Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
8 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 28, 1975)-v. 8, no. 40 (Dec. 17, 1982).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 2, 1976 called v.2, no. 22, but constitutes v.2, no. 1.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: July 28, 1978 called no. 14 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement; Aug. 25, 1978 called no. 16 in masthead and no. 17 in publisher's statement; Aug. 10, 1979 called no. 15 in masthead and no. 16 in publisher's statement; Oct. 22, 1982 called no. 31 in masthead and no. 32 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44607504
lccn - sn 00229550
ocm44607504
System ID:
AA00014311:00154

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)


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Full Text
WK,
uoiniai lie
OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
Combining "OUt VOICE" and "FEDERATION REPORTER"
in conjunction with The Jewish Federation of Palm Roach Comity
Volume
3 Number21
Palm Beach, Florida Friday, October 21,1977
Price 35 Centa
Women's Division Education Day Set for Nov. 2
BUDDIE
BRENNER
It is imperative that the women of the Palm Beach
County Jewish community understand the problems which face
Jews in this country, Israel and around the world, and how they
can effectively deal with them," stated Baxbra Lifshitz,
education vice president of Women's Division for the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach County. "That is why we have
planned an intensive educational program on Wednesday, Nov.
The Women's Division Education Day will take place at
the Ramada Inn, West Palm Beach, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
"The first half of the program will feature an event, which
by its nature precludes any publicity," stated Jeanne Levy,
president of Women's Division. "But I can promise those
women who participate, two hours of the most interesting,
stimulating and challenging programs we have scheduled in the
recent past. The dilemma the Jewish people face today
warrants everyone's attendance at this most important
Education Day Program."
KEYNOTING the afternoon session will be Buddie Bren-
ner who will discuss the "Role of the Jewish Federation In
the Community, in Israel, and Around the World."
Brenner is presently Head Start director for the Community
Action Council of Palm Beach County. She was past president
of the Brandeis University National Women's Committee,
Palm Beach County Chapter, Southeastern Regional Chapter
and national board member of the same organization. She
served as past officer of the board of directors of Temple Israel,
West Palm Beach, and was past board member of the Jewish
Federation, Palm Beach County, where she chaired many of its
committees. She was the recipient of Hadassah's Myrtle
Wreath Award and the Leadership Award from Florida's
Concern for Children. She has been a resident of West Palm
Beach for the past 18 years. Her husband, Stanley, is president
of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County.
"Education is really the key to understanding what our
responsibility as Jews must be," stated Barbara Shulman,
Women's Division Campaign chairman. "Without knowledge
we become naive and vulnerable as a people.
FOR RESERVATIONS and information on the Women's
Division Education Day program, contact the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach County.
IN GERMANY
Don't Confuse Palestinians
With PLOrganization
Council on Jewish Aged Forms
BvHARALDVOCKE
Frankfurter Allegemeine
Prior to the fighting in
Lebanon, the Palestinian refugee
camp at Debeiyyeh was one of
the smallest in the country, but
like the others, it was fortified
and served as a terrorist training
camp.
During the civil war, Debeiy-
yeh was initially a Palestinian
base, then taken over by Chris-
tian militiamen. Since the
fighting ended, it has been
deserted.
Debeiyyeh's continued claim to
fame is Saudi Prince Faisal ben
Musaki. the nephew and assassin
of King Faisal, who was trained
is a terrorist by Palestinian in-
itmctors there.
PRINCE Faisal shot the King
in his Riyadh palace on March 25,
1975. King K haled, his successor,
las yet to reveal full details of the
assassination.
A Riyadh court ruled that
Faisal ben Musaid was not out of
& mind at the time. The prince
as sentenced to death and
aecuted That is about all we
know for sure.
The Soviet and Palestinian
' version of events is that King
Faisal was murdered at the in-
stigation of the CIA. Less
sophisticated Middle Eastern
opinion may be prepared to
swallow this line.
Many Arabs nontheless know
that Prince Faisal ben Mussaid
was trained by Palestinian guer-
rillas in Lebanon and are con-
vinced that Al Fatah leader Salah
Chalaf was the man behind the
assassination.
IS THE Saudi royal family
afraid of Al Fatah assassination
squads? It not only kept quiet
about the assassination of King
Faisal, but has also continued to
underwrite the Palestinian
partisans with substantial sums
of money.
Maybe this is merely a tactical
stratagem The Saudi royal
family knows well enough that Al
Fatah has Soviet backing and
remains extremely popular with
the general public in many Arab
cities.
Were the Saudi rulers to
declare outright war on Al Fatah,
they would run the risk of
political setbacks that could even
culminate in the fall of the
monarchy. So it seems to be a
case of "kiss the hand you cannot
Continued on Page 10
"During the past decade. Palm
Reach County has experienced a
rapid growth of retirees who have
chosen to relocate in Florida,
seeking a new lifestyle in a hos-
pitable climate. Consequently, it
is not surprising to learn that the
percentage of retired and elderly
people among the Jewish
population of the Palm Beaches
approximates 60 to 65 percent.
During the past few years, the
Jewish Federation has received
numerous inquiries regarding
services to the aged, such as
transportation, housing, coun-
seling and nutrition," according
to Detra Kay, cochairman of the
newly formed Council on the
Jewish Aged.
COCHAIRMAN Bernice Ro-
gers said "The Federation recog-
nizes its responsibilities for
meeting the unmet needs of the
Jewish community and has es-
tablished through its Social
Planning Committee a Council on
the Jewish Aged.
"This group will act as a coor-
dinating-planning body to study,
on a continuing basis, the needs
of older persons in order to dis-
cover gaps or inadequacies in
services and to plan for the
development of new services
which do not presently exist,"
Rogers said.
ROGERS and Kay will be
assisted by representatives of
Jewish agencies and or-
ganizations from Palm Beach
County which are currently
involved in programs for the
aged. They include the Jewish
Family & Children's Service, the
Comprehensive Senior Citizens
Center of the Jewish Community
Center, the Friendly Visitors of
the Jewish Federation, the
National Council of Jewish
Women and interested citizens in
the community.
For additional information
regarding future meetings of the
Council on the Jewish Aged, con-
tact the Federation office.
Can Panama Close Canal to Israel?
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON Among
questions concerning the new Pa-
nama Canal treaties that require
explicit definition in the Senate
debate and from the Panamanian
authorities is whether the U.S.-
Panama accord is the final word
on any nation's use of the
waterway.
Israeli ships, sailing for the
Zim Shipping Company on its
Pacific Line, transit the canal in
Israel's trade with the Far East,
particularly Japan. Apart from
this economic factor is the issue
of principle of equal treatment for
all nations in peace and war and
under any circumstance of in-
ternational relations.
Practically, it is recognized,
naval tactics outside the
precincts' of the canal can ef-
fectively block any vessel seeking
to enter the canal.
SEEKING AN authoritative
definition that would meet in-
ternational acceptance, the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency
asked U.S. and Panamanian
spokesmen whether the treaties
supersede any possible action by
the United Nations that may
impinge on the U.S.-Panamanian
treaties.
For example, should the
United Nations apply economic
sanctions against a country
say Israel does that country
still have the right to use the
waterway? In other words, does a
treaty between two nations
outweigh a majority view in the
United States?
On the legal question, both
American and Panamanian
responses to JTA were positive.
Continued on Page 12
Leader States Local
rk following is an excerpt from
\*speech by George Golden given
"the recent Middle East Con-
ce. sponsored by the Israel-
[Middle East Task Force of the
y*.ish Federation's Community
\Wattons Council. The remarks
we in response to Congressman
\\ynes Vanik of the 22nd Dis-
l^tofOhio.
.Mr,Congressman, we want
jw to leave Palm Beach with a
firm
this
conviction that the Jews of
.community want and will
Itoi *" American-Israeli
pcy which is good for America.
- and we believe that what will
be good for America, In the long
run, will be good for Israel as
well.
"Thus, we believe the following
things: that an Israel which is
forced into commitments before
it sits down to negotiate with its
Arab neighbors at Geneva is
already an Israel weakened at the
negotiating table, because it will
be facing states which will not
have to negotiate on the same
basis since their job will largely
have been done for them.
"FURTHER, we believe, as
does Israel, that Palestinian
refugees have legitimate interests
which should be discussed at
Geneva as should the interests
of 700.000 Jewish refugees who
have been forced from Arab
lands.
"Next, the creation of a new
state on the West Bank or any-
where in the region is inimicable
of the best interests not only of
Israel and America but of Jor-
dan. Egypt and Lebanon as well,
and we sincerely believe that the
creation of such a state will sow
the seeds for the next war bet-
ween the countries of the Middle
East or worse.
"We would respectfully remind
the world that the West Bank
was under Jordan's domain
before, and for 19 long years
after, Israel came into existence
from 1948 to 1967. And no
Palestinians, PLO or otherwise,
in that long period of almost two
decades clamored for a new Arab
state in the region! Nor did Arabs
in the Gaza Strip either!
"AN OBJECTIVE analysis
must lead one to conclude, there-
fore, that a new state on the West
Bank, especially one under PLO
control, will ultimately be used as
a springboard for an attack on
Israel.
"Further, the world should be
reminded that the PLO came into
being in 1964 three years
before the Six-Day War when
Palestinians were the only ones
living on the West Bank. What
did the "L" in PLO stand for in
1964? It stood for liberation.'
'Liberation' from whom? Not
from Jordan. The PLO was
created then and stood then for
the same thing that it stands for
Continued on Page 5


