Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
8 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 28, 1975)-v. 8, no. 40 (Dec. 17, 1982).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 2, 1976 called v.2, no. 22, but constitutes v.2, no. 1.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: July 28, 1978 called no. 14 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement; Aug. 25, 1978 called no. 16 in masthead and no. 17 in publisher's statement; Aug. 10, 1979 called no. 15 in masthead and no. 16 in publisher's statement; Oct. 22, 1982 called no. 31 in masthead and no. 32 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44607504
lccn - sn 00229550
ocm44607504
System ID:
AA00014311:00159

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)


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Full Text
The Jewish Federation of Pelm
Beach County will launch iU
1978 CJA-IEF Campaign with
the Advene* Gifts Dinner
(minimuni $6,000 contribution)
w be held on Wednesday, Jen.
11. The announcement was made
by H. Irwin Levy, Advance Gifta
Chairman and Nathan Tanen, co-
chairman. The black tie dinner
will be held at the Breakers in
Palm Beach.
Maj. Gen. Avraham Oriy,
coordinator of Government and
launch
Israel Defense Force Operations
in the Administered Territories
will be the guest of honor.
PRIOR TO the establishment
of the State of Israel, Oriy
belonged to the Irgun (un-
derground). In 1948, he joined
the Israel Defense Forces and
took part in the War of Inde-
pendence where he volunteered
for and was one of the founding
members of the Airborne Corps.
During his service with the Air-
borne troops, he took part in
most of the reprisal operations
preceding the Sinai. Campaign,
the campaign, com-
the Airborne and
Warfare training
and after
manded
Guerrilla
center.
A graduate of the U.S. Army
Command and General Stan
College at Fort Lee v en worth,
Kans., Oriy served a year as an
instructor m the I.D.F. inter-arm
Command and Staff College.
Between 1968 and 1971 he served
' as the head of the Israel Defense
H6f Campaign
' Force military mission in
Ethiopia, and in 1972 was ap-
pointed Deputy Commander of
the Gaza Strip.
In 1973 he was appointed
Commander (Governor General)
of that area and the Northern
Sinai and was promoted to the
rank of Brigadier General. In
addition to this assignment, he
received a secondary appoint-
ment in the Yom Kippur War,
making him Commander of the
Suez Canal Western Area. He*
was appointed head of the Officer
Personnel Department In 1974
and coordinator of I.D.F. Opera-
tions in the administered
territories in 1976.
"WE ARE all encouraged by
the perspectives for peace in the
Middle East, but even if it oc-
curs, it will take time to imple-
ment and could collapse if Israel
shows weakness," stated Levy.
"Israel faces severe economic
pressures which will not dis-
' Continued on Page 7
wJewisti Flloiriidlihin
OFPALMBEA CH COUNTY
'OUR VOICE" and "FEDERATION REPORTER"
in con junction with The Jewish Federation of Palm Bench Coanty
Volume 3 Number 26
Palm Beach, Florida Friday, December 30,1977
Price 35 Cents
The Thrill Of
Walking Cairo
Alleys
Boca Raton Announces
Campaign Leadership
By DR. YITSCHAK BEN GAD
CAIRO It has been said
that journalists are supposed to
be above emotion. So perhaps I
should switch professions,
because I am extremely
emotional and to a certain extent
even astonished.
I am here in Cairo, and it is not
a dream. Cairo, the capital of the
biggest and most influential
Arab state, is welcoming the
Dr. Yitschak Ben Gad
is one of 12 newspapermen
who flew to Cairo on the
Israel press plane on Dec.
13. He will be reporting to
The Jewish Floridian
directly from Cairo
throughout the entire
length of the talks.
VIEW FROM ABROAD
Israelis. Egyptians smile at us
warmly, shake our hands
willingly and anxiously do their
utmost to make us feel at home.
THE WORDS, "El Al Israeli
Airlines," decorated the plane
which brought us here with the
Israeli delegation. In Cairo
today, you can hear .Hebrew
being spoken and Israeli songs on
the radio. More important, you
can feel the warmth, friendship
and respect of your hosts. What
an interesting world this is, what
a crazy Middle East we live in,
what a dream, what a beautiful
dream.
As an Israeli, you ask yourself:
"Am I really in Cairo? Am I in
the country which fought Israel
four times in the past, causing
thousands of our men? Am I
standing in the country which
conducted a bitter war of
propaganda against Israel in
various international forums?"
And you ask yourself: "Am I
Continued on Page 10
Alan L. Shulman, general cam-
paign chairman for the 1978
Jewish Federation Combined
Jewish Appeal Israel Emer-
gency Fund campaign, and
Barbara Shulman, Women's
Division Campaign Chairman,
announced the appointments of
Dr. Karl Enselberg as campaign
chairman of the South County
area. Dr. Gerald Robinson as co-
chairman and Mrs. J. P. Listick
as president of the South County
Women's Division.
Dr. Enselberg, a South County
physician, has been a resident of
Florida for the past six years. He
serves as chairman of the Pro-
fessional Education Committee
of the Broward Cancer Society
and is a member of the executive
committee of the Boca Raton
hospital. Dr. Enselberg is a
member of B'nai Torah Congre-
gation, the Anti-Defamation
League and the B'nai B'rith
Olympic Lodge XL in Boca
Raton.
"THE SOUTH County Jewish
community is growing
tremendously," stated Dr.
Enselberg. With this growth
comes the increasing need for
expanded services in this area.
The opening last year of a full-
time Jewish Federation office and
the Jewish Family and Children's
Service in Boca Raton, is further
evidence of the great needs of this
community. In order to build and
Karl Enselberg
Gerald Robinson
J. P. Listick
support a strong Israel we must
have a strong local Jewish com-
munity. This can only be accom-
plished by increased commitment
on the part of every Jewish
resident in the South County
area."
Dr. Robinson, a practicing
surgeon, has been active in
Jewish affairs in the South
County area. He is a member of
B'nai Torah Congregation and
serves as their representative to
the Board of Directors of the
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County. "Although I've only
been here for a short time, I feel
that my appointment is in-
dicative of the fact that there is
room for all those who are willing
to serve Jewish needs, to become
active in the community."
J. P. Listick has been involved
with the Florida Jewish com-
munity for the past 10 years. She
served as a volunteer workers for
the Jewish Federation in Fort
Lauderdale from 1967-72. Both
she and her husband Michael, a
local attorney, were youth group
advisers for Temple Beth Israel
in.Fort Lauderdale and are char-
ter members of Temple Beth
El, Boca Raton and Temple
Emeth in Del ray. For the past
four years, she has been active in
the Women's Division South
County campaign for the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County and has served for the
past two years as co-chairman of
the $125 luncheon. In 1974 the
Listicks spent six weeks touring
Israel.
YEAR the Women's
concerned with
is
:.:::::*:W^^
j Women's Army *>
I Feminine/Military
X;
;:::
By J. A. SOKOLOFF
It is surprising that the name
of the Women's Armed Forces in
Israel CHEN means
"charm," and even more contrary
to expectations, to find the Com-
mander-in-chief of CHEN a
warm, lovely and beautiful
woman. CoL Dahlia Raz, like the
word CHEN, serves as a kind of
affirmation that women can func-
tion in traditionally male robs
and still be just as traditionally
" 'How do you manage?' is the
first question I'm always asked,"
said the petite, smartly dressed
colonel, wife and mother. Dahlia
Raz gave her usual answer "I
somehow manage, like every
working woman. You get used to
it it's natural."
AN ARMY career for a woman
is not so strange in a country
where about sixty percent of the
female population is drafted.
Women enter the army at the age
of 18. for a two-year period,
followed by two years in the
reserves.
The exceptions are mostly
among the underprivileged and
those exempted for religious,
medical or mental reasons.
"You grow up with the army
it's part of everything; the
army Is the people," noted Col.
Raz. She pointed out that men
enter the army at 18, then
become a part of the reserves, the
Continued on Page 11
DAHLIA RAZ
Where Tonr Federation Dollars Go.-Page 18
"THIS
Division
educating the women in the
South County area on the role of
the Jewish Federation." Listick
stated. If we understand how
important Federation is to every
Jew throughout the world, we
can then understand how vital it
is to the Jewish people in the
South County area. We are
planning several coffees in dif-
ferent homes around the com-
munity to carry out this
education program. Various
speakers will discuss what the
Jewish Federation means to
Israel. Jews in the Soviet Union.
Russian resettlement, and health,
education and welfare programs
and services in Palm Beach
County ... specifically in the
South County area. By letting
the women know what we do, we
hope they will understand and
support the campaign."


intjwwitnm
orr
Page 2
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, December 30,1977
With the
Organizations
WOMEN'S AMERICAN ORT
Women's American ORT of
Golden Lakes Village celebrated*
the first anniversary of their
Chapter, Dec. 27 and Member-
ship Chairman Ethel Siegel was
presented with a certificate from
National ORT. There will be an
open meeting on Jan. 24 with a
program showing the Israeli film
Mellah, President Kathryn Koffs
announced. The meeting will be
at the clubhouse.
West Palm Chapter of
Women's American ORT will
meet on Wednesday, Jan. 25 at
12:30 p.m. at the Salvation Army
Citadel. Dr. Robert K. Alsofrom,
noted T.V. psychologist, will be
the guest speaker.
On Sunday. Jan. 8 a bus
luncheon and river cruise on the
boat River Queen will be held.
Buses will leave West gate of
Century Village at 10 a.m. A full
course luncheon will be served at
Lord Chumleys Pub restaurant
and a cruise on the St. Lucie
River. For information call Anne
Shelton. On Feb. 20. the annual
donor luncheon will be held at
Old Port Cove Yacht Club. For
reservations call Ann Allen.
The Century Chapter of
Women's American ORT will
meet on Wednesday, Dec. 28 at 1
p.m. at Temple Anshei Shalom.
Century Chapter is presenting
the Habimah Players on
Tuesday. Jan. 17 at 7:30 p.m. at
Temple Anshei Sholom. For
tickets, contact Anne Shartsis or
Yetta Schneider.
MID COUNTY
MEDICAL CENTER
The Mid County Medical
Center Women's League of
Century Village will meet on
Monday. Jan. 9 at 10 a.m. in the
Hospitality Room. A program
entitled "Ask the Doctors."
sponsored by the Institute of
New Dimensions, will present a
panel of three doctors.
On Wednesday. Jan. 11, at
11:30 a.m., the League will host a
card party and luncheon at
Oriental Century Corners
restaurant. Contact Iris Miller.
LEON ATLAS CHAPTER
Leon Atlas Chapter of the
American Cancer Research
Center will meet at the Century
Village Holiday Inn at 1 p.m. on
Monday, Jan. 2. The next
monthly bus trip to M> uni Beach
leaves from West gate at 9:16
a.m. on Thursday. Jan. 5.
Contact Anne or Len Antelis.
The chapter also is sponsoring a
Night at the Races," on
Saturday, Jan. 21 with a bus
leaving from West gate at 4:45
p.m., followed by a dinner and
harness racing. Contact Fay
Solow.
AMERICAN ISRAELI
LIGHTHOUSE
American Israeli Lighthouse,
Arthur S. Cowan Chapter,
Century Village, will depart for
Miami Beach on Wednesday,
Jan. 18 from West gate at 9:30
a.m. and return at 6 p.m. Contact
Bea Marks. There will be a
meeting on Thursday, Jan. 12 at
Century Village Holiday Inn at 1
p.m.
HADASSAH
The Palm Beach County
Chapter of Hadassah will be
holding the first in its series of
four book reviews on Tuesday,
Jan. 10. Aaron Rose will review
the book. The Worlds of Maurice
Samuel. It will be held at the
West Palm Reach Public Library
on Clematis Street at 1 p.m. The
dates for the other book reviews
are Feb. 14, March 14. and April
11. The books for these reviews
will be announced.
Shalom Hadassah is spon-
soring a Mini-Bazaar and Cake
Sale on Monday. Jan. 2 from 10
a.m. to 3 p.m. on the lawn of Jean
Solomon's home at Century
Village.
The new Study Group series of
Shalom Hadassah begins on
Tuesday, Jan. 3 at 10:30 cm. in
the Hospitality Room. The
subject will be "Maimonides
Mishna Torah" and sessions will
be held under the leadership of
Rabbi Martin Adolf. For future
dates, call Dorothy Lieberman. A
luncheon and card party will be
held on Wednesday. Jan. 11 at
Mama Sorrento. Call Jean
Solomon for tickets.
NATIONAL COUNCIL
OF JEWISH WOMEN
The Palm Beach Section of the
National Council of Jewish
Women will hold its next meeting
on Jan. 18, which will be a
luncheon at the Old Salt
restaurant in the Holiday Inn on
South Ocean Drive, Palm Beach.
The luncheon will take place at
11:30 a.m. with a program to
follow.
SISTERHOOD
Sisterhood Anshei Sholom will
hold its board meeting on
Monday, Jan. 2 at 9:30 a.m. and
its regular meeting on Tuesday,
Jan. 17. Installation of officers
will be held.
Tickets are on sale for "Them
"J Were the Days" for presentation
by Sisterhood Anshei Sholom the
evenings of Jan. 28, 29 and 30,
and matinee on Jan. 31. Norma
Sirota and Ruth Presser have
planned the performance. Tickets
are limited.
Sisterhood Temple Emeth in
Delray Beach will show movie on
Israel and provide live entertain-
ment on Thursday, Jan. 5 at
noon.
On Wednesday, Jan. 11 from
10 a.m. to 5 p.m. there will be a
bus trip to Omni Shopping
Center in Miami. For information
call Betty Bergman.
On Tuesday. Feb. 21 at 8 p.m.
the Habimah Players will present
a musical production at Temple
Emeth. Contact Chairman Sylvia
Breitman for information.
The next regular meeting of
Temple Beth Shalom Sisterhood
will be held on Wednesday, Jan. 4
at 8:15 p.m. Ruth Moss will
perform a "Psychiatrist Fan-
tasy" and "The Home
Beautiful." Directed by Annette
Dubey, narrator is Lucille Weiss,
Jerome Feinberg will play the
piano and a cast of 20 others will
participate.
UNITED ORDER
OF TRUE SISTERS
A regular meeting of the
United Order of True Sisters,
Palm Beach County 61 will be
held Monday. Jan. 9 at 12:30 at
Century Village Holiday Inn.
CENTURY VILLAGE GUILD
FOR THE BLIND
The Century Village Guild for
the Blind has been incorporated
to assist and support programs
for the blind and anyone with
sight disabilities. Volunteers are
needed to come to meetings every
Tuesday at 3 p.m. in the Hos-
pitality room. Stanley Samuelson
will speak on current events.
Bring any discarded glasses with
you.
YIDDISH CULTURE
GROUP
On Jan. 3 the Yiddish Culture
Group of Century Village will
present Debbie Chiat. who will
sing Yiddish and Hebrew songs.
She also will play the guitar.
Betty Steinberg Tell will perform
dramatic readings in English,
and Lillian Shapiro will play the
violin. Her repertoire will consist
of Yiddish musical selections.
The Jan. 10 program of the
Yiddish Culture Group will
feature the Century Village Man-
dolin Ensemble under the
direction of Mac Ball. The guest
speaker will be Bernard Cherrick.
executive vice president of the
Hebrew University in Jerusalem.
A member of the rabbinate, he
will speak about the Hebrew
University. Lillian Kessler will
sing Yiddish and English
selections and play the piano.
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LABOR ZIONIST
ALLIANCE
Labor Zionist Alliance. Palm
Beach County will meet Thur-
sday, Jan. 5 at 3 p.m. at the Hos-
pitality Room in Century Village.
John Moss will speak on Soviet
Jewry with a discussion to follow.
BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY
NATIONAL WOMEN'S
COMMITTEE
The Boynton Beach Chapter of
Brandeis University National
Women's Committee will hold its
next meeting on Monday, Jan. 2
in the Congregational Church of
Boynton Beach at 1 p.m. Judith
Temple will be the guest speaker
and she will perform poetry
readings.
On Monday. Jan. 16 there will
be the annual "University on
Wheels" luncheon in conjunction
with Palm Beach East Chapter,
at the Holiday Inn in West Palm
Beach. Prof. Steven J. Rosen will
speak on the subject of Arab-
Israeli conflict.
B'NAI B'RITH WOMEN
Boynton Beach Chapter of
B'nai B'rith Women will
celebrate its third birthday at the
meeting on Monday, Jan. 9 at
12:30 p.m. at Temple Beth
Sholom in Lake Worth. An
original skit written and directed
by Edna B. Feldhuhn entitled
This Is Your Life will be pre-
sented in poetry and sontf by
eight members.
At the Chanukah Holiday
Program on Dec. 12, there was a
Chanukah skit chaired by Sue
Ziffer, and performed by Sybil
Miller, Laura Kaiser, Serena
Howard, Rose Brazilian, Rose
Freedman, Ruth Cohen. With
Horowitz, Rivell Meyers, Minna
Gerber and songs by Diane Adler
and Esther Rosen, accompanied
on the piano by Norma Plump.
Henry Bloom (right), president of Temple Emeth in Delray
Beach, presents "The Man of the Year Award" to the Reverend
Dr. William W. Roughton of the Cason Methodist Church.
Temple Emeth used the church Fellowship Hall for Friday
evening services prior to the building of the new temple. Pic-
tured with them is Mrs. William Roughton.
or generations
symbol of _
For
a
Jewish tradition.
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counties is exclusively a Riverside Chapel,
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Rabbi Harry Z. Schectman
Anshei Sholom to Honor
Congregation Anshei Sholom
I will honor Rabbi Harry Z.
[ Schectman during a State of
Israel Bonds testimonial Sunday
[ifternoon. Jan. 15.
A committee headed by
[General Chairman Max B.
Shapiro, Shirley Fleishman and
jack Hoffman is making
preparations for the event which
will begin at 1 p.m. at Congre-
gation Anshei Sholom in Century
| Village.
The Executive Vice President
[of the Rabbinical Assembly of
I America's New York division,
Kabbi Wolf E. Kelman, will
ipeak in Rabbi Schectman's
nonor.
RABBI SCHECTMAN
Concb Campaigns to Begin
Active Solicitation Drive
The (ondo Division of the 197
Combined Jewish Appeal Israel
Kmergencjf Fund Campaign
developing; activities
the various condominium
complexes participating in the
current drive. Located in various
areas from south Palm Beach
County to North Palm Beach, a
number of condos have already
In lo organizational meetings and
arc now proceeding with workers'
a^M'mblies and training sessions.
The Fountains in Lake Worth
ii sponsoring a Special Gifts
Cocktail party on Jan. 4 and a
golf tournament to be followed by
a cocktail party and luncheon on
Jan. 18. David UchiU is F'oun-
tains Campaign chairman.
THE CAMPAIGN Committee
of l.eisureville. in Boynton
Ki.-n-h. headed by Heinz Falik-
man. sponsored a Chanukah
party on Dec. 9 that served as a
campaign opening vehicle for
I .eisureville and nearby condos.
Lakeside Village in Palm
Springs, held its first Workers
Organisation meeting on Dec. 15
and will begin active solicitation
early in January. Iaiu Levine is
campaign chairman. Poinciana
Place. ('.olden Lakes Village,
Lake Clarke Gardens and Village
Royale on the Green are other
condo groups where campaign
leaders already have set their
sights for increased giving in the
1978 campaign. Active
solicitation will take place after
the new year.
Kings Point in Delray Beach
held a Workers Organizational
Breakfast at Temple Emeth in
Delray Beach on Dec. 22. Co-
Chairmen Izzy Siegel and Sam
Blaustein have enlisted the
services of large groups of
volunteers needed to cover this
condominium.
Yiddish Culture Group to Present
Bernard Cherrick of Hebrew Univ.
liernard Cherrick, executive
vice president of the Hebrew
University of Jerusalem and
member of the University's
Permanent Policy Committee,
will be the guest speaker at the
Jan. 10 meeting of the Yiddish
Culture Group of Century
Village. He took his Master of
Arts degree in Semitic languages
and philosophy at the University
of Manchester, England and held
a research fellowship there. After
his graduation, he conducted
research in sociology at the
London School of Economics.
Later, Cherrick served as rabbi
t a leading synagogue in
London. When the war broke out
in 1939, he became an army
chaplain. Upon his discharge
from military service, Cherrick
became director of the Jewish
National Fund and the United
Palestine Appeal of Great
Britain. In this capacity, he
gained recognition as an admin-
istrator and orator.
IN 1947, the year before Israel
became an independent State,
Cherrick settled there and
became associated with the
Hebrew University of Jerusalem,
is its World Director of
Organization. His current uni-
Dinner to Ho.ior
Alfred Golden
South Florida Jewish com-
munity leader, Alfred Golden,
will be honored at the annual
Temple Beth El Israel Dinner of
State on Sunday, Jan. 8, to be
held at the temple, it was an-
nounced by Rabbi Samuel Z.
Jaffe, spiritual leader of the
congregation. Golden will be the
recipient of the State of Israel
United Jerusalem Award.
Dinner chairmen will be Mr.
and Mrs. Owen L. Whyman.
Century Village Ready
For CJA-IEF Kick-Off
A team of leaders and workers under the chairmanship of Abe
Bisgaier is set for a mid-January opening of the Century Village effort
on behalf of the Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency r und
campaign. With the assistance of co-chairmen Rev. Martin Adolf,
Louis Bailey, Sam Durbin, Robert Ketzia, Ben Rothenberg and Dave
Welsh, twenty of the twenty-nine sections comprising the Century
Village division of the drive conducted by the Jewish Federation of the
Palm Beaches are ready for active solicitation.
In a cooperative move to more effectively broaden coverage in all
sections, the Women's Division of Federation has assigned Esther
Banish to plan the campaign in the nine sections presently being
organized. The joint plan calls for teams in each of the twenty-nine
areas to contact both men and women prospects in their respective
sections.
AN EXECUTIVE with River-
side Memorial Chapels, Golden
has been active in the leadership
of the Israel Bond Organization.
He is a member of the board of
directors of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation. National
Commissioner of the Anti-
Defamation League and' the
Hillel Foundation.
David Schoenbrun, radio and
television broadcast journalist,
will Ik- the guest speaker He is
the winner of numerous reporting
awards, and was a correspondent
during World War II, covering
the invasion of Normandy. After
the war, Schoenbrun became
Paris correspondent for CBS
News. He regularly covers events
in the Middle East.
Travel Program Offered
Receive-A-Guest of London,
England, travel program
specialists, are offering their
sixth annual "Summer in
London" cultural / social tour
program for Jewish-American
teenagers. Each year, a group of
Jewish teens from the United
States spends its summer
vacation as guests in the homes
of British Jewish families in the
London metropolitan area. They
are provided with all meals and
accommodations in a British
family setting during their stay
of either four or six weeks. They
receive an event-filled, close-up
view of London, other parts of
Britain and its people.
For further information
contact Carol Jacobs in
Hollywood.
HEADING THE sections now
Andover Louis A. Brown
Berkshire Oscar Spiegel
Cambridge Malcolm Pitkin
Canterbury Emanuel Appelbaum
Dorchester Lil Rosenzweig
Dover Sol Margolis
Fast hampton Ben Rothenberg
Golfs Edge Dave Welsh
Greenbriar Rev. Martin Adolf
Hastings Robert Cahn
ready to begin campaigning are:
Kingswood Jonas Meyerson
Oxford Louis Bailey
Plymouth Louis Weinstein
Salisbury Dan Weiner
Sheffield-
Somerset Ada Columbus
Stratford Max Kelman
Southampton Robert Ketzis
Wellington Sam Durbin
Windsor Sol Ganelee

