In those areas where children
are to be found in statistically
viable numbers, there is little
question that Greater Miami has
a substantial number of single
parent families. One congre-
gation with a mixed urban-sub-
urban membership accounts for
2C percent of its substantial
Religious School enrollment in
that category while others range
from 10 to 15 percent. Admit-
tedly, many of these children
represent a financial burden on
congregations which are finding
themselves less able than for-
merly to handle the cost of
educating even those Jewish
children who come to their doors.
How many are turned away can
only be guesswork, for no syna-
gogue will admit to such a harsh
procedure while at the same time
setting up psychological barriers
of rejection.
Some Federations throughout
the country have begun, in a
small way. to recognize that,
since most Jewish education
takes place in the synagogue,
there is a responsibility for the
community to assume some of
the burden represented by those
unable to pay their way. More
pertinently, it is a matter of com-
munity self-interest and survival
as a Chicago Federation poster
headline.-,: "Jewish Education -
It's For Life."
LAST September the Chicago
Federation through its Syna-
gogue-Federation Relations
Committee (whatever did happen
to Miami's?), announced the
creation of the "Federation Edu-
cation Encouragement Fund." It
is a modest fund, beginning with
$15,000 to be made available to
families, based on their financial
need, in stipends of up to $200,
toward Jewish educational fees.
The program," according to the
announcement, "is aimed at
involving families with syna-
gogue life through the intro-
duction of their children to
Jewish education in the syna-
gogue of their choice" (italics
mine).
I am convinced that, at this
time, those who need the most
help in this area are single
parents (nearly all of them
women) whose incomes do not
permit them the "luxury" of
paying even a small amount for
the Jewish education of their
children. Granting that some
synagogues could do better than
they are, the over-riding fact ia
that this must be a total com-
munity commitment if it is W
succeed in the mitzvah of helping
these women in their search for
Jewish roots through the Jewish
education of their children.


Friday. January 13, 1978
Rapaport Elected V.P. Of
United Synagogue of America
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 5
ORGANIZATIONAL SCENE
At the biennial convention of
the United Synagogue of Amer-
ica, Robert D. Rapaport, Palm
Beach community leader, was
elected to serve for the second
term as national vice president.
The United Synagogue of
America is an arm of the Con-
servative movement, the largest
congregational organization in
North America.
THE convention was held at
the Concord Hotel, Kiamesha
Lake. N.Y. Temple Beth El, West
Palm Beach, sent a large
delegation headed by President
Barbara Weinstein and Rabbi
Asher Bar-Zev.
Shimon Peres, former minister
of Defense of Israel and chairman
of the Israeli Labor Party, was
one of the principal speakers. A
session devoted to Jewish Influ-
ence on American Politics
featured Stuart Eisenstat,
counsel to President Carter;
ludah Gribetz, counsel to New
York (Jov. Hugh Carey; Dr.
Lowell Uellin. former health com-
missioner of New York City; and
David Lissy. former counsel to
President Ford.
Mrs. Weinstein pointed out
I hat according to a survey. 82
percent of American Jews
identify with religion and 40.5
percent of those follow the Con-
servative movement.
SUMMER IN LONDON
Amencon Jewish Teenagers
Spend summer 1978 with London's
Jewish youth. Tours, sightseeing,
theatre. LIVE IN JEWISH HOMES.
Meet British youth In social, cultural,
sporting activities.
Sixth Great Season
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Brochure: Mrs. Carol Jacobs
"='* A Gu*t of London
4721 N. 35 St.
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Tel. evenings (305)983-0437
ROBERT D. RAPAPORT
MORE than 2,000 delegates
attended the biennial convention,
representing 858 congregations
in every state of the Union, as
well as Canada and Puerto Rico.
NCJW Spotlights Tie to Israel
More than 100,000 members of the National
Council of Jewish Women in 200 cities nationwide
will celebrate NCJW Week Jan. 8 to 14. Theme of
the celebration is "Hand-in-Hand in Israel,"
announced Esther R. Landa, national president.
Meanwhile, more than 400 delegates to NC-
JW's Joint Program Institute will meet in
Washington from Jan. 16 to 19 for a session on
"Social Policy and the Changing Family." The
function will culminate with the presentation of a
major award to Congresswoman Millicent
Fenwick (R., N.J.) and Elizabeth Holtzman (D.,
N.Y.) for their achievements in the field of
women's rights.
The Zionists-Revisionists have officially with-
drawn their lawsuit in a New York State Court
aimed at preventing the ZOA from using pictures
of Menachem Begin and Ezer Weizman in the
election campaign for the forthcoming 29th
Zionist Congress.
ZOA spokesmen declared that This points out
the lack of validity of the lawsuit apparent in the
first place and the fact that the Revisionists
realized, although belatedly, that they stood no
chance in the civil courts. It was a publicity stunt
that failed."
During President Anwar el-Sadat's visit to
Israel, the intensive cardiac care ambulances that
followed the Egyptian President and Prime
Minister Begin were connected to the Hadassah
JHebrew University Medical Center 24 hours a
day, which also had their blood types in readiness
for any emergency.
Also on hand at a moment's notice were Dr.
Bernard Lewis, Hadassah cardiologist who had
been in London with Mr. Begin previously, and
Dr. Mahmoud Attiya, chief of cardiology at Ein
Shams University in Cairo, President Sadat's
personal physician.
' The American Jewish Congress has urged the
Civil Service Commission to scrap a plan to
require federal employees and job applicants to
supply data about their race, ethnic background
and sex.
Naomi Irvine, executive director of the
Congress, in a letter to Alan K. Campbell,
chairman of the Civil Service Commission, said:
"Such information on application forms facil-
itates deliberate, unintentional discrimination.
We are by no means persuaded that such dis-
crimination is no longer a problem."
Hi-Rise
Division
Continued from Page 1
in the cities of Cleveland and
Detroit.
We must impress upon our
pan lime residents that they
have a vested interest in this
local community since this will no
doubt be the future home of
many of their children and
grandchildren."
Hi-Rise chairmen for the 1978
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund Campaign are
George Golden and Mortimer
Weiss, overall Hi-Rise division;
Milton Bluestein, Regency;
Donald J. Brodey. The Barclay;
H. I. Bucher, Claridges
Kast West; Milton R. Cohen,
Lands of the Presidents; Louis
Kaston, The Mayfair; Philip
Harris, Tuscany; Louis Hill,
Carlyle House; Samuel Hirsch-
berg. Royal Saxon; Stanley A.
Hollander, Ibis Island; Martin
Karlan. Rapallo North; Ralph
Lieberman, Rapallo South;
Samuel Orling, Longwood;
Edward Rapaport, The Cove;
Bernard Roberts, Ambassador
South; Benjamin D. Salinger, La
I'alma; Albert I. Shuster, Reef;
Sidney C. Seltzer, Horizons;
Julius Steinhauer, Patrician;
Benjamin Wohlgemuth, Harbour
House; George Greenspan,
Ambassador North.
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rngeo
I he Jewish tiondian of falm tieach County
m,,omtnmry ia, iiB
The Yamit Strike
Beachite: I Didn't Come to Live Under Egyptian Rude
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
And TUVIA MENDELSON
TEL AVIV (JTA) Yamit.
the new development town on the
coast of northern Sinai, was
closed down for three hours by a
general strike called by the local
residents to protest Prime Min-
ister Menachem Begins plan
that would return all of Sinai to
Egyptian rule.
The worried settlers were
reacting to published reports that
the Yamit area and the sur-
rounding settlements would
revert to Egyptian sovereignty
within three years, and until then
would be under United Nations
protection.
THEY SAID they were told by
a Knesset personality whose
name they refused to reveal, that
the published version of the
Begin plan was, in fact, correct
and their fears therefore were
warranted.
The establishment and de-
velopment of Yamit had been a
pet project of Foreign Minister
Moshe Dayan when he was De-
fense Minister in the Labor
government and had the support
of the Labor led regime. The
authorities encouraged settle-
ment there, especially by immi-
grants, as a place that offered
opportunities and challenges to
young, ambitious people with
wide horizons.
An American woman who
settled in Yamit recently, Carol
Roadblatt, told a reporter, "I did
not leave Miami Beach to live
under Egyptian rule. I came to
live in Israel."
DAVID MARGOLIT, head of
the Yamit yeshiva, said a group
of residents went to see Likud
Knesset members to protest the
Begin plan. "They are simply
blinded by Begin's moves," he
said. Another deputation of
settlers went to Jerusalem today
to demonstrate outside the Prime
Minister's office while the Cabi-
net was in special session.
The scope of the protests was
widened by a meeting at Ofra of
representatives of virtually all of
the Jewish settlements, who
came from Sharm el-Sheikh,
Sinai, the West Bank and the
Golan Heights.
All of the speakers said they
would fight the Begin proposals
by all possible means, starting
with a demonstration in front of
the Knesset building.
THE OFRA meeting involved
not only spokesmen for Gush
Emunim but also representatives
of other settlement m< vements.
An agreement emerged from the
heated discussions that the
settlements should fight Begin
under one overall committee.
Moshe Shamir of Likud and a
member of the Greater Israel
Movement, formerly one of
Begins staunchest supporters,
denounced the Prime Minister,
declaring he had betrayed" his
supporting voters. Shamir
declared that the people of Israel
were "drunk" with euphoria. He
said the Begin proposal was a
"folly" and a "grave mistake."
Yigal Cohen, another Likud
MK, rejected the idea of placing
Israeli settlements in the Sinai
under Egyptian or United
Nations rule.
In the United States,
meanwhile, there was a
sharp reversal of attitudes
toward Begin. The
Mapam-oriented Amer-
icans for Progressive
Israel-Hashomer Hatzair
I API-HH) issued a state-
ment praising the Prime
Minister's "new flexibility
toward territorial conces-
sions in return for peace."
But a group calling itself
the National Union of
Jewish Activists ... de-
nounced Begins plans for
self-rule for the A rabs...
SOME observers said the
presence of Rabbi Haim Druk-
man, a National Religious Party
MK, among the demonstrators at
Ofra might indicate a coming
split within the NRP on the
Egyptian-Israeli negotiations. In
an earlier development, Zvi
Shiloah, chairman of the Greater
Israel Movement, resigned from
the Likud Executive in protest
against the Begin plan.
In the United States, mean-
while, there was a sharp reversal
of attitudes toward Begin. The
Mapam-oriented Americans for
Progressive Israel-Hashomer
Hatzair (API-HH) issued a
statement praising the Prime
Minister's "new flexibility
towards territorial concessions in
return for peace." But a group
calling itself the National Union
of Jewish Activists, led by
Jewish Defense League founder
Meir Kahane, denounced Begin's
plans for self-rule for the Arabs of
the West Bank and Gaza Strip.
THE API-HH statement,
issued by Moshe Kagan, chair-
man of its policy committee, said,
"We are encouraged at Prime
Minister Begin's new flexibility
toward territorial concessions in
return for peace in the Middle
East. Begin, who has been known
in the past to aavocate a stand of
not one inch' is now proposing
many of the points contained in
the Mapam peace plan issued
following the Six-Day War and of
which Begin was very often
critical."
Kagan noted that, ironically,
much of the criticism in Israel
against Begin now comes from
his own party.
The National Union, many of
r
JCCBeaux Art Show, Sale Set
The JCC will sponsor its
second annual Beaux Art Show
and Sale on Sunday, March 5
from 11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Artists
and craftsmen from the Palm
Beach County area have been
invited to participate in the
program.
The Art Show Commmee, co-
chaired by Ralph Weisman and
Leo Morgan, announced that this
year's location will be the Com-
munity Federal Savings & Loan
Association on Congress Avenue
and Palm Beach Lakes Boule-
vard in West Palm Beach.
ORIGINAL works in the
categories of painting, crafts,
graphics, photography and
sculpture will be accepted. Par-
ticipants will pay a $6 regis-
tration tee and 10 percent of all
sales. The proceeds will benefit
the JCC Children's Program.
Judging and awards will take
place in all the above categories.
Alice Swarcze, John George III,
Henri Bouton and Martin Becker
have consented to act as judges
for the event.
An unusual corner for a Chil-
dren's Art Happening is being
coordinated by Lisa Rubin, JCC
art specialist. Youngsters will be
able to try their hands at string
art, spatter and body painting
plus a few surprises.
MUSIC and food will round
out the day'8 events. Interested
artists may contact the JCC to
receive guidelines and regis-
tration forms.
condemned him for allegedly
giving away "an inalienable part
of the historic land of Israel
whose members, including
Kahane, had hailed Begin's
election victory last May, today
\ Community Calendar
i
which God has given exclusively
to the Jewish people.''
They accused the Prime Min-
ister of betraying "all of the great
religious and nationalist prin-
ciples" that he had "fought for all
of his life" and of "surrender to
international pressure for one-
sided Israeli concessions."
ta.li
B'noi Toroh Congregation Children*
Shobbat Service Boca Raton
- Jon. 14
I Jewish Community Day School -
Cocktoil Party 8:30 p.m.
| Jan. IS
B'noi Toroh Congregation, Tallil one!
Tifillin Club Boca Raton
B'nai Torah Congregation lecture Boca Raton
Temple Beth El Brotherhood Breakfast -
Boca Raton 10: IS a.m.
Temple Emonu-EI Sisterhood Lake Worth -
Breakfast -9:30 a.m.
Women's Americon ORT Royal Palm Beach Rummage Sale
I