TkT
With the
Organizations
YIDDISH CULTURE GROUP
The Yiddish Culture Group of
Century Village will meet on
Tuesday, Oct. 25. Shirley Fleis-
man will chair the meeting and
Dori Dasher will play the
Hawaiian guitar, accompanied by
Mildred Birnbaum on the piano.
B'nai B'rith representatives
will speak on anti-Semitism, and
Gabriel Rabenbach will sing Yid-
dish songs.
At the Tuesday, Nov. 1,
meeting, Gabriel Rabenbach will
be the chairman. Mildred Birn-
baum will play classical piano,
and Louie Bialey will lecture on
the works of Shalom A sen
Hanna Safran will give a poetry
reading. Sol Winich of Deerfield
will sing, accompanied by his
wife, Tillie.
HADASSAH
The Tamar Group of Hadassah
will meet on Monday, Oct. 24,
12:30 p.m. at the North Rec Hall,
Green way Village. Refreshments
will be served before the meeting.
The program will be "You Are
There" at the Hadassah National
Convention, held in New York
City in August.
On Nov. 20, there will be a din-
ner and show at Musicanna,
West Palm Beach. On Nov. 30.
the Palm Beach County Chapter
of Hadassah will hold its Bazaar
at the West Palm Beach Audi-
torium.
On Monday, Oct. 24, the Chai
Group of Hadassah will hold its
annual paid-up membership lun-
cheon at the Challenger Club-
house at 12:30 p.m. The guest
speaker will be Marjorie Drier,
past president of the Palm Beach
Chapter of Hadassah.
On Sunday, Nov. 6, from 9:30
a.m. to 5 p.m., Z'hava Chapter of
Hadassah will hold an Israel
Marketplace at Golden Lakes.
Delicacies from the Middle East1
will be served. The public is
invited to attend. The funds
raised will go for cancer research
at Hadassah Hospital.
The Yovel Group of the Palm
Beach Chapter of Hadassah will
hold its Study Group on Oct. 27
at 10 a.m. at the home of Sibyl
Senecoff, Century Village, under
the leadership of Sara Gimble.
The topic will be "The Role of
Women in Jewish History."
Yovel will participate in the
Chapter Bazaar on Nov. 30 at the
West Palm Beach Auditorium.
There are still a few reser-
vations open for the Thanks-
giving weekend at the Saxony,
Miami Beach. Contact Claire
Braun for Bazaar and weekend
information.
The paid-up membership lun-
cheon will take place on Oct. 25 at
the Ramada Inn.
WOMEN'S AMERICAN ORT
The North Palm Beach Chap-
ter of Women's American ORT
(Organization for Rehabilitation
through Training) will hold a lun-
cheon with fashions by Anna
Lisa of Oakbrook Square on
Monday, Oct. 24, 11 a.m. at the
North Palm Beach Country Club.
Reservations may be made by
calling Mrs. Isador Moskowitzor
Mrs. Norman Friedman.
The Delray Chapter of
Women's American ORT will
hold a "Paid-Up Dues" luncheon
and Fashion Show on Wed-
nesday, Oct. 26, noon, at Temple
Emeth, Delray Beach.
The next open meeting of the
Golden Lakes Chapter of
Women's American ORT will be
held on Tuesday, Oct. 25, 12:30
p.m. at the Clubhouse
auditorium. A mini-concert will
be given by Max Koffs, after
which refreshments will be
served. Members and friends are
invited to attend.
The West Palm Chapter of
Women's American ORT will
meet on Wednesday, Oct. 26,
12:30 p.m. at the Salvation Army
Citadel. The guest speaker will be
Doris Orbom, director of Geron-
tology, Community Mental
Health Center, Palm Beach
County.
AMERICAN MIZRACHI
WOMEN
The American Mizrachi
Women's Organization is calling
on all former members or anyone
else interested, to join a newlv-
formed chapter in Century Vil-
lage, West Palm Beach. For
I information, contact Hattie
JThum.
The American Mizrachi's
Women's Organization is in exis-
tence over 52 years. It sponsors a
network of vocational and high
schools, children's villages,
settlement houses, community
centers, nurseries and other
education, social welfare and
childcare programs.
UNITED ORDER
OF TRUE SISTERS
A meeting of the United Order
of True Sisters, Palm Beach
County 61, will be held on Mon-
day, Nov. 14, at 12:30 p.m.at the
Century Village Holiday Inn.
AMERICAN CANCER
RESEARCH CENTER
The Leon Atlas Chapter of the
American Cancer Research
Center will meet on Monday,
Nov. 7, at Century Village
Holiday Inn at 1 p.m. The
monthly bus trip to Miami Beach
will be on Thursday, Nov. 10. For
reservations, contact Anne or
Len Antelis. Reservations are
also being taken for the holiday
luncheon on Monday, Dec. 12, at
noon at Christopher's in West
Palm Beach. For information,
contact Anne Honickman
NATIONAL COUNCIL
OF JEWISH WOMEN
On Wednesday, Oct. 26, the
National Council of Jewish
Women Palm Beach Unit
will hold a luncheon at the
Hamlet Country Club, Delray
Beach, from noon to 2:30 p.m.
Martha Bernstein, vice chair-
woman of the Justice for Children
Task Force and the National Af-
fairs Committee of National
Council of Jewish Women will be
the guest speaker. Her topic will
be "Today's Children Tomor-
row's World." Reservations may
be made during the day by
calling Mrs. Victor Ratner, North
Palm Beach, and in the evening,
Mrs. Jeffrey Ornstein of North
Palm Beach.
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TEMPLE BETH EL
BOCA RATON
Herman Herat Jr.. a member
of Temple Beth El, Boca Raton
and a former member of their
board of directors, recently re-
ceived the Good Citizenship Me-
dal for 1976 from the Sons of the
American Revolution.
In 1976, Herat made over three
dozen lectures to patriotic or-
ganizations, civic and church
groups, and service clubs on the
subject of the American Revo-
lution. He accompanied his talks
with exhibits from his collection
of original manuscripts, letters
and documents of famous
_i_Jcx^.
Revolutionary War individuals.
The Gold Medal was presented
to Herat at a meeting of the Sons
of the American Revolution held
at the Boca Raton Country Club
JEWISH COMMUNITY
DAY SCHOOL
The Jewish Community Dav
School will hold an art auction on
Sunday, Oct. 23, at Temple Beth
El. West Palm Beach.
Oil, graphics, lithographs and
watercolore by such artists as
Lebadang, Liberman, Chaeall
and Goldberg will be on view
from 7:30 p.m. with the auction
beginning at 8:30 p.m.
ORT Celebrating
50 Years of Service
Women's American ORT (Or-
ganization for Rehabilitation
through Training) is celebrating
its fiftieth anniversary this year
at their convention in Jerusalem.
In 1950 Women's American
ORT had 13,000 members.
Today, the membership has
grown to 130,000 with chapters
throughout the United States.
Women's American ORT ad-
vances the cause for quality
education in America. Its aim is
to teach vocation and technical
subjects as electronics, computer
technology, engineering, aero-
mechanics, fashion design, car-
pentry and other technical
subjects.
THE ORT network now runs
700 vocational technical schools
in 22 countries, on five con-
tinents, with an annual enroll-
ment of 75,000. Nearly 1.5 million
persona have gone through their
programs.
Recently, the Division of Tech-
nology and Business Adminis-
tration opened at the Branson
ORT Training Center in New
York City, which trained Hun-
garian refugees in the needle
trade during the 1960's. A year
ago. the ORT School of En-
gineering was dedicated in Jeru-
salem.
Along with fund-raising,
Women's American ORT
provided $3 million this year for
vocational training projects.
THE PALM Beach County
region has a membership of
nearly 2,000. The region also
operates a Thrift Shop in West
Palm Beach. For information on
ORT. contact the Palm Beach
County Region office on week-
days between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m.
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*mmrwmmw*m
Why we
There is a reason why after nearly 6000
years, we remain a strong people with a
sense (if pur|K)se.
Throughout histoiy, the synagogue has
been the force that has bound us together
asa People and a Faith. And it is partic-
ularly appropriate at this time of year for
all of us to reaffirm our commitment to
our tradition by joining and supporting a
synagogue or temple of our choice.
I'm -your convenience we have listed here
the synagogues and temples which serve
the Jewish communities in our area.
Reform
Temple Israel
Temple Beth El Of Boca Raton
Conservative
Congregation Anshei Sholom
Temple Beth El
Temple Beth Sholom
Temple Beth David
Temple Beth Sholom
Temple B'nai Jacob
B'nai Torah Congregation
Temple Emeth of the Delray Hebrew Congregation
Temple Emanu-El
Conservative-Liberal
Temple Eternal Light



Phis ad is published as a community service by
Riverside
Memorial Chapel Inc./Funeral Director*
For generations a symbol of Jewish tradition.