Other members of the campaign committee include Norman Axe,
Sidney Falik, Sidney Feinatein, Manny Goldman, Joe Klein, Howard
Kaye, Morris Leader, Joe Ram, Mary Rodd, Sybil Senecoff. Abe
Thropp and Nathan Weinstock. Chairmen for the yet unorganized
sections will be announced following their appointment.
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world. He has appeared before
audiences in England, Australia,
New Zealand, Canada, South
Africa, Latin America and the
United States.
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rage 4
TUMJ
TKeJemsTFloAdum ofPaL Beach County
Friday, December 30,1
977
Israel Bond Program
Plans to expand economic aid to Israel in 1978 are
already in the offing following an annual meeting of the
National Rabbinic Cabinet of State of Israel Bonds in New
York last week.
The plan for stepped up activity coincides with the
30th year of Israel's independence, and South Florida is
particularly fortunate in its relationship to this area of
Israel Bond endeavor because our own Rabbi Leon
Kronish, of Temple Beth Sholom, is chairman of the
National Rabbinic Cabinet.
It is no exaggeration when the Rabbi told the New
York planning session that "in the light of the momentous
events taking place today, the campaign for Israel Bonds
takes on a heightened importance."
It is no exaggeration when the Rabbi told the New
York planning session that "in the light of the momentous
events taking place today, the campaign for Israel Bonds
takes on a heightened importance."
Just One of Many Ways
The role of Israel Bond funds in the Jewish State is
legion. It has not changed since the first issue back in the
exciting days of 1951, with a special inaugural U.S.
launching by David Ben-Gurion.
Israel Bond dollars help Israel expand its industrial,
commercial and global economic horizons. This frees the
government to use monies it would otherwise have to use
for these activities in other areas, notably defense.
Through Israel Bond dollars, every individual pur-
chaser of bonds thus makes a critical contribution to the
country.
News of the National Rabbinic Cabinet campaign
highlights just one part of a complex endeavor, but
whether we participate through congregational appeals or
through other of the many programs operated by the
Israel Bond campaign, the important thing is to continue
our support.
Official Florida Discrimination
We applaud the position taken by the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, the American Jewish
Congress and the American Jewish Committee in con-
demning the recent action of many members of the State
Board of Education.
These members voluntarily promulgated a plan which
would impose a system of rigid racial quotas on Florida's
institutions of higher learning.
We understand the haste of these members of the
Board, who are also members of the Florida State Cabinet.
They are moving in the direction of redressing past
grievances involving discrimination on the basis of race
and creed by giving these races and creeds an added
"handicap" in order that they may become upwardly
mobile.
But the fact is that such handicaps are in themselves
discriminatory. They bar other, often far more qualified
students, from entry into the various state schools of
higher education on the basis that they are members of the
major races and creeds and therefore ought to be happy to
pay the penalty for the discrimination practiced against
minorities in days gone by.
The Nurturing of Mediocrity
We cannot igree. Apparently, neither can our
principle human i ghts agencies. Unfortunately, a cloud
will continue to hover over this dilemma until the Supreme
Court finally renders its opinion in the Bakke case in
California.
For now, all we can say is that such liberal inter-
pretations of equal access /equal opportunity provisos
and affirmative action programs not only discriminate in
the name of ameliorating discriminations; they also
nurture mediocrity in the classroom and, what is worse, in
the practitioners of the many professions such as law and
medicine who will be sailing through those classrooms
under a system of misguided social reform rather than
rigid academic discipline.
Jewish Floridian
Absurd Age Limit on Retirement
Bismarck started a large part
of the current hassle over man-
datory retirement by picking 65
as the age designated in his far-
seeing plan for collecting govern-
ment insurance as the years flew
by.
And now the nation is going to
the mat on the retirement issue.
Faced by Congressman Claude !
Pepper, 77, of Florida, strong
forces are at work to hike the cut-
off age from the present 65 to 70.
Later on, some hope the man-
datory clause will apply at 72.
And some hardy souls even
envision the day when legal age
limits on the right to hold a job
will be lifted clear off the legis-
lative map.
CONSIDER: Pope Paul VI
turned 80 recently and said he
OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
nmo "OUR VOICE" and "FEDERATION REPORTER"
In conjunction with Jewlah Federation of Palm Beach County. Inc.
Combined Jewlah Appeal
PALM BEACH BOCA RATON OFFICE
1SS0 NWlAvi., Boca Raton. Fla. SS4J2 Phone MS-3001
MAIN OFFICE and PLANT 1NE th St Miami, Fla SSI J2 Phone ST1 0B
MIAMI ADDRESS: P.O Box 013*71. Miami. Florida SS101
rRE D K SHOCHET SUZANN E SHOCHET RONNIE TARTAKOWE R
Editor and Publisher Executive Editor Newa Coordinator
MORTON GILBERT Advertising Representative
laiiJaiatB 1*1 Hitter I------"'"--------------
01 Til Mil ibaali I -------------"*~ '""-'--------
A.. P.O. ISTS roturna are to be forwarded to
The Jewlah Floridian. P.O. Box01-3971, Miami. Fla. 13101
Putoltehed Bl-Weekly
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
Jewish Federation of Pair.------------
Beach, Fla. JJ49* Phom -O If. federation officers. oreslSont. Stanley Brenner, Vice Presidents. Rabbi Hyman
Fishmen Dr. Howard Kay, Kenneth Scherer, Dr. Richard Shuaarman, Treasurer,
Stacev Lesser, Secretary. Bruce Daniels, Executive Director, Norman
Sdiimeiman. Submit material for publication to Ronnie Tartakower, Director of
Public Relations.
e~i.v rwnr-M-an 1977 20 TEVETH 5738
Friday. December 30, ln Number 26
Volume) 3
Robert
intended to continue his arduous
duties indefinitely; Ellsworth
Bunker at 83 has a key role in
negotiating the Panama Canal
treaty; Arthur Fiedler at 82
delights thousands with Boston
Pops; Mizz Lillian Carter, 78, is
busier than most of our
Presidents' mothers have been at
younger ages; nobody asks
Admiral Hyman Rickover to quit
at 77; Mike Mansfield is our top
China hand at 74; and Ruth
rlah Floridian. P.O. Box01 3971, Miami. Fla. 1S101
Second Class Pootaj-e Paid at Boca Raton, Fla OoMoO
TES: (Local Area) One Veer7.ja, or by membership to
I Palm Beach County, "41S Ofceechebee Boulevard. West Palm
I Gordon still holds the attention
of theatergoers at 80.
Ancora imparo ("I am still
learning"), Michelangelo
declared near the end of a
robustly creative life that found
him gracing the world with great
art in his late 80s. Closer home,
Thomas Edison, who died at 84,'
spoke for many spunky elders
when he said: "I am long on
ideas, but short on time. I expect
to live to be only about a hun-
dred."
So what is the real significance
of mounting efforts to give people
a chance to go on working in spite
of what the calendar says? If the
age limit is changed, how many
of our young people will really be
penalized? In view of scientific
advances that have extended life,
if Bismarck had it to do today,
wouldn't he set the limit at 80
instead of 657
WONT THE protests against
early retirement brighten chances
that government and industry
will find new ways to create more
joe so that the young and the
elderly alike will benefit?
Perhaps Edward E. Marcus of
Chicago has put the matter most
succinctly and effectively in a
one-sentence letter to Newsweek:
"The basic issue is whether this
201-year-old nation believes that
all people are created equal, but
only until they reach age 65 or
7o/'
Maine and the city of Seattle
have already voted the end of
mandatory retirement for
government employes. The
Connecticut General Insurance
Corporation has told its 11,900
employes they no longer will be
required to quit at 65. And while
Eric Sevareid is on notice to step
aside at that age, you can lay a
pretty safe bet that Walter
Cronkite, now 61, will find the
cut-off axe duller four years
hence.
NOW THAT 11 of every 100
Continued on Page 5
Anita Bryant Having it Her Way
The appeal to the dark side of
the American people, rather than
the best, has always been con-
sidered good politics.. Maybe
"good" isn't the word for it,
rather winning: see Richard
Nixon as the prime example.
It comes as no surprise that a
poll of Good Housekeeping
readers found Anita Bryant
chosen as the "most admired
woman in the world," par-
ticularly when the press reported
that she "beat everyone else by a
wide margin except Pat Nixon,
who was runnerup." Poor Pat
Nixon, at beat a plastic saint for
having put up with her husband,
the second most admired woman
in the world?
Well, we learned several years
ago what the Good Housekeeping
seal of approval was worth in too
many instances and the stamp of
admiration by the readers of that
stodgy publication is probably as
valid as the Literary Digest poll
in 1936 which gave Alf Landon
an easy victory over Franklin D.
Roosevelt
THE SAME upper middle-
class readership bias which dis-
torted the Literary Digest poll
and for shame forced it out of
business makes an absurdity
of the Anita Bryant-Pat Nixon
admiration quiniela. The result
won't kill Good Housekeeping,
for as someone said when it was
reported that Calvin Coolidge
was dead, how can you tell?
In Jewish tradition, we know
that there is a constant struggle
between the good and evil within
us, and today there are many
politicians betting on the latter.
Bryant, who professes Christian
love for homosexuals and gives a
neo-fundamentalist twist to the
New land Old) Testament that
Edward
Cohen
inhibits her from calling for then-
death by either stoning or
burning, has learned that
political lesson well.
In the name of love and
concern for all of us, she is ready
to put her homosexual crusade in
the closet and, according to
reports from a Kansas City
crusade, is going to save us all by
getting Bible reading and prayer
back into our schools.
SOME WILL object that I
imply "evil" in that move, and I
hastily do not deny that. The
desire to do unto others that
which they do not want is evil in
my eyes, and the protestations
that Bible reading and prayers
are for the good of our children
are to me nothing but hypo-
critical pieties.
Moreover, appeals of this kind
ultimately are appeals to that
dark side of the American people,
and I am pessimist enough to
know that as a Jew I am the loser
if this kind of issue ever comes to
a vote or, for that matter, any
other issue that would deprive a
minority of rights to freedom of
speech, liberty, assembly, or the
exercise of religions.
There are Jews who would not
disagree with Anita Bryant on
the prayer issue. Until recently, I
would not have identified them
with the mainstream of American
Judaism, but with the rise of the
Commentary crowd I'm not se
certain anymore.
WHEN THE B'nai B'rith.
whose ADL has been one of the
major defenders of the First
i Amendment, invites as a guest|
speaker a Congressman who is
one of the leaders in the effort to
amend the Constitution to permit
prayer in the public schools, it is
time to take a look at our historic
position. It may not be as im-
portant as some of us have been
led to believe by ADL and others
over the years.
Former Florida Gov. LeRoy
Collins, that gentle man of
courage, had the idealistic notion
to test the good in people when he
proposed to the Constitution Re-
vision Commission that we be
given an opportunity to vote on
the issue of banning capital
punishment. Atty. Gen. Bob
Shevin, who is the front can-
didate for that post at this time,
knows better the evil inclinations
that lurk in the hearts of the
voters. He led the opposition to
such a test although he must
know how ovemhelmingly the
proposal to end the death penalty
would be defeated.
IN A SENSE, the Commission
vote of 26 to 10 against the
Collins notion was as good
sampling of the sentiment in the
state as we might expect-
There begins to grow the
suspicion that Anita Bryant ana
sponsors, well aware of the
majority mood in the country
this time, is being groomed tor
political office at a high level
Certainly this "most admired or
mid-America has learned to wort
on those fears and hates which
trouble us as we let the evil spirit
get the upper hand to ">
struggle for our souls. And tno>
that's good politics.
Jk*.