I

I
i
i
i
i
i
j
i
j
i
i
j
j
j
i
i
i
i
i
i
16
Boca Roton
Women's American ORT Regular Meeting
B'nai B'nth Women Naomi 12 30 p.m.
Hadossah Shalom Noon
Hodassah-Palm Beach-Tikvoh- 12 30p m
Jewish Family & Children's Service 7:30 p.m.
Temple Emonu-EI Sisterhood 12:30p.m
Temple Israel Sisterhood Noon
Jan. 17
B'noi Toroh Congregation Yiddish Culture Circle -
Boca Raton 7:30p.m.
B'noi B'nth Women Menoroh Board 10 am
B'nai B'nth Women Tjedakah Board 8pm
Hodassoh Henrietta Szold -1pm
Temple Beth El Sisterhood Donor luncheon Noon
Temple Israel Board -8pm
Yiddish Culture Group 10a.m.
B'nai B'nth lodge 3041 -8 15pm
Americon Jewish Congress 12 30 p m.
Jan. 18
B'nai Torah Congregation Women's Group -
Regular Meeting Boca Raton -8pm
American Techmon Society
JEWISH FEDERATION WOMEN'S DIVISION
CAMPAIGN CABINET 8 p.m
Jewish War Veterans Aumliary 408 I p m.
Women's Americon ORT Region 9 30 a.m.
Temple Beth Sholom Sisterhood Board 10:15a.m.
JEWISH FEDERATION GOLF TOURNAMENT -
THE FOUNTAINS 8 45a.m.
Jan. 19
Temple Beth El Sisterhood Regulor Meeting Boca Raton
JEWISH FEDERATION WOMEN'S DIVISION -
$6,000 LUNCHEON 11 am
Hodassah Rishona 1 p.m.
Free Sons of Israel 7 p.m.
American Jewish Committee 8 p.m.
Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Board Noon
Hadossah Al lya Board 10 a.m.
Hodassah Bat Gurion Youth Aliyo Luncheon Noon
Hodassah Yovel 1 p.m.
Hodassah Zhava 12:30 p.m.
National Council Jewish Women -
Okeechobee Unit 12 30 p m
Women's American ORT Evening Board 8 p.m.
Temple Israel Men's Club Board 8 p. m.
Jan. 21
Women's American ORT Evening 8 p.m.
Temple Beth El Social Sets
Jewish Community Center Film Series
Women's American ORT Royal Palm Beach Mustcano
Jan. 22
Jewish Community Center
Hadassoh Choi- I2:30p m.
Temple Beth El Bond Dinner 6 p.m.
Jan. 23
B'noi B'nth Women Boynton Board 1 p.m.
B'nai B'nth Women-Naomi Boord 1 p.m.
Women's Americon ORT North Palm Beach 12:30 p.m.
Women's American ORT Palm Beach
Women's American ORT West Gate Boord Noon
Hodassah Choi 12:30 p. m.
Hadossah Rishona (Fund-Raising) 7 p.m.
24
Yiddish Culture Circle-
B'noi Torah Congregation
Boca Raton 7 30 p.m.
Brandeis University Women Brandeis Professor Boca Raton
B'noi B'nth Women Masada luncheon Noon
B'nai B'nth Women Menoroh Donor Noon
B'noi B'nth Women Mitzvah Lunchon Noon
B'noi B'nth Women Tzedakah 8 p. m.
Congregation Anshei Sholom 1 p.m.
Yiddish Culture Group 10 a.m.
Temple Beth David Sisterhood 8 p.m.
Jan. 25
Hodossoh Avivo Regular Meeting Boco Raton
National Council Jewish Women Meeting -
Boco Raton -8pm
JEWISH FEDERATION BOARD MEETING -8 p.m.
Jewish Guild for the Blind 10 30 a.m.
Jewish Community Day School Friends 8 p.m.
Notionol Council Jewish Women
Notional Council Jewish Women Palm Beach 8 p.m.
Pioneer Women Golda Meir Board
Women's American ORT Century Noon
Temple Beth David Sisterhood -8 p.m.
Women's Americon ORT Delroy 12:30 p.m.
Techmon Reception 4 to 6 p m.
Jan. 26
JEWISH FEDERATION LANDS OF THE PRESIDENTS
SOCIAL GATHERING 8 pm.
Americon Jewish Congress Board 1230 p. m.
B'noi B'nth 2969 8 p.m.
Hadassoh Aliya Noon
Hadossah Bat Gurion
Jewish Community Center Executive
Women's American ORT Polm Beach -
Mother to Another Noon
Temple Beth El Men's Club Board -8pm.
Congregation Anshei Sholom Men's Club 8 p.m
3IIC
3HC
3ttC
3C
om we
^ilC
one
one
SADAT VISITS ISRAEL!
WHY NOT YOU?
DO IT THE RIGHT WAY- THE EXCITING WAY-
THE PERSON-TO-PERSON WAY WITH THE
AMERICAN JEWISH CONGRESS
Learn how from
TUESDAY, JAN. 17 10:30 A
BREAKERS HOTEL
S. County Rd.
Palm Beach, Fla.
BETTY WEIR ALDERSON
"THE LADY OF THE TOURS"
M.
TUESDAY, JAN. 17 2:30 P.M.
Holiday Inn
6255 Okeechobee Blvd.
Century Village
n
Help us celebrate the 20th Ann.versory of our Overseas Tour Program.
Join us for Birthday Cake & Coffee.
Reservations required, write or cal
I 689 4884 (Free admission)
Mrs. Terry FeWmon
c/o AMERICAN JEWISH CONGRESS
NAME__
ADDRESS.
CITY
4200 BISCAYNE RIVD., MIAMI, HA. 33137
YPC 0) (We) w.ll be delighted to attend the d.scuss-on of the American
"**# Jewish Congress Overseas Program
.STATE.
TELEPHONE NO
THERE WILL RE
MEETING PLACE
ZIP
Of US (NUMRfR)


Friday, January 13, 1978
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 7
Jewish Community renter Presents
KEREN ORR PROGRAM
The Jewish Community Center
Keren Orr Pre-School Program is
provided for children ages two
and a half through five years old.
Early Childhood Education:
Sharen Stone, supervisor, 8:30 to
1 p.m. a creative individualized
program providing a relaxed
atmosphere where the child is en-
couraged to develop a good self-
image, physical stamina and
critical thinking skills. Special-
ized programs in music, dance,
[ art and Hebrew. Emphasis on
language, arts and mathematic
readiness skills.
Pre-School Enrichment Pro-
gram: Lisa Rubin, Enrichment
Supervisor, 1 to 3 p.m. A child's
introduction to the creative and
performing arts and natural
sciences. Child's developmental
goals are: large muscle develop-
ment through dance and body
movement; small muscle
development through exploration
of various art media; poise and
self-confidence through story
dramatization and puppet shows;
and awareness of the world
around him through basic science
experiments.
Creative Skills Program:
Judith Fenakel, 3 to 5:30 p.m.
Socialization with peers, story
dramatization and puppet play.
Available to Full Day children.
Fees, Early Childhood Education
$60 per month; Pre-School
Enrichment Program is $40 per
month; Full Day Program 8:30
to 5 p.m. is $125 per month.
Applications are available at the
JCC. Register now for the Winter
Mid-Year; JCC membership
required. Call 689-7700 for more
information.
CHILDREN'S PROGRAMS
Sixty-five children from the
community enjoyed two JCC
programs offered during the two-
week winter vacation. The
Kaleidoscope Nature Travel Pro-
gram was a success and the
children enjoyed Fort Lauderdale
Ocean World, hiking at Pine Jog,
cruising down the Loxahatchee
River and even holding snakes!
The JCC super-circus week was
a hit. The children learned skits,
acrobatics, made costumes,
made-up in clown white, and pre-
sented all their antics to visiting
parents in our "Greatest Show on
Karth."
JUNIORS
Kids: There are some great
things in store for you beginning
Jan. 16. All the arts and crafts
courses will continue, as well as
ballet and karate. The new pro-
gram includes a Nature Study
Club at Pine Jog Center. You'll
take nature hikes, study and hold
snakes and other animals, and
learn about the environment.
Professional Pine Jog personnel
will guide you through this
fantastic nature journey.
JCC Troubadours under the
direction of music expert Khona
Lustic, will audition anyone from
fourth to sixth grades for a
musical that the JCC will
produce in conjunction with the
drama group. Lisa Rubin will
help with Beginning Stitchery.
)f Learn the art of needlepoint,
crewel, and other fancy stitches.
TWEENS
Come and enjoy your regular
Wednesday night meetings at
7:30 p.m. Help plan the next 10
meetings. Programs begin Jan.
16.
JCC Bandstand Dancing will
be offered every Wednesday
before Tween night activities.
Learn all the great dances, but
sign up now before the class
closes.
You can Paint Your Clothes
with Lisa Rubin, and learn the
art of Jazz Dancing with Barbara
Altz.
TEENS
Make Tuesday nights count.
Come on over and get to know
the kids in the JCC Teen group.
Right before that on Tuesdays
from 6;30 to 7:30 p.m. Learn the
latest In dance crazes in our JCC
Bandstand dance group. We've
also got Karate (Co-ed),
Sculpture and Ceramics. Register
now.
SUNDAY FUNDAY
Every other Sunday beginning
Jan. 15 children in First Grade
through Sixth Grade will have
the opportunity to participate in
a myriad of activities including
Arts and Crafts, Sports Clinics
and organized Team Sports.
Come and join us for these
Sunday afternoons from 1 to 3
p.m. You must register prior to
attending. Spaces are limited (10
alternate Sundays). Fees: JCC
members $12.50; non-members
$25.
The JCC is proud to announce
a Baby Sitting and Child Care
Course starting Thursday, Jan.
19 and continuing for five con-
secutive weeks from 7 to 9 p.m.
for 13 years old and up. The fee is
$12 for JCC members and $25 for
non-members. Upon completition
of the course, which includes 20
hours of comprehensive child
care, first aid, CPR, feeding,
nutrition, recreation, etc., each
participant will receive a JCC
child care certificate and be auto-
matically enrolled in the JCC
Baby Sitting Pool. The JCC
considers the important need
among the members of the Teen
and Tween community for part-
time work and financial inde-
pendence and hope we can assist
them in securing this type of
work. Instructors: Marcy Fine,
R.N.; Lisa Rubin, Sharen Stone,
Bill Keiser.
SPORTS FANS
The JCC shortly will be of-
fering a comprehensive program
of athletic activities for all age
groups, under the direction of Bill
Keiser. Bill will be coaching
basketball, soccer, softball,
volleyball, calisthenics, track and
more. He also will be adding rec-
reational activities to the
program.
Sports activities will involve
the JCC in intermural com-
petitions and a Grand JCC
Olympiads. Starting date will be
announced soon. Call 689-7700
for more details.
CAT PROGRAM (Counselor
Apprentice Trainee) Ages 16 and
17
Last summer the JCC offered
its first season of the creative and
performing arts program. One of
its successes was the great
rapport established between staff
and junior counselors. In
preparation for this summer's
program, a 20-hour CAT
Training Course will be offered to
boys and girls who wish to apply
as junior counselors in the
program. The course will include
recreation, first aid, CPR, sports
guidance, water safety and more.
The course will begin Thursday,
Feb. 23 from 7 to 9 p.m. and meet
for five consecutive weeks.
Instructors are Bill Keiser, Lisa
Rubin and Michael Soil. Fees are
$12.50 for members and $25 for
non-members. Call the JCC.
EXTENSION PROGRAM
Attention: All North Palm
Beach and Palm Beach Gardens
residents: The JCC is offering an
extension program in this area
every Monday afternoon from
3:30 to 5:30 p.m. to children,
in grades K through sue.
Courses in ballet, karate, arts and
crafts, sports clinics, street
theater and more. Call the JCC
. for a special application blank
listing times and fees. Classes are
limited.
ADULT PROGRAMS
Michael Puder-Harris, chair-
person for adult programs urges
all adults to take special note of
the wide variety of educational
and recreational programs
available at the JCC this winter
semester.
Quality specialists in their
respective fields have been
engaged to afford participants
the best possible instruction. All
classes begin the week of Jan. 16.
For a copy of a detailed Winter
Program call 669-7700.
Here are a few of the available
programs: Brian Rich is con-
tinuing with his unusual course
in Natural Food Cooking. Both
a.m. and p.m. classes are being
offered; Personal Growth Work-
shop participants will be working
with Dr. Ronald Schenberg, a
clinical psychologist of the
Gestalt persuasion. Those
familiar with his work through
the Widowed Workshop may
wish to participate in this group.
PHOTOGRAPHERS
Ms. Peggy Roaman, M.A.,
plans to explore the use of the
most up-to-date equipment, com-
position and design of photos.
Limited places available for this
class.
WIDOWED-TO-WIDOWED
WORKSHOP
Don't miss the important
meeting to be held Sunday, Jan.
22 at 7 p.m. in the Senior Center.
Elections of officers and a dis-
cussion of future programs are on
the agenda.
SEPARATION
AND LOSS
Ms. Ginger Bush, M.S.W..
comes to us from South County
Mental Health. She will be giving
a course focusing on how various
cultures deal with the advent of
losses be they physical or
emotional in nature.
Hospice intervention and other
solutions to these problems will
be covered. Selected texts to be
used.
YIDDISH CONVERSATION
AND CULTURE
Transliterations of almost for-
gotten songs, poems and folk
sayings are presented by
Shoshana Flexer in her weekly
classes. Come and visit mini-
mal previous knowledge of Yid-
dish is all you need.
YOGA helps remove the
The children of "Super Circus" celebrate Monica Kay's trans-
formation from girl to clown. Pictured (from left to right) are
Jonathen Davidoff, Jackie Strasser, Suzanne Strasser, Missie
Ollin, Monica Kay, Judy Schlussel, Matthew Bernstein, Jodi
Crane, and with her back to the camera, is Andreanne TilL
causes of headaches, insomnia,
anxiety and stress, while you
learn to develop will power, con-
centration ability and deep
mental peace. Beatrice Ross, an
accomplished yoga specialist, will
give six sessions beginning
Friday, Jan. 20. For further
information on any of the classes,
contact the Center.
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
of the palm beaches, inc.
2415 Okeechobee Boulevard, West Palm Beach, Florida 3340 '
Telephone 689-7700
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PALM BEACH 832-0211
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i ......n ih'iVi i i ii