T\
1 dZL.
"*m *
i i n
The Carter Rei(g)n
What is beginning to become clear in the present tangle
of Administration matters is that President Carter does
not hold a tight rein. His intentions may be honorable
indeed, noble but he wants to be all things to all men.
David Horowitz, our United Nations correspondent,
opines in a report this week that the joint U.S.-Soviet
statement on the Palestinians was not a Carter statement
at all.
In Horowitz' view, it was a Cyrus Vance statement or,
to be more accurate, a State Department statement.
Reckoned in these terms, the State Department gave
the Soviet Union what it wants in the Middle East at the
expense of Israel as a tradeoff for the Soviet Union's
coming to terms with the U.S. on the strategic arms
limitations talks.
This can only mean that it is the State Department that
is conducting American foreign policy, not the President,
who is specifically empowered by the Constitution to do
just that, with the State Department merely acting as his
agent to carry his policy out.
Whenever the President permits the State Department
to usurp this power, our country suffers the costly effects
of backstage expediency at the expense of its best in-
terests and, more to the point, of its high moral principles.
This has especially been the case with Israel, where
traditional State Department anti-Semitism always
manages to overcome these principles and, indeed, the
national commitment to these principles.
We suggested here last week that the Jimmy Carter
who spoke to us during his candidacy is not the same
Jimmy Carter who speaks to us now. If there is any ex-
planation for this at all, it is for the reason we suggest:
that he maintains too loose a rein on his Administration.
High Court Opinion
We await with great interest the outcome of the
arguments set forth in the Allan Bakke case before the
United States Supreme Court this week.
Up for grabs is an official high judicial opinion on the
reverse discrimination issue.
Proponents for reverse discrimination argue that it is
the only way to make more equitable a resolution of the
discrimination practiced against American minorities
during previous generations that now makes them un-
derprivileged and disadvantaged.
Equal access-equal opportunity, they declare, must in
the end really mean unequal access and unequal op-
portunity in their favor.
Opponents of this position, among them some of the
most pretigious Jewish civil libertarian organizations, are
insistent that discrimination is discrimination even if
known by another name.
The California would-be medical student, Allan Bakke,
will now have his fate decided by the Supreme Court
whether or not it was fair of the University of California
to exclude him while admitting others of a lower academic
ranking because they were of the "right"' minority per-
suasions.
At Regional Conference
Weizmann Bust Disappears
RIO DE JANEIRO (JTA) A bust of Chaim Weiz-
mann, Israel's first President, that has stood in the square
across from the Governor's Palace here for 15 years, has disap-
peared.Sources at the City Council said the disappearance was
due to subway construction, but no one can say where the bust
is now and whether it will be returned to its place once con-
struction ends.
THe Jewish Floridian
m M O* PALM BEACH COUNTY
CMMMntnfl "OUR VOIC1 MM) FIDf RATION REPORTER
In conjunction with JtwWi Federation of Palm Baach County Inc
Combined Jcwlah Appeal
^.-^ii*0!f"ch05? Boulavart. We* Palm Beach. Florida S30
OmCI and PLANT-IJON.E h St., Miami. FT. 3J1S2 Phone 173-*M0
ADVBRTiaiNa DEPARTMBNT1-.7.-M0.
5g v22SXSr -SELVZgBS
Of The Merchandise Advertised In Its Columns
All P.O. 1079 return* are to be forwarded to
. .,._*. .. ~ S" wtan Flort,u*n- P-O. BoxOl-Jtn, Miami, Fla. Ill01
Publlahed Biweekly Second Claa. Poata Paid at Miami. Fla. MMM
?U,.!5'^T,OW "ATM: <-oc"l Araa) Ona YmrVM, ar hv membarshl. ta
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County, U\i Okeechebee BavTevir- witfPalm
Beach. Fla 1MM Phone wt S*t (Out < Tew- rnZnTmitl}
FEDERATION OFFICERS: Preside**, StaisYEeiIlrvica PreaieW. >****
Hymen Flshman. Or Howard Kay, lIZeTa^!S%^Vy^3'ft"!?l **
*!ulEnJ?^ "** r BifMiCBflB, h RcmI Tartaaaw, Director of
Eban Tells UJA Leaders To
Strengthen Ties With Israel
ORLANDO The United
Jewish Appeal Florida Region
launched its 1978 campaign at a
Leadership Conference attended
by 230 community leaders last
weekend in Orlando.
Those attending from the Palm
Beach County area were Dr. and
Mrs. Howard Kay, Mr. and Mrs.
Ken Scherer, Mr. and Mrs. Alan
Shulman, Mr. and Mrs. H. Irwin
Levy. Mr. and Mrs. Stanley
Brenner, Bruce Daniels, George
Golden, Hank Bassuk, Mr. and
Mrs. Norman Schimelman, Mr.
and Mrs. Arnold Lampert, Mr.
and Mrs. Bob List, Ronni Tar-
takow, Dr. Elizabeth Freilich,
Bemice Rogers, Al Goldstein,
Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Jaffe,
Marlene Ganz and Sanford
Burns.
PLEDGES announced at the
meeting showed a 68.7 percent
increase over last year.
Israel's former Foreign Minis-
ter and UN Ambassador AbbaS.
Eban told the Leadership group
that strengthening the partner-
ship between the people of Israel
and American Jewry is a prime
task in the Jewish world today.
"We have restored Jewish
pride," he said. "We have given
the Jewish people a sense of col-
lective creativity. We have
caused Jewish history to flow
again into the central currents of
universal culture. We have ful-
filled our human vocation: to
bring hundreds of thousands of
our kinsmen out of humiliation
and death into the emergence of a
new hope. Israel is a people with
a future even greater than its
past."
REFERRING to the 1978
campaign as a tribute to the 30
years of partnership between the
Jews of America and Israel. UJA
General Chairman Leonard R.
Strelitz said: "We're not just
here in Orlando to launch an an-
nual fund-raising drive. Our cam-
paign in 1978 represents the
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I ichcrman started painting
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Friday, October 21,1977
Volume 3
9HESHVAN6738
Number 21
Addr
Cay.
heartbeat of Jewish life! And
when we say Campaign '78 will
be a time of celebration and a
time of testing, we are not just
talking about a campaign, we are
referring to the future of Jewish
life the way we would like it to be
here in America, in Israel, or
wherever Jews are vulnerable.
"So we must use this oppor-
tunity to make our own commit-
ment to the people of Israel,
matching our intentions with
strength and with action,"
Strelitz said.
Irving Bernstein, UJA execu-
tive vice chairman, told the com-
munity leaders: "Your concern
for the quality of Jewish life must
be expressed 365 days a year. We
are the leaders of a vast
UJA /Federation complex, the
only existing vehicle today that
can reach the totality of our com
munity. There was a day when
Jews raised funds, but todav
fund-raising raises Jews.
,T REGIONAL Conference
planned by the Regional Cabin*
under the chairmanship
Charles Rutenberg of Clearwater
ft^a /ET*1 the nions W8
UJA/Federation campaign The
national campaign goal of $7no
million .s the largest in UJA
history. Stanley W. Rosenknuu
of Tampa was Conference chair
man.
Prior Regional Conferences
were held in Houston. Tex
Princeton, N.J.; Syracuse, N Y i
*",, LCam,b"dge, Mass. Others
will be held m October in CiS
nati. Ohio; Chicago. III.- and
Coronado, Calif. .
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'


CRC_L!PJkl
b 'It' Happening Here (and Now)?
Bv HENRY GROSSMAN
Chairman, CRC
Let's speculate together. We
kD0W "it can't happen here."
But, let's suppose "it" can!
THE MOTIVE (Why?) -
Take your choice:
1) A sincere, messianic drive to
pacify the Middle East even at
Letter To
The Editor
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
With shame and revulsion, I
voice my feelings regarding
President Carter's approval and
recognition of the PLO.
The biblical story of Abraham
and Isaac emphasizes Israel's
ancient, present and future com-
mitment against the destruction
of human life and the shedding of
human blood.
IT IS time each of us awakes
from our lethargic slumber and
devotion to "the trifles of the
hour.'' Vain illusions can neither
profit nor deliver.
Today, the PLO terrorists and
murderers disdainfully and ar-
rogantly display their guns and
evil intentions in the UN. Now,
they threaten and work towards
their evil deeds against a tiny
democracy, Israel.
In the future, they will attempt
the same toward our larger
democracy, until the world is at
their mercy.
WE HAD better remember
before it is too late, that "an
injury to one is an injury to all."
Has not history devastatingly
proved this? The eyes of the
peoples of the world are upon
America's leader. It would be
well if the eyes of our President
were upon our Creator and the
path of righteousness.
If freedom is precious to you,
let our President know how you
feel about his official sanctioning
of the vicious PLO.
MRS. TOBY F. WILK
West Palm Beach
CRC Leader
Continued from Page 1
now: the total destruction of
Israel'
<>n the question of borders,
we believe that the issue should
be negotiated at the conference
table in Geneva. We submit that
a border which is not defensible
in the Middle East cannot be
secure! We sincerely believe that
a policy by our government
*hich is based on expediency
Israels basic rights and security
for OPEC oil is not only morally
wrong but time will prove it to
have been politically bankrupt as
well if it is pursued.
"LASTLY, we believe that a
quid pro quo Israel's interests
>nd security for Soviet co-
operation on SALT' agreements
- will boomerang against us
w*ause it, too. is morally wrong.
nd the USSR is not trustworthy
m any event, as witness the
recently made Helsinki agree-
ment.
Above all. Mr. Congressman.
this we know this is a part of
forded history: that in the
ingress of the United States,
we have a body which, through
"Publican and Democratic con-
gressional majorities and ad-
ministrations over the past 30
ytV8. has understood the will
*"<1 the mood and the desires of
|* American people vu a via
l,r*el, and this desire has been
"latently to support strongly
go forthrightjy the only ally
*Jt America can always count
* ^ Middle Eaat Israeli
*nd to you and to the Congress
"* to all of our follow Ameri-
<*n>. we art thankful.''
Israel's expense or
2) A Quid Pro Quo with
Russia, "Well give you Israel in
return for a SALT agreement,"
or
3) Bad advice from top echelon
executives.
THE MO. (Method of
Operation)
1) Lull the American people
with promises and statements of
support for a fellow democracy,
plus furtherance of continued
development of American in-
fluence in the Middle East, both
protecting our energy lifeline and
our determination to defeat Rus-
sian domination of the area.
2) Lull the American Jewish
community with promises and
statements of support for Israel.
3) Continue 11) and (2), above,
while chipping away at the
United States' stated position:
a) Renege on the written
U.S.-Israel agreement not to
negotiate with the PLO unless
UN Resolution 242 is accepted by
the PLO iwhich would implicitly
recognize Israel's existence
within secure borders and
renounce PLO covenant's goal of
the annihilation of Israel).
b) Use American leverage to
force Israel to a Geneva Con-
ference at which PLO demands
will be put on the table (State'
Department language is "respect
for Palestinian rights").
ANNOUNCEMENT TO
PALM BEACH COUNTY RESIDENTS
Arrangements for blood specimens to be taken at the Gene-
tic Clinic of the Palm Beach Gardens Hospital for detection of
Tay-Sachs carriers can be made according to the following
schedule: This clink operates the first Saturday of every month,
except when that weekend is a three-day holiday week-end. Then
it meets the second Saturday of the month. Dr. Paul Benke is
the director of that clinic and he transports the specimens to the
laboratory the same day they are taken. Appointments for the
clinic can be made by calling the clinic at 622-1411 on a Satur-
day.
ct Force Israel to be "intran-
sigent," isolate her, acquiesce in
pushing Israel out of the UN.
d) Apply American "sanc-
tions" against Israel
e) Freeze American aid to
Israel
Could this possibly be hap-
pening here?
We seem to be up to point (3),
above.
What would be the result of
such an M.O.?
It would make the next Middle
East war inevitable, with the
elimination of the State of Israel,
and probably bring on World
Warlll.
What should be the role of the
American Jewish community
now?
1) Alert our entire country that
removal of U.S. support for Israel
is wrong for the United States.
2) Develop programs to
educate Congress and the
Administration that the only
solution is a just solution;
agreements between Israel and
the Arab States based on
freedom and security for all
Middle East countries.
a) The "Big Powers" may
help arrange meetings but cannot
set in advance the terms of agree-
ments:
b) Lessening of support for
Israel can only harden Arab
positions and obfuscate the real
solutions to Middle East prob-
lems;
c) Israel is one issue. The
"Oil Weapon" is quite another. If
Israel did not exist, OPEC would
still blackmail the world unless
the United States calls the Arab
bluff and threatens food and
other sanctions;
d) Where were (and are) the
Arab States when help for Arab
refugees was needed? Not in-
terested! Where was the demand
for a Palestinian State when the
PLO was created in 1964? Non-
existent! ;
e) Where in the Arab States
is there respect for human
rights?;
f) Where in the World is
there help for Jewish refugees
from Arab States?;
g) The American people are
way ahead of our government in
seeing that U.S. interests
demand support for Israel. They
don't want World War III.
When Hitler came into power,
German Jews didn't see the
threat. They felt Germans were
German, and became easy prey.
That is why the World's Jews
have well-developed antennae.
We sense a second Holocaust and
will not stand still for it to
happen. Begin sees this very
clearly; thus, his uncom-
promising position, Israel secure
and safe as a result of face-to-face
negotiations between sovereign
states, no outside leverage.
.9%