Friday December 30,1977
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 5
Dr. Marvin M. Rosenberg
To Chair Bonds Campaign
Limit on Retirement Seen as Absurdity
Dr. Marvin M. Rosenberg will
serve as General Chairman of the
1977-78 State of Israel Bonds
Campaign in Palm Beach
County.
Jesse Newman, senior vice
president of the Royal Trust
Bank of Palm Beach, will be vice
chairman for the campaign.
Evelyn Blum will chair the
Women's Division. Robert
Rappaport, co-chairman of the
Israel Bonds Campaign in the
southern states, also will serve as
DR. MARVIN ROSENBERG
a member of the campaign
ciiinmittee.
A RESIDENT of Palm Beach
County for 17 years. l)r
RosenbtCg was campaign chair-
man for the local Jewish Fed-
eral ion and United Jewish
Vppetl from 1972 through 197,r>
He also has served as vice praai-
dent of the Palm Beach County
Jewish Federation and is an
active member of the Temple
lielh-EI in West Palm Beach.
He received his education in
dentistry at New York
I niversity and his graduate
iraining in periodontics at the
I niversity of Pennsylvania and
llnston University. He is an
associate professor at Boston
I niversity. He is an associate
professor at Boston University
and at the University of Penn-
sylvania School of Dental
Medicine. A past president of the
llorida Society of Periodontists.
he is affiliated with Doctors Hos-
pital in Lake Worth.
An idea launched by Israel's
first Prime Minister. David Hen-
SUMMER IN LONDON
American Jewish Teenagers
Spend summer 19'8 with London's
Jewish youth. Tours, sightseeing,
theatre LIVE IN JEWISH HOMES.
Meet British youth in social, cultural,
sporting activities.
Sixth Great Season
Miami Departures
Brochure: Mrv Carol Jacobs
Receive A Guest of London
4721 N. 35 St.
Hollywood, Fla. 33031
Tel. evenings (305)983-0437
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QUA
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l 31st. J
Gunon. in 1950, Israel Bonds
have accounted for more than S3
billion available for stimulation
of Israel's economy.
NO MONEY raised through
bond sales leaves the United
States. Israel uses the sums
raised for the purchase of
materials, supplies, tools and
equipment from U.S. firms.
Continued from Page 4-A
Americans are over 65 and zero
population is a good possibility,
the opportunity to continue to
work in the older years grows
stronger notonly in legislative
halls but also in the courts. Grey
Power is no joke; it's earnestly
serious; and George Meany, 83,
continues with clout enough to
bring the AFL-CIO over to the
side of the elderly in the hot fight
for a chance to stay on the job
longer if you want to.
Which is not to say that every-
body so wishes. Actually, the
average retirement age has
declined from 65 to 62. Many, if
financially able, like to get into
green pastures in their 50s. For
some, the living is easy, work
distasteful, and the hire of travel
and spectator sports irresistible.
But for millions of others, the
cold outlook of being pushed
aside just because a bell rings on
an actuarial clock brings bitter-
ness, regret and a feeling of being
cheated. Add to that the
inadequacy of many pensions and
the ravages of inflation, and you
come to understand why
numerous older folks are busy
exploding myths about
retirement.
THANKS TO court rulings,
legal action, and a change in
public thought, discrimination on
the bases of race, creed, national
origin, and sex is in sharp decline.
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.'


Page 6

The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Frkky, December 30,1977
Jewish Community in South Africa
Adopt-a-Family Program
Aides Soviet Jews
The Adopt-a-Family program
of the Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County's Soviet Jewry
Task Force is a nationwide
person-to-person project to help
Soviet Jews get out of Russia and
to sustain them until they obtain
their exit visas.
The families that are adopted
are refuseniks" they have
applied for emigration visas to
leave their country but have been
denied. Many have been waiting
for years.
"THE Adopt-a-Family pro-
gram can supply names of
adoptable families to individuals,
groups or synagogues who are
willing to devote some of their
time and and efforts through
letter writing, to help with the
plight of these oppressed
people." explained John Moss,
chairman of the International
and Soviet Jewry Task Force.
Moss announced the appoint-
ment of Sharon Lopez to head the
Adopt-a-Family program in Palm
Beach County.
The first step with a< iption is
to establish contact vith the
Soviet family. This is not always
easy. After regular contact has
been established, and in some
cases, financial assistance of-
fered, letters of protest can be
written. These letters go to
Soviet and U.S. government
officials to persuade them to help
the family get out of the USSR.
Getting friends and relatives to
write letters of protest and to
send greeting cards on Jewish
holidays and birthdays to the
family is an attempt to indicate
to Soviet authorities that the
family is known to Americans,
and can serve as protection for
them. The local media coverage
also is used to help raise aware-
ness of the problem.
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County.
By ELIE WIESEL
London Chronicle Feature
You feel ashamed when you
look inside their dwellings, when
you glance at their faces. It is the
man within you, the Whit- man.
who feels himself reduced to
shame. You lower your eyes so as
not to see South Africa.
You want to do something.
You know that something ought
to be done and quickly. But
you also know that you are
powerless. Too much misery has
been built up here over too many
years. There has been too much
suffering, too much injustice.
Might it still be possible to act, to
make a fresh start? That is
difficult to believe. A feeling of
finality imbues one. Too late, it is
too late.
YOU REMEMBER the ac-
quaintances, as well as the
strangers, in Johannesburg, Cape
Town, Durban and Port
Elizabeth, whom you were going
to question about the situation.
They got in first, however, with a
brief and poignant question of
their own: "How much time do
you give us?"
Industrialists and civil ser-
vants, teachers and prominent
figures, students and leaders
they all demand an adequate and
original reply from you, the
objective visitor to their country.
All right, then, tell them how
much time is left to them to go on
living in this earthly paradise.
You are a doctor and must give
I only
the patient guidance. Advise,
him, or simply tell him that his
case is hopeless.
Some people expect you to
humor them, to say that the
danger will pass, and all will be
well. Conversely, there are others
who ask you to unsettle them, to
give them a jolt, to push them
into leaving. The time for
hesitation is past. It is late, too
late.
A CAPTIVATING country
with a pleasant climate. Breath-
takingly beautiful scenery.
Warm-hearted, generous Jews,
fired by everything Jewish,
Oggendbl*)
everything human and every-
where, fear.
Do not be hasty in passing
judgment, your friends will tell
you. The situation is more com-
plicated than it seems. You are
consumed with the desire to
protest against apartheid and the
dictatorship of the Whites? That
is all vary well, but have you
taken into account South Africa's
friendship for Israel? Be a little
pragmatic and hold your
peace.
Admit it: the argument is not
Continued on Page 13
Community Calendar
*:
ft:
ft:
ft;
V
I
"AFTER MUCH time has
passed," noted Moss, "an many
hours have been snAt writing
letters, going to th^post office
and really feeling what these
families have been going
through, maybe the next letter
that is received from the family
will be postmarked from Israel or
an ORT school in Rome."
For information on the Soviet
Jewry Task Force and the Adopt-
a-Family program contact the
I
|
9
'.
v.
::
DEC. 31
Jewish Community Center
Temple Beth El Dinner Dance
Temple Beth El New Years Eve
Dinner Dance Boca Raton
JAN. 1
Temple Emanu-EI Men's Club Breakfast 10 a.m.
JAN. 2
Brondeis University Women Boca Raton
Jewish Fomily and Children's Service -
Board Meeting 7:30 p.m.
Women's American ORT Royal Palm Beach Board
Temple Emanu-EI Sisterhood Board 10 a.m.
JAN. 3
B'nai Torah Congregation -
Yiddish Culture Circle Boca Raton
Delray Hebrew Congregation Board 6p.m.
Women's American ORT Lake Worth 1 p.m.
Temple Beth El Board
Temple Beth El Sisterhood Board
Temple Isroel Men's Club 6 p.m
Yiddish Culture Group 10a.m.
Women's American ORT West Gate Noon
B'nai Torah Congregation -
Yiddish Culture Circle 8 p.m.
JAN. 4
National Council of Jewish Women Board Meeting -
Boca Raton -8 p.m.
Jewish Community Center Board
Jewish Federation Women's Division -
Executive 10 am.
Jewish War Veterans 7:30 p.m.
National Council Jewish Women Board P.M.
National Council Jewish Women -
Palm Beach Board AM
Women's American ORT Region Executive 9:30 am
Temple Beth Sholom Sisterhood 12:30 p.m
Jewish Federation Women's Division -
Executive Committee 10a.m.
JAN. 5
Temple Beth El Sisterhood Boca Raton -
Book Review 1.30p.m
Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Noon
Hadassah Board 10a.m.
Hadassoh Rishono
National Council Jewish Women Okeechobee -
Board 1030 a.m.
Women's American ORT Evening 8 p. m
American Friends of Hebrew University -
Annual Dinner
B'nai B'rith Women -Mitzvah -9 a.m.
Temple Beth El Men's Club
Jewish Community Day School Friends -
Family Day- 11:30 to 4 p.m.
JAN. 9
B'nai B'rith Women Boynton 12:30 p.m.
Jewish Community Day School Board 8 p.m.
Women's Americon ORT North Palm Beach -
Board9 45a.m.
Women's American ORT Palm Beach Board
Women's American ORT-Mid Palm 1:30 p.m.
Temple Emanu-EI Board 7:30 p.m.
United Order True Sisters Board -
10a.m. and 12:30p.m.
Hadassah -Choi -Board 1030a.m.
Women's Americon ORT Royal Palm Beach
B'nai B'rith 3041 Installation of
Officers 8:30 p.m.
JAN.10
B'nai Torah Congregation Boca Raton -
Yiddish Culture Circle Boca Raton
Hadassah Aviva Board Boca Raton 10 a.m.
Temple Beth El Board Boca Raton 8pm
Women's American ORT- Delray -Board- 12:30 p.m
B'nai B'rith Lodge 2939 7:30 p.m.
B'nai B'rith Lodge 2969 Board 7 p. rr,.
B'nai B'rith Women Masada Board 8 p.m.
B'nai B'rith Women Medina Board 8 p.m.
B'nai B'rith Women Menorah 1 p.m.
Hadassoh Book Review
Hadassah Henrietta S/old Board 1 p.m.
Temple Beth El Social Sets Board 8 p.m.
Temple Beth El Boca Raton 8p.m.
Temple Emanu-EI Sisterhood Board
Temple Ivael Young Adults Board 8 p.m.
Yiddish Culture Group 10 a.m.
JAN.11
B'nai Torah Congregation Board Meeting Boca Raton
Temple Beth El Bridge Club Boca Raton
Congregation Anshei Sholom Board -1 p.m.
Jewish Community Center Women's League 7:30 p. m
Jewish Federation Advance Gifts Dinner
National Council Jewish Women -
Palm Beach Board lOo.m.
Women's American ORT Century Board 1 p.m.
Pioneer Women Golda Meir Luncheon 12:30 p m.
Temple Beth David Sisterhood Board 8 p.m.
Temple Beth Sholom Sisterhood Cord Porty Noon
JAN. 12
?
Temple Beth El Sisterhood Board Meeting -
Boca Roton 10 a.m.
American Jev >sh Committee Board 4:30p.m.
Hadassah B<. I Gunon Board
Hadassah Shalom Board
Hadassah Palm Beach Tikvah Board 10a i
Hadassah Yovel Board lOo.m
Hadassah Zhava Board 1030 a.m.
Women's Americon ORT Region Board 9:30 o m.
-Temple Beth Sholom lake Worth ftowd .3Qcum. %
*::::::: mmtmmu&y. ^tmmmtmmmmmmtam-


y.
JAN. 7
Cystic Fibrosis Sixty-Five Roses -
10th Anniversary
Federation Leadership Development First Year
and Leadership Development Continuing Group
JAN. 8
B'nai Torah Congregation Boca Raton -
Nationol Guest Lecturer Boco Raton