------


PageS
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday. January 13,1978
What Are They Saying? News Views
Henry Gt
Community Relat >oas CouaKil
"Hi* Aiwfiftt Jewish
Committee's Summary
alike Hebrew Pm
Shimon Peres in Yediot
Ahmm: Bg*ft go* back the
Suet Canal and the oil through
the partial agreements of 19*4
and i?~5. but as a result of these
agreements Israel buih its
military- power to such an extent
that the military opcxxi was to a
great extent out oi the question
for Egypt. Abo. the ability of the
Arabs to bring American
on Israel proved to be
Sadat decided to get out
of this very problematic situauor.
by going to Jerusalem
CRC Update
|SMnaa57 r>r Bfoch said It
starts, he went on. "with social
conditioning. The psychiatrists,
who take an oath to be guided by
the principle of communist
morality.' may really believe that
those who disagree with the
political system are strange.
And if they do not. then they are
dissenters It is easier to play
along."
There haw been doctors who
raised questions or protested and
were warned not to make prob-
lems or were themselves arrested
Do the psychiatrists need psy-
chiai.r% That's been dis-
cussed. Dr Bloch said It's a
frightening i
\rel Ginai in lVvior A rower
Gmai thinks that what stands
he haul America's lack of en-
over the latest hap-
in the Maklk* Ease is its
need for stahtluation in the area,
which overrides s interest in
> wiring its own poaataon of
influence A stabOued Vlidd*
East mear-s a steadv ffow of oil to
the West.
Daniel Block D+i*r
potnts out that Begins power
v aa the fact that rf he decades oe
iocs and cvwnpromase. he
haw :he shinty to i
InteraacianalTi
A study of the PLO reveals the
nature of a threat that r| not
disappear on the basis of
dramatic military operations or
rhetoric Charles Wie)
While the maionty of Western
for combat tang terrorism, the
Israeks h*\e an offensive policy
Too many nations do not
mnhahar- tbear
resoums until an actual
incident takes place, and then
with the in of
:i :betr bW*Jtor]
Soviet and American societies are
vast In Russia, the State
provides fobs, housing and
education all private matters
in the IS. But Soviets gain
these social rights" at the
expense oi political freedom
taken for granted by Americans
If you don t think as Brexhnev
thinks. you re considered
mentally- IL" comments one
Soviet psychologist living in the
Boston area
Russians were never able to
count on or trust anyone they did
Iwiiami with in the Soviet
Union." en plains Enid Shapiro,
supervisor of the JFCS Brookiine
branch We know that they had
to yell and holler to get what they
wanted m the Soviet Union We
^"^fid that strength because it
helped them to get out. Here that
style is not acceptable and it
takes a while for them to un-
derstand
They see our agency as an
author* y she adds They- have
no experience with social
agenda* and often fail to realize
that we are not the government.
Their ni wiaal stress and frus-
tration is often projected on the
Family Service and other
i providing help."
Federation's TV Program
To Begin 1978 Season
Mosaic, the Jewish Federation
of Palm Beach County sponsored
TV program will begin its 1978
season on Sunday. Jan. 15 at
9 30 a-m. on Channel 5-WPTV
The opening program will be Part
I of a documentary' filmed in
Israel this past November,
during the first Palm Beach
County community mission
Encounter with Jewish His-
tory." The film was produced by
Barbara Shubnan. co-leader of
the mission and commentator for
the Mosaic program. Steve
Gordon is co-host for the show.
The Jewish Federation first
sponsored a TV' program in 1962.
The program called People of the
Booh was hosted by Evelyn
Bhun. The format included
sermons by the local rabbis,
organizational information and
up-to-date news on Israel, holi-
day programs, etc. In 1965. the
name was changed to Our People
and Thelma (Tootsie) Newman
took over as commentator for the
program.
IN 1975, the program became
Mosaic and was co-hosted by
Cliff Josephson. former executive
director of the Jewish Federation.
Rabbi Sheldon Harr and Barbara
Shulman. Steve Gordon, presi-
dent of Gordon Associates, a
local advertising agency, has
produced Mosaic since its in-
ception four years ago and today
serves as the co-boat for the
show.
"We chose the name Mosaic
because the word means variety
and this is the type of program-
ming we present to the Jewish
and the general community,
stated Gordon.
In the past the programs have
included interviews with per-
sonalities in the fields of politics,
literature, the arts, music and
others. There also have been
programs on Israeli fashions.
Jewish cooking. Jewish holidays
and Jewish education.
"I THINK the most exciting
program we've ever done was our
exclusive interview last year with
Moshe Dayan m Palm Beach."
said Gordon.
"Our program has been well
received by both the Jewish and
the non-Jewish community."
stated Barbara Shubnan. We
strive to give the community the
most interesting and informative
programs possible, and we are
grateful to Channel 5 for giving
us the opportunity to do so."
theCfoposaax:
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THE SHELF MAN
VENTILATED VINYL
COATED "\
CLOSET SHELVING
"Let me r
closets for man mom tisef'
Call CHUCK for prompt fast service?
FREE ESTlMATESmGUARANTEED WORKMANSHIP
PHONE: 566-6222
Licensed
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Insured
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skefdipacead
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Gomaja
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OLIVER'S
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TfchSk


I
January 13,1978
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 9
How Press Sees Middle East
By PHILIP KLEINMAN
I London Chronicle Feature
ON DON Though Fleet
rt now devotes an enormous
iunt of space to the Middle
,t its comments tend to run in
ji'ctable grooves. Thus there
nothing in the least sur-
,ing in the fact that most
ional papers hailed President
fts visit to Jerusalem as a
*ntous step towards peace,
in their urging Prime Min-
r Begin to make some im-
iate concession to match.
t was unfortunately also not
prising that no paper
Inaged to give the impression
!t it really understood what
going on in the Middle East.
,ind all the rhetoric, who has
n doing what to whom?
'HE FIRST plausible answer
hat question that I have seen
in the latest issue of Jon
Kimche's Afro-Asian Affairs
newsletter. If I rarely quote from
this publication, it is not because
it is less interesting on the
Middle East than the national
newspapers the opposite is
usually the case but because
the main task of this column is to
monitor general press attitudes.
For once, however, let us forget
Fleet Street, and concentrate on
Kimche's remarkable report. As
usual, he quotes no sources, and I
cannot vouch for its accuracy.
But it does make sense.
According to Kimche, the
events which triggered Sadat's
mission took place not in Egypt
but in Syria, which in October
began to move 30,000 of its
42,000 troops in Lebanon
(Kimche's figures) to the Golan
front. Others were sent to
Southern Lebanon to pose as
Palestinian guerrillas.
TOWARDS the end of

\ictured with Alexander Slepak (right) are his brother (Leonid)
\nd his mother (Maria) who are still living in the Soviet Union,
\nable to obtain exit visas out of that country.
\Son of Refuseniks to Speak
October, President Assad in-
formed Sadat that Israel was
reinforcing its positions in the
north and clearly preparing for a
preemptive strike into Lebanon
or Syria. Assad also told Sadat of
his own troop movements and
requested parallel action by
Egyptian forces in Sinai.
Sadat responded by ordering
large-scale military exercises. On
the other side, Israel altered her
forces to the dangers in both
south and north. Meanwhile,
Russia resumed delayed arms
deliveries to Syria, and Yasir
Arafat delivered at the beginning
of November a speech which
appeared to cancel the PLO's
previous agreement to withdraw
its men from Southern Lebanon.
Alarmed at the way things
were shaping up, and remem-
bering how Syria and Russia and
maneuvered Nasser into the
measures which led to the Six-
Day War, Sadat decided to
"preempt any step taken by
either the Syrians or the Pales-
tinians which might have pro-
voked the Israelis into an action
similar to that of June, 1967." In
other words, the object of his
Jerusalem mission "was not pri-
marily to make peace but to save
Egypt." To save Egypt,
however, he needed peace.
SADAT, says Kimche, told his
hosts that he was not in Jeru-
salem to negotiate. He and they
agreed that negotiations should
be conducted in Cairo. The Presi-
dent did not, unlike many leader
writers, believe that complicated
issues could be resolved on the
spur of the moment.
Transportation A vailable
To Disadvantage*!Seniors
[Alexander Slepak, son of
viet Jewish Refuseniks
ladimir and Maria Slepak of
|oscow, arrived in Israel in early
Dvember and is now in the
lited States to speak on behalf
his family and other Jewish
Itivists still in the Soviet Union.
Friday, Jan. 20 at 8:30 p.m.
epak will address Congregation
nshei Sholom in West Palm
^ach.
Alexander, now 25, has served
^rious prison sentences in the
SSK for emigration activities
Dng with his father Vladimir,
ktween 1972 and 1977. He was
[lowed to emigrate to Israel in
Btober, 1977 to rejoin his Amer-
an wife Elaine. At the same
ne, his younger brother Leonid
Jfused induction in the Soviet
ny in Moscow and faces a
[ssible trial and prison sen-
nee.
I WHILE a candidate for Presi-
fnt, then-Gov. Jimmy Carter
Dke out on behalf of the Slepak
lily before the B'nai B'rith
kternational Convention in
pptember, 1976 saying that "If
[become President, the fate of
bch men as Slepak will be very
buch on my mind aa I negotiate
with the Soviet Union."
Since first applying in 1970,
the entire family has been under
constant watch by the Soviet
secret police (KGB). Both
parents, dismissed from their
jobs in Moscow, have signed
numerous petitions on behalf of
Soviet Jewish activists. Refused
emigration permits because of
alleged secret work, Vladimir
Slepak has admitted that his
work has long ago become ob-
solete.
Alexander is traveling with his
American wife, whom he married
in Moscow. In addition to this
meeting, Alexander has been
conferring about his family with
various U.S. governmental of-
ficials in Washington, D.C., at
meetings arranged by the Na-
tional Conference on Soviet
Jewry.
Slepak's appearance in Palm
Beach County is being coor-
dinated by the National Jewish
Community Relations Advisory
Council and the International-
Soviet Jewry Task Force of the
Community Relations Council of
the Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County. The Task Force is
chaired by John Moss.
130
Close ppien&s & Relatives
Will always RememBea
the We66inq Reception of
me. & mas. aiex 6avi6$'
OauQhtea at temple
Beth-l in West palm Beach
fogt QaiimtCatoiiq
for Information
Call: 842-2889
Transportation is available for
transit disadvantaged adults, 60
years or older, at the Compre-
hensive Senior Service Center.
Call the JCC for information.
Five classes of Adult and Com-
munity Education will begin on
Jan. 16. This second session will
introduce "When To Call the
Doctor." It will be on Thursdays
at 1 p.m. Classes are free.
Registration is required.
DANCE Energistics meets
Tuesdays at 10 a.m. members, 10
lessons, $10; non-members, 10
lessons, $20.
Is "The Impossible Dream" of
peace in the Middle East coming
true? What do you think? Come
and express yourself on this
topic, at the Self Led In-depth
Discussion. Call Moderator,
Rozalind Ram at JCC to par-
ticipate. We will be meeting
every third Tuesday beginning
on Jan. 17 from 1 to 3 p.m.
Sunday for Seniors has
returned, meeting Sundays at 1
p.m. for an informal get-together.
Margo Sanders, chairperson,
invites seniors to stop by and join
the group for a friendly afternoon
of discussions, cards or games
and socialization. Joel Levine,
former leader of the original
Sunday for Seniors, will be the
guest speaker on Sunday, Jan.
15.
Second Tuesday Club is in-
volved in its semi-annual Flea
Market and Garage Sale to be
held Jan. 29. Sam and Marion
Rubin, chairpersons, and their
committee are making plans. Call
the JCC if you have items to con-
tribute to the sale or wish to help
in the fund-raising event.
Organizations are invited to par-
ticipate. Call the Center and ask
for Sam.
Lido Spa Holiday: Make plans
to join the four-day three-night
trip to the Lido Spa in Miami
Beach from March 26 to 29. For
information concerning prices
and what the trip will include,
contact the JCC.
Artist of the Month: Esther
Molat. chairperson for Artist of
the Month, announces Hyman
Rosen as artist for the month of
January. Rosen is a retired ac-
countant who replaced his pencils
and balance sheets with brushes
and canvases. Stop by and see his
works at the Comprehensive
Senior Service Center. Visit the
hospitality corner.
I nd.-rstrlil
Orlhi Mini
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Open f 7
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t -JFri.
14 Sun
Closed Sal
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Empire, of course...
Look for the fresh Empire
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and on all chicken parts.
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At better quality Kosher Butcher Shops, Food Stores and Dellys, Coast-to-Coast
DISTRIBUTED BY:
MENDELSONS', INC. 672-5800