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not low taste.
Most low tar cigarettes are a tasteless version
of something else. Not Winston Lights.
Winston Lights have low tar. But they also have
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w|f
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i*pa|iiM*.FTCR*sflAUG.77; lWTOTfcO|.-|r.l.0*cw.Bci|Be*nC
,v.v.v.


JL_K*_
1 aTl
JUHk-JLS.- -X-
.1__1___rii
Jewish Community Center Presents

REGISTRATION CLOSING
Registration is closing soon for
all Jewish Community Center
programs.
The Creative and Performing
Arts School, which was
developed this year, features
professionals teaching both chil-
dren and adults. Ballet, jazz and
tap dancing are offered for all age
groups'. Theater, acting work-
shops and playreading groups
will continue to meet on an on-
going basis with a view toward
forming both children's and
adults' repertory companies.
Print making, jewelry making,
watercolor and many more
courses are also being offered.
Teen Night for grades nine
through twelve is every Tuesday
from 7:30 to 9 p.m.
Tween Night is every Wednes-
day from 7:30 to 9 p.m.
Parents of children in North
Palm Beach Gardens can attend
Parents Fun Night to introduce
parents to the Palm Beach Gar-
dens Extension Program. The
evening is planned for Monday,
Oct. 24. at 7:30 p.m. at the home
of Elaine and Barry Soloway.
RSVPattheJCC.
The Widowed to Widowed
Workshop will meet on Sunday,
Oct. 23, at 7 p.m. in the JCC
Lounge. Guest speaker Alejandro
Villalobos, M.D., a psychiatrist.
and Kathy Eggeton, MHT, will
discuss "Coping with Stress
through Biofeedback Tech-
niques." JCC members can
attend for free. The fee for non-
members is SI.50.
Adult Workshops:
Watercolor, Thursday. 8:15-
9:45 p.m., 10 sessions, mem. $20:
non-mem. $35. Ceramics, Wed-
nesday. 7:30-9:30 p.m., 10
sessions, mem. 810; non-mem.
20. Batik, Tuesday. 9:46-11
a.m.. 10 sessions, mem. 810; non-
mem. 820. Macrame & Creative
Basketry, Thursday. 9:45-11:15
a.m.. 10 sessions, mem. 810; non-
mem. 825. Indoor Plants, Wed-
nesday. 10-11 a.m., 6 sessions,
mem. 86; non-mem. 812. Natural
Food Cooking, Monday. 10-11:30
a.m.; Monday, 7:30-9 p.m.. 6
sessions mem.85; non-mem. 810.
Fine Jewelry Making, Thursday,
7:30-9:30 p.m., Ongoing sessions,
mem. 815; non-mem. $25. Play
Reading Workshops, Tuesday,
7:30-8:30 p.m., 10 sessions, mem.
$5; non-mem. $12. Acting Work-
shop. Thursday. 8:30-10 p.m., 10
sessions, mem. $10; non-mem.
$25. Photography, Tuesday, 7-
9:30 p.m., 10 sessions, mem. $10;
non-mem. $20. History of Jewish
Theatre, Thursday, 7:30-8:30
p.m., 10 sessions, mem. free; non-
mem. $10. Theater Appreciation,
Thursday. 8:30-9:30 p.m., 10 ses-
sions, mem. free; non-mem. $10.
Danceraize, Monday, 7-9 p.m. 8
sessions, mem. $24; non-mem.
$48 Karate. Thursday, 7-8 p.m..
10 sessions, mem. $25; non-mem.
$35. Social Dancing, Beginners:
Tues 9-10:30, 10 sessions; Ad-
vanced: Thurs. 9-10:30, 10 ses-
sions, mem. $15; non-mem. $25.
Bridge, Beginners: Sunday, 1-3
p.m.; Intermediate: Sunday,
10:30 a.m.-noon, mem. $15; non-
mem. $25. Duplicate Bridge
Club, Sunday, 7-10 p.m., mem. $1
per week; non-mem. 81.50 per
week.
A Chanukah Concert featuring
Theodore Bikel will be held at the
Royal Poinciana Playhouse in
Palm Beach on Dec. 4. Ticket
information is available at the
Jewish Community Center of-
fices.
Saturday Night at the Movies,
monthly series of films on
Jewish content, will begin on
Saturday, Oct. 22, at8:30 p.m. in
the JCC Lounge. The following
films are scheduled: "A Journey
to Jerusalem," Oct. 22; "The
\ngel Levine," Nov. 19; "Mr.
Emmanuel," Dec. 17; "Bye Bye
Braverman," Jan. 21; "The II-
egals," Feb. 11; and "The Jazz
Singer," April 1.
Sponsors of the movie series
ire the Labor Zionist Alliance of
'aim Beach County, West Palm
Beach Workman's Circle 1041,
JCC Young Revakot and
Revakim, the JCC Prime Time
Chib and the Yiddish Culture
Club. Contact the JCC for reser-
vations.
The Revakim and Revakot
(Young Adults) will hold the
following programs: Oct. 30,
cocktail party at Rhona Lustig's,
Palm Beach Gardens; Nov. 9,
"Meet Us At Tiffany's," Riviera
Beach; Nov. 20, wine and cheese
party; Dec. 7, Chanukah party-
dinner; Dec. 17, Road Rally. For
information, contact Lisa Rubin
at the JCC.
SENIOR NEWS
The Jewish Community
Center-Comprehensive Senior
Service Center's (JCC-CSSC) 14-
passenger bus is transporting
transit disadvantaged senior
adults to doctors, hospitals,
rehabilitation centers, nursing
homes, social service agencies,
nutrition sites and food shop-
ping. Working to augment the
program are the Drivers Who
Care. Drivers take clients to
places that the regular transpor-
tation service cannot handle.
Volunteer drivers can contact
Gail at the JCC-CSSC.
Adult Community Education
classes include Oil Painting,
Writer's Workshop, Psychology
and Modern Topics. The Know
Your Community Services
program features a different
community speaker each week.
On Oct. 26, Alice Skaggs will dis-
cuss "Consumer Affairs." On
Nov. 2, the topic will be "Legal
Affairs," and on Nov. 9, "Water
Management" will be the topic.
As part of the Institute of New
Dimensions, which provides
programs and speakers every
fourth Tuesday at the JCC, Karl
Von Meter will review Colleen
McCulloghs The Thorn Birds.
Under the direction of Etta Kess,
the Institute is a group of retirees
from the arts and professions in
the community.
The Goldaliers of Boynton
Beach helped the Second Tues-
day Club celebrate its second an-
niversary. Sam and Marion
Rubin, chairmen, and their com-
mittee arranged the afternoon.
Mime Yacov Noy also made an
appearance.
The Second Tuesday Club is
selling tickets for Noy's Royal
Poinciana Playhouse perfor-
mance on Saturday, Oct. 29, at
8:30 p.m. Tickets are 88, 89, and
810 per person. Sam Rubin can be
contacted at 686-9592 for dis-
count tickets.
Chairperson of the Consult
Your Doctor series, Jean Gross,
has announced that Dr. J. Good-
man, dermatologist, and Dr.
Peter Wunah will speak at the
Thursday, Oct. 27, meeting at
1:30 p jn. at the CSSC. The group
meets weekly on Thursdays.
The Seniors Exhibit for Oc-
tober features the paintings of
Morris Hellerman. Chairperson
Esther Molat has announced that
the artist for November will be
Lillian Sternback.
The JCC is lookingfcrns^T
interestedin atten^- 5ft
in Hypertension Educ.tio?
which is sponsored throughout
the community by the Health
Department. Hypertension
Glaucoma testing are
regularly at the CSSC.
and
done
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
of the palm beaches, inc
2415 Okeechobee Boulevard, West Palm Beach, Florida 3340
Telephone 689-7700
Chen to Head Beth El
Religious, Youth Programs
Temple Beth El President Bar-
bara Weinstein, and Rabbi Asher
Bar-Zev have announced the
appointment of Michael Chen to
head the religious school and
youth programs.
The principal is assisted by 10
religious school teachers, and
classes run from kindergarten
through high school. The high
school program, which meets
Monday nights, is the only one in
the area. The temple also offers
various courses in adult edu-
cation.
The teaching approaches used
include audio-visual techniques
for teaching and Hebrew lan-
guage, dramatics for teaching the
Bible, and the thematic approach
for Jewish history.
Chen is a gra-
duate of Schein
Teachers College
in Israel. He ob-
tained a B.A.
degree in Psy-
chology from Bar
Han University
while, at the
same time,
teaching the Bi-
ble CHEN
Shortly after he received hia
degree, Chen, his wife Mira, and
their children moved to the
United States where he com-
pleted his masters program at the
University of Missouri. He then
started working on his PhD
while, at the same time, gaining
experience by being a principal in
several temple-affiliated schools.
JM PRESENTS THE FIRST
ONE-VOLUME ENCYCLOPEDIA
BY RANDOM HOUSE
The Random House Encyclopedia is a revolutionary
concept. It's a new kind of reference work, the first
specifically designed to serve both adults and young
people. Pictures are used in an unprecedented new way-
as a basic means of conveying knowledge! Original in
its organization, it provides quick alphabetical access to
factual information and relates the facts in a broader and
deeper span of human knowledge. 2,856 pages including
an 80 page atlas, more than 13,800 pictures and over
11,000 in full color. 69.95
Books, at all jm stores except lauderhill and pompano
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SHOP ALL JM STORES TODAY, 10:00 AM TIL 9:00 PM