Friday, December 30,1977
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 7
CRC Update-Refusniks
By HENRY GROSSMAN
Chairman, Community
Relations Council
Departing from our major
concern, continuing com-
munication with Congress and
the Administration on support
for Israel in the current Arab-
Israeli peace negotiations, we
turn to another support for our
Soviet Jewish brethren.
The Soviet Jewry Task Force
is now ready to point the way for
us to join the Adopt-a- Family
program. It is very simple.
WHEN A Soviet Jew makes
application to leave the USSR he
becomes practically a non-person.
He loses employment. He and his
family are harassed. Often, his
ru-cessary I.D. and other papers
are called for and often not
returned. He in effect lives in
limbo, at the mercy of the police
and the police state.
You can help such families by
becoming an American pen-pal.
What does this do? 1) Helps the
U.S. Tourism To
Israel Increases
NEW YORK (JTA) -
"More Americans visited Israel
in the first 10 months of 1977
than in the whole of 1976," it was
announced here by Israel Zuriel,
Israel Commissioner for Tourism
for North America. A total of
233.248 American tourists visited
Israel from Jan. 1-Oct. 31, a 25
percent increase over the same
period of 1976. and 8,000 more
than visited the country in all of
! Israel expects a record one
million visitors this year, and we
project an even larger number in
1978, our 30th anniversary year,"
Zuriel said. "This factor, linked
with the hopefully successful
moves towards a permanent
Middle East peace settlement,
should have very positive effects
in encouraging increased tourism
to Israel \AVff%."
C?A-IEF
Advaned
Gifts Dinner
Continued from Pane 1
appear overnight."
U'vy also commented that
the local needs in Palm Beach
County are increasing
dramatically with the growth in
population, particularly in con-
nection with health, education
and welfare programs serving the
Jewish community. An increased
commitment on the part of every
Jew Irving in the Palm Beach
County area is needed more than
ever."
Members of the Advance Gifts
Committee are H. Irwin Levy,
chairman; Nathan Tanen. co-
chairman; Stanley B. Brenner,
Dr. Howard Kay, Arnold
Lamport, Jeanne Levy, Robert
List, Kenneth Scherer, Alan L.
Shulman, Barbara Shulman, and
Mortimer Weiss. Barbara Tanen
>s handling the arrangements for
the Advance Gifts Dinner.
ADULT
Jewish Education Teochers
Wonted for Palm Beach oreo
>o teach courses in all fields of
Hebrew, Yiddish, History.
Customs 4 Ceremonies, etc.
Pleas* send resum* of
qualifications, experience and
specific subjects you with to
>eoch to Box EDU. Jewish
Floridion P.B. County, P.O. Box
012973, Miomi. Flo. 33101
family morale and lets them
know they are not alone; 2| Helps
the family becuase USSR of-
ficials become aware that news of
this family and its treatment is
known in the Western world.
Being sensitive. Soviet officials
are more careful in their treat-
ment of those who are not for-
gotten by us.
What does it mean to you? 1)
Write approximately one letter
per month; 2) Attend a short
briefing session; 3) Comply with
the rules for record keeping.
WE ARE reliably informed by
a number of friends who are in
the Adopt-a-Family program
that it is a great mitzvah and the
satisfaction they receive is far in
excess of the time and writing
involved.
To participate, write to John
Moss, chairman of the Soviet
Jewry Task Force at the Jewish
Federation in West Palm Beach.
Lighting the Chanukah candles at a recent
holiday program at the Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach Community Pre-School are
Phyllis Morgan, Pre-School Director, and
students Dara Genoe, Khadijjua Mainer,
Danielle Venoff, Beth Hoffman, Louis
Shapiro, Bryan Cohen, and Jill Ravitz.
We've been developing our figure
for 25 years and it's time to
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important, not because of the size
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I raw a/'an
Page 8
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Bench County
Friday, December 80,1977
Yiddishe Mama Invades World of Go. Politics
ByLISAGELDBART
When Cathey Steinberg en-
tered the race for Georgia rep-
resentative, her constituents had-
many reasons not to vote for her.
She was Jewish, female,'
young, inexperienced, had two
small children who needed her
attention, and was a transplanted
"Yankee" of only five years
duration in Atlanta.
BUT MBS. Steinberg decided
to take her chances, and a week,
before the qualifying deadline,
she threw her name into the hat.
After six months of hard cam-
paigning, she won the race and
became state representative from
the 46th District.
"I wasn't sure if I could really
win since I felt I had so many
things going against me. I was
ready to lose, but I knew my life
wasn't at stake," she said.
But she also thought people
were ready for a change and did
not run as a politician with many
promises but as a "concerned
citizen who just wanted to help."
"IT WAS similar to the post-
Watergate era. My opponent was
getting into a lot of trouble. He
was the incumbent, and I think
the people wanted a new face
maybe someone not as familiar
with politics." she said.
Was being Jewish a problem?
"Some of the people around me
were more concerned about my
being Jewish than I was. I
remember one friend saying,
'Cathey, if only you had a dif-
ferent last name.' I just didn't
think my religion would be that
much of a handicap. Sure, every
now and then one of my cam-
paign workers would come back
and say someone wouldn't vote
for me because of my religion, but
this was the exception," she said.
IN FACT, during her cam-
paign, she enlisted two Southern
Baptist ministers' wives to dis-
tribute brochures in their
churches.
Mrs. Steinberg feels many
Jewish people are paranoid about
anti-Semitism, but only once did
she experience a tinge of self-
paranoia during her campaign.
"Some of my yard signs were
burned to the ground. This
bothered me. and I started
thinking of the Ku Khix Klan. I
got 'knotty' about this, but it
was probably unnecessary
paranoia. For all I know, bids
could have done it," she said.
One of her goals is to get more
Jewish women interested in
politics.
"I'M WORKING with the Na-
tional Council of Jewish Women
and getting them more involved
in public affairs, lobbying and
perhaps even running for office
Unfortunately, many women
don't aee themselves as political
candidates."
She has found, however, being
a woman in politics has its pros
and cons.
"When campaigning, I would
go to someone's door, give them
my brochure with my picture on
it, explain my views and they
would say, 'Your husband sounds
like a wonderful man, and I'd be
happy to vote for him.' They just
couldn't get it through their
heads that I was the one run-
I
Attending the Women's Division Education Day for the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach County were (left to right} Barbra
Lifshitz, education vice president of Women's Division;
Barbara Shulman, Women's Division Campaign chairman;
Jeanne Levy, president of Women's Division and Bluma
Marcus, Overall Women's Division coffees chairman for the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation and guest speaker for the
day.
Bluma Marcus (standing left}. Overall
Women's Division coffees chairman for the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation, addressed
a group of over 90 women at a recent Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach County-Women s
Division Education Day. Barbara Shulman,
Women's Division C impaign Chairman gave
an overview of the needs in Israel and Jeanne
Levy, president of Women's Division, ex-
plained the role of the Jewish Federation in
the community. Announcements were made
of the special events planned for the 1978
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund campaign.
MEL WHYTE
ENTERPRISES INC.
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Gifts Pocket Books Lucites
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f December*), 1977
treated her as "just another
female" instead of her perceived
role as an "intelligent legislator."
She also felt she was not being
"taken seriously as a woman."
"I THINK a tot of men won-
dered what I was doing there.
But being a woman did have its
advantages. I found I was
noticed more quickly, while a new
male legislator has to introduce
400 bills to get attention," she
said.
And through all this, Mrs.
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 9
Steinberg has found the time to
raise her two children, Jill, 7, and
Lauren, 4.
Mrs. Steinberg appears quietly
satisfied with her new life. Her
husband, David, is a physician.
In the past, she was always
known as the "doctor's wife" and
resented people who only at-
tached her to her husband's pro-
fession.
"MY WHOLE life was or-
ganized around carpools, but a
person can't spend her whole life
that way. My only contacts were
the gas station attendant and the
grocery store cashier. I thought
to myself, 'all I have to look for-
ward to next year is counting
raffle tickets at the school.' I just
couldn't find anything chal-
lenging about that. So I decided
to run for office."
In addition to the children's
adjustment, she also finds it has
taken her husband some time to
adapt to the idea of her role as a
wife-legislator.
"During the first several
months, I think he was in shock,
but once he got used to the idea,
he was great," she said.
MRS. STEINBERG is not
sure whether she will go any
further in politics. Right now she
is concerned mainly with the
humanistic issues of the legis-
lature, including divorce reform
and the anti-rape bill
Aside from the "issues," Mrs.
Steinberg has learned a lot as a
legislator.
"I have learned, for instance,
to be more tolerant of people.
Sometimes a legislator won't
agree with you. but you have to
listen to him. I found this has
made me more understanding
with my family and everyone
around me." she said.
Israel Histadrut To
Sponsor Symposium
tured left to right are Joel Hoch, Don McMullen, Gen.
mjamin Peled and Joel Reinstein.
Bankers Receive Bonds Award
oel Hoch, director, and Don
iullen. vice president of the
erican National Bank and
t Company, Fort Lauder-
, were the recipients of a
cial award whan they
rated a check for the pur-
by the bank of $200,000 in
el Bonds to Gen. Benjamin
Bd, commander-in-chief of
el's Air Force.
I. Peled waa the guest
MENDEL
ACKERMAN
STEIN
Rabbi Norman T. Mendel,
program chairman, has an-
nounced that the Israel
Histadrut Foundation is spon-
soring a luncheon and sym-
posium to be held at Temple Beth
El of Boca Raton, where he of-
ficiates, on Tuesday, Jan. 10 at
noon.
Rabbi Mendel will speak on the
Threshold to Peace." Dr. Sol
Stein, national president of the
Israel Histadrut Foundation, has
just returned from Israel after
extensive consultations with
Histadrut and government
leaders. As a noted authority on
the economic problems of Israel,
his current analysis will be on
Facing the New Realities in
Israel."
WITH The Dawn of a New
Outlook for Israel" as the sym-
posium's theme, Anne Acker-
man, communal and civic leader,
will present Moshe Dayan's
autobiography.
For information and reser-
vations contact Henre Freeman,
co-chairman, or Phyllis Ladden.
co-chairman.
SECRETARIAL HELP NEEDED
for Jewish Federation office. Secretary, excellent
stenography and typing skills. Must be able to work
independently. Good benefits. Salary commensurate
with experience and ability. Please phone the Jewish
Federation offices at 689-5900.
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speaker at the Bal du
Maimonides, sponsored by the
Medical and Dental Professions
of Broward County on behalf of
Israel Bonds. Joel Reinstein,
chairman of the Israel Bonds
Broward County Fiduciary Com-
mittee, noted that "the purchase
brought the bank's holding of
Israel Bonds to S350.000, the
largest by any bank in Broward
County."
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Page 10
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, December
30,1!

Thrill of Walking Cairo Streets
Continued from Page 1
actually shaking hands with
Egyptians whom I might have
faced many times in the past on
the battlefield?"
THEN IN a state of astonish-
ment you query: "Are we going
to achieve peace this time? And if
not, will we find ourselves face to
face with these Egyptians on the
battlefield once again?" You
cannot help but feel that your
Egyptian host is asking himself
these same questions.
All of us, Egyptians and
Israelis alike, share the feeling
that we are embarking upon a
new era which might become a
positive turning point in the
Arab-Israeli conflict.
Despite the warm atmosphere,
you cannot help but feel some
concern concern not for the
physical risk you as an Israeli are
taking being in Cairo, but con-
cern that the mutual good will
and cooperation will not be
sufficient to close the wide gap
between the Arab and Israeli
positions.
WHERE IS the point of
compromise between the
traditional Arab demand for
complete Israeli withdrawal from
lands occupied since June, 1967,
and Israel's refusal to accept this
demand? How can the gap be
closed between the Arabs' in-
sistence upon the establishment
of a Palestinian state and Israel's
stiff opposition to such a state?
What about Jerusalem? Will it
be divided once again, as the
Arabs demand, or will it remain
united, as the Israelis desire?
All these and other questions
occupy your mind. Standing here
in Cairo, you understand the full
meaning of these questions and
the implications of their answers.
Afterwards, you sense some
optimism. You remind yourself
that the Middle East is unpre-
dictable and at times even
miraculous.
After all, who would have
expected Sadat to come to
Jerusalem? Who could have
anticipated him proclaiming
before the world that the Yom
Kippur War would be just? And
if those and other unpredictable
things have happened, then
perhaps even peace is possible
EVEN THE wether here
seems to reflect the feeling of
concern and optimism. Some-
times it's cloudy, and rometimes
it's clear.
The Egyptian officials meeting
here in the Mena House Hotel
share the belief that President
Sadat is a very courageous and
determined leader who knows
what he wants and he wants
They explain that Sadat did
not go to Jerusalem out of weak-
ness, but rather due to his strong
conviction that this is the way to
break the deadlock. Judging by
the huge demonstrations in
Egypt in the last few days, one
can see ihe tremendous support
the Egyptian leader enjoys from
his people.
THE EGYPTIAN media are
devoting most of their time to
explaining Sadat's new policy
and how it can only benefit the
cause of the Arab world, in-
cluding that of the Palestinians.
At the same time, the Egyptian
media bitterly attacked the Arab
rejection front, which is com-
prised of Syria, Libya, Algeria,
South Yemen and the PLO.
In a speech at the rally the
other day. President Sadat
described the leaders of the
rejection front as "ignorant and
pygmies." He accused them of
talking too much and doing
nothing.
Israelis may not agree with
Egyptians about Sadat's real
readiness to compromise on the
issues of territories and the PLO.
However, it is wrong to deny the
fact that he is a very daring man
who knows when, and perhaps
more important, how to make
decisions and to pursue them.
FURTHERMORE, he knows
how to surprise his enemies com-
pletely and: to take advantage of
their un preparedness.
When Anwar Sadat took power
in 1970, the common feeling was
that this ordinary and non-
charismatic leader would not last
long. Some speculators gave him
a few weeks or months to main-
tain his rule over Egypt. His
opponents immediately prepared
themselves to remove him from
power. Yet Sadat proved that he
was quicker than all his enemies.
In May, 1971, with one strike
he removed, arrested or exiled all
those who opposed him.
His next step was against the
Russians. Sadat's predecessor,
Gamal Abdel Nasser, had
developed a special relationship
with the Russians, and several of
their supporters held strong
positions iaw the Egyptian ad-
ministratioQ.
SADAT WALIZED that as
lon( *8 these pro-Russian
elements were in power ho would
be unable to capture American
sympathy and support. Once
again Sadat demonstrated his
shrewd planning abilities and bis
determination. In an astonishing
move be expelled all Russian
technicians and advisers from
Egypt in Jury, 1972.
Foreign and Israeli analysts
were misled into believing that
Sadat had weakened his armed
forces by this move. Sadat, who
was then preparing for war,
ordered his communications
media to strengthen this view.
Egyptian sources claimed that
as s result of the expulsion of the
Russians, the Kremlin had
stopped sending needed spare
parts. Egyptian diplomats the
world over were ordered to
emphasize Egypt's desire for
peace. One week prior to the Yom
Kippur War, Sadat delivered s
speech devoted mostly to
Egypt's internal difficulties.
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IN LIGHT of this well-staged
design, the next day some Israeli
journalists concluded that by not
mentioning the military option,
Sadat very likely received the go-
ahead from his supporters in
parliament to continue searching
for peace through political
means. Therefore, when everyone
assumed that warfare was
presently out of the question,
Sadat attacked.
Sadat's daring and shrewd
planning which enabled him to
survive his enemies did not end
with the Yom Kippur War. In
1975, he signed a separate
agreement with Israel, to the
shock and bitterness of his
counterparts in the Arab world.
Last but not least, he recently
sprang two tremendously sig-
nificant surprises: his historic
visit to Jerusalem and the Cairo
conference.
HISTORY proves that shrewd
leaders can be both dangerous
and promising. In contrast to
Nasser, Sadat proved he could be
dangerous to Israel. On the other
hand, only shrewd, realistic
leaders who know their
limitations can make daring
decisions, and even make peace
with their rivals.
Nasser was less dangerous to
Israel than Sadat. He lost in the
repeated wars with Israel yet
the more he lost, the more bitter
he became. Therefore, with
Nasser it would have been im-
possible to move toward peace.
It is indeed interesting to feel
the curiosity among my
Egyptian colleagues, who want
to know everything about Israel
and her people.
However, the one question,
ironically, I was most hesitant to
answer was about my country of
origin, Libya. Today in Cairo,
Libyans are considered enemies,
whereas Israelis are friends. This
is the new reality of the Middle
East.
SPEAKING Arabic with the
Egyptians here helps break the
language barrier and helps you to
feel like one of the family. The
Egyptians know how to break
down the walls of suspicion snd
were warm and responsive. When
they speak with you, you can't
help but feel as if you've known
them for awhile and that you
come from a country which has
had amicable relations with
them.
As an Israeli in Egypt, it's
difficult to adjust to the fact that
you hsve both Egyptisn and
Israeli security men following
you everywhere.
Security is extremely tight i
result of the numerous th
sabotage the conference.
AS AN Israeli, you may
about security ptob\Si
However, the development
events is so rapid, interesting,
important that you almost I
no tune to consider them ,
can't help but feel that you
witnessing a turning point in t
history of the Middle East.
And when events of such i
magnitude are unfolding '
has the time to think about's
things.
From here in Cairo, I wou
like to wish our readers
and an Arabic salaam.
Lehrman Elected to Boon
Dr. Irving Lehrman, rabbi of
Temple Emanu-El and past
national president of the Syna-
gogue Council of America, has
been elected to the national board
of directors of the American
Friends of Bar-1 Ian University in
Israel
RABBI LEHRMAN, himself a
recipient of the Pinchas Churgin
Award of Bar-1 Ian, is a national
vice president of the Zionist Or-
ganization of America and chair-
man of the board of governors of
the State of Israel Bonds Or-
ganization in Greater Miami.
He served for two consecutive
years as general chairman of the
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund campaign of
the Greater Miami Jewish Fed-
eration, and is a national leader of
the National Conference of
Christians and Jews.
He is past national chairman of
the Rabbinic Cabinet of the
United Jewish Appeal, vice
president of Religion in American
Life and a member of Omicron
Delta Kappa at the University of
^
RABBI LEHRMAN
Miami, the institution's higl
national honorary leadership
scholarship fraternity.
RABBI LEHRMAN has .
earned and honorary doctor
from the Jewish Theologu
Seminary of America, and in 1
will observe his 35th anniversafl
as rabbi of Temple Kmanu
largest synagogue in Mi
Beach and the largest
servative congregation in
South.
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I