V
'W
Page 10
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, January 13,1978
Jewish Federation
Mini-Mission to Israel
Jewish
Destiny
is in
Members of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County sponsored "mini-
mission to Israel wait in the El Al terminal as they begin their week-long fact-
fading trip. They are (left to right) Dr. Henry SaionU, Dr. Abe Szmuckler, Dr.
Howard Kay co-leader of the mission, Norman Layton, Arthur Yeckes, Dr.
Thomas Davidoff and Dr. Richard Shugarman.
Dr. Henry SaionU views a photographic display at Yad Vashem.
Visiting the gravesite of Jonathan Netahanyu, the Israeli soldier killed at
Entebbe, are (left to right) Dr. Tom Davidoff, Dr. Abe Szmuckler, Dr Henry
Saiontz, Dr. Jeffrey Faivus, Dr. Howard Kay, Mission co-leader, David
Shulman and Alan L. Shulman, mission co-leader.
Dr. Thomas
Rehabilitation
Davidoff greets Revital Kraus, an outpatient at the Alyn
Center where she goes every day for therapy.
Mission participants attend a briefing at Yad Vashem, the memorial to the si$^.
million Jews killed in the Holocaust during World War II.
Alan L. Shulman (right), General Chairman for the Jewish Federation's 197Q
CJA-IEF campaign and co-leader of the mission, listens to an English tran-
slation in a Hebrew class given at Absorption Center to recent immigrants
coming into Israel, a process funded by UJA dollars.
Mini-mission participants visit Alyn, a Rehabilitation Center for Children,
totally funded by UJA dollars.
Visiting a military cemetery in Israel on the recent Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County Mini-Mission are (foreground left to right) Dr. Abe Szmuckler,
Dr. Henry Saiontz; (background) Dr. Howard Kay and Alan L. Shulman,
Mission co-leaders, and Dr. Richard Shugarman.
Dr. Tom Davidoff (left) and David Shulman (center) examine an Irnii *'*? .?**/" Nathanson; director of the Alyn Rehabilitation Center in
machinegununder the watchful eye of an Israeli soldier at the Allenby bridge DaZtd Shubn^n T^'Th ***% V*^ SlT* patU"ltS are (left to Hght>
on the Israeli-Jordan border. *noy oriage jjavid Shulman Dr. Jeffrey Faivus, Dr. Thomas Davidoff, Dr. Richard
1 ...... Shugarman, Dr. Abe Szmuckler, and Dr. Htnry SaionU.



.


, January 13, 1978
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
rage 11
Camp Shalom Opens 78 Registration;
Holds First Annual Camp Reunion
Registration for the 1978
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County's Camp Shalom summer
program was officially opened at
the first Annual Camp Shalom
reunion for former campers and
staff held on Dec. 26 at the camp
grounds on Belvedere Road.
Those present viewed slides and
films of the 1977 camp season
and learned of the plans for the
coming summer.
"This is the first camp reunion
in our 15-year history and we
hope this will be the beginning of
many more in the years to come,"
stated Charles Jacobson, camp
committee chairman. "It is
rewarding for us to see the sense
of friendship and camaraderie we
have promoted at Camp Shalom
and we look forward to con-
tinually providing this com-
munity with a high quality
camping program that comes
from our many years of ex-
perience serving the total Halm
Reach County community."
"LAST summer was one of the
most exciting and successful
seasons we've ever had," stated
Ronni Tartakow, Camp Shalom
program director. "Through our
American Red Cross water safety
program we were able to teach a
record number of children the
skills necessary to be good safe
swimmers.
"Our program is geared to the
individual child as well as to the
group, and our campers are able
to participate in programs that
are educational and creative as
well as fun. This summer's
program promises to be even
bigger and better than last
year's.
"We are planning to include in
our program courses in gym-
nastics and snorkeling. We are
also planning to develop a swim
team to compete against other
John Spielman (standing left) registers his sons Andy (left) and
Michael for the 1978 Camp Shalom summer program as Konm
Tartakow, program director (seated left) and Marilyn Lampert
look on.
. Mm
7
SW*SWP%^-
-*/
area teams. Camp Shalom will
continue to participate in the
Israeli Scout program which has
brought many fine boy and girl
scouts from Israel to this country
to spend their summers with us.
"THESE youngsters have
always provided Camp Shalom
with a tremendous spirit, and
have proved to be an exciting and
informative part of camp. The
scouts teach our youngsters
about Israel, through songs,
dances and other creative
programs and they assist in our
overall Jewish content program-
ming, which has always been a
highlight of our season.
In addition to these programs
we will continue to have the
Camp Shalom newspaper, our
ukelele band, the Camp Shalom
Players" drama group, a fine arts I
and crafts program, a full athletic
program, trips to interesting
places, and many more special
surprises."
For information on Camp
Shalom contact the Jewish Fed-
eration of 1'alm Beach County.

the first Annual Camp Shalom reunion,
lepers, their parents and camp staff met to
u> films and slides of the 1977 summer
'gram and "reminisce about the good
es they had last summer." Charles
Jacobson (right), camp committee chairman,
announced plans for the 1978 Camp Shalom
program. "We will continue to provide a high
quality camping program for the Palm Beach
County community ..."he stated.
YOU CAN FIND IT...HERE
CAMP SHALOM 1978
CAMP FEES
Pre-School, Elemeniary Divisions
8 weeks $225 ? $40 Registration and Activity Fee.
4 weeks $125 $20 Registration and Activity Fee.
(For each additional child Irom same family:
8 weeks $205 ? $40 Registration and Activity Fee;
4 weeks $115 ? $20 Registration and Activity Fee.)
FEES INCLUDE transportation, snacks, a Camp Shalom "T" Shirt, insurance and
special activities.
MINIMUM ENROLLMENT one 4-week session
Enrollment is open to children ages 3-12.
REGISTRATION and ACTIVITY FEE MUST BE PAID WITH APPLICATION |if
cancelled by June 1, one-hall of this fee will be refunded I
TOTAL FEES MUST BE PAID IN FULL PRIOR TO EACH SESSION unless
arrangements have been made for late'r payment. Reduced fees and scholarship aid
are available based on need.
For further information, please call or write:
JEWISH FEDERATION OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
2415 Okeechobee Boulevard 689 5900
West Palm Beach. Florida 33409
CAMP SHALOM (Pre School, Elementary)
RETURN AT ONCE TO CAMP OFFICE
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
2415 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach. Florida 33409
Please enroll my child (children) m the summer day camp.
Male D
I
i
I
1 Child's Name.
I Name of School.
|2. Child's Name.
I
I
Female GB",hDa,e-
, Grade in Sept '78.
Male D
Female DBl,,hDa,e-
Name of School.
, Grade in Sept.'78.
Parent's Name.
Address______
, Phone No. ,
Business Phone No.
1st Period June 19-July 14
2nd Period July 17 Aug. 11 ?
a I wish to enroll my child (children) for:
|Eight weeks June 1r Aug. 11 ?
I hereby apply fo mission of my child(ren) to the day camp program of tha
I Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County.
I
Parent Signature.
, Date,
Note: Each child's application must be eccompemed by payment of Registration
Activity fee. Check payable to: Camp Shalom.


Page 12
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, January 13,1978
Campaign Reception Held For
Hi-Rise Division Chairmen
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Hirschberg (left) and Mr. and Mrs. Louis
Hill attend a Hi-Rise Reception given for the chairmen of the
Hi-Rises, at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Alan L. Shulman in Palm
Beach. Mr. Hirschberg is chairman for the Royal Saxon
Cor, bined Jewish Appeal Israel Emergency Fund campaign
and Mr. Hill is chairman of the Carlyle House.
Attending the Hi-Rise Reception for the campaign chairmen of
the Hi-Rises are Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Lieberman Rapallo South
(left) and Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Wohlgemuth Harbour
House.
Mr. and Mrs. H. I. Bucher lleft) of the Claridges East West
and Mr. and Mrs. Milton R. Cohen of the Lands of the
President attend the Hi-Rise Chairman Reception on Dec. 29.
George Golden (right), co-chairman of the Hi-Rise Division for
the 1978 Combined Jewish Appeal Israel Emergency Fund
campaign greets Sam Orling, chairman of Longwood, at the
recent reception given for Hi-Rise chairmen.
Mr. and Mrs. Albert I. Shuster. Mr. Shuster is campaign
chairman for the Reef.
<3E>
Mortimer Weiss, co-chairman of the Hi-Rise Division (right),
greets Mr. and Mrs. Donald J. Brodey of the Barclay at the
recent reception for Hi-Rise chairmen held at the home of Mr.
and Mrs. Alan L. Shulman in Palm Beach.
Mr. and Mrs. Julius Steinhauer attend the Hi-Rise reception on
Dec. 29. Mr. Steinhauer is the chairman for the Patrician
Combined Jewish Appeal Israel Emergency Fund campaign