cause Someone Oared
Talk of U.S. Naval Base In Haifa 'Just Talk'
^STEPHEN LEWITT
A.CS.W.
I vitw from the Execu-
0f the Jewish
1} Children s Service.
names mentioned in
melts are fictitious; client
tion at Jewish Family A
j Service is held in the
yofconfidence.)
4,w, Mrs. X, was recently
I to my ff'ce for ne,P in
a variety of anxiety
mi. Her doctor had felt
-at of her complaints were
[ychosomatic nature and
at was really needed was
( to sit down and talk for
g period of time than the
Joffice visit could possibly
ijjrrt she was hesitant
approaching our office
"After all, aren't you
in the Jewish
n?" I patiently had to
Uhatour JF & CS offices
been situated within
office suite for quite
ne; that we have our own
entrance in another
c She thereupon desired
j the identity of our sec-
ond anybody who could
recognize her. After
t repetition of the fact that
f on our office staff knew
consented to her first
nent. This took approxi-
ten minutes of phone
[but I believed I had suc-
| in overcoming her initial
ce to scheduling an
jtment.
IT IS, until I mentioned
Kter of our agency's fee.
I demurred at this point,
ning why a charitably-
y should charge a fee
rvices. I explained that I
! happy to answer that
but in greater detail
hone call could permit.
times it's better to share
s a vis, rather than
such an impersonal
nt as the telephone," I
| "Of course, we have a
(scale, for fees, based on
lability to pay," I em-
ough she was not entirely
out her coming to our
she did quickly agree that
iphonewas "an impersonal
nt." She further recalled
telephone recently
the news of her hus-
}death in t he middle of the
In fact, she still was
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Talk of a possible U.S. naval base
m Haifa has blown far out of
proportion the realities of such an
establishment coming to pass,
both United States and Israeli
BB College to Reopen
STEPHEN
LEVITT
having trouble in sleeping
through the night.
I LISTENED patiently as this
was explained. Although half an
hour had now passed, I could
relate to at least part of her prob-
lems. Finally an appointment
time was agreed upon.
Mrs. X did keep that appoint-
ment.
(The Jewish Family & Children's
Service is a non-profit agency
designed to meet the social, emo-
tional and counseling needs of the
Jewish community of Palm
Beach County. Our office is
located at 2411 Okeechobee Blvd.
Our telephone number is 684-
1991.)
The B'nai B'rith College will
reopen next month in Miami
Beach for the benefit of officers
and members of B'nai B'rith
lodges in the South Florida area,
it has been announced by Fred
Snyder, president of the Florida
State Association of B'nai B'rith
Lodges.
The college will be held at
Miami Beach Senior High School
for seven consecutive weeks
beginning Oct. 19, and will
consist of two-hour sessions
covering direct dues billing,
membership retention and in-
surance, programming and adult
Jewish education, leadership and
training of officers, youth ser-
vices and fund-raising, Anti-
Defamation League, community
volunteer services and Israel.
DEANS OF the B'nai B'rith
College will be Maurice
Mehlman, retired assistant
superintendent of schools of New
York City, and Julius Freilich,
retired New York City school
principal. Col. Phil Cohen,
regional director of B'nai B'rith,
is the administrator. The faculty
will consist of B'nai B'rith lay
leaders and professionals.
Since its inception in 1971 as a
project of the South Florida
' Council, the B'nai B'rith College
has been held on an annual basis
as the forum for bringing
working knowledge of B'nai
B'rith to its members, for the
welfare of the individual lodges
and for the benefit of each
member.
The Florida State Association
comprises nearly 100 lodges with
some 14,000 members.
FOR FURTHER information
regarding the B'nai B'rith
College, which is open to any
member of B'nai B'rith, contact
the B'nai B'rith regional office,
M iami Beach.
UJA to Conduct
Student Mission
For the seventh consecutive
year, the United Jewish Appeal
will conduct a December Student
Leadership Mission to Israel,
designed for campus campaign
leadership.
Meetings with Israeli youth,
faculty and government leaders
will be combined with exploration
of the country and its people. In
addition, participants shall
undergo training and preparation
towards the organization of their
own campus campaigns.
In order to insure positive ex-
periences for all participants, as
well as results in terms of cam-
paign leadership, the University
Programs Department urges that
each student recommendation be
given careful consideration.
University Programs Depart-
ment representatives will contact
the nominating individual for
suggestions and to clarify ap-
plication procedures.
The cost of the Mission is $975
from New York, round trip. Add-
on fares and extensions can be
obtained for up to $350. If the
campus campaign leader cannot
bear the entire cost, aid exists
through the student program, the
community and the Hillel Foun-
dations.
The Mission will be lead by
Judy Flumenbaum, director of
Student Activities. She can
provide further information
about the Mission.
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g....."\
:bbb;
| sources agreed there.
Some major newspapers
prominently reported scraps of
information from the meeting
Israeli Foreign Minister Moshe
Dayan held with the House
International Relations Com-
mittee Sept. 20 with the im-
plication that it was Day an's
idea.
REP. CLEMENT Zablocki
(D., Wis.), the Committee chair-
man, angered by leaks from the
closed-door meeting, demanded
silence from all those present, but
it is known, since the initial
leakage occurred, that it was not
Dayan who brought up the
subject, but "one or more
Congressmen," attending, a
Capitol source told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency.
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The Labor Party in Crisis
By UZI BENZIM AN
JERUSALEM Five i months after its
devastating defeat in the Knesset
elections the Labor Party seemes
in danger of losing its way and
perhaps even disintegrating.
Labor leaders Yitzhak Rabin,
Shimon Peres and Yiga Allon
openly and publicly question
each other's competence to lead
the party. Labor has not been
able to adjust to its role in the
opposition, partly because most
of the new government's
decisions in domestic affairs are
the direct results of earlier policy
decisions taken by the Labor
government. Thus Labor's
criticism of those decisions has
an unconvincing ring.
EVEN WITH regards to
foreign affairs the Labor Party is
having a hard time winning
public sympathy. The Begin
government deliberately strives
to focus its foreign policy on
those issues in which Labor
shares almost the same views,
such as the complete negation of
the PLO as a negotiating partner,
the absolute rejection of an in-
dependent Palestinian state and
the firm refusal to withdraw to
the 1967 lines.
Labor's ideological and per-
sonal problems are endangering
its continued role as a major force
in the Israeli political arena. The
personal problems derive from
the bitter rivalry between Rabin,
Allon and Peres over the party
leadership.
Though Peres was elected
almost unanimously as Labor
chairman before the elections he
is not supported by Rabin or
Allon. Rabin recently accused
Peres publicly of having un-
dermined him as Prime Minister.
The former Prime Minister
delcared flatly that he does not
consider Peres as his leader and
Allon expressed the same view. I
THE ACHDUT Haavoda
faction in Labor, from which
Allon derives his main support,
asked, with bitter sarcasm, why
Peres should lead the party while
most of the ex-Rafi faction
which is considered Peres'
constituency has found its
place in the Likud bloc. The
reference is to the La Am (State
List) faction in Likud, which is
comprised mostly of ex-Rafi men,
including Foreign Minister
Moshe Dayan.
But the sharp differences I
between the three central figures ,
Ttie Air Conditioned
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in Labor are not the sole
manifestations of the party's
personal crisis. Most of its
veteran and most prominent
politicians are nearing the end of
their political careers. People like
the former Finance Minister
Yehoshua Rabinowitz, the once
influential Minister-Without-
Portfolio Israel Galili. former
Histadrut Secretary-General
Yitzhak Ben-Aharon, and former
Justice Minister Maim Zadok are
men in their sixties who lack the
enthusiasm, the ambition and the
capability to pull the party back
onto the high road to power.
The ideological crisis of the
party is reflected in its almost
frantic casting about for a stand
whenever a controversial political
issue arises. The Labor Party has
no united approach towards the
Palestinian problem, territorial
compromise or West Bank
settlements.
ONE FACTION of which MK
Yossi Sarid is an authentic
representative, champions the
creation of a clearly ideological
party of the left, while another
group represented by former
I Transport Minister Gad Yaacobi
advocates the formation of a
party of center and dreams about
eventual unification with the
Democratic Movement For
Change (DMC). A third section
represented by MK Amos
Haddar, brother of Commerce
Minister Yigal Hurwitz and a
cousin of Foreign Minister
Dayan, urges the establishment
of a government of a national
unity under Menachem Begin.
The Labor Party also suffers
from severe financial problems, a
legacy of its election route. It has
organizational difficulties too and
as a result morale at the grass
roots level is at its lowest ebb.
Mendelssohn's 'Elijah'
To be Performed
In Boca
Temple Beth El of Boca Raton
will present the 100-voice Greater
Fort Lauderdale Symphony
Chorus and Orchestra in Men-
delssohn's "Elijah" on Sunday
evening. Nov. 13, at 8 p.m. in the
temple auditorium.
The Symphony Chorus was or-
ganized in 1951 as a performing
group. Its members are a diver-
sified group of professionals and
semi-professionals.
The performance of "Elijah" is
a first for Boca Raton. Among
the soloists is Temple Beth El*s
Cantor Martin Rosen. As the
temple's first public event of the
season, the concert will be open
to the community-at-large.
For ticket information, contact
Temple Beth El, Boca Raton.
New Caseworker at JF &
Rosalyn Taffal, president
of Jewish Family & Children's
Service, and Ste-
phen Levitt,
A.C.S.W., execu-
tive director,
jointly an-
nounced the ap-
pointment of
Sanford I. Grun-
ther as a new
caseworker at the
agency at a
board of direc-
tor's meeting *
held recently. GRUNTHER
Grunther assumed his new
duties on Sept. 16. A recent
graduate of the Barry College
Graduate School of Social Work,
Grunther has received specialized
training in family therapy,
psychodrama and reality therapy
techniques. During his two years
of full-time study in Miami, he
was a heW intern for the n
Faintly & Children'a. g?
where he conducted bdiv
adolescent and marital
ehng sessions. Additionally
was involved with couS.
services, with the aged rjonTJ
of Miami. During^W
ther was an intern at the'i.
Community Center of
Honda in Miami.
A native of Long Island N J
Grunther received his
degree from Hofstra Univpr,
m 1975 with a Dean's and rW
List distinction a
.Levitt stated to the board I
Mr Grunther's arrival ,
greaUy enhance and increase,
JF & CS capability to meet I
increasing requests for c
seling services from the Je
community in the Pi
Beaches."
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__________