December SO, 1077
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 11
'oman's Awny leader* feminme/militauy Balance
Continued from Page 1

ches independence and responsibility
until
tgest part of the army,
py are 55 yean old.
IMKN AND women in the Is-
ili armed forces are equal in
en. respect except combat, said
colonel. Women have not en-
id in combat since the Israel
r for Independence in 1948,
all other military duties are
en to them.
|"In fact, there are 220 roles for
bmen in the army," Col. Raz
ilained.
Fifty-five percent are in-
|ved in administrative work,
145 percent are in the medical,
ching, social welfare, me-
mics, communications (radar.
ones) and computer fields,
ey are also military police,
ivers and parachute folders.
ently, about 20 new roles in
technical fields have been
ned up to women, including
spun repairs and electronics,
ch is great progress in the
Pvancement of women soldiers,"
colonel said proudly. "The
ny couldn't make it without
i women."
ISRAEL, Col. Raz noted.
i military in a very high status
ofession for women. "We say
t the two years in the army is
education in the best school
t a girl could have," she said.
["It teaches her to be indepen-
h! and responsible. The posi-
and tasks we give a girl at
I age of 20 she wouldn't find on
(outside."
lia Raz, the daughter of a
okkeeper who immigrated to
ael from Poland at the age ot
and a seventh generation
bra who taught kindergarten.
ta't aspire to an army career as
"i girl. She didn't plan on
iming a commander or even
;>ng the army her career when
1 'x'Kan duty at the age of 18.
' kept signing up for six-month
"> at a time, not knowing
t 1 was going to do," Col. Raz
w her first two months in
ervica, she entered the of
training course. During
next one and a half to two
ahe trained Nahal girls.
- following 14 years were spent
'hi Navy, the last ten aa a
manpower officer (personnel
administrator) a first for a
woman. "I liked the Navy way of
life very much!" Co. Raz ex-
claimed.
DAHLIA RAZ became CHEN
commander of the Northern Area
in 1966. Six years later she spent
some of the busiest years of her
life going to school at Haifa
University, completing a degree
in social work in two instead of
the usual three years. In 1975.
she was promoted to her present
position.
"It's a job you don't finish,"
said Col. Raz. one of whose duties
is chief staff advisor. "I deal with
all sorts of problems personal,
social and professional. I just
love it."
She is responsible for the wo-
men in the army "from top to
bottom." Rules, discipline,
medical treatment. basic
training, NCO and officer
training, interviewing special
cases, traveling to camps to talk
to all the girls and making deci-
sions about releases are some of
her responsibilities. Her work
day is often 12 hours.
"I WAS personally involved
with a special project of CHEN,"
the colonel said enthusiastically.
Last year, the army drafted 300
young women from under-
privileged backgrounds who
would not normally have served.
The girls had become high school
dropouts by the age of 13 or 14.
"I walked with them step by
step," said the commander. The
girls underwent basic training for
two months, instead of the usual
one month. During this period,
they learned gymnastics, self-
defense, marching and military
discipline and were taught 'Zion-
ism.' "
"In ten weeks, we had to fill in
the gap of the past five years,"
Col. Raz explained. The girls took
courses in hygiene, behavior,
inter-personal relationships and
sex education.
THEY WERE also taken
across their country, through
history. For other Israelis, the
experience would be natural: but
it was their first opportunity to
face Israel Jerusalem, the
Knesset, Yad Vashem.
Many of the young women
were placed in a nursing assistant
training program after basic
training, in which they did very
well. And they still received
general and professional educa-
tion once a week after completing
the training, while serving in the
army.
"The pride and confidence
these young women gained was
extremely obvious they had
new self-images." noted Col Raz.
They returned to their towns,
heads held high, proud to be in
the army, happy with them-
selves.
MANY OF these draftees came
from Pioneer Women Na'amat
schools. "Without the support of
Na'amat, we couldn't have done
it," explained the commander.
"They do the whole job and we
get the results." She pointed out
that you can immediately dif-
ferentiate between those girls
who go to Na'amat schools
"they do the best" and those
who don't. And the difference
between a student just beginning
and those who have been at the
schools for a few years is quite
noticeable.
Plans are now being made to
draft 1,000 more underprivileged
young women.
THERE IS much more to this
vivacious commander-in-chief.
She is the mother of two boys,
aged eight and 14, and wife of an
engineer who has his own com-
pany, and is himself a lieutenant
colonel in the reserves. "When
you come home and the kids are
jumping around, you stop being a
colonel," she said. "I love being a
mother. I love being a wife. But
after so many years, I don't know
if I could just stay home and
watch everyone else go off to
work and school."
As for other interests, Dahliah
Raz said her first love is books;
her reading matter covers a broad
spectrum of interests. And ahe is
a concert-goer, but gave her sub-
scription to a friend last year: "I
couldn't come home at eight, say
shalom, shalom, to the children
and be at the concert at nine,"
she explained. Col. Raz also likes
diving and swimming. And
during her short visit to New
York, -she was an avid theater
patron.
IT WAS startling to hear this
dedicated woman say she plans
on retiring from the armed forces
in a few years, knowing her at-
titude towards her work: "If you
love it, you do it with all your
heart ... If you're interested in
progress, you put your stamp on
it."
Plans for the future? The
colonel says she may return to
social work and wants more
time for herself.
The dynamic and charming
Col. Raz left the Pioneer Women
office saying, "I'm so glad to be a
part of you."
We trust she knows how happy
we are to be a part of her and her
work in Israel.
Season's Greetings
To The Entire Jewish Community
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Eat Like the Dickens.
A Tureen of Soup
Pickwick Salad
14 m. Roasted Prime Ribs of Beef
Yorkshire Pudding
Baked Potato
Spinach Souffle or
Creamed Corn
Coconut It Cheee Bread
sa.5
also featuring
Ye Okie Confectionary Shoppe
Kngllsh Tea & ( uriousities Called Coffee
Seafood Bar* Pub
Oliver's is an 1850s happening
that brings the London of
Charles Dickens back to life.
From the moment the Artful
Dodger parks your car and
starts you wondering whether
he'll sell it while you're eating,
you enter the immortal world of
Bo/. You'll be greeted and
seated by Nancy Sikes. Little
Nell or Kate Nickelby. served by the likes of Rosa
Dartlc. Martha C'ratchit. Lucic Mancttc. With Fagin
liki'K to be coming over to your table and Filching a
watch or necklace: Ebenc/er Scrooge admonishing
you not to leave too big a tip. At Oliver's, you dine in
the fine tradition of Dickens' world, surrounded by
his marvelous iracters. And unlike Oliver himself,
you'll nevet I u have to ask for more.
OLIVER'S
HJr)| MOUSE Q> HtlMI ^
Restaurant. Seafood Bar 4 Pub at Runaway Bay O 79th St. Causeway Miami Beach, Fla. Rea: S6frl511


Page 12
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, December a
Ben-eiissaa Seoves as lspael's top
Civil Servant, faienfc to Begin
JERUSALEM (JTA> Prime
Minister Menachem Begins
selection of Eliahu Ben-Elissar as
head of the Israeli delegation to
the pre-Geneva talks in Cairo was
seen here as an indication that
Begin intends to keep those talks
under his closest scrutiny.
Ben-Elissar, 45, is Director
General of the Prime Minister's
Office, Israel's Number 1 civil
servant. He is also a trusted
political aide and loyal personal
friend of Begin. He was to
provide the Prime Minister with
detailed reports on the progress
of the Cairo meeting and will be
receiving detailed instructions
directly from Begin.
BEN-ELISSAR should cut an
impressive figure in the Egyptian
capital. Six feet tall, slim but
broad-shouldered with black hair
and a meticulously groomed
black beard, he is witty,
ingratiating and carries himself
with dignity. He made friends
easily with the Egyptian aides
who accompanied Sadat to
Jerusalem.
Politically, Ben-Elissar has
always been a Merut loyalist. As
a child he was -muggled out of
Nazi-dominated Europe by
Polish friends of his family.
Many of his relatives perished in
the Holocaust. Until 1965, Ben-
Elissar was an operative of
Massad. Israel's secret intel-
ligence agency, which kept him
out of politics. In 1971 he
declared his political preference
and became chief of information
at Herat's headquarters.
His second in the Cairo talks
was to be Meir Rosenne, legal
adviser to the Foreign Ministry
and an old friend. Both men
studied political science at the
Paris Sorbonne in the 1950s and
both worked part-time at the
Israeli Embassy in Paris under
Ambassador Jacob Tsur.
ROSENNE was born in
Rumania and served as Israel
Consul in New York in the late
1950s. He was closely involved in
the post-Yom Kippur War nego-
tiations and was present at
Kilometer 101 where the first
Israeli-Egyptian cease-fire was
negotiated. He went to Geneva in
the spring of 1974 as a par-
ticipant in the disengagement
negotiations with Syria and to
Washington in August, 1975 to
draft the Israel-U.S. memoran-
dum of understanding prior to
the second Sinai disengagement
accord.
Rosenne participated in the
negotiations with Egypt at
Geneva in September, 1975 which
resulted in the "military pro-
tocol" attached to the second
Sinai pact. He also participated
in the buffer zone "joint com-
mission" talks with Egypt in
1976 and accompanied Foreign
Minister Moshe Dayan at the
drafting of the U.S.-Israel
working paper on Geneva con-
ference procedures in New York
last September. He has been legal
adviser to the Foreign Ministry
since 1971.
Rigid Education Quota
System Condemned
The Florida region of the
Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith, the American
Jewish Committee and the
American Jewish Congress
have condemned the recent
action of a majority of the
Florida State Cabinet,
sitting as the State Board
of Education, in which they
voluntarily promulgated a
plan which would impose a
system of rigid racial
r
s
^n *$-
^J
1
l2 7875 Belvedere Rd., Wast Palm Beach, Fla. 33411
Located at Camp Shalom
_SZ PROGRAMS AND FEES
.1? 5 Day Program (Monday-Friday)
^ Playgroup2-3 year olds
^ Pre-School4-5 year olds
"~3 Morning Program 9a.m. 12 noon
Tuition: $52 per month
a non-refundable $40 deposit is payable with ap-
plication.
Afternoon Program: 12 noon3 p.m.
$175 per aemesn
# FULL-DAY PROGRAM: $400 per semester (a
savings of $25 per semester)
Phy us Morgan: Pre-Schoc upervisor
Staci Lesser: Pre-School Comr tee Chairman
PPUCATION FOAM
Child s Name______
Parent or Guardian .
! .
hom.
Address.
.City.
.2.p.
enroll my chiKJ in the 1977-78 COMMUNITY PME MOO:
Morning program -inly.
Afternoon program only.
Full day program.
My $40 00 non-ralundab* application la* s enclosed
. Signature ___
Dae___________________
MAIL TO COMMUNITY PRESCHOOL
Jewish Federation of Palm beach County
2415 Okeechobee Boulevard
VVeet Palm Beech Florida 3*0*
quotas on Florida's institu-
tions of higher education.
The groups called upon
state officials to adopt
instead a non-discrim-
inatory affirmative action
plan to aid all economically
and culturally deprived
persons regardless of their
race.
ACCORDING to Richard
Essen, chairman of the Regional
Board of the Anti-Defamation
League, as a spokesman for the
three agencies in this matter,
"the Board of Education's plan
requires that students be ad-
mitted into all public colleges,
universities and graduate schools
in fixed percentages of black
students to white students,
rather than solely upon the
applicants' ability and
qualifications: and further, that
the highly sought-after employ-
ment opportunities in those
institutions be filled upon racial
preferences, not upon merit and
skill alone.
"The plan further provides
that it would be supervised by a
committee, the majority of whose
members must be black."
The Anti-Defamation League,
the American Jewish Committee
and the American Jewish Con-
gress are long-time advocates of
remedial and compensatory
education to offset the
deleterious effects of generations
of prejudice "committed to the
principle that affirmative action
must be taken to overcome the
history of discrimination against
all persons," Essen said.
THE AGENCIES insist, how
ever, that any action taken to
remedy the plight of the dis-
advantaged "must be directed at
all culturally and economically
deprived persons regardless of
their race, color, creed, national
origin or tax
Earn noted that the im-
position Florida's Cabinet represents "an
unwarranted and uncon-
stitutional fDvarnoMntaJ in-
trusion into our *> stem of higher
education ami i annul
tolerated.-'
DESPITE the fad that the
'-met has to this data, not beam
responsive to numerous attempts
to eliminate the racial pr. I
imposed by the plan, which they
approved on September 7. 1977.
the agencies are hopeful that thi
Cabinet will yel
I Essen noted.
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v.
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y.
V.
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1977 Allocations
The Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County holds an annual
campaign to raise funds for humanitarian needs of the local
national and international Jewish community. This year tr- 1977
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund raised a total of
11.522.283.
At a Jewish Federation board meeting last June, approval was
S'ven to the recommendations of the Federation's Allocations and
udget committees Under the chairmanship of Rabbi Hyman
Fishman and Dr. Richard Shugarman, the committees baaed their
disbursements on requests from local, regional, national and over
seas agencies.
THE UNITED JEWISH Appeal will receive the largest
allocation. S900.000, approximately GO percent of the total dollars
raised Stanley B. Brenner, president of the Jewish Federation
praised Rabbi Fishman and Dr. Shugarman and the members of
their committees.
The complete 1977 Allocations are listed below
LOCAL SERVICES
590.348
Jewish Federation Services:
Community Relations 3.000
Floridian Newspaper 14.350
Forum 2.500
Home for Aged
(Jacksonville 1 5.000
Jewiah Education 1,500
Leadership Development 3.000
Missions 1.000
Raftlgei Resettlement 8.000
Social Senrfcei 1.100
1 V Program 1JJ00
Pre-School IH PB-Bocal 10.000
i amp Shalom Main-
tenance 21.000
("amp Shalom Capital
Improvement iXK)
Public delations 5.000
:10th Anniversar) of
Israel Independence 5.000
Jewish 1 ederal mn
\1l1111n1si rat mn
I ainpaicn
Jewish I amiK A
1 hildren Sen Icea
Jewish ('immunity
I lay S< In Nil
( oinmiinily < intinyem \ Fund
REGIONAL SERVICES
B'nai H nth llillel
Foundation MM
Central Xgencv for Jewish
Fduciition of Miami ISO '",hI
NATIONAL 8BRVICE8
1 nmmunit) UeiaUnna
XgllM les
American Jewish
Committee RUM
\rncru an Jewish
Congress I loo
B'nai R'rilh Ann-
Defamation League 2.100
Jewish Labor Committee .350
Jewish War Veterans 325
National Conference on
Soviet Jewry 350
National Conference of
Jewish Communal 50
National Jewish
Community Relations 775 Total
Total of
Categories
$87,050
Percentage
39 pet
$274,298
70.0011
MO.000
BO.000
8.IMX)

I in 1
CULTURAL AOENCIE8
Jewish Cultural Appeal
KKI.KilOUKA
KIMJI VlliiWI.
American Academic Assn.
for Peace in the
Middle Fast
American Assn. for
Jewish F.ducation
American Jewish Archives
Dropsie UaJvanit)
Jewish Chatauqua Society
Jewish Theological
Seminary
Keform Jewish Appeal -
Hebrew University
8) nagogue Council of
America
"> evhiva University -
Orthodox
Council of Jewish
Federation* Welfare
Funds 1 Fellowship in
Jewish Fducation
Leadership' 500
Honllah Jewish Teachers 100
100
500
500
150
200
250
500
500
100
300
$7,200
400
Total
3.600
SOCIAL WELPARE
\ss of Jewish 1-aniiK
Children Xgancin
it ti.ii R'rilh Youth
Ban i ei Xpaoel
Jewish Hr .iiII.- Instil tit*
\atu.nal I.
Welfare B<
Ninth \nieru an Jewish
Studenu
I IVI RSI XSSI R\ M I s
Vmi
:
I.Ml
no
150
1.300
Total