.-riday. January 13,1978
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 13
I ,co Mindlin
Books?They're for Burning
Continued from Page 4
shop. 1 made a most eloquent
Mentation: Nation of the Book,
)la. through many millennia.
Got any dresses?" I was
sked. "Or men's clothing?
lybe some furniture in good
ilion wood pieces, fine
nod pieces?"
THE BOOKS," I said, are
nainlv in English novels,
unnicntaries, histories, studies
)f Israel. There are even some," I
poktgized, in Yiddish and
lebrew, too, but I am sure there
ire plenty of people around who'd
)c glad to buy things like that."
Maybe a good kitchen ap-
ce?" the voice came back.
Or ii radio? Radios are coming
ack big. People don't see 80
)od no more. They want radi~;
A ho s got time for books even if
they had ihe eyes? Listen, in our
)usines8, books are a junk item, a
nuisance."
On the phone to a convalescent
home, I was told. We'll pick up
clothing. If you have plenty
clothing, I mean plenty, maybe
we tan come by and pick it up."
A LONG pause followed
during which neither of us hung
up \iid then: Or a color TV."
the voice suggested in excited
nlicipation, and before I could
ay ilure wasn't any TV. the
uggestion was repeated with a
pitnole in the form of a pro-
tibilion: But no black-and-
white, they're a dime a dozen.
only color."
About the books," I said.
We'll take them, but just as a
courtesy to gel them off your
hands. But you got to have
plenty clothing, or a color TV, or
we can't be bothered."
I was elated and went through
a rack of old suits in my mind I
could wrap up the cartons of
K)ks in and be done with them
once and for all.
and drove ther
would hold
downtown.
The librarian greeted me,
sniffing and sneering at the same
time. Til go through every
single one of them," she warned
me, "to see if maybe there's
something worthwhile."
Suddenly, I felt a lubricinus
coat of perspiration spreading all
over my body. I wasn't giving
something away free; I was a
thief trying to get rid of stolen or
worthless items, or perhaps a
pusher of marijuana or cocaine
detected by the scrutinizing eye
of a sharp librarian bent on pro-
tecting the community from the
scourge of an underworld
operation. My heart pounded.
and a sense of embarrassment
and depression seized me.
THE CUSTODIAN, who was
wheeling the cartons into the
library from outside, sniffing
suspiciously, stopped short and
shouted: A roach. There's a g
amn roach. Lets get this filth out
of here. The stuff ought to be
burned, if you ask me."
There's a most marvelous
1918 edition of the Ben (iurion-
Ben Zvi study on Israel in the
collection." my high, cracking
voice, plagued by nervousness,
managed. Its in Yiddish. .'
think, or maybe Hebrew. And
there are matched sets of Tolstoy
in Russian.
English ."
Agnon in
"I CAN help get the hooks into
catalogue shape." I volunteered.
Catalogue shape?" the phone
cackled in laughter. I told you.
we'll take them off your hands
just as a courtesy. You know
what we do with books? We burn
books when we're forced to take
them. Books area fire hazard."
Not mine you don't burn," I
said, and so I guess you don't
need any suits either."
All of this was several years
jo. Since then, I have had
visions in my mind of the
Warsaw Ghetto uprising, the
Kristalsnacht pogrom, the
burning pyres of Jewish works
throughout Nazi Germany, the
Inquisition, the Crusades the
millennia of our torturous
stewardship back to the building
of the Bible itself.
ALSO SINCE then, dozens of
more cartons of books we cast off
|rom our library have piled up in
Mr garage where they are now
*>red. Occasionally, a carton at
time seems suddenly to "dis-
ppear," I suspect thrown ou*
"rreptitiously one by one with
w trash if only to make room for
nore cartons.
'rankly, I have been unable to
Place a single book since those
"rsl memorable efforts of mine.
JThe other week, however, I
tried again, this time with a truly
august Jewish institution
wasting a fine library.
Only for you," thev said
snidgingly. We don't really like
to accept gifts of books "
BY Now steeled to such
difference, I refused to philoso-
ize over the disgrace of why
ey would rather not bother or
en to insist that they send a
Jck to pick the cartons up.
stead, I jammed as many into
y car as the trunk and back seat
Strelitz Names St. Louis
Man to Chair 'Upgrade'
NEW YORK Bernard S.
(Bud) Levin of St. Louis, Mo.,
was named chairman of the
United Jewish Appeal's Oper-
ation Upgrade here, by Ieonard
R. Strelitz, UJA general
chairman.
Strelitz, who called Operation
Upgrade a moving force in
raising the level of giving in
UJA Eederation campaigns
since its inception five years ago.
described Levin as "ideally
suited to sustain this vital
program in the crucial year
ahead."
AS CHAIRMAN, Levin will
be heading a nationwide solici-
tation and training program to
achieve upward mobility in cam-
paign gifts at the intermediate
level ($1,000 to $10,000).
Operation Upgrade provides
communities with the services of
a highly skilled corps of inter-
regional solicitors as well as
intensive programs of solicitor
training, including a Community
Leadership Practicum in con-
junction with the Council of
Jewish Eederations.
Levin is a member of the UJA
Young Leadership Cabinet. He is
vice president of the Jewish Fed-
eration of St. Louis and chairman
of the Special Gifts Division of
the Israel Emergency Fund. Also
in St. Louis, he is a member of
PASTON &COFFMAN,M.D/s,PA
Philip Paston, M.D.
Tom M. Coff man, M.D.
Diplomates of the American Board
of Opthamology Specializing in
Diseases & Surgery of the Eye
Announce the relocation of their offices to
2889 -10th Ave. North
Lake Worth, 33461
(Next to Doctor's Hospital)
TELEPHON E: 964-0707
PALM BEACH EYE ASSOCIATES
Richard G. Shugarman, M.D.
Emanuel Newmark, M.D.
P.A.
Announces the Relocation of
their (Watt Palm Bt.ch) Office
in the Practice o Diseases and
Surgery of the Eye
To
1500 No.
Dixie Hwy.,
659-7277
Suite 201
the Atlantis Office Remains
At 111A J.F.Kennedy Circle
968-0130
I could manage no more
defense and escaped before some-
one cornered me, maybe the cus-
todian behind his dolly, to
demand that I take the books
back with me. On the way home,
the perspiration matted more
heavily beneath my clothes, and
my embarrassment became
uncontrollable.
THE ROACH. I a.* ired
myself, got into the e rtons
because they had been slot... in
the garage all those years. The
Sense <>f revulsion everyone felt in
BERNARD S. (BUD) LEVIN
the boards of the St. Louis
Jewish Community Center
Association and the Central
Agency for Jewish Education.
Klsewhere, he serves on the
boards of the North American
Jewish Students Appeal and the
National Conference Center in
New York. He has been a member
of the board of the Joint Dis-
tribution Committee Council.
A vice president of the Mid-
west Petroleum Company and of
the Winchester Tire Company,
Levin is a member of the
Advisory Board of the Citizens
Bank of University City.
varying degrees at being given
books seemed now to be .eizing
me, too. When I got he ne. I
sprayed my car thoroughly.
Yesterday, as I was bringing
out a new carton of books to the
garage, sad to see the wide open
space there ineluctably being
filled up again. I wondered
whether there is a difference
between spraying and burning.
In either case, that's whatyou'do
to prevent contamination. At
Dachau, to members of the
Nation of the Book, they did
both.
Anshei Sholom Testimonial
To Benefit Israel Bonds
Max B. Shapiro, a resident o
Century Village who heads the
committee planning the Congre-
gation Anshei Sholom testi-
monial for Rabbi Harry Z.
Schectman. announced that
Rabbi Wolf K. Kelman. executive
vice president of the Rabbinical
Assembly of America's New
York division, will be the guest
speaker at the testimonial.
Habbi Schectman. of
Congregation Anshei Sholom,
will be honored at the testimonial
which will benefit the State of
Israel Bonds on Sunday. Jan. 15
at 1 p.m.
BORN IN New York City.
Rabbi Schectman received
citations from the National Con-
ference of Christians and Jews
and from American Zionists for
service as a U.S. Army chaplain
during World War II. After
retiring from his congregation in
Kingston. N.Y., Rabbi Schec-
tman came to Anshei Sholom.
Honored for 11 years of service
on the Human Rights Com-
mission, he can be found in
Who's Who in World Jewry:
Who's Who in America; Who's
Who in Religion; Who's Who in
the West and in the Zionist
Encyclopedia of Zionist
Honorccs.

\
MAX B. SHAPIRO
O

-*KK ^
J"3
^
l2 7875 Belvedere Rd., Weet Palm Beach, Fla. 33411
Located at Camp Shalom
_SZ PROGRAMS AND FEES
.* 5 Day Program (Monday-Friday)
^ Playgroup2-3 year olds
^ Pre-School4-5 year olds
'^ Morning Program 0 a.m.12 noon
Tuition: $52 per month
a non-refundable $40 deposit Is payable with ap-
plication.
Afternoon Program: 12 noon3 p.m.
$175 per semester
**FULL-DAY PROGRAM: $400 per semester (a
savings of $25 per semester)
Phyllis Morgan: Pre-School Supervisor
Staci Lesser: Pre-School Committee Chairman
APPLICATION FORM
Child's Name.
.Blrthdata.
Parant or Guardian.
Add rest___________
.Tataphona.
-City.
-Zip.
PIMM enroll my child in the 1977-78 COMMUNITY PRE-SCHOOL
Morning program only.
Afternoon program only.
Full day program.
My (40 00 non-rafundabta application Im ancloaad
Data.
MAIL TO: COMMUNITY PRESCHOOL
Jwin Fadaratlon of Palm Reach County
2415 Okaachobaa Boulavard
Will Palm Baach, Florida 33400
. Signature


Page 14
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, January 13,197J
r
L.
<% 71
Eabbimcal f age
devoted to discussion of themes and issues relevant to Jewish life past and present
co-ordinated by the
Palm Beach County Rabbinical Council
Editor
Rabbi William H. Shapiro
I
I
.1
J
Ethics and Morals
By Rabbi Morris Silberman
Temple Emeth of Delray
Wholesale corruption in
government and business, with
stealing and murder rampant, the
breakdown of the family, the
spread of youthful delinquency
and crime all these affect not a
few individuals, but thousands
upon thousands of respectable
men and women in society. The
bitter experience of the mid-
century teaches that morality
cannot be taken for granted as
innate and "self-evident."
Decency is not an instinct, but an
acquired characteristic, which
people can shed all too easily.
Needless to say that we cannot
depend on the police power to
enforce the rules of decent human
behavior. It is not morality which
rests on the law, but the law
which rests on morality. There
are not enough policemen, judges
or jails to enforce obedience. The
law cannot force me to love my
neighbor, nor can a law com-
pelling the honoring of one's
Bo
"And ye shall eat it in haste it is the Lord's passouer"
fExod. 12.11). "The Lord smote all the first-born in the
land of Egypt" (12.29).
BO God sent Moses to Pharaoh once more with the
following words: "Go in unto Pharaoh ... and tell... him:
'... If thou refuse to let My people go, behold, tomorrow
will I bring locusts into thy border' (Exodus 10.1-4).
Pharaoh would not be moved. Then God punished Egypt
with a thick darkness. Yet Pharaoh remained adamant.
Finally, Moses warned the King of Egypt that God would
send the most fearful plague of all, the death of all the
first-born in the land, both of men and beasts. The
Israelites were given the ordinance of the Passover, so
named because God passed over the homes of the
Israelites when he killed the first-born of the Egyptians,
on midnight of the fifteenth day of the first month
(Nissan). Pharaoh was shaken, at last. He sent the
children of Israel from the land. They consisted of "about
six hundred thousand men on foot, beside children." In
their haste to leave Egypt, the Israelites baked matzoh
from dough that was not leavened. Hence the prohibition
against eating leavened bread on Passover.
(The recounting of the Weekly Portion of the Law is extracted and based
upon "The Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage," edited by P. Wollman-
Tsamir, Sis, published by Shengold. The volume is available at '5 Maiden
Lane, New York, N.Y. 10031. Joseph Schlang is president of the society
distributing the volume.
parents be enforced.
STEALING is a crime, but
there can be no legal prohibition
against envy. We are a nation
dedicated to freedom and justice
to all, yet practicing widespread
discrimination on the basis of
race, creed or color. It is obvious
that civil rights legislation and
judicial decisions are indis-
pensable instruments in fighting
grossest forms of racial and
religious discrimination. Their
usefulness, however, depends
upon the recognition by the
American people that group-
prejudice is an evil.
Ethics is substantially more
than a series of traffic regulations
for society. It includes not only
overt acts, but also the duties of
the heart, the subtler feelings and
attitudes within the spirit of
man.
We must ever cultivate a
deepening sensitivity to the
dignity and rights of all men,
women and children, in the con-
sciousness of an ever-closer bond
uniting the far-flung corners of
the earth into one human fellow-
ship. There is little need for new
ethical and moral principles that
will go beyond the highest level
of the prophets, sages and saints
of the past.
WHAT IS desperately needed
is the intelligence to understand
them and the will to apply them.
We must recognize that ethical
ideals are not principles of
etiquette or the trappings of con-
vention, but in truth, the pillars
upon which the world rests, built
into the constitution of
humankind.
The way to be nothing, is to do
nothing.
MMM
CANDLELIGHTING
mmmmmmmm
jtx%%xs%xx%xxsaixxxss%xx^

are****swj*SRS6ss*S3sa^^
Sunday evenings at 8:15 at Temple Israel
1901 North Flagler Dr., West Palm Beach
Jan. 29 Dorothy Rabinowitz
Feb. 12 Dr. William Korey
Feb. 26 Albert Vorspan
Mar. 12 Judge Jerome Hornblass
Mar. 26 Max Dimont
Subscription series tickets $10
Individual program tickets S3
(may be purchased at the door)
Student admission $1
Topic: "Survivors of the Holocaust"
Topic: "United Nations and the Middle East"
Topic: "What's Happened to Jewish Liberalism?"
Topic: "The Changing Social Mores of the Young American Jew'
Topic: "A Clash of Destinies"
Please order your tickets early.
Seats are not reserved, but
every effort will be made
to assure seating for subscription
ticket holders.
Doors open at 7:15 p.m.
JEWISH COMMUNITY FORUM
JEWISH FEDERATION OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
2415 Okeechobee Blvd.
West Palm Beach, Fla. 33409
Enclosed is my check for S_____
1978 Jewish Community Forum
Name_______________________
for.
.subscription tickets for the
Phone 689-5900 J
Address.
City____
Zip.
Phone.
Please make checks payable to the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County.
*XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX%%%%XX%XXX%\%%XX\%XX*XXM**^^^^^^1i%%^^^^%%