Oi
^
i4t fAe Jewish Federation's Community Pre-School, children
paint, cut and paste their individual Sukkahs. Pictun d with
teacher Sandy Konigsburg are (left to right) Laurel Mayer,
Mark Offerman, Craig Mazer and Martine Perry.
instruction and swim play are an
ml part of the Community Pre-School's
mm during the Fall and Spring months.
I with swim instructor Carol Saun-
(left) and teacher Ruth Kirshner are
Khadiijua Mainer, Mary Rayside, Wendy
Neville, Tiffany Kapner, Cortney Bruh,
Anna Case, Danielle Venoff, Dora Genoe,
Matthew Schweitz and Jason MacNeney.
Israel Agrees to Go to Geneva
IHTED NATIONS-The
I Cabinet agreed in closed
ion to go to Geneva for
ed Middle Fast peace talks,
Isreveult'd here.
_rhile, Israel Foreign
ster Moshe Dayan offered a
loint peace plan with the
based on the following
Elad:
Israels -. untv must be
Hired;
should be freedom of
Katmn in all international
waterways in the area;
#The main water sources of
Israel, such as the Jordan River
sources in the North, should be
secured;
Equal rights and full co-
existence between Israel and
Palestinian Arabs in the Gaza
Strip and in Judea and Samaria
should be achieved.
DAYAN EMPHASIZED that
Israel would never negotiate with
the PLO. even if the PLO revised
\Z
3
0

ai*n *$.

7875 Belvedere Rd., West Palm Beech, Fla. 33411
Located at Camp Shalom
PROGRAMSAND FEES
5 Day Program (Monday-Friday)
Playgroup2-3 year olds
Pre-School4-6 year olds
Morning Program 9 a.m.12 noon
Tuition: $52 per month
-refundable $40 deposit Is payable with ap-
tlon.
Afternoon Program: 12 noon3 p.m.
... $175 per semester
kFULL-DAY PROGRAM: $400 per semester (a
*mgs of $25 per semester)
. Phyllis Morgan: Pre-School Supervisor
Slscl Lesser: Pro-School Committee Chairman
APMJCATMMPOMI
FNm,___
.ftklMt
m Guardian.
. TaMpAon*.
-CHy-
Z*-
,*")" m1 ch'W lo tr* H77-TICOMMUNITY Pe-8CMOOL
Morning program only.
'Wnon.
Alloc noon program only.
Full day program.
''undauia application la* aiicloaad
It:------1-------------____________Signature
IJO COMMUNITY rfW-SCHOOL
*!??"<" <* Mm ** County
** Florida 3M0
its charter calling for the
destruction of Israel. Nor would
it return occupied land in the
Gaza Strip or West Bank of the
Jordan River.
"Many delegations have
proposed the establishment of a
Palestinian state governed by the
Palestinian Liberation
Organization in the West Bank
and Gaza," he told the General
Assembly. "This is but a futile
exercise in wishful thinking,
totally unacceptable to us."
Instead, Dayan's proposals
envision continued Israeli control
of the West Bank and the Gaza
Strip, with Israelis and
Palestinians living together
there.
Pre-School Staff Attends
Early Childhood Confab
The staff of the Jewish Federa-
tion's Community Pre-School
recently attended a FACUS
(Florida Association for Class-
room Teachers of Children Under
Six) Convention in Jacksonville,
Fla. The teachers participated in
a variety of sessions conducted
by specialists in the area of Early
Childhood.
"The convention was a
tremendous learning experience
for us all," said pre-school
director Phyllis Morgan. "We not
only came into contact with the
latest methods and materials, but
were fortunate enough to meet
other educators from all over
Florida, and some from other
parts of the United States. This
sharing of ideas and experiences
will certainly aid us in the enrich-
ment of our program.''
ESTABLISHED in 1962, the
Jewish Federation's Community
Pre-School has achieved recog-
nition from parents and
educators for its program,
teaching staff, facilities and
professional standards.
Classes are held Vonday
through Friday from 9 m. to
noon during the school year with
an optional afternoon ; >gram
held from noon to 3 p.m.
The Community Pre-Si hool is
held at the Federation Camp
Shalom site on Belvedere ,oad in
West Palm Beach. Camp Shalom
offers a swimming program,
facilities for independent ac-
tivities and areas for physical
development and academic
needs.
A CENTRAL pick-up and
drop-off point is available for
small additional fee. For infor-
mation on the Federation Com-
munity Pre-School, contact the
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County.
Guarantee A Good Life
For Your Family And
Their Descendants
In Israel.
After years of plann-
ing a stunning new
community is being
established on a
breath-taking moun-
tain in the Judean hills
outside of Jerusalem
and near Tel Aviv. In this com
munity of shared American
backgrounds'and mutual inter
ests, a complete Jew-
ish experience awaits
you. Come to the
home of your fore
fathers and make it
the home of your chil-
dren and grandchil-
dren. Here you will be at home.
It's the realistic way of becom-
ing part of Israel.
This is not an offering, which may be made only by formal prospectus filed with
the Department of Law of trie State of New York.
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:
THE YOUNG ISRAEL ALIYAH HOUSING AND DEVELOPMENT CORP.
103 Park Avenue. New York, NY. 10017 (212) 679 7171
Department A
* As set forth in the prospectus, seven out of nine of the dwellings in this community are
to be sold to immigrants to Israel and the other two to Israelis.
.
La