'
|
M slu.nk


wr
A Ml O KWlill r HJI Ultun u/ i w uum immj
Jewish Commiutity in front 11 Africa
|D.ntinuedfromPge6
(glse Israel's dramatic
, 0UKht to justify certain
' jges Morals and politics
En together except for the
|f of Machiavelli. The
hire busv with something
a true that Israel has
been able to count on
andintf and help from
South Africa during periods of
crisis and peril. As far as the
Jewish State is concerned. South
Africa has proved herself.
IT IS equally true that the
governments of the developing
African countries let us down
many times. They have quickly
forgotten everything Israel did
M Jewish Emigration Up
Ly YORK (JTA, The
i Jewry Research Bureau of
National Conference on
, Jewry, has reported that
ber'of Soviet Jews emi-
from the USSR from
IJy.November. 1977 sur-
the number of Jews
to leave in 1976.
Ltte .lacobson, bureau
Lrson, announced that
[January-November, 1977.
Soviet Jews have emi-
to Israel and elsewhere
[the total allowed to leave in
(was 14.213.
|e welcome the increase,
on 9aid. "and hope that it
| continue throughout the
months. Analysts have
Fied that the increase in
[being allowed to emigrate
i last few months is due to
ons in Belgrade by those
countries signing the Helsinki
Final Act, which includes pro-
visions for the free emigration of
all people."
CONTINUING, she pointed
out: "Though 1977 figures will
surpass last year's total, they do
not approach the peak years of
19721973 when more than 66,000
Soviet Jews left the USSR.
Soviet authorities are continuing
harassment against thousands of
Soviet Jewish activists who wish
to leave, many of whom applied
for exit visas more than five
years ago. At the same time anti-
Semitic remarks are carried in the
Soviet media and Soviet Jewish
activist Anatoly Sharansky is
still being held in Moscow's
Lefortovo prison pending com-
pletion of the Soviet authorities'
investigation '
Court Ruling Seen As
Blow to Day Schools
B>
DAVID FRIEDMAN
EW YORK (JTA) The
illy hard-pressed Jewish
lichools in New York will not
ve a hoped-for reimburse-
t of about tl million from the
[as a result of a ruling by the
| Supreme Court.
court, in a 6 to 3 decision,
I that a 1972 New York law
|provided about til million
burse parochial schools for
cost of state-mandated
rd-keeping and testing
is unconstitutional. The
said the law was uncon-
lional because "it will of
isity either have the primary
1 of aiding religion ... or will
in exessive state involve-
I in religious affairs."
JBI Bernard Goldenberg,
Irate director of Torah
the National Society
Pebrew Day Schools, told the
Telegraphic Agency here
cision was a bit of a blow"
Jewish day schools. He
could see "nothing
about keeping atten-
records or administering
inquired by the state.
enberg said the day
ols will now have to provide
nds needed to carry out the
itnd record-keeping required
' i state, leaving leaa money
olarships for children from
t funiles and putting more of
cial burden on the parents
[students He noted one
"Vi in Queens closed recently
others are having severe
I trouble.
1972 law that was struck
*>s passed by the New
State legislature after a
District Court In 1972
unconstitutional a 1970
[providing $28 million a year
amchial and private schools
record-keeping and teat-
|penses. The district court
Payments for the second
[of the 1971-72 school year.
the State Legislature
law which permitted
[cnools to file claims for the
'payment thus insuring its
Wily until the federal court
was appealed and
* dissenters. Chief Justice
"urger and Associate
William H. Rehnquist,
.relieved that a decision
* Supreme Court in 1973
upholding the right of Pennsyl-
vania to make similar payments
to private schools until the court
had acted on the con-
stitutionality of the enabling
legislation should have applied in
the New York case.
Associate Justice Byron
White, the third dissenter,
declared "the court continues to
misconstrue the First Amend-
ment in a manner that dis-
criminates against religion and is
contrary to the fundamental
educational needs of the coun-
try."
Goldenberg said the court
decision makes it incumbent
upon those American Jews who
oppose state aid to parochial
schools to see thst the Jewish
community provides more finan-
cial aid to Jewish schools.
RABBI Moshe Sherer,
executive president of Agudath
Israel of America, which operates
day schools, said the "Supreme
Court decision is s serious blow
to the hopes of non-public schools
for justice. As Associate Justice
Byron White pointed out, this
decision discriminates against
religion' by refusing to reim-
burse the non-public schools
for strictly secular expenses
incurred by government man-
date. Nevertheless, we are
determined to continue our fight
to obtain the benefits to which
non-public schools are entitled,
undaunted by these temporary
setbacks, with trust that fairness
will ultimately prevail."
ADL Awards Ferguson
James L. Ferguson, president
of General Foods Corp.. received
the Americaniam Award of the
Anti-Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith at a dinner Nova 29 at the
Waldorf-Astoria in New York.
Ferguson is the ninth recipient
of the Americanism Award. Since
graduating from Hamilton
College, Ferguson served with
the Corps of Engineers in the
Pacific and graduated from the
Harvard Business School. He
currently is a truatee of Hamilton
College, the JuiUiard School of
Music in New York, and Outward
Bound.
HE IS a director and treasurer
of the Grocery Manufacturers of
America, a member of the Con-
ference Board, and director of
American Productivity Canter.
for them. Schools and hospitals,
roads and factories, economic
enterprises and military installa-
tions they owe them all to
Israel Nevertheless, when the
first test came, they turned their
backs. Worse, in betraying
Israel, they betrayed themselves.
The victims of racialism have
invented a new kind of racialism.
How many free, democratic
regimes still exist on the con-
tinent of Africa? And how can
one be sure that a Black South
Africa government would be able
to resist the temptations of total-
itarianism and of being anti-
Israel? One can rather be sure of
the contrary.
Also, why act against our
objective interests? Why give aid
to our adversaries, our potential
enemies of tomorrow?
Yes, of course, this reasoning is
not devoid of logic. Only, when
you go inside Soweto, outside Jo-
hannesburg, you are confronted
by concentrated poverty and
humiliation without parallel. You
speak to the men and women who
barely keep body and soul
together, to the children who turn
you sour. You discover a melan-
choly, closed world in their eyes,
and logic is forgotten.
BE CAREFUL, a well-known
industrialist exclaims. You are
being very charitable, but at our
expense. What right do you have
to sacrifice us so quickly? Do not
be under any illusion. It is a
question of our disappearing
altogether. If the Blacks take
power, they will establish their
own apartheid against us. Is
this what we deserve?
The speaker is a man of old
Afrikaaner stock. When he puts
his case, his reasoning too, seems
logical.
"My ancestors arrived here
several centuries ago, not as
'colonizers.' but as settlers. They
were the first to till this soil We
built this country ourselves. We
did not drive out anyone, we did
not take anyone's place. Why do
they want us to leave? And
besides, where would we go? If
anything happens, the English
will go to England, the Jews to
Israel But we, the Afrikaaners,
where are our brethren who will
invite us to come and join them?"
IN OTHER words, he has not
the slightest intention of leaving.
The thought has not even entered
his mind. His love for his country
is total, absolute. He regards it as
his last stop, and when he asks
you: "Why are you ready to fire
on our lives, on our destinies?"
you think twice before replying.
Besides, what answer can you
give that the inhabitants of
Soweto take precedence over the
owners of luxurious mansions?
That logic is one thing and
conscience another? That, being a
Jew, you could never accept
racialist laws? It would be going
against nature not to be roused to
indignation. We Jews must
combat racialism everywhere,
even if those who practice it call
themselves your friends.
What strikes one about
apartheid is its stupidity, as well
as its cruelty. Those restaurants
for Blacks and Whites. Those
separate hospitals. Those
separate buses. Those separate
lavatories. An injured White and
an injured Black must not be
carried together in the same
ambulance. Either one or the
other, but not together.
IT IS impossible not to
protest, impossible at one and the
same time to believe in Judaism
and pass over in silence an
ideology based on considerations
of biology or color. We are anti-
racialists by tradition and by def-
inition, so it is natural for Jews to
be in the forefront of the move-
ment of those who reject apar-
theid. Helen Suzman is not an
exception. Others follow her. The
majority of young Jews decry
racialism. Young South African
Jews are courageous and ideal-
El.IK WIESEL
istic. We are right to be proud of
them.
But what of the future? "How
much time do you give us?" The
disturbances increase and in-
tensify. Violence and repression,
the vicious circle widens. Is it the
beginning of the end? The police
are efficient; the army is well-
trained and equipped and, it is
said, possesses nuclear weapons.
As for our Jews and the
community is undoubtedly one of
the best in the diaspora what
fate awaits them? The Whites
will detest them for their liberal
ideas, while the Blacks will reject
them because of their color. Will
they be able to leave in time?
Tomorrow, they run the risk of
becoming the moat con-
spicuously-threatened Jewish
community of all. Will they be
prepared? And shall we?
BEPIB5
ton
Office: 848-9753
Horns: 622-4000
DON VOGEL
700 U.S. Hwy. 1, No. Polm Baocb
PALM BEACH EYE ASSOCIATES
Richard G. Shugarman, M.D.
Emanuel Newmork, M.D.
P.A.
Announces the Relocation o
meir (West Palm Beach) Office
in the Practice of Diseases and
Surgery of the Eye
To
1500 No. Dixie Hwy.
659-7277
Suite 201
the Atloirtis Office Remains
At 111AJ.F. Kennedy Circle
961-0130
mtmmmmmKtamammmmmmmm
S%3*30**%****SS%-%.Tt**1saOC
Jan.29
Feb. 12
Feb. 26
Mar. 12
Jfaruni

Sunday evenings at 8:15 at Temple Israel
1901 North Flagler Dr., West Palm Beach
Dorothy Rabinowitz
Dr. William Korey
Albert Vorspan
Judge Jerome Hornblass
Mar. 26 Max Dimont
Topic: "Survivors of the Holocaust"
Topic: "United Nations and the Middle East"
Topic: "What's Happened to Jewish Liberalism?"
Topic: "The Changing Social Mores of the Young American Jew'
Topic: "A Clash of Destinies"
Subscription series tickets 810
Individual program tickets 83
(may be purchased at the door)
Student admission 81
Please order your tickets early.
Seats are not reserved, but
every effort will be made
to assure seating for subscription
ticket holders.
Doors open at 7:15 p.m.
i JEWISH COMMUNITY FORUM
JEWISH FEDERATION OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
2415 Okeecbobee Blvd.
West Palm Beach. Fla. 33408
Phone 689-5900
Enclosed is my check for 8--------
1978 Jewish Community Forum
Name----------------------------------
.for.
.subscription tickets for the
-.Zip
_, Phone.
Please make checks payable to the Jewish Federation of Palm Bench County.


! 3tye Tl

iRabbtntcal f age
devoted to discussion of themes and issues relevant to Jewish life past and present
co-ordinated by the
Palm Beoch County Rabbinical Council
Editor
Robbi William H. Shopiro
Survival
By Rabbi William H.
Shapiro, Sc.D.
Executive Secretary
Rabbinical Council
of Palm Beach County
UJA Federation Sabbath was
set for observance for this coming
Shabbos Vaera Jan. 6 and 7. This
will present the rabbis with an
opportunity to discuss the
concepts of Tzedakeh charity
and Jewish commitment. The
rabbis of the Talmud obligated
vatyon even the poor, to do
tz-edakiih, because all were
obligated to perform acts of
justice and express their
humani'\
The poor had a corresponding
moral claim in the community;
rather than simply ask, they had
the right to demand that the
community meet their needs.
Communal leaders, acting in
behalf of the poor, had the right
to demand of their constituents
in the community that they meet
their obligations. In fact, these
leaders had and often utilized
their authority to force com-
pliance of those who failed to
fulfill their responsibilities Com-
mitment was a complete response
to the idea of establishing just n
< 'ommitment meant the willing-
ness t,, engage in an arduous and
difficult struggle to realize I
belief. How many of us have a
true commitment to Jewish
ideals? How many Abrahams are
there among us who truly
sacrifice for the sake of commit-
ment to strengthen Jewish life
here and protect Jewish life
abroad?
MAKING A gift and feeling
comfortable about it is not a
sacrifice. A sacrifice is a gift that
hurts. It means a realignment of
personal priorities It costs a
great deal to be Jewish today.
beCSUM inflation has hit our
people Spiritual inflation is
corroding the Jewish spirit, and
excuses cannot underwrite the
OOStS of self preservation.
Because Someone Cared
By STEPHEN LEVITT. ACSW
A personal view from
The Executive Director
of the Jewish Family
and Children's Service
(All case names mentioned in
these articles are fictitious; client
information at JF&CS is held in
the strictest of confidence.)
Very often in the course of
therapy. I am asked by the client
how I feel about him; his
behavior, his logic and in general
how I feel toward him. This is a
difficult and oft-time "loaded"
question, because one's response
can and does materially affect the
relationship. It needn't always
be. however, when you consider
that frequently what is really
being asked is. "do you accept
me?" And the answer to that
question is an immediate and
emphatic "yes!"
I would like to share the ex-
perience of one Social Worker -
Psychologist. Carl Rodgers. on
the subject of the Therapist's
Experience" in the counseling
process, to give you a brief idea of
how I sometimes feel: "To the
STEPHEN LEVITT
therapist, it is a new venture in
relating. He feels. "Here is this
other persons, my client. I'm a
little afraid of him. afraid of the
depths in him as I am a little
afraid of the depths in myself.
Yet as he speaks. I begin to feel a
respect for him. to feel my
kinship to him.
I SENSE how frightening his
world is for him. how tightly he
tries to hold it in place. I would
like to sense his feelings, and I
would like him to know that I
understand his feelings. I would
like him to know that I stand
with him in his tight constricted
little world, and that I can look
SYNOPSIS OF rHE WEEKLY TORAHPORTION
SHEMOT
"And he looked, and, behold, the bush burned with fire,
and the bush was not consumed" (Exod. 3.2). "And Moses
hid his face; for he was afraid to look upon God" (3.6).
SHEMOT The children of Israel increased and multi-
plied and the land of Goshen was filled with them. But a
new king arose in Egypt; one who had not known Joseph.
He said to his people: "The children of Israel are too many
and too mighty for us; come, let us deal wisely with them,
lest they multiply, and it come to pass, that, when there
befalleth us any war, they also join themselves unto our
enemies, and fight against us, and get them up out of the
land" (Exodus 1.9-10). The new Pharaoh made slaves of
the Hebrews. He also commanded that every new-born
male infant was to be cast into the river Nile. However,
Moses was saved from this infanticide by the king's
daughter and grew up in Pharaoh's court. He was forced
to flee Egypt after slaying an Egyptian whom he found
mistreating a Hebrew slave. Moses went to Midian, where
he tended sheep for<4iis father-in law Jethro in the desert
near mount Horeb. God appeared to Moses in a burning
bush and told him to return to Egypt, for it was his
mission to liberate the children of Israel and lead them to
the land of Canaan. With the help of his brother Aaron,
Moses united the Hebrew slaves into a people. Then he
came before Pharaoh with God's demand that he "let My
people go."
(The recounting el the Weekly Portion of the Law t* extracted and bated
upon "The Graphic History of the Jewish Herltafe," edited by P. Wollman
Tsamir, tl s, published by Sh on fold The volume is available at ?$ Maiden
Lane, New York, N.Y. loeaa. Joseph Schlanq is president ol the society
d.stnUuting roe volume...... ..............
upon it relatively unafraid
Perhaps I can make it a safer
world for him. 1 would like my
feelings in this relationship with
him to be as clear and as trans-
parent as possible, so that they
are a discernible reality for him.
to which he can return again and
again.
I would like to go with him on
the fearful journey into himself,
into the buried fear, and hate and
love which he has never been able
to let flow in him. I recognize that
this is a very human and unpre-
dictable journey for me. as well as
for him, and that 1 may. without
even knowing my fear, shrink
away within myself, from some of
the feelings he discovers. To this
extent I know 1 will be limited in
my ability to help him. I realize
at times his own fears may make
him perceive me as uncaring, as
rejecting, as an intruder, as one
who does not understand.
I want fully to accept these
feelings in him. and yet I hope
also that my own real feelings
will show through so clearly that
in time he cannot fail to perceive
them. Most of all I want him to
encounter in me a real person. I
do not need to be uneasy as to
whether my own feelings are
therapeutic.' What I am and
what I feel are good enough to be
a basis for therapy, if I can trans-
parently be what I am and what I
feel in relationship to him. Then
perhaps he can be what he is,
openly and without fear."
(The next article will deal with
the client's subjective view of the
therapist.)
(The Jewish Family and
Children's Service is a non-profit
agency designed to meet the
social, emotional and counseling
needs of the Jewish community
of Palm Beach County. Our office
is located at 2411 Okeechobee
Blvd. Our telephone number is
6841991. The JF&CS is a bene-
ficiary agency of the Jewish Fed-
eration of Palm Beach County.)
CANDLELIGHTING
mm
TIME
5:25
O
20TEVETH-5738
'^K^K^H^'**V<>*d>>1^<
It is a challenge to die as a Jew
in today's chaotic milieu. The
greater challenge is to live as a
Jew and that means sticking our
necks out for what we believe. We
cannot allow our generation to
surrender our heritage for which
our ancestors sacrifice so much.
We thank G-d that 1977 was a
year without warfare in the
Middle East. Yet there is a war!
Israel today a war of attritjV
of social services. We can win f
war through our contributions
Federation campaigns. In 19
let us serve as an example to <.
congregations of the love, col
mitment and devotion we f]
toward our people in Israel -7
home and throughout
world.
Synagogues in
Palm Beach County
REFORM
CONSiRVATIVMBERAl
TEMPLE ISRAEL
1901 North Flogler Drive
West Polm Beach, Florida
33407
833 8421
Rabbi Irving B. Cohen
Sabbath Worship Services
Friday at 8:15 p.m
TEMPLE BETH EL OF
BOCA RATON
333 S.W Fourth Avenue
Boca Raton, Fl. 33432
391-8901
Rabbi Norman T. Mendel
Cantor Martin Rosen
Sabbath services, Friday ot
8:15p.m.
Saturday morning services ot
1030a.m.
TEMPLE ETERNAL LIGHT
P.O Box 3
Boca Raton, Florida 33432
426-1600
Rabbi Ben|amin Rosayn
Sabbath services, Friday
8:15p.m.
at Unitanan-Universalist
Fellowship Building
162 W. Palmetto Park Rd
Boca Raton
CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION
ANSHEISHOL0M
5348 Grove Street
West Palm Beoch, Flo 33409
684-3212
Rabbi Harry Z Schectmon
Cantor Arthur B. Rosenwasser
Services: Friday 8:30 a.m.,
5pm, 8:15p.m.
Saturday 8:30 a.m., 5p.m. n.
Daily 8 30o m., 5p.m.
CONGREGATION
BETH K0DESH
Boynton Beach, Flo.
732 5147
Rabbi Isaoc O Gimprich
Sabbath Services
Friday at 8:15 p.m
Saturday at 9a.m.
Congregational Church
1I5N. Federal Highway
TEMPLE BETH El
2815 North Flogler Drive
West Palm Beoch, Florida
33407
833^X339
Rabbi Asher Bor-Zev
Sabbath service* Friday ot 8:15
p.m.
Saturday at 9:30 a.m.
Doily M.nyan at 8:15 o.m.,
Sunday ot 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SH0L0M
315 N. "A" St.
Lake Worth, Florida 33460
5855020
Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg
Cantor Jocob Elman
Services, Mondays and
Thursdays
ot 8:15a.m.
Friday ot 8:15 p.m.
Saturday at 9 am
TEMPLE BETH DAVID
Sobbath services, Friday ot 8
p.m.
At Westminister Presbyterian
Church
10410 N. Military Trail. Polm
Beoch Gardens 321 Norihloke
Blvd., North Palm Beoch. Fla.
3340< 854 1134