:
t
:
T.V. Highlights
Mosaic, the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
sponsored T.V. program, will be aired weekly over Channel
5WPTV on Sunday mornings at 9:30 a.m. beginning January
15.
Program Schedule:
January 15 Palm Beach County "Mission to Israel" Part
I.
January 22 Palm Beach County "Mission to Israel"
Part II.
Synagogues in
Palm Beach County
REFORM
CONSERVATIVE LIBERAL
TEMPLE ISRAEL
1901 North Flagler Drive
West Palm Beach, Florida
33407
833-8421
Rabbi Irving B. Cohen
Sabbath Worship Services
Friday at 8:15 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL OF
BOCA RATON
333 S.W. Fourth Avenue
Boca Raton, Fl. 33432
391-8901
Rabbi Norman T. Mendel
Cantor Martin Rosen
Sabbath services, Friday at
8:15p.m.
Saturday morning services at
10:30a.m.
TEMPLE ETERNAL LIGHT
P.O. Box 3
Boca Raton, Florida 33432
426-1600
Rabbi Benjamin Rosayn
Sabbath services, Friday ot
8:15p.m.
at Unitarian-Universolist
Fellowship Building
162 W. Palmetto Park Rd.
Boca Raton
CONSERVATIVE

CONGREGATION
ANSHEI SH0L0M
5348 Grove Street
West Palm Beach, Fla. 33409
684-3212
Rabbi Harry Z. Schectman
Cantor Arthur B. Rosenwasser
Services: Friday 8:30 a.m.,
5p.m., 8:15 p.m.
Saturday 8:30a.m., 5p.m. n.
Daily 8:30a.m., 5p.m.
CONGREGATION
BETH K0DESH
Boynton Beach, Fla.
732-5147
Rabbi Isaac O. Gimprich
Sabbath Services
Friday at8:15 p.m.
Saturday at 9 a.m.
Congregational Church
115 N. Federal Highway
TEMPLE BETH EL
2815 North Flagler Drive
West Palm Beach, Florida
33407
833-0339
Rabbi Asher Bar-Zev
Sabbath services Friday at 8:15
p.m.
Saturday at 9:30 a. m.
Daily Minyan at 8:15 a.m.,
Sunday at 9a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SH0L0M
315 N. "A" St.
take Worth, Florida 33460
585-5020
Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg
Cantor Jacob Elmon
Services, Mondays and
Thursdays
at 8:15a.m.
Friday at 8:15 p.m.
Saturday at9a.m.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID
Sabbath services, Friday at 8
p.m.
At Westminister Presbyterian
Church
10410 N. Military Trail, Palm
Beach Gardens. 321 Northlake
Blvd., North Palm Beach, Flp
, 33*08 854-1134 :
Rabbi Hymon Fishman
Cantor Nicholas Fenakel
TEMPLE BETH SH0L0M
N.W. Avenue "G"
Belle Glade, Florida 33430
Jack Stateman, Lay Leader
Sabbath services, Friday at
8:30 p.m.
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB
275 Alemeda Drive
Palm Springs, Florida 33460
Sabbath services, Friday at 8
p.m.
Saturday at 9a.m.
President Jacob Front 964-
0034
Mondays and Thursdays at'
a.m.
Services held at Faith United
Presbyterian Church, Palm
Springs
B'NAI T0RAH
CONGREGATION
1401 N.W. 4th Ave.
Boca Raton, Florida 33432
392-8566
Rabbi Nathan Zelizer
Sabbath services: Friday at
8:15p.m.
Saturdays at 9:30 a. m.
TEMPLE EMETH of the
DELRAT
HEBREW CONGREGATION
5780 West Atlantic Avenue
Delray Beoch, Florida 33446
276-3536
Morris Silberman, Rabbi
Leonard Price, Cantor
Sabbath services: Friday at 8
p. ir.. Saturday at 9 a. m.
Daily minyans at 8:45 a.m.
and 5 p.m.
TEMPLE EMANUEL
190 North County Road
Palm Beach, Florida 33480
832-0804
Rabbi Max L. Forman
Cantor David Dardashti
Sabbath services, Friday *
8:30 p.m.
Saturday at 9 a.m. (



:iday, January 13,1978
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 15
[rving Rifkin Chairs Bonds
Campaign Again in Boca
The wails of his Boca Teeca
9nie already filled with plaques,
Lentos and awards for service
| other campaigns, Irving Rifkin
ill serve a second term as
neral chairman for the State of
'rael Bond campaign- in the
Ka Katon area.
When the former New Yorker
-t doing one thing for Israel,
s doing another.
,EVERAL days before
ristmas, he and other members
the Boca Raton committee
thered in the home of Mr. and
Reuben Viener. Col.
nethim Milson of the Israeli
iratroops, aide-de-camp to
dat during the Egyptian Prime
inister's visit to Jerusalem,
,oke, but the purpose of the
eeting was planning.
A dinner scheduled for Feb. 26
ill honor attorney Irving E.
;t. While making pre-
inary preparations for the
,nt, Rifkin*s committee
ided to meet again Jan. 6 in
Recreation Hall at Boca
Teeca. Meetings have been a part
of Rifkin's life. They remain a
part of his retirement.
A New Jersey resident before
moving to Boca Raton in 1975,
Rifkin was chairman of the
Northern Area United Jewish
Appeal in that area for many
years. For equally long periods of
time, he chaired White Meadow,
New Jersey's Israel Bond cam-
paign. He and his wife Rose have
worked for Israel Bonds for more
than 20 years, Rifkin says.
THE EFFORT pays off. Sold
as a means of supporting Israel's
economy, Israel Bonds are a
common American purchase,
second only to U.S. Savings
Monds. Israel uses the money
raised through bond sales for
purchase of goods and services in
the United States.
During the December meeting
of his committee, Rifkin an-
nounced that Boca Raton sales
are 25 percent ahead of last year's
pace, a campaign which realized
more than $150,000 in sales.
Palm Beach Hadassah Sponsors
First Israel Bond Event at Challenger
JEWISH FAMILY AND CHILDREN'S SERVICE
An ou'stonding professiono/ counseling agency serving fhe Jewish
community of Palm Beoch County. Professional and confidential
help is available for
Problems of the aging
Consultation and evaluation services
Vocatiofial counseling
AAdrilol counseling
Parent-child conflicts
Personal problems
In
Private Offices: 2411 Okeechobee Blvd.
West Palm Beach, Fla. 33409
Telephone: 684-1991
Or
3200 North Federal Hwy. Suite 206-
Room 12, Boca Raton, Fla.
Telephone: 395-3640
|Moderate fees ore charged in family and individual counseling to
those who can pay (Fees are based on income and farriily size)
^he Jewish Family and Children's Service is a beneficiary agency of
he Jew,sh Federation of Palm Beach County. ~^ a^"of the'Tourism and
I
*
I
i
i
j
i
i
i
i
i
The Palm Beach Chapter of
Hadassah will sponsor their first
Israel Bond event when they
honor Mrs. Myron (Terry)
Rapaport at a brunch to be held
at the Challenger Country Club
on Jan. 18. In keeping with
Hadassah tradition of success, it
is expected to be a banner event
in the 1977-78 Israel Bond Cam-
paign in this area.
Mrs. Rapaport. of North Palm
Beach, a Florida Region Hadas-
sah vice president and 1978 Con-
ference chairman, has held many
positions in the Florida Region
and virtually every position on
the local level in Mamaroneck,
N.Y. and Palm Beach.
DURING her three-year term
of office as president, the Palm
Beach County chapter was reor-
ganized from a single chapter
with a membership of 700 to a
chapter with six groups with a
membership of 2,400. For two
years she was chairman of the
chapter's "Big Gifts Luncheon" -
"Angel of Mercy Luncheon."
Guest speaker for the event
will be Mrs. Stanley (Bryna M.)
Lieberman of New York City,
who is a member of the National
Board of Hadassah, the Women's
Zionist Organization of America,
Inc. She is currently the National
Major Gifts Coordinator. She is
past national chairman of
Founders and Special Gifts,
Endowments and Annuity
Trusts and "H" Month.
During the more than 30 years
as a member of Hadassah, Mrs.
Lieberman has held leadership
posts in all phases of its work,
and was for three years president
of the New York chapter. Mrs.
Lieberman is a member of the
National Hadassah Medical
Organization Advisory Com-
Jewish Community Day School
Ot Palm Beach County, Inc.
2815 N. Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach, Florida 33407
Is now accepting applications for
Pre-School-Full or Half Day
Kindergarten-Full Day
Grade l-Grade Vl-Elementary School
Grades Vll-VIII-Junior High School
Transportation throughout Palm Beach County
Admission Tests Required
Application Forms A Further Information-
Dr. Avie Waxman, Director
832-8423 4
IMS/!t33*
Jewish Community Day School of Palm Beach County, Inc.
2815 N. Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach, Fla. 33407
Telephone 832-8423 / 4
A Beneficiary Agency of the Jewish. Faderatip/1 o/ Palm-Be^ch Oo'tmfyr *' *'
MRS. MYRON
(TERRY) RAPAPORT
Wills and Bequests Committees.
She was a Hadassah delegate to
the International Conference on
Soviet Jewry in Brussels in
February, 1971.
SHE IS a member of the
National Executive Committee
and a trustee of the United Israel
Appeal. Most recently, she
supervised the various Founders'
events and dedications at the
rededicated Hadassah University
Hospital, Mount Scopus in
October, 1975 and June, 1976.
Also, she is a Founder of the
Hadassah Hebrew University
Medical Center.
A special musical program will
be presented by the Habinah
Players. President of the Palm
Beach County Chapter of
Hadassah is Ann Hopfan. Chair-
men of the Bond brunch are
Gladys Bisgaier and Dorothy
Isaacs. Arrangements chairman
is Anne Sales.
The following are the presi-
dents and Bond chairmen for the
various Hadassah groups: for
Aliyah, the president is Flora
Friedman, Shirley Greenberg,
chairman; for Bat Gurion,
Barbara Wunsh is president and
chairman; for Chai, Annette
Cook is president, Sylvia Mass,
chairman; for GoWa Meir,
Dorothy Kaye is president,
Sophie Rosenblatt, chairman; for
Henrietta Szold, Minette Gross is
president and chairman.
FOR Rishona, Bertha Heitner,
Ann Kahn and Eve Morton are
presidents, Morton is also chair-
man; for Shalom, Lillian Yelo-
witz is president, Jean Solomon,
chairman; for Tamar, Martha
Pincu is president, Lillian
Kudisch, chairman; for Tikvah,
Emma Shippec is president, Ida
Coplan, chairman; for Yovel,
Sibyl Senecoff is president,
Dorothy R. Isaacs, chairman;
and for Z'Hava, Florence Sharpe
is president, Elizabeth Lassoff,
chairman.
The history of Israel Bonds is
one of the most dramatic in the
history of the State of Israel.
Since its inception, the State of
Israel has sold over $3.5 billion
worth of bonds and has repaid
$1.5 billion when these bonds
have come due. It is the second
largest held security in the U.S.,
second only to U.S. savings
bonds. More Americans own
Israel bonds than AT&T stock.
THE PROCEEDS from Israel
Bonds are used to provide capital
for Israeli industrialists to
purchase equipment in the U.S.
in order to expand its economy.
Israel Bond proceeds, however,
do not leave the United States
but remain at Chase Manhattan
Bank in the form of credits.
For example, if a Russian
immigrant has the knowledge to
operate a plastics plant but does
not have the capital, the govern-
ment of I srael may lend him both
pounds in Israel and Bond dollars
in the U.S. Industrial equipment
he buys here, then it is sent to
Israel, and as the plant opens he
employs new people.
As the plant prospers and he
repays his bank and government
loans, this money is set aside to
repay the American investor.
Israel Bonds pay 4 percent and
begin.at $250. A Guardian of
Israel is someone who purchases
$1,000 in Israel Bonds.
THE bonds mature in 15
years; however, they can be
cashed in on the over-the-counter
market in New York and the
going price has been 90 to 95 over
the past several years.
Israel Bonds make excellent
gifts for children and grand-
children since they carry "an
extra dividend" in giving the
child a piece of history when the
child owns an Israel Bond.
Israelis need Israel Bond
dollars to expand their economy
because they are taxed from 50 to
85 percent of their income. This is
what pays for the military
budget.
For further information con-
cerning Israel Bonds or the
Hadassah luncheon, call the
Israel Bond office.
JEFFER
FUNERAL HOMES. INC.
OKCTOK:
bwnJiHar '
1M-I1 MUS0E UK.H0UB. 11.NY.
1283C0NR BLANOUK.KM.NT.
212/776-8100
OAK COUNTY 133H W 0U HWY
947-1185 kj sm lmm fo
MWMO COUNTY 1921 KMWOB NO
925-2743 m> *$ im.fd
PALM BEACH COUNTY *" omiicmomb nvo
1 -926-2743 a* **m*m. fo
SerwcK IMkfkl n < corfr
muniliej m New *rt nd throughout
the &e*ei Main arn >
SHALOM MeMOIU&L PAflK
Palm Beach County's
Only All Jewish Cemetery
COMPLETE PRE-NEED ARRANGEMENTS
5061 Okeechobee Blvd.
W. Palm Beach, Fla. 33409
W. Palm-684-2277
Delray- 427-3220
JWJ/
R. L. (Bob) Newhart. LED. Colin J Ragev. LED.
Lawrence S Faville. I. F.D. William R Zem. Jr.. LED
Michael K. Wick. I.ED. Oneral Manager
Mizell-Faville-Zern
FUNERAL CHAPELS
HIBISCUS CHAPEL SOUTHDALE CHAPEL NATIONAL CHAPEL
413 Hibiscus Si 410) Parker Avt 1540 Hypoluxo Rd
West Palm Beach Wast Palm Batch,...... Uno* 582 9061
8328121 813 4061 ".............