% d^t
./HJwO* a_____i. i- Don't Confuse Palestinians With PLO, Germans Told
Continued from Page 1
crush," to quote an old Arab
proverb.
BUT THERE is no reason why
the West -houId follow suit. King
Khaled, a tick man, may have felt
it opportune to keep quiet about
the background to his brother's
assassination, but why has
xiety in his voice.
A number of Western diplo-
mats in the Middle East are
blithely unaware of the methods
the Palestinian leaders use to
gain their political ends.
This seems to apply in par-
ticular to powerful, outspoken in-
IN GERMANY
nothing been said in public in
other Arab States or in the
West?
Silenct' about the ties between
Prince Faisal ban Musaid and Al
Fatah is i yardstick of the an-
xiety thai predominates in the
Middle East
In the Middle Ages, an Islamic
brotherhood known as the Assas-
sins terrorised powerful Moslem
empires. Al Fatah today has suc-
ceeded in imposing silence not
only on the Saudi government,
which ha-- financial reserves
totaling at least $50 billion, but
also on other Arab States and
even well-informed Western ob-
servers of the Arab world.
ARABS are reluctant to men-
tion Prince Faisal's training in
Palestiniai refugee camps in the
vicinity ot Beirut. The writer
recently held a lengthy conversa-
tion about Saudi Arabia with an
Arab acquaintance of long
standing.
"So you know about the link
between Faisal ben Musaid and
the Palestinians, do you?" the
Arab acquaintance eventually
asked, with a note of distinct an
dividuals who will not take
kindly, if at all, to attempts at
blackmail, or so the Palestinians
feel.
LOCAL staff at Western em-
bassies in the region, on the other
hand are almost invariably sub-
jected to heavy pressure and fre-
quently unable to resist terrorist
demands.
This country's diplomats,
when questioned about the ac-
tivities of Palestinian agents,
usually console themselves with
the thought that "the locals have
no access to our confidential
files."
They often fail to appreciate
that the contents of these files for
the most part merely summarize
talks and encounters that take
place within sight and earshot of
their local staff.
PALESTINIAN agents exert
greatest pressure on Western
embassies in what used to be
Palestinian-controlled West
Beirut.
On June 16, 1976, at the height
of the fighting in Lebanon, U.S.
Ambassador Francis E. Meloy
Envoy Herzog Regrets Carter
Talk Before United Nations
UNITED NATIONS (JTA) Chaim Herzog, Israels
Ambassador to the United Nations, expressed regret that
President Carter spoke about the legitimate rights of the
Palestinians in his speech to the General Assembly Oct. 4.
HE SAID he was surprised at the role the President gave the
Soviet Union in the negotiating process and warned of the
danger of increased influence and Soviet penetration in the
Middle East. Herzog said he was pleased that Carter clarified
the need to implement Security Council Resolutions 242 and
338 and his expressed desire that the parties to the conflict
reach peace treaties.
The Israeli envoy noted, however, that Carters speech did
not contain references to human rights. He asked. "Where did
the issue of human rights disappear? Is this a sign of further
understanding of the Soviets?"
and two aides were shot in West
Beirut. The PLO issued a com-
munique denying responsibility,
but subsequent investigations
confirmed that Palestinian par-
tisans were to blame.
A few weeks later, the U.S.
authorities responded to the
assassination by requesting
Palestinian cooperation in the
evacuation of American civilians
from Beirut.
OFFICIALLY the Bonn
government has no dealings with
the Palestine Liberation Or-
ganization. It may not recognize
the PLO, but it would be mis-
leading to suggest that this
country has no ties whatsoever
with the Al Fatah guerrillas.
Ambassadors in the Middle
East may be instructed not to
have dealings with PLO leaders,
but senior officials at a number of
Bonn's Middle East embassies
have been entrusted with the
task of maintaining confidential
contacts with Palestinian or-
ganizations.
In Beirut. Paul von Maltzahn,
who was later posted to Paris,
was the PLO contact for several
years. He soon enjoyed the
PLO's full confidence and as
charge d'affaires included PLO
views on the fighting in his
reports to the Bonn Foreign
Office.
OTHER Foreign Office diplo-
mats were more discreet in their
dealings with the Palestinians,
but the confidential diplomacy
inaugurated by Foreign Minister
Genscher soon led to a strange
symbiosis of Palestinian ter-
rorists and Bonn diplomats
which inevitably influenced
embassy reports from the Middle
East on the Palestinian issue.
It was not long before the For-
eign Office saw nothing unusual
in employing a Palestinian who
lives in Bonn as the interpreter in
confidential talks between the
Foreign Minister and visiting
Arab politicians.
Shortly after the assassination
of King Faisal, Genscher flew to
Riyadh, taking with him his
Palestinian interpreter. It is
hardly surprising that in the
circumstances, the Saudi
Arabian leaders were unwilling to
divulge detailed information
about the murder.
HANS DIETRICH Genscher
initially agreed to stand hostage
instead of the Israeli athletes
held by Palestinian commandos
at the Olympic Village in Munich
jRabbtatatl (Earner
The Torah Holiday
By RABBI HYMAN FISHMAN
Temple Beth David
North Palm Beach
The annual cycle of Torah
readings has started once again
following the holiday of Simchat
Torah. Th.s cycle, practiced
universally, sets a different
portion to be read in the syna-
gogue each Sabbath until the
Torah (five >ooks of Moses) is
completed. Any Jewish calendar
lists the Torah portion and some
even list the Haftorah reading
from the Prophets for each
Saturday.
The custom of reading the
Torah is thought to have
originated in the time of Ezra,
about 440 BCE, whan it is
recorded th. the people gathered
on market ays (Mondays and
Thursdays) .>nd holidays to hear
the Torah read with the Targum
(translation). This practice was
started in order to acquaint all
the people with the contents of
the Book of Law by which they
were expected to live.
IN SYNAOO015BS today, Che
Torah portion is read and rabbis
usually use the portion as an
opportunity to teach their people
the religious, moral, and ethical
contents of Jewish law.
When the average Jew was a
regular attender of Sabbath and
weekday services, he participated
in these readings and knew what
portion was read on the previous
Saturday. He was usually familiar
with its contents as well. When-
ever he wrote letters and docu-
ments, they would be dated with
the portion of the week.
The completion of Torah
readings and the beginning of a
new cycle to such a Jaw was a
happy occasion. Simchat Torah
had a very significant religious
connotation to each adult Jew.
The Hakafot. the Aliyot, and all
the happy celebrations were an
adult experience with the chil-
dren participating only for the
educational experience.
THINGS ARE very different
today. So many of our people
celebrate Simchat Torah only
through the eyes of their children
and attend the service mostly
because they enjoy seeing how
their children sing and dance
around the Torahs. The custom
of ending the Torah cycle and
beginning a new one has little
significance to them. They are
unfamiliar with the contents of
the Torah and could not tell you
which portion was read or will be
read. Some do not even know how
to find this information in the
Jewish calendar.
If you feel that you ahve been
described in what I have written
so far, then be advised that all is
not lost.
First, you can start attending
services regularly and learn the
contents of your Torah.
SECOND, each congregation
offers an adult study course. You,
too, can begin to taste the sweet-'
neas of Jewish knowledge that
has been the heritage of our
people since early times.
If you follow this advice, your
gain will be twofold. Your know-
ledge of Judaism will be in-
creased and you will begin to
really enjoy all the Jewish
holidays as you have never
before.
in 1972, according to a former
Israeli Ambassador to Bonn,
Kliashir Ben Horin.
He later withdrew this offer,
evidently feeling the risk was
more than he was prepared to
take.
Genscher can hardly be blamed
for changing his mind on this
point, but why does he still in-
struct diplomats to maintain
contacts with Palestinian ter-
rorists?
The hundreds of thousands of
Palestinian refugees who still
languish in makeshift camps
deserve sympathy from inter-
national public opinion.
BUT THE civilized world
ought not even to consider
partnership of any kind with the
*'
f"1 P,L9 lea<*er8 who naj
their political object^T ^
means of taking ^ i
hijacking aircraft^ ^
innocent individuals. ^
The poor Palestinians ,
certainly not solely t blame d
misfortunes as the Bonn Fore,
Office rightly points out R ,?1
recent years, the Palest' ]
guerrilla leaders have hadaS
deal to answer for.
So where Palestine is ,
cerned, the Bonn govemmj
tion than the Foreign OfficT fl
been doing of late between tb i
the Palestinian refugees an
*t!f ^jmjnal.current leadershinj
the Palestine Liberate gamzation.
Synagogues in
Palm Beach County
reform
TEMPLE ISRAEL
190) North Flogler Drive
West Polm Beach, Florida 33407
8338421
Rabbi I'vinn B Cohen
Sabbath Worship Services Friday
at 8:15 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL OF
BOCA RATON
333 SW Fourth Avenue
Boca Raton, Fl. 33432
391-8901
Rabbi Norman T. Mendel
Cantor Martin Rosen
Sabbath services, Friday ot
8:15 p.m. Saturday morning
services at 10:30 a.m.
CONSfRVATIVlWUAT
TEMPLE ETERNAL LIGHT
P O. Box 3
Boca Raton, Florida 33432
426-1600
Rabbi Beniamm Rosayn
Sabbath services, Friday at 815
p m
at Uniianan-Universalist
Fellowship Building
I62W Palmetto Pork Rd
Boca Roton
CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION
ANSHEISH0L0M
5348 Grove Street
West Palm Beach, Fla. 33409
684-3212
Rabbi Harry Z. Schectman
Cantor Arthur B. Rosenwasser
Services: Friday 8:30 a.m., 5:30
p.m., 8:30 p.m.
Saturday 8:30a.m., 7:30p.m.
Daily 8:30a.m., 7:30 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL
281 5 North Flagler Drive
West Polm Beorh, Florida 33407
833 0339
Rabbi Asher Bar-Zev
Sabbath services Friday ut 8 15
p m
Soiurday at 9 30 a m
Daily Minyan ot 8 15 am.,
Sunday at 9 a m
TEMPLE BETH SH0L0M
315 N. "A" St.
Lake Worth. Florida 33460
585-5020
Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg
Cantor Jacob Elmon,
Services, Mondays ond Thursdays
at 8:15 a.m.
Friday ot 8 15 p m
Saturday at 9 o. m.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID
Sobboth services. Friday ot 8 p m
At Westminister
Presbyterian Church
10410 N M.l.tory Troil, Polm
Beoch Gardens 321 Northloke
Blvd North Palm Beach, Flo
33400
845 1134
Rabbi Hymon Fishmon
Cantor Nicholas Fenakel
TEMPLE BETH SH0L0M
N W Avenue "G"
Belle Glade. Florida 33430
Jock Stateman, toy leader
Sobboth services. Friday al 8 30
p.m.
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB
275 Alemedo Drive
Polm Springs Flondn 33460
Sabbath services, Friday at8p.m.|
Saturday at 9 a.m.
President Jacob Front 964-0034
Moiiituys ond Thursdays at 9o m
Services held at Faith United
Presbyterian Church. Polml
St" i
BMAITORAH
CONGREGATION
1401 N.W. 4th Ave.
Boca Roton, Florida 33432
392-8566
Rabbi Nathan Zelizer
Sabbath services: Friday at 8:15|
p.m.
Saturdays at 9:30 o.m
TEMPLE EMETH of the DELRA1
HEBREW CONGREGATION
5780 West Atlantic Avenue
Delray Beach, Florida 33446
276-3536
Morris Sdberman. Rabbi
Leonard Price, Cantor
Sabbath services: Friday ot 8
p.m. Soiurday ot 9a.m.
Dally minyoos at 8:45 a.m. ond
5 p.m.
TEMPLE EMANU El
190 North County Rood
Polm Beoch, Florida 33480
832-0804
Rabbi Mo I Forman
Cantor Dovtd Dardoshti
Sabbath services. Friday at 8 30
p m
Soturdoy at 9 a m
Ouidlettte
6:27
9 HESHVAN 5738