Rabbi Hymon Fishman
Cantor Nicholas Fenakel
TEMPLE BETH SH0L0M
NW. Avenue "G"
Belie Glade, Florida 334%
Jack Stoteman, Lay Leader
Sabbath services, Friday at|
8:30 p.m.
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB
275 Alemeda Drive
Palm Springs, Florida 33460
Sabbath services, Friday at 8|
p.m.
Saturday ot 9o.m.
President Jocob Front 964-1
0034
Mondays and Thursdays ot |
a.m.
Services held at Faith United
Presbyterian Church, Polm|
Springs
B'NAI TORAH
1401 N W 4th Ave.
Boca Raton. Florida 33432
392-8566
Robbi Nathan Zelizer
Sobbath services: Friday ot|
8:15p.m.
Soturdays at 9:30 a.m.
TEMPLE EMETH of ffc|
DELRAT
HEBREW CONGREGATION
5780 West Atlantic Avenue
Delray Beoch, Florida 33446
276-3536
Morris Silbermon, Rabbi
Leonard Price, Cantor
Sabbath services: Friday at 8|
p.m. Saturday at9a.m.
Daily minyans at 8:45 a.m.
and 5 p.m.
TEMPLE EMAHU EL
190 North County Rood
Polm Beoch, Florida 33480
832-0804
Rabbi Max L. Formon
Cantor David Dordashti
Sabbath services, Friday ot|
8:30p.m.
Saturday ot 9 a. m.
...... "


, December 30,1977
The Jewish Fbridian of Palm Beach County
1 age *'
[aim Beach Businessman,
Fred Gladstone, Dies
I Gladstone. New York and
Heach businessman, died
12 at his home in Palm
Gladstone devoted most
j life to philanthropic causes.
was a member of Temple
j-KI of Palm Beach and
as a member of its board
lirectors. He was active in the
sh Federation's Combined
lish Appeal Israel Emer-
Fund campaign and was
iimental in obtaining con
j for the Palm Beach
ty Israel Bond Drive.
Iladstone was a member of
is ORT and also was a mem-
of Masonic lodges.
^hile residing in New York he
involved with the United
rih Appeal and was a
kding member of Temple
el in Great Neck, Long
Ind.
Is is survived by his wife
kna. two children, Arthur and
FRED GLADSTONE
Judith and four grandchildren,
Ellen, Melinda, Jonathan and
Edith.
JEWISH FAMILY AND CHILDREN'S SERVICE
In outstanding professional counseling ogency serving rhe Jewish
lommuniry of Polm Beach County t*rofessional ond confidential
tip is available for
problem* of tha aging
onsuliotion ond evaluation services
tionol counseling
Moniol counseling
Porent child conflicts
Personal problems
Pri*teOfficts: 2411 Okeechobee Blvd.
West Palm Beach, Fla. 33409
Telephone: 684-1991
Or
3200 North Federal Hwy. Suite 206-
Room 12, Boca Raton, Fla.
Telephone: 395-3640
derate fees are charged in family ond individual counseling to
ho con poy (Fees ore based on income ond faniily size)
Jewish Family and Children's Service is a benefiaofy ogency of
he Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County.
Louis Untermeyer,
Poet Dies at 92
Louis Untermeyer, poet,
editor, anthologist and critic,
died Dec. 18 at his Connecticut
home at age 92.
Untermeyer, a high school
dropout, was credited with
bringing poetry to more people
than any other American writer
of his generation.
Besides his own books of
poetry, he wrote, edited and
anthologized hundreds of others.
Among his most popular anthol-
ogies were Modern American
Poetry and Modern British
Poetry, both used as textbooks.
He was a contemporary and
friend of such noted poets and
authors as Robert Frost. Stephen
Vincent Benet, Ezra Pound,
H. L. Mencken, Carl Sandburg
and D. H. Lawrence.
Born in New York City in 1885,
he always wanted to be a com-
poser and pianist, but entered his
family's jewelry manufacturing
business when he was 17 and for
the next 20 years devoted his
days to business and his evenings
to his literary interests.
By 1922 he had published
several volumes of poetry and
parody. He resigned from his
successful business career in 1923
to devote full time to writing.
He was the Phi Beta Kappa
poet at Harvard in 1955, and was
a member of the prestigious
National Institute of Arts and
Letters.
UNTERMEYER held the gold
medal for distinguished service to
poetry from the Poetry Society of
America and served as professor
and poet-in-residence at
numerous American colleges and
universities.
Jewish Community Day School
Of Palm Beach County, Inc.
2815 N. Flagler Drive, Wast Palm Beach, Florida 3340/
Is now accepting applications for
Pre-School-Full or Half Day
Kindergarten-Full Day
Grade I Grade Vl-Elementary School
Grades Vll-VIII-Junior High School
Transportation throughout Palm Beach County
Admission Tests Required
Application Forms 4 Further Informalion-
Dr. A vie Waxman, Director
832-8423 4
12/ z?::~-
Jewish Community Day School of Palm Beach County, Inc.
2815 N. Flagler Drive, Weat Palm Beach, Fla. 33407
Telephone 832-8423 / 4
A Benefiotery Agency oMhe\>ewi3h Federatforroffalm Beach County
Placing of the Mezuzah on the entrance to the new Levitt
Memorial Chapel are (left to right) Sonny Levitt, PhUip
Weinstein, Henry Klein, Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg, Rabbi
William Shapiro, Rabbi Max Forman, Sidney Rosofsky, Rabbi
Hyman Fishman, and Rabbi As her Bar-Zev.
Dedicates
On Dec. 12. Levitt Memorial
Chapel opened its second Chapel
in Palm Beach County. Their
first chapel located at 625 S.
Olive Ave.. West Palm Beach,
has served the Jewish com-
munity for five years The newest
facility is located at 5411 Okee-
chobee Blvd. in West Palm
Beach.
Participating in the traditional
placing of the mvzuzah was
Rabbi Max Forman. president of
the Palm Beach County Rab-
Sabbath In Cairo
By MAURICE SAMUELSON
CAIRO (JTA)
Thousands of excited Egyptians
shouting "Begin Shalom. Sadat
Shalom" greeted the Israeli
delegation to the Cairo peace
conference as they arrived for
prayers at the city's central
synagogue, the Shaar Shamayim
Synagogue on Adly Street.
It was the first time that
Eliahu Ben-Elissar. Israel's chief
negotiator, and his fellow Israeli
negotiators had made a public
appearance. The unanimous and
enraptured reaction by the
Egyptian public upon seeing
them showed the enormous
popular support for President
Anwar Sadat's bid for peace with
Israel. This support had been
shown until now only to Sadat
himself on his return from
Jerusalem.
binical Association along with
Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg.
president-elect of the Rabbinical
Association. Rabbi William
Shapiro. Rabbi Asher Bar-Zev.
Rabbi Hyman Fishman. Rabbi
Benjamin Rosayn. Rabbi Harry
Schectman, founder of l-evitt
Memorial Chapel. Philip
Weinstein. vice president. Henry
Klein, and Sidney Rosofsky. all
Jewish funeral directors.
LEVITT Memorial Chapels are
strictly Jewish and have the
largest Jewish professional staff
in the county and provide pre-,
at. and post-need counseling. The
Chapels sponsor the widow to
widow program at the Jewish
Community (enter.
The new facility has the largest
Chapel and parking accom-
mndel ions of any funeral home in
Palm Beach County.
j JEWISH CEMETERY j
j COMMISSION
SHALOM
MEMORIAL
PARK
TRIBES
OF ISRAEL
MAUSOLEUM
rwlm feet* Cemtyt amHaitu afl /ewfsa
SPECIAL PRE-NEED DISCOUNT
Otter Expires Jan. 31, 1978
2 SPACES (SIDE IT SIM)
2 VAULTS
1 MEMORIAL PLAQUE on granite
$117900
(LOT EXCHANGE PROGRAM)
CALL MILTON GROSS, SALES MGR., AT 414-2277
01 MAIL COUPON
----------------------------COUPON------------------------------.,
smow wewoim pabk *- j
[5061 OKHCHOtH R4VD.
.WEST PALM REACH, RORIDA 3340*
SPECIAL MEMORIAL OFFER!
jNAME.................................................................................................. j
ADDRESS........................................................................................... J
ftCITY................................................STATE......................2.............. j
Phone.............................................................................................. !


F^X. December!

President Carter and Israeli Premier Begin Confer
wu asked whether he invited | sheepishly and quipped:
President Carter to Jerusalem, raelia have given C
the Israeli Prime Minister smiled I standing invitation."
Rabbis to Heighten U,
Fundraising Efforts
By TRUDE B. FELDMAN
Jewish FloridUn
White House Correapondeat
President Carter and Israeli
Prime Minister Begin conferred
privately for one hour last Friday
in the White House's Oval Office.
The two leaders then joined their
staffs in the Cabinet Room for
another hour'a discussion on
aa Menachem Begin put it
"the most important problems
concerning the peace-making
process in the Mideast."
Because so many
photographers wanted pictures,
two photo sessions were arranged
in the Oval Office, leading the
President to tell Begin: "You
bring me a lot of good publicity
... There's a lot of interest in you
lately ... You've made a lot of
friendships around the world
these last few months ... No one
has had a more exciting Fall and
Winter than you've had ..."
Referring to the Sadat speech
at the Knesset, Carter added:
"We were glad to have had a few
members of our Congress there
including Jim Wright. They
reported on the mood and the
climate of the Knesset that day
and we're proud to have you
here."
AFTER Begin told Carter he
would stay in Washington
through Sunday, Carter invited
him for additional talks on Satur-
day night, whereby Israeli Am-
bassador Simcha Dinitz post-
poned a (inner in Begins honor
for Sunday lunch. Meanwhile,
President Carter telephoned
President Sadat in Cairo to keep
him posted on latest develop
ments. and Prime Minister Begin
disclosed that he would meet
again with Sadat in the near
future.
It appears also that Carter
himself will meet with SadagtoKi
Begin when he visits the Majgyst
during his six-nation tour laert
week.
A third photo "opportunity"
was when Carter and his aides
walked Begin and his aides to
their cars on the driveway out-
side the Oval Office. And when
they arrived at Blair House
(where the Begin party spent the
weekend) Begin was serenaded
with Hebrew songs by a choir
from the Hebrew Academy.
Others held signs, "Welcome,
Begin ... the Statesman ..."
Prior to their second two-hour
session after Shabbat. there was
a fourth photo session, this time
in the Cabinet Room. While
photographers were clicking
away. Begin looked up and
recognized a friend firm during
his Irgun Days and hit first visit
to the United States. Undaunted
that he was standing between the
President and the Vice President
of the United States. Begin, with
his characteristic nonchalance,
called out to Myer Neurenberger.
Apparently Begin was so en-
thused to see his friend of 30
years, that he walked over to him
and said, "Remember today's
parsha (Va-Yigae where God
tells Jacob not to be afraid of
going to Egypt. This was an
indirect reference to Begins plan
to consummate his proposed deal
with Egypt and his visit in the
next few days with Egypt's
President Sadat).
THE White House issued a
statement, saying that all
aspects of the current Mideast
situation were discussed in the
"context of the search for a com-
prehensive peace. The Prime
Minister and the President dis-
cussed the most effective ways to
continue the momentum and to
turn to the broader goal of nego-
tiating a comprehensive peace.
"In this respect," the state-
ment said, "the Prime Minister
and the President discussed
underlying principles which could
guide future negotiations. Begin
outlined proposals concerning the
future relations between Egupt
and Israel and a process for