Page 16
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, January 13, i978
Mini-Mission To Israel
Continued from Page 1
with it.
ASSOCIATE Campaign
Chairman and Mission Co-Leader
Dr. Howard Kay, a dentist, said,
"before coming to Israel my first
time in November, 1975, I was
involved in UJA because I just
knew it was the right thing to do,
but not with the depth of under-
standing or grasp of the subject I
have now."
Dr. Kay's response was typical
of what the others said, all
voicing their sentiments as the
tour wound its way to a close in
mid-December in Jerusalem.
The grueling itinerary included
slops at the Allenby Bridge, the
Good Fence, Yad Vashem, the
Alyn Children's Rehabilitation
Hospital, an absorption center, a
Golan Heights military outpost
and Masada.
IT WAS a dedicated group of
contributors who made the visit,
evinced by Dr. Kay's remark
"that outside of taking care of
my family, UJA is the most
important thing in my life." Kay
is a member of the National UJA
Young Leadership Cabinet.
Shulman, the group's leader
and an attorney, has made a
plethora of previous trips to
Israel. On this visit he perceived
"the sincere craving for peace
that is maturing into fruition."
He added "There is a lot of soul
searching going on because peace
is so important to Jews as a
people and to Israel as a country.
The gravestones at the military
cemeteries tell you that."
"ISRAEL as a place demon-
strates the Jewish people's
struggle for survival, restoring
one's personal memory and
collective memory as a Jew. I
suddenly became aware of this,"
said Norman Layton, a textile
designer and architect, who is the
founder and owner of Shalom
Memorial Park.
"I will return," declared Dr.
Tom Davidoff, a dentist. "I want
JFCS
Launches

Continued from Page 1
agency in the county," according
to Levitt.
The reason for this is that Title
18 (Medicare) will only pay for
medically related services, but
specifically does not cover
domestic maid service. According
to Levitt, the JFCS has counted
an increasing number of people
who phone the agency and who
are unable to adequately manage
their own households and are
experiencing particular dif-
ficulties in the matter of house
cleaning. This may be due to
illness or a general long term
problem due to increasing age
and infirmity.
Due to the nature of the grant,
the program is targeted for low
income families, however Levitt
stated to the Board that "there
would be no fixed income level
used in determining who is
eligible. Medical conditions will
be considered, as well as overall
financial circumstances."
THERE will be, similarly, no
fixed age requirement either.
This means the service "could
include younger families where a
parent is unable to clean due to a
recuperation period or other
reasons," Levitt noted. There will
be no charge for this service,
however participants in the
program are expected to provide
all cleaning equipment necessary
to accomplish the job.
Persons who desire more in-
formation about this service and
who would like an interview con-
cerning this program should
contact the JFCS main office in
the West Palm Beach area. This
program also will be available on
a limited basis at the Boca Raton
office.
my family to see this. Israel is the
suburb of my own people. These
are my people!"
Dr. Abe Szmukler, an
anesthesiologist, said he also
"wants his children and wife to
come." Dr. Szmukler, who came
to Florida from Havana, Cuba in
1963, said he was excited "to see
the real thing after reading so
much about Israel."
"THE MIRACLE performed
by man" was what moved Arthur
Yeckes, a real estate agent, who
was "amazed at the land being so
poor and what the Israelis have
done with it."
"I never hear anybody com-
plain here, despite the hard life,"
observed Dr. Jeff Faivus, a
veterinarian, "the Israelis are a
people with a great spirit." He
said he met a pediatrician doing
military reserve duty who was
earning only $25 a month during
that period. "But he wasn't com-
plaining. He had a purpose in
life," said Dr. Faivus.
"It was also the 'Israelis' sense
of mission' that impressed Dr.
Henry Saiontz, a neurosurgeon,
who described the trait as
"pluckiness." Dr. Saiontz said he
"came to Israel because he had
no concept of what the country
was like" and was heartened
during his brief stay to have
learned so much about the people
and the land.
ANOTHER member of ,
group was Shulman's 15-year-<
son David, also here for the |_
time. As an American Jew, Day
was struck "by the feeling
warmth" in the country. "I fa
very comfortable here," he
mitted.
Dr. Richard Shugarman,
ophthamologist, elaborated
that theme, saying that
relationship between Amer
Jews and Israelis was war
up." He concluded, "We i
feel part of what's going on
now."
GIFTS FOR SAVERS
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Lightweight, tough-wearing luggage.
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Gifts limited to supply on hand ar to size and color
For new money only No internal transfers. Only one
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We make no charge to tranaler your savings
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NOW YOUR SAVINGS INSURED TO 140.000 BY
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PASSBOOK SAVINGS
5 39'. Aaaul TieM
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SAVINGS CERTIFICATES
o
592 Aeanil TltM
on 5'\ Annual Interest
Minimum Term 90 days
Minimum Amount $500
6%%
6 72'.AmmIYnM
on 6"i\ Annual Interest
Minimum Term One Year
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MISAmuIVM.
6'.% Annual Interest
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HIGHER INTEREST RATES AVAILABLE
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on 7 75% Annual Interest
Minimum Term 6 Years
Minimum Amount $1,000
I FINANCIAL I
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SAVINGS & LOAN ASSOCIATION
auuNornct
401 Lincoln Road Mali. M-ami Beech Pti 674 4523
(MUCH OFFICtS MAM MAC* MWTH WOK: 301 71st St. Mm. ftucrt. Ft. S7U7W S0VTM JMOM 755
tMWBLtt 393 Sana, IUB8M .Muffli.F1. 947 14l5MWOMJttMK:Sl?tnSt Mami Bt Ft. 6/4-4700
S^J2101 UtSF*** mtm- n n34M mUM "m WO"** 939. MHIt. RoM (art to
nlW^,_Mty.i, 274 8000
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(Man Uin Or t laelam U Ntit to PaMi and EcUria). Mum Ft. 551 5500 MFMI FUZA JJIMfeU
CHtTDt 7W w j7tt. lW.au Mae... Ft. 7M HI I
ISTMAn SAW: aaPTWaV ?9M awhyi |M. (Hi tat msH rant to P.bn.) M*a. Ft. 9312374
F 556e5IITMMet:M74ll" 57thStrati Timartc Ft. 722 1030UtUSHALL 34H SttttM 7 fSBA""********* H mvK""",mL34**k'*"**" "2"**

A substantial mtertst penalty a required for early withdrawal
Irom any ot these certificates
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FILES


Friday, January 13.1978
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 3
JNF to Plant Jewish Chi ldrens Forest
In Israel to Celebrate 30th Anniversary
Knesset Member to Speak
At CJA-IEFReception
Under the patronage of
president Ephraim Katzir of
Israel and of Prime Minister
Menachem Begin, the Jewish
National Fund is launching a
vast Jewish Children's Forest in
celebration of the forthcoming
30th anniversary of Israel's
independence in May.
The forest will be planted by
the JNF on an area of 7,000
dunams of land at Goren in
western Galilee, some 26
kilometers east of Nahariyah.
The forest will not only help to
reclaim and beautify this hitherto
neglected Galilee region, but will
serve as a joint effort of Israeli
and American Jewish students to
commemorate Jewish children
who perished in the Holocaust
and, more recently, at the hands
of the Arab murderers at
Ma'alot.
TO IMPLEMENT the Jewish
Children's Forest, Israeli
students will write to Jewish
youngsters in this country in-
viting them to participate with
them in this endeavor. Together,
each pair of students will plant
three trees: one for each of the
participants, and the third in
memory of the fallen child.
Institutions and educational
organizations, schools and com-
munity centers will be asked to
take part in this endeavor which
also has been officially endorsed
by the Israeli Ministry of Edu-
cation, together with the
Teachers' Association for the
Organizations
Continued from Page 2
BRANDEIS WOMEN'S
COMMITTEE
PROF. STEVEN ROSEN
Halm Beach East Chapter of
Mrandeis University National
Women's Committee is planning
a University Day luncheon on
Monday, Jan. 16 at noon at the
Holiday Inn on South Ocean
Boulevard in Palm Beach.
Prof. Steven Rosen of the
I lepartment of Politics will speak
on The Middle East Conflict in
its (ilobal Setting."
For reservations call Vera
Levine.
MR. AND MRS
JACK DOROSHK IN
The Jan. 31 program of the
Yiddish Culture Group will be
dedicated to Mr, and Mrs. Jack
Doroshkin, founders of the
Yiddish Culture Group in
Century Village, who will
celebrate their sixty-fifth wed-
ding anniversary and Yankel
Doroshkin's eighty-fifth birth-
day.
Florence Sharp from Golden
Lakes will sing, accompanied by
Ruth Steindorf at the piano.
A string quartet consisting of
Jacky Lorber, Phil Herman and
Sam Finkenthal on .violins and
Helen Penka at the piano, will
play Yiddish and English
compositions.
On Jan. 17 the group will
present Mildred Birnbaum and
her group, "The Musical Notes,"
with a selection of English and
Yiddish songs. Shirley Fleichman
will read excerpts from Yiddish
author Avrom Raisin. Tony
Vacaro will play selections on the
electric guitar.
On Jan. 24, the group program
will present Maxim Brodyn and
his wife Zelda Zlotin. They ap-
peared here last year. The
program consists of singing and
monologue. The duo of David
Alt man on concertina and Sam
Korsun on guitar will play a
series of Hebrew and Yiddish
songs.
TEMPLE BETH EL
Temple Beth El of Boca Raton
will present an art show and sale
of original works including art,
sculpture, paintings, ceramics,
jewelry and home accessories
from Feb. 11 to 16, in the new
temple building in Boca Raton.
A champagne reception
honoring artists and patrons will
open the show on Saturday
evening, Feb. 11.
Contact Augusta Driel, fine
arts committee chairman.
UM Offers Latin-American
Jewish History Class
The first course in Latin-
American Jewish History will be
offered at the University of
Miami during the Spring 1978
semester.
The three-credit course will be
oriented towards the entire
Greater Miami community, as
well as students majoring in
Judaica and Hispanic Studies. It
is relevant for teachers at schools
where Jewish studies are empha-
sized, as well as those interested
in the Jewish communities in
Latin America.
THE COURSE is designed to
provide an overview of the
history, sociology and antro-
fology of the Jews in Central and
South America from 1500 to
1977.
The course begins on Thur-
sday. Jan. 16 from 7:25 to 9:45
p.m. Registration will take place
Jan. 11 for undergraduates and
graduate students in the Richter
Library.
Limited scholarships are avail-
able through by contacting Drs.
Shamir and Ersoff.
THE instructor for the course
is Seymour B. Liebman. an
authority on the History of the
Jews in Latin America, author of
several books on the subject and
a former resident of Latin
America.
JNF.
Upon completion, groups of
children in the Diaspora will be
invited to participate in tree
planting in the new forest. The
Youth and Education Depart-
ments of the Keren Kayemeth in
Jerusalem and the JNF in New
York have prepared a wide
variety of interesting, attractive
and educational materials to be
utilized in the promotion of this
unique forest tribute.
IN announcing the planting of
the forest, in which hundreds of
thousands of children will par-
ticipate, Meyer Pesin, president
of the JNF of America, said,
"This forest is expected to forge
new and stronger bonds between
the children of Israel and Jewish
children the world over. The
Jewish Children's Forest will not
only be an American project, but
children from many countries
throughout the world will be
invited to share in this evergreen
and enduring memorial to the
defenseless children who suffered
a bitter fate at the hands of
savage oppressors."
Former Prime Minister Golda
Meir was in Beilenson
Hospital in Tel A viv this week
for tests following a sudden
illness brought on by a
stomach disorder. Israeli news
reports said Meir had been
brought to the hospital in
shock following the loss of
blood caused by a burst ulcer.
Beilinson physicians insist
there is no indication of
cardiac difficulties.
Milton R. Cohen, chairman of the
Lands of the President Com-
mittee for the Jewish Federation
of Palm Reach County's 1978
Combined Jewish Appeal Israel
Emergency Fund campaign,
announced that an International
Dessert Reception will be held for
residents of that condominium on
Thursday. Jan. 26, 8 p.m. at the
President Country Club.
Dr. Josef Rom, member of the
Knesset and a key adviser to
Israel's Prime Minister
Menachem Begin, will be the
keynote speaker.
DR. ROM holds a Ph.D. in
Aeronautical Engineering from
the California Institute of Tech-
nology. In the past he has been
professor of aeronautical
engineering at the Technion -
Israel Institute of Technology,
Haifa, Israel, and Dean of the
Department of Aeronautical
Engineering. From 1958-1977 he
served as head of Aerodynamic
Laboratories. He serves as con-
sultant to the Israeli government
and to the Israeli Industry on
Research and Development.
In 1977, Rom served as a
member of the Likud election
Campaign Committee and chair-
man of the Government Tran-
sition and Government
Reorganization Committee
following the elections of May.
1977.
Presently, as a member of the
Knesset, he serves on the Foreign
and Defense Committee and is
chairman of the Subcommittee
for Arms Purchasing and Pro-
duction. He also serves on the
Immigration and Absorption
Committee and is a member of
the Central Committee of Herat.
MILTON R. COHEN
in charge of Youth and Young
Members Group.
THE program will be followed
by an International Dessert
Reception featuring pastries from
around the world. Special
arrangements for the reception
are being coordinated by Co-
chairmen Lee Stein and Ruth
Wilensky. They are being
assisted by Lenore Block.
Members of the Lands of the
President Campaign Committee
are Milton R. Cohen, chairman;
Jack Atkins, Norman Bauer,
Irving Bernstein, Arnold Black,
Irwin Brainen, Philip Doppelt,
Ted Feinstein, Dave Gerstein,
George Golden, Irving Ingber,
Sol Kronovet, Morris Ladge,
Stuart Landis, Leonard Laser,
Jack Libman, Sol Marks, Joseph
Punch, Jack Shaprow, Milton
Simmons, Harry Stein, Louis
Stulberg, Dave Weiss and Alvin
Wilensky.
First Marine
National Bank and Trust Company
114 NO "J STREET
LAKE WORTH. FLORIDA
'.82 5641
Member F.D.I.C.
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.;bbb,'