wiets Favor Geneva Pronto
D NaTIONS tJTA>
y^ Foreign Minister
fTGromyko has told the
', Assembly
Union favors
that the
the early
of the Geneva
with the participation
Palestine
but
UN Secretary General Kurt
Waldheim. said that while he was
"very pleased" with Israel's
acceptance of a pan-Arab
delegation at the Geneva con-
ference, the conditions attached
by Israel "do not accurately
reflect our views."
He said he shared the Israeli
view that "there should be
bilateral discussions" at Geneva
between the Israelis and in-
dividual Arab delegations, "but
as to the other conditions, there
are differences between us." He
did not specify what the dif-
ferences were.
VANCE NOTED that "some
of the parties" had said that
and people. Gromyko there would ^ no cnecking of
credentials and there should be
no well-known PLO members at
Geneva. Israel has categorically
ruled out any PLO presence but
conceded it could not check the
Palestinians for pro-PLO
sympathies.
Vance said the U.S. position
was that if the PLO accepted
Resolution 242, the U.S. would
Liberation
charged that
"policies are the main
Howard that goal.
.ppears the Israeli
would not bring
to climb a step
would not bring them-
f closer to common sense
andon their plans for
o at the expense of other
SOVIET
spoke at
Foreign
a general
which the assembled
outline the foreign
of their respective
talk to the PLO. but whether
LO people were admitted to
Oeneya depended on agreement
by all of the parties to the con-
ference.
BEN ROTHENBERG
Counselor and
Sale* Representative
SHALOM
mtmOPIAL PARK
"Palm licoch County's
first Ceri.iery Indicated
Exclusively to the Needs
of the Jem 'omtnumtv"
Office S84 2277
Horr- 0860646
i Secretary of State Cyrus
g speaking to reporters
Ew-minute meeting with
JEWISH FAMILY AND CHILDREN'S SERVICE
iioufswndmg professional counseling agency serving the Jewish
pmuniry of Palm Beach County. Professional and confidential
Ljisovoilob/e for
jblems of the aging
uultotion and evaluation services
Kioftot counseling
Marital counseling
Parent-child conflicts
Personal problems
Private Offices: 2411 Okeechobee Blvd.
West Palm Beach, Fla. 33409
Telephone: 684-1991
Or
3200 North Federal Hwy. Suite 206-
Room 12, Boca Raton, Fla.
Telephone: 395-3640
lerote fees ore charged in family ond individual counseling to
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I Jewish Family and Children's Service it a beneficiary agency of
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PRIME LOCATION
Professional Bldg.
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965-8272
CHRIST0FF REALTY
Realtor 968-8282 MLS
Jewish Community Day School
01 Palm Beach County, Inc.
2815 N. Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach, Florida 33407
Is now accepting applications for
Pre-School-Full or Half Day
Kindergarten-Full Day
Grade l-Grade Vl-Elementary School
Grades Vll-VIII-Junior High School
Transportation throughout Palm Beach County
Admission Tests Required
Application Forms & Further Information-
Dr. Avie Waxman, Director
832-8423 4
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B Telephone 832-8423/ 4
A Beneficiary Agency of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
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Community Calendar
OCT. 22
Temple Israel Young Adults
National Council of Jewish Women
Jewish Community Center Film Series
Women's American ORT Royal Palm Beach Trip
OCT. 23
7 p.m. Jewish Community Day School Art Auction
Temple Beth El Boca Raton Concert
OCT. 24
1 p.m. B'nai B'rith Women Boynton Board
1 p.m. B'nai B'rith Women Naomi Board
12:30 p.m. Women's American ORT North Palm
Beach
Women's American ORT Palm Beach
Noon. Hadassah Chai Luncheon
8 p.m. JEWISH FEDERATION PUBLIC RELATIONS
MEETING
OCT. 25
1 p.m. Congregation Anshei Sholom
8 p.m. B'nai B'rith Women Masada
8 p.m. B'nai B'rith Women Medina
8 p.m. B'nai B'rith Women Tzedakah
Noon. Hadassah Yovel Luncheon
Women's American ORT Lake Worth Board
10 a.m. Yiddish Culture Group
8 p.m. Temple Beth El Executive
OCT. 26
8 p.m. Jewish Community Day School Friends
8 p.m. JEWISH FEDERATION BOARD
1 p.m. National Council of Jewish Women Palm
Beach
Noon. Women's American ORT Century
Pioneer Women Golda Meir Board
8 p.m. Temple Beth David Sisterhood
National Council Jewish Women
12:30 p.m. Women's American ORT Delray
OCT. 27
12:30 p.m. American Jewish Congress Board
8 p.m. B'nai B'rith Women 2969
Noon. Hadassah Aliya
Hadassah Bat Gurion
Jewish Community Center Executive Committee
8 p.m. Temple Beth El Men's Club Board
1 p.m. Temple Beth El Sisterhood Card Party
OCT. 29
Leadership Development Open House
NOV. 1
1 p.m. Women's American ORT Lake Worth
6 p.m. Delray Hebrew Congregation Board
8p.m. Temple Beth El Board
7:45 p.m. Temple Beth El Sisterhood Board
6 p.m. Temple Israel Men's Club
Yiddish Culture Group
NOV. 2
Jewish Community Center Board
10 a.m.-2 p.m. JEWISH FEDERATION WOMEN'S DIVI-
SION EDUCATION DAY
7:30 p.m. Jewish War Veterans
9:30 a.m. Women's American ORT Region
Executive
12:30 p.m. Temple Beth Sholom Sisterhood
National Council Jewish Women Board
NOV. 3
Noon. Cystic Fibrosis Foundation
10 a.m. Hadassah Board
10:30 a.m. National Council Jewish Women Okee-
chobee Board
8 p.m. Women's American ORT Evening
Temple Beth El Sisterhood Boca Raton Book
Review Series
SR&1CM K5NS3SXKL Pteft
Palm Beech County's Cemetery
Exclusively tor the Jewish Community
FEATURING
1. Tribes of Israel Mausoleum
2. Bible Garden
3. Private Estates
4. 24 Hour Counseling Service
OFFICE:
5932 Okeechobee Blvd.
W. Palm Beach, Fla. 33409
PHONE
W. Palm684-2277
Delray427-3220
( a
a*


>T"_
T^ ...1 -^
na^ A------
t n<
Can Panama Bar Israel?
Continued from Pag* 1
The State Department replied, in
writing, that no country's ships
can be legally barred from
transiting the canal and that if a
country is condemned by the UN
it still could have its ships go
through the waterway. "The
Canal," the Department said,
"will be open to all nations on a
free, open and non-discriminatory
basis."
DOES THAT mean, JTA
asked, that the treaties supersede
any UN action? "That's my
understanding," replied
Assistant Secretary of State
Hodding Carter, the spokesman
for Secretary of State Cyrus R.
Vance.
At the Panamanian Embassy,
Counselor Marina Mayo told
JTA, "The canal will be open at
all times to vessels of all nations
on an unrestricted basis without
discrimination."
Since Panama has voted with
the Arab nations on many oc-
casions and abstained on the
infamous anti-Zionist resolution,
JTA asked whether Panama
would permit Israeli ships to pass
even though Panama itself had
imposed sanctions against Israel.
The counselor replied:
"Panama might apply sanctions
as a government, but it would not
apply sanctions towards another
country's use of the waterway.''
PANAMA'S HEAD of
?3vernment, Brig. Gen. Omar
orrijoa Hen-era, said in an
interview that the canal is "as
indefensible as a newborn baby,"
and therefore "the only thing
that would guarantee its safety is
to tell all the countries of the
world that they can transit freely
and without discrimination 24
hours a day, 366 days a year."
The fact that Sol M. Linowitz,
former chairman of the board of
Xerox and former U.S.
Ambassador to the Organization
of American States, had a major
part in the shaping of the
treaties, is additional testimony
to the important roles Jews have
had in Panama's external and
domestic affairs.
Linowitz. in association with
Ellsworth Bunker, not only
performed a lion's share of the
negotiation for the United States,
but he also was called upon by
President Carter to convince such
organizations like the American
Legion to approve the treaties
and to persuade the Senate of
their need.
JEWISH TRADERS and
financiers helped cement U.S.-
Panamanian relations at the time
the canal was being contemplated
and when it was being dug under
American auspices. Jews were in
the narrow waist of Panama
when Americans and others
crossing it on their way to
California and the gold
discovered there in 1849.
Three centuries before that, the
first Spanish colonial governor of
the Panamanian province of
Colombia was the Marrano Pedro
Arias Davila. While a Catholic,
Davila is widely regarded in
Central America as a Jew and one
of many like him who were sent
to the Isthmus in those years to
help colonize Spain's new
territories.
In 1967, another Jew, Max Del
Valle, became Panama's
President for a brief time. In a
political upsurge that year, the
government's head was deposed
and Del Valle as vice president
assumed his duties until a new
government took charge.
DEL VALLE IS one of two
Jews, outside of Israel, who
served as President of a country.
The other is the late Moses
Pijada, who was Yugoslavia's
President in the early years of
ah
Tito's authority af
II. Many Jews
ministers.
Panama's
population of
total of about
60 percent
country's first
Panamanian rule
Spanish-Portuguei
on the Dutch and
in the Caribbean.
At present, Pan
about 1,500 Jews, i
some 200 and tfc
tarings in David
other towns.
In the Panama i
Jewish Welfare
maintained a J
Balboa to serve
in the zone and,
services statione
affiliated with
tributed also towa
in Panama.
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Name.
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National Council
of Jewish Women.
Today.
For Tomorrow.
re today s woman
you also care
about tomorrow
What is the
range of your
possibilities7 In
education work
community activity
meaningful human
relationships The
world you help make
for yourself today
will also determine
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Turn your feelings
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action Join the National
Council of Jewish Women
Your dollars help support NCJW training and
action programs throughout the U S and Israel
Please join with us today For Tomorrow
I wurr n Mir mtpmt wum milin
RMM rSSMM MM II TM KM IMVr II HT CMNWaiTT
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is last MM Street. New Yortt, N.Y. leeit
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If you've bought an apartment in a
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Arts and Crafts Building. Or reduce your waistl^
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Best of all. a spectacular auditorium for comr
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In short, there's no limit to the fun you can hav
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There are already over 500 happy families that|
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Life should be fun.
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Models and Sales Center open daily from 9 to 51
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Financing Example: I bcdroom/l bath
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COAAl
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>
>
SAMPLEROAD
I HILI
IXII 24
HAMMOND J,,
MARGATE
1X11 JO.
executive |
ajrtort
COMMERCIAL]
BLVD.
OAKLAND fARJCj
M.VO


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