resolving the issue of Palestinian
Arabs."
Carter told Begin that the U.S.
is convinced that the course of
direct negotiations on which they
have embarked offers a unique
opportunity for peace. "We
recognize that in these new cir-
cumstances the teat of accep-
tability of the provisions of a
negotiated settlement will lie in
the judgments of those who will
ultimately sign the peace
treaties." the White House said.
"The U.S. will continue to remain
in the closest possible consul-
tation with both aides in the
effort to help them find common
ground."
Jody Powell was reluctant to
give details of the hour-long
meeting that he sat in on, but did
relate that charts, maps and
papers were used in the dis-
cussion.
"THE meetings were serious
and friendly," Powell said. "But
I'm not going to deal with any of
the details of the ideas and dis-
cussions either to confirm or
deny things that came up."
Over lunch, Menachem Begin
also revealed some of his new,
secret proposals for peace to four
of Israel's staunchest allies in the
U.S. Senate New Jersey's
Clifford Case; Florida's Richard
Stone; New York's Jacob Javita
and Washington's Henry Jack-
son. The senators described the
proposals as excellent, adding
that they involve many sacrifices
almost everywhere. Sen.
Javita called the plan "a credible
basis for peace." He also said
Begin is "determined if it can
be humanly done to bring
peace now.'
Sen. Jackson aaid the plan is
"most impressive, and when the
world finds out about it, people
will see we're really on the road to
peace.
"I think the moderate Arabs
will buy it, the moderate Pales-
tinians will buy it," he added,
"The radical Arabs and Pales-
tinians will not buy anything,
anyway."
WHEN Menacham Begin
NEW YORK A
national project designed to
increase the level of rabbinic
participation as solicitors and
contributors as well as spiritual
guides in UJA / Federation fund-
raising campaigns, was an-
nounced here by Rabbi Joseph H.
Lookstein. chairman of the
United Jewish Appeal Rabbinical
Advisory Council.
The basic elements are a
solicitor training program to be
known as RAC Operations Up-
grade and a pacesetters group of
rabbis contributing gifts of
tl .800 or over to the annual cam-
paigns. RAC Operation Upgrade
will be chaired by Rabbi Joseph
H. Rubinstein of Temple!
in Levittown, Pa
"IT 18 through our .
efforts in behalf of local i
seas needs," Rabbi .
aaid, "that the American i
community demons!
tztdakah in action. The .,
eration Upgrade prograi.
providing participating
with a pragmatic appro,
effective solicitation, will]
deep spiritual elemi
strengthen and enrich i|
blend of the practical
spiritual will aid concern...
in their efforts to infui.
munity campaigns with!
meaning."
MORE
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For more than a quarter of a century, American
Savings has been dedicated to the philosophy
that offering both the highest savings rates
permitted by law and the highest quality finan-
cial services is in the best interest of the entire
community.
These sound business principles have made
it possible for American Savings to reach one
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The next time you think of maximum interest
rates on savings and the highest quality finan-
cial services, think of American Savings.
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Full Text
mm
IIUSO \swl*n i uji tuum i/ x i*/. If**,* v,~~.
Jewish Community in {South Africa
Continued from Page 6
false. Israel's dramatic
on ought to justify certain
omises. Morals and politics
I go together except for the
of Machiavelli. The
are busy with something
is true that Israel has
been able to count on
standing and help from
South Africa during periods of
crisis and peril. As far as the
Jewish State is concerned, South
Africa has proved herself.
IT IS equally true that the
governments of the developing
African countries let us down
many times. They have quickly
forgotten everything Israel did
wiet Jewish Emigration Up
YORK (JTA) The
Jewry Research Bureau of
National Conference on
Jewry, has reported that
[lumber of Soviet Jews emi-
ng from the USSR from
iry-November, 1977 sur-
the number of Jews
to leave in 1976.
a> Jacobson, bureau
i-rson, announced that
January-November, 1977,
Soviet Jews have emi-
to Israel and elsewhere
> the total allowed to leave in
[was 14,213.
j welcome the increase,"
bson said, "and hope that it
continue throughout the
months. Analysts have
sted that the increase in
being allowed to emigrate
last few months is due to
ussions in Belgrade by those
countries signing the Helsinki
Final Act, which includes pro-
visions for the free emigration of
all people."
CONTINUING, she pointed
out: "Though 1977 figures will
surpass last year's total, they do
not approach the peak years of
1972-1973 when more than 66,000
Soviet Jews left the USSR.
Soviet authorities are continuing
harassment against thousands of
Soviet Jewish activists who wish
to leave, many of whom applied
for exit visas more than five
years ago. At the same time anti-
Semitic remarks are carried in the
Soviet media and Soviet Jewish
activist Anatoly Sharansky is
still being held in Moscow's
Lefortovo prison pending com-
pletion of the Soviet authorities'
investigation."
Court Ruling Seen As
Blow to Day Schools
ly DAVID FRIEDMAN
EW YORK ncially hard-pressed Jewish
schools in New York will not
ive a hoped-for reimburse-
it of about tl million from the
e as a result of a ruling by the
Supreme Court.
he court, in a 6 to 3 decision,
d that a 1972 New York law
t provided about til million
mburse parochial schools for
cost of state-mandated
ord keeping and testing
rices is unconstitutional. The
t said the law was uncon-
itional because "it will of
ssit y either have the primary
:t of aiding religion ... or will
Bit in exessive state involve-
t in religious affairs."
BBI Bernard Goldenberg,
iatc director of Torah
orah, the National Society
Hebrew Day Schools, told the
ish Telegraphic Agency here
decision was a "bit of a blow"
the Jewish day schools. He
he could sac "nothing
us" about keeping atten-
e records or administering
required by the state.
oldenberg said the day
Is will now have to provide
funds needed to carry out the
a and record-keeping required
the state, leaving less money
scholarships for children from
familes and putting more of
ncial burden on the parents
students. He noted one
iva in Queens closed recently
others are having severe
ncial trouble.
e 1972 law that was struck
n was passed by the New
State Legislature after a
ral District Court in 1972
lared unconstitutional a 1970
providing S28 million a year
parochial and private schools
cover record-keeping and test-
expenses. The district court
payments for the second
of the 1971-72 school yaar.
the State Legislature
ted a law which permitted
schools to file claims for the
d payment thus insuring its
lability until the federal court
' m was appealed and
I TWO dissenters, Chief Justice
puren Burger and Associate
>ce William H. Rehnquist.
1 they believed that a decision
^ Supreme Court in 1973
upholding the right of Pennsyl-
vania to make similar payments
to private schools until the court
had acted on the con-
stitutionality of the enabling
legislation should have applied in
the New York case.
Associate Justice Byron
White, the third dissenter,
declared "the court continues to
misconstrue the First Amend-
ment in a manner that dis-
criminates against religion and is
contrary to the fundamental
educational needs of the coun-
try."
Goldenberg said the court
decision makes it incumbent
upon those American Jews who
oppose state aid to parochial
schools to see that the Jewish
community provides more finan-
cial aid to Jewish schools.
RABBI Moshe Sherer.
executive president of Agudath
Israel of America, which operates
day schools, said the "Supreme
Court decision is a serious blow
to the hopes of non-public schools
for justice. As Associate Justice
Byron White pointed out, this
decision 'discriminates against
religion' by refusing to reim-
burse the non-public schools
for strictly secular expenses
incurred by government man-
date. Nevertheless, we are
determined to continue our fight
to obtain the benefits to which
non-public schools are entitled,
undaunted by these temporary
setbacks, with trust that fairness
will ultimately prevail."
ADL Awards Ferguson
James L. Ferguson, president
of General Foods Corp., received
the Americanism Award of the
Anti-Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith at a dinner Nove. 29 at the
Waldorf-Astoria in New York.
Ferguson is the ninth recipient
of the Americanism Award. Since
graduating from Hamilton
College, Ferguson served with
the Corps of Engineers m the
Pacific and graduated from the
Harvard Business School. He
currently is a trustee of Hamilton
College, the JuUliard School of
Music in New York, and Outward
Bound.
HE IS a director and treasurer
of the Grocery Manufacturers of
America, a member of the Con-
ference Board, and director of
American Productivity Center.
for them. Schools and hospitals,
roads and factories, economic
enterprises and military installa-
tions they owe them all to
Israel Nevertheless, when the
first test came, they turned their
backs. Worse, in betraying
Israel, they betrayed themselves.
The victims of racialism have
invented a new kind of racialism.
How many free, democratic
regimes still exist on the con-
tinent of Africa? And how can
one be sure that a Black South
Africa government would be able
to resist the temptations of total-
itarianism and of being anti-
Israel? One can rather be sure of
the contrary.
Also, why act against our
objective interests? Why give aid
to our adversaries, our potential
enemies of tomorrow?
Yes, of course, this reasoning is
not devoid of logic. Only, when
you go inside Soweto, outside Jo-
hannesburg, you are confronted
by concentrated poverty and
humiliation without parallel. You
speak to the men and women who
barely keep body and soul
together, to the children who turn
you sour. You discover a melan-
choly, closed world in their eyes,
and logic is forgotten.
BE CAREFUL, a well-known
industrialist exclaims. You are
being very charitable, but at our
expense. What right do you have
to sacrifice us so quickly? Do not
be under any illusion. It is a
question of our disappearing
altogether. If the Blacks take
power, they will establish their
own apartheid against us. Is
this what we deserve?
The speaker is a man of old
Afrikaaner stock. When he puts
his case, his reasoning too, seems
logical.
"My ancestors arrived here
several centuries ago, not as
'colonizers,' but as settlers. They
were the first to till this soiL We
built this country ourselves. We
did not drive out anyone, we did
not take anyone's place. Why do
they want us to leave? And
besides, where would we go? If
anything happens, the English
will go to England, the Jews to
Israel. But we, the Afrikaaners,
where are our brethren who will
invite us to come and join them?"
IN OTHER words, he has not
the slightest intention of leaving.
The thought has not even entered
his mind. His love for his country
is total, absolute. He regards it as
his last stop, and when he asks
you: "Why are you ready to fire
on our lives, on our destinies?"
you think twice before replying.
Besides, what answer can you
give that the inhabitants of
Soweto take precedence over the
owners of luxurious mansions?
That logic is one thing and
conscience another? That, being a
Jew, you could never accept
racialist laws? It would be going
against nature not to be roused to
indignation. We Jews must
combat racialism everywhere,
even if those who practice it call
themselves your friends.
What strikes one about
apartheid is its stupidity, as well
as its cruelty. Those restaurants
for Blacks and Whites. Those
separate hospitals. Those
separate buses. Those separate
lavatories. An injured White and
an injured Black must not be
carried together in the same
ambulance. Either one or the
other, but not together.
IT IS impossible not to
protest, impossible at one and the
same time to believe in Judaism
and pass over in silence an
ideology based on considerations
of biology or color. We are anti-
racialists by tradition and by def-
inition, so it is natural for Jews to
be in the forefront of the move-
ment of those who reject apar-
theid. Helen Suzman is not an
exception. Others follow her. The
majority of young Jews decry
racialism. Young South African
Jews are courageous and ideal-
ELIE WIESEL
istic. We are right to be proud of
them.
But what of the future? "How
much time do you give us?" The
disturbances increase and in-
tensify. Violence and repression,
the vicious circle widens. Is it the
beginning of the end? The police
are efficient; the army is well-
trained and equipped and, it is
said, possesses nuclear weapons.
As for our Jews and the
community is undoubtedly one of
the best in the diaspora what
fate awaits them? The Whites
will detest them for their liberal
ideas, while the Blacks will reject
them because of their color. Will
they be able to leave in time?
Tomorrow, they run the risk of
becoming the most con-
spicuously-threatened Jewish
community of all. Will they be
prepared? And shall we?
m
i|fc~l H
Hors-
Offlce: 848-9753
Home: 622-4000
J-TJI
DON VOGEL
.1OCIT|
700 U.S. Hwy. ), No. Potm Beoch
PALM BEACH EYE ASSOCIATES
Richard G. Shugarman, M.D.
Emanuel Newmark, M.D.
P.A.
Announces the Relocation of
their (West Palm Beach) Office
in the Practice of Diseases and
Surgery of the Eye
To
1500 No. Dixie Hwy., Suite 201
659-7277
the Atlantis Office Remains
At 111A J.F.Kennedy Circk
961-0130
ammmmammmm
Jfanttn
tMWWMMaWWaMe^
Sunday evenings at 8:15 at Temple Israel
1901 North Flagler Dr., West Palm Beach
Jan. 29 Dorothy RabinowiU
Feb. 12 Dr. William Korey
Feb. 26 Albert Vorspan
Mar. 12 Judge Jerome Hornblass
Mar. 26 Max Dimont
Topic: 'Survivors of the Holocaust"
Topic: 'United Nations and the Middle East"
Topic: "What's Happened to Jewish Liberalism?"
Topic: "The Changing Social Mores of the Young American Jew'
Topic: "A Clash of Destinies"
Subscription series tickets $10
Individual program tickets $3
(may be purchased at the door)
Student admission II
Please order your tickets early.
Seats are not reserved, but
every effort will be made
to assure seating for subscription
ticket holders.
Doors open at 7:16 p.m.
ifwish community forum
Jewish federation of palm beach county
2415 Okeechobee Blvd.
West Palm Beach, Fla. 33409
Phone 689-6900]
Enclosed is my check for t--------
1978 Jewish Community Forum
.for.
.subscription tickets for the
Name.
Address.
City
Zip
Phone.
Please make checks payable to the Jewish Federation of Palm Bosch County.
TSSMOOBO
w,tnnwiL..* 30000
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TWTrnmmmm w mm amen uuuuv
. 1977
Page 12
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Frkky. December 30.
<.
Ben-eiiss&i? Selves as isRael's top
Civil Servant, faiend to Begin
JERUSALEM (JTA) Prime
Minister Menachem Begins
selection of Eliahu Ben-Eliasar as
head of the Israeli delegation to
the pre-Geneva talks in Cairo was
seen here as an indication that
Begin intends to keep those talks
under his closest scrutiny.
Ben-Elissar. 45, is Director
General of the Prime Minister's
Office, Israel's Number 1 civil
servant. He is also a trusted
political aide and loyal personal
friend of Begin. He was to
provide the Prime Minister with
detailed reports on the progress
of the Cairo meeting and will be
receiving detailed instructions
directly from Begin.
BEN-ELISSAR should cut an
impressive figure in the Egyptian
capital. Six feet tall, slim but
broad-shouldered with black hair
and a meticulously groomed
black beard, he is witty,
ingratiating and carries himself
with dignity. He made friends
easily with the Egyptian aides
who accompanied Sadat to
Jerusalem.
was to be Meir Rosenne, legal
adviser to the Foreign Ministry
and an old friend. Both men
studied political science at the
Paris Sorbonne in the 1960s and
both worked part-time at the
Israeli Embassy in Paris under
Ambassador Jacob Tsur.
ROSENNE was born in
Rumania and served as Israel
Consul in New York in the late
1950s. He was closely involved in
the post-Yom Kippur War nego-
tiations and was present at
Kilometer 101 where the first
Israeli-Egyptian cease-fire was
negotiated. He went to Geneva in
the spring of 1974 as a par-
ticipant in the disengagement
negotiations with Syria and to
Washington in August. 1975 to
draft the Israel-US. memoran-
dum of understanding prior to
the second Sinai disengagement
accord.
Rosenne participated in the
negotiations with Egypt at
Geneva in September, 1975 which
resulted in the "military pro-
tocol" attached to the second
Sinai pact. He also participated
in the buffer zone "joint com-
mission" talks with Egypt in
1976 and accompanied Foreign
Minister Moshe Dayan at the
drafting of the U.S.-Israel
working paper on Geneva con-
ference procedures in New York
last September. He has been legal
adviser to the Foreign Ministry
since 1971.
The Florida region of the quotas on Florida's institu-
Anti-Defamation League of tions of higher education.
B'nai B'rith, the American
Jewish Committee and the Tne groups called upon
American Jewish Congress state officials to adopt
have condemned the recent instead a non-discrim-
Elissar was an operative of action of a majority of the inatory affirmative action
Massad. Israel's secret intel- Florida State Cabinet, plan to aid all economically
ligence agency, which kept him sitting as the State Board and culturally deprived
^ 2L 1. V 7 of Education, in which they arsons regardless of their
declared h,s pol.Ucal preference vo,untarily promulgated a
plan which would impose a
system of rigid racial
Politically. Ben-Elissar has
always been a Herut loyalist. As
a child he was smuggled out of
Nazi-dominated Europe by
Polish friends of his family.
Many of his relatives perished in
the Holocaust. Until 1965, Ben-
and became chief of information
at Herut s headquarters.
His second in the Cairo talks
race.

^\TK /*.
JTO
1
1
ifi* 7875 Belvedere Rd., Weal Palm Baach, Fla. 33411
Located at Camp Shalom
_SZ PROGRAMS AND FEES
. <> 5 Day Program (Monday-Friday)
^ Playgroup2-3 year olds
^ Pre-School4-5 year olda
3 Morning Program 9 am -12 noon
Tuition: $52 par month
a non-refundable $40 deposit is payable with ap-
plication.
Afternoon Program: 12 no 3 p.m.
$175 per semestei
**FULL-DAY PROGRAM: $400 per semester (a
savings of $25 per semester)
Phyllis Morgan: Pre-Schoc jpervisor
Staci Lesser: Pre-School Corm tee Chairman
aVpuca
iTION FOftM
Child's Nam*----------
Parent or Guardian.
Addfass------------------
ia*_
hone.
-City.
.Zip.
anroll my child mlha 1977-78 COMMUNITY PPE rtOO:
Morning program only
Afternoon program only___________
Full day program.
My *40 00 non-rarundatoia application laa s ancloaad
_ Signature
Data--------------,-------.------------------
MAM. TO COMMUNITY PRE-SCHOOL
Jewish Federation of Pm Beach County
2415 Okeechooee Boulevard
We* Pawn Beecr. f^^^^____________.L______-______________.________J
ACCORDING to Richard
Essen, chairman of the Regional
Board of the Anti-Defamation
League, as a spokesman for the
three agencies in this matter,
"the Board of Education's plan
requires that students be ad-
mitted into all public colleges,
universities and graduate schools
in fixed percentages of black
students to white students,
rather than solely upon the
applicants' ability and
qualifications; and further, that
the highly sought-after employ-
ment opportunities in those
institutions be filled upon racial
preferences, not upon merit and
skill alone.
"The plan further provides
that it would be supervised by a
committee, the majority of whose
members must be black."
The Anti-Defamation League,
the American Jewish Committee
and the American Jewish Con-
gress are long-time advocates of
remedial and compensatory
education to offset the
deleterious effects of generations
of prejudice "committed to the
principle that affirmative action
must be taken to overcome the
history of discrimination against
all persons," Essen said.
THE AGENCIES insist, how-
ever, that any action taken to
remedy the plight of the dis-
advantaged "must be directed at
all culturally and economically
deprived persons regardless of
their race, color, creed, national
origin or sex."
Essen noted that the im-
position of racial quotas by
Florida's Cabinet represents "an
unwarranted and uncon-
stitutional poVaTBBMBtal in-
trusion into our ) steal of higher
daesUon sad eaaaol be
tolerated.'
DESPITE the fart that the
1 .iliinet has to this date, not been
responsive to numerous attempts
to eliminate the racial preferences
imposed by the plan, which they
approved on September 7, 1977.
the agencies are hopeful that the
nnet will yet reverse itself,"
n noted.
1977 Allocations
The Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County holds an annual
campaign to raise funds for humanitarian needs of the local
national and international Jewish community. This year th 1977
Combined Jewish Appeal Israel Emergency Fund raised a total of
$1,522,283.
At a Jewish Federation board meeting last June, approval was
given to the recommendations of the Federations Allocations snd
Budget committees. Under the chairmanship of Rabbi Hyman
Fishman and Dr. Richard Shugarman. the committees based their
disbursements on requests from local, regional, national and over
seas agencies.
THE UNITED JEWISH Appeal will receive the largest
allocation. 1900.000. approximately 60 percent of the total dollars
raised. Stanley B. Brenner, president of the Jewish Federation
praised Rabbi Fishman and Dr. Shugarman and the members of
their committee*.
The complete 1977 Allocations are listed below:

''.

8
Rigid Education Quota
System Condemned
3
v

.;.
;.;.
LOCAL SERVICES J590.348
Jewish Federation Services:
Community Relations 3.000
Floridian Newspaper 14.350
Forum 2.500
Home for Aged
(Jacksonville! 5.000
Jewish F.ducation 1.500
leadership Development 3.000
Missions 1.000
Refugee Resettlement 8.000
Social Services 1.200
T.V. Program 1.500
Pre-School (WPB-Boral 10.000
("nmp Shalom Main-
tenance 21.000
Camp Shalom Capital
Improvement 5.000
Public Relations 5.000
tilth Anniversary of
Israel Independence 5.000
Jewish Federal ion
\iiiinnislr;il Inn
i ampaign
Jewish I- 'iimtly at
Children Ser\ Ira
lew ish ( 'iimmuiiily
l)a> "si IhmiI
( luiiniunil) Cimillihenry Fund
REGIONAL SERVICES
B'nai It nth llillel
Foundation 5.500
CHal Agencv tor Jewish
Kducalion of Miami 250
NATIONAL SERVICES
( (immunity ltel.il Inns
Vgem in
Total of
Categories
87.060
Percentage
39 pet
Total
274.398
70.000
KO.000
80.000
M.IKKI
5.750
I |H I
American Jewish
Committee S2.150
VmtTsran Jew iaJi
Congress I.Ml
B'nai B'rith Ann
Defamation league 2.100
Jewish Labor Committee 350
Jewish War Veterans 325
National Conference on
Soviet Jewry 350
National Conference of
lew ish Communal 50
National Jewish
Community Relations 775 Total
CULTURAL AGENCIES
Jewish Cultural Appeal
KKI.ICIOUH*
400
7.200
400
EDUCATIONAL
American Academic Assn.
for Peace in the
Middle East 500
American Assn. for
Jewish Kducation 500
American Jewish Archives 150
Dropsie University 200
Jewish Chatauqua Society 250
Jewish Theological
Seminary 500
Reform Jewish Appeal -
Hebrew University 500
Synagogue Council of
America 100
Yeshiva Universitv
Orthodox 300
Council of Jewish
Federation & Welfare
Funds I Fellowship in
Jewish Kducation
leadership) 500
Herzliah Jewish Teachers 100 Total
SOCI ^L WELFARE
\ssn o( Jewish Family
Children \ henries 150
H nai B'rith Youth
Service* tpaaal *m
Jewish Braille Institute
Nutinnul Jewish
Welfare B< IJBO
Ninth Vmerit an Jewish
Students ksjM
DVI RSI \SSf lt\ it I B
Vim
itton
: ( mini il nl
I
nd
i
RIODIC ILS
s.aoo
ratal

ToUil


*
funds raised I '-as shi.nk