Page 2
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, January 13, 197R
With the # !._
Organizations
ORT
The Sixth Annual Mother tc
Another Luncheon of the Palm
Beach Chapter of Women's
American ORT will be held or
Thursday. Jan. 26 at noon at the
Breakers Hotel in Palm Beach.
Ciuest of honor. Mrs. Nathaniel
l.evi (Bettvi is the Mother of
the Year Guest speaker at this
event will be Shirley Traum.
national vice president of
KducationofORT.
The program for the afternoon
will be the Habimah Players who
will dance and narrate.
Proceeds for the luncheon goes
to ORT for its Social Assistance
Program. Chairpersons for the
luncheon are Mrs. Irving Gould
iSyrvial; co-chairperson. Mrs.
Oavid Colby (Sylvia); and
reservations, Mrs. Kdward
Schreiber iSaJJy).
Honor Roll Credit of $25 will be
received.
HADASSAH
The Tamar Group will meet on
Monday. Jan 23 at the new Civic
Hall Building in Royal Palm
Beach at about 12:30 p.m. The
program planned is called Turn-
about. The men will conduct
this meeting
The Youth Aliyah Luncheon
and Show. Hankypanky" will
be Jan. 88 at the Showtime
Theatre in Fort Lauderdale Call
Ruth Crandell for reservations
Yovel Hadassah will hold its
regular meeting at Congregation
Anshei Sholom on Thursdav.
Jan 19 at 1 p.m. The film With
Thfsc Ch:..:-,. U1 be presented
bj Man Rodd. Youth Aliyah
chairman The film highlights the
progress and accomplishments of
Youth Aliyah to date.
On Jan. 25 the group's annual
luncheon and card party will take
place at Sweden House from
11:30 am. to 4 p.m. For reser-
vations, contact Ruth Heyman
The Riahona Group of the
Palm Beach Chapter will hold its
regular monthly meeting on
Thursday. Jan. 19 at 1 p.m. at
the North Palm Beach Public
Library
The program will be two
movies: Edna Hibet 7Tk* World I
Lot-*, and Hibtt on Porcrlai*
The next regular n eeting of
Tikvah will be held on Monday.
Jan 16 at 12:30 p.m at Temple
Anshei Sholom \ paid-up
membership entertainment will
be offered
The Tikvah study group will
meet on Saturday. Jan 14 at 2
p.m. at Chatham L-241. Phone
ahead if you are coming.
Shalom Hadassah will hold a
general meeting on Monday. Jan.
16 at 12:30 p.m. at Salvation
Army Citadel. Ruth Moss of
Palm Beach Chapter will present
a skit on HMO.
Bat Gurion Group is having a
Youth Aliyah Luncheon honoring
their first president. Staci Lesser,
on Thursday. Jan 19 at noon at
the Challenger Country Club.
Poinciana Place. Lake Worth
Road. Lake Worth. Chairman for
this event is Barbara Tanen.
Contact Sheila Kngelstein for
information.
SISTERHOOD
The third Festival of Arts
series of Temple Emanu-Kl
Sisterhood is scheduled for
Monday. Jan. 16 at 12:30 p.m.
and will feature our "Petite
Buffet
Art enthusiasts can view The
Masterpiece Tour of the Her-
mitage, prepared by Nat E.
Levi.
jewelers will be showing their
works.
Anyone interested in being a
donor is welcome.
National Council of Jewish
Women. Okeechobee Unit, will
meet on Thursday, Jan. 19 at 1
p.m. Shoshanna Flexer. guest
soloist, will entertain with inter-
national songs. For information,
call Ruth Gottdiener.
Council tours provide tours for
members To quote F.sseSalkind.
tour chairperson, "Have you seen
the Western Wall in Israel?
Cruised the fascinating Greek
Islands? Visited the exciting
Orient or absorbed the beauty of
Scandinavia? These are just a few
of the many wonders of the world
for you to enjoy." Contact her for
information.
MEN'S CLUB
The Men's Club of Congre-
gation Anshei Sholom will
present on Sunday. Jan. 22 at 8
p.m.. David Schoenbrun.
American commentator who has
won professional awards in even-
major field of communication and
the first reporter for the Voice of
America after Pearl Harbor. He
was Intelligence Officer for Gen.
Eisenhower and chief correspon-
dent for CBS News.
AMERICAN JEWISH
COMMITTEE
Under the direction of Norma
Sirota and producer. Ruth
Prewar, the Drama Group of
Anshei Sholom Sisterhood of
Century Village will present
Them Were the Days. a vaude-
ville presentation, on Jan. 2840
at B p.m. and a Jan. 31 matinee.
Tickets are available at the syna-
gogue before noon. Phone Anne
Strobin for information
NATIONAL COUNCIL
OF JEWISH WOMEN
The Palm Beach Section of the
National Council of Jewish
Women still have openings for
any senior citizen who cannot
shop or prepare their own meals,
in their Meals on Wheels
delivery sen ice
Anyone interested or knowing
anyone interested should contact
the Federation and ask for the
Kosher Meals on Wheels'
program.
The Welcome Wagon service is
available for new members of the
community.
On Feb. 19 from 1 p.m. to 10
p.m.. the Council will have its
annual art show at the Flagier
Museum .Artists, sculptors and
KC64STERED REAL E STATE BOKE
ACRKAG E HOMKS LOTS AP ARTMKNTS MM P ROP ERTT
1 u.nirixini
omci m:
iA!ji"Jtfjiaj
DON VOGEL
0*c 848-9753
Moma 622-aXC
700U.S H> 1 Ntp Poi-Beoct-
PHILIP WEINSTEIN.F.D
HENRY KLEIN. FQ
evitt memorial chapel
*Vl"!"CMO"" LVO- *$T ** **CH FLORIDA
The Men's Club of Temple
Emanu-EI began weekly
duplicate bridge games on
Tuesdays at ~:45 p.m. in the
Social Hall of Temple Emanu-EI
in Palm Beach.
The Bridge Committee, with
Henry Milner. chairman, assisted
by Dr. Kalman Apfel. will be in
charge of all the arrangements.
Al Kaye. a professional certified
director, will direct the plavine.
PIONEER WOMEN
The Golda Meir Club of
Pioneer Women will hold a white
elephant and cake sale on
Tuesday. Jan. 24 at the Ramada
Inn on Palm Beach Lakes
Boulevard.
B NAI B'RITH WOMEN
The annual Queen for a Day"
donor luncheon, sponsored by
five chapters of Mitzvah Council.
B'nai B'rith Women in Palm
Beach County, will be held
Tuesday. Jan. 24 at noon in the
Venetian Ballroom of the
breakers Hotel in Palm Beach.
The international service
organization is celebrating its
80th year, and through the years
has grown to a membership of
over 150.000 women throughout
the world.
Participating in this years
donor luncheon are Boyatoa
Beach Chapter, Maaada and
Medina Chapters of West Palm
Beach. Meaorah Chapter of
Century Village, and Naomi
Chapter of Delray Beach. The
donor luncheon committee in-
cludes Mrs. William Fischer
chairman. Mrs. Sam SiegeL co-
chairman. Mrs. Morris Gewirz
honorary chairman. Mrs. Harold
Schapiro. Mrs Max Starr and
Mrs David Stern, honorary co-
chairmen, and Mrs. Sam Stegel.
reservations chairman.
Following the luncheon, which
includes entertainment. the
annual "Queen for a Day" will be
chosen from someone attending.
Aftmtiaa mmkimni wiii:
collection of n,n cow-ace m -
s. '% 15*1 S'eo**'
-a.-~9ra**r rtn our ndust*
"* B/- wss Prosmevs ia7$j
H E 4W. C' S V B JOS' *S> >MS
PIANIST WANTED
To play for Sunday
School Class. Call
Temple Israel. w.P.B
833-8421
*
GEORGE GOLDEN
George Golden, a member of
the Board of Trustees of the
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County, who is chairman of its
Israel Mid-East Task Force, will
be the guest speaker at the dinner
meeting of the Palm Beach
Chapter of the American Jewish
Committee, to be held at Holiday
Inn, 100 Datura. West Palm
Beach on Thursday, Jan. 19.
Dinner will be served at 6:30 p.m.
The program will begin at 8 p.m.
with seating provided for those
who come after dinner.
Golden, a native of Cleveland.
Ohio, had a career in law and in
his family business prior to
coming to the Palm Beach area in
1973, where he resides in the
Land of the Presidents. He is a
graduate in law from Western
Reserve University.
AMERICAN JEWISH
CONGRESS
On Jan. 17 at 1 p.m. the
American Jewish Congress will
hold a regular meeting at the
Salvation Army Citadel.
Abraham (iittelson is guest
speaker.
Tour meetings will be held with
Betty Alderson at the Breakers
Hotel at 10:30 a.m. and Century
Village Holiday Inn at 2:30 p.m.
A lunch and seminar will be
held Jan. 23 at Temple Beth
Shalom in Miami Beach. Contact
Esther Froelich for information.
ODD FELLOWS
The night of Jan. 18 at 7 p.m
will be the installation cere-
monies of all 1978 officers of the
Palm Beach Odd Fellows Lodge
88 in their Temple Hall Building
in downtown West Palm Beach.
The assembly is exclusively for
Brother and Sister members of
IOOF in West Palm Beach and
adjacent areas. Arrangements
have been made for a collation,
immediately following the
evening's activities.
Continued on Page 3
SECRETARIAL HELP NEEDED
for Jewish Federation office. Secretary, excellent
stenography and typing skills. Must be able to work
independently. Good benefits. Salary commensurate
with experience and ability. Please phone the Jewish
Federation offices at 689-5900.
The assurance
of service. In the
Jewishtraditfon.
At Riverside, we take full responsibility
for the performance of our service in a manner
consistent with the expectations of the
community and the high standards
demanded by Jewish Law and Custom. For
this reason we do not allow our name to be
represented by any other organization. Each
chapel is exclusively a Riverside Chapel.
Our staff of Riverside people consists of
the largest number of Jewish professionals
employed by any funeral director in the State.
They are people who understand Jewish
tradition and honor it.
Since 1935, these policies have been
our assurance to a family of service that
respects their needs and the dignity of Jewish
funeral ritual.
It's a trust we've never taken lightly.
co* k|^iobee Boulevard, West Palm Beach
boo-oo/6
Other Riverside chapels in the Greater Miami area:
Sunr.se Hollywood.North Miami Beach
me New YrTrL refCua,nd M,am'' F|ve chapels serving
me New York City Metropolitan area.
B Riverside
*amon*ctacei ir* Funeral r>rctors
For gelations a symbol of Jewish tradition.
ijt
IVT,
WS