Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
8 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 28, 1975)-v. 8, no. 40 (Dec. 17, 1982).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 2, 1976 called v.2, no. 22, but constitutes v.2, no. 1.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: July 28, 1978 called no. 14 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement; Aug. 25, 1978 called no. 16 in masthead and no. 17 in publisher's statement; Aug. 10, 1979 called no. 15 in masthead and no. 16 in publisher's statement; Oct. 22, 1982 called no. 31 in masthead and no. 32 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44607504
lccn - sn 00229550
ocm44607504
System ID:
AA00014311:00149

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
pJewish IFIIciriidlihi in
OFPALMBEA CH COUNTY
Combining "OUI VOICI" and "FEDERATION REPORTER"
in conjunction with The Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
.3 Number 18
Friday, August 12,1977
Price 35 Cents
tnts u whether or not the marriage has broken down
N GERMANY
sw Divorce Laws
rook No Guilt
pOLF PETZOLDT
law on marriage and
r, effective from July 1,
j a fairer, but generally
| more long-drawn-out
Jfor divorce. The annual
iARTER
IRICHTEN
divorces is at present
100,000. The main
It sentence of the new
krriage is that Marri-
age is entered into for life." It un-
derlines the guarantee in the
Basic Law to give special
protection to the family and the
institution of marriage.
THE NEW law is based on the
principle of equal rights and
duties for both partners. It does
not acknowledge any traditional
roles or privileges. Both partners
should decide "by mutual
agreement" who is going to run
the home and whether one or
both partners is to work.
Partners will however have to
Continued on Page 4
IMINIST FRONT
ie's Overweight
WorriedAt 14
3SE FRANZBLAU
K*r than moat of my
I have always been in
ay class.
' not have a boyfriend.
he overweight. Many
, weight, but then put
P11- I don't have many
as close to one girl but
I away.
Ml I am going to a very
school that is not in
t..j am worried that
["id m the 9th grade, a
vent me from making
IE a sister, 18, who is
(an out-of-town college.
k went away, I joined
Fatchers and lost 12
'hen we all went to take
f to college and spent a
topped dieting. Now, I
nda overweight
My sister is 5'6", slim and nice
looking. I am 5' tall.
The only amusement I have is
to go to a movie or shopping with
my parents. Otherwise I stay
home, do my school work or write
poetry.
ANSWER
In adolescence when so many
physical, physiological and
emotional changes are taking
place in a youngster's life they
want to hold on to the old and
familiar as a security measure.
Before they are sure of what they
want to be, look like or do, they
cannot make the important
decision which might make them
an entirely different person.
To go off on their own and give
up what they had always gotten
from their parents adds to their
feeling of insecurity. It makes
CoatiniMd oa Page 8
Carter Eyes West Bank
By TRUDE B. FELDMAN
Jewish Floridian
White House Correspondent
WASHINGTON-The Middle
East was not only the first
topicbut the central focusof
the President's twice-monthly
press conference last week at the
White House. And the West
Bank Jewish settlement situation
was the dominant theme of the
35-minute question and-answer
session with the White House
Press Corps.
The first question at Jimmy
Carter's 12th press conference
since he became President of the
U.S. was: Did the Israeli embrace
of the three settlements on the
West Bank diminish in any way
the prospects for a negotiated
settlement in the Mideast?
"YES," the President an-
swered. "I think that any move
toward making permanent the
settlements in the occupied
territories or the establishment of
new settlements obviously in-
creases the difficulty in ultimate
peace. It's not an insurmountable
problem. The matter of legalizing
existing settlements was a
subject that was never discussed
by me or Prime Minister Begin.
"My own concern was with the
establishment of new set-
tlements. And I let him know
very strongly that this would be
a matter that would cause our
own government deep concern.
This matter of settlements in the
occupied territories has always
been characterized by our
government by me and my
predecessors as an illegal action,
but I think that the establish-
ment of new territories or the
recognition of existing territories
to be legalboth provide ob-
stacles to peace, obstacles which
we can overcome.''
CARTER ADDED that Prime
Minister Begin didn't give him
any promise about his action on
the settlement question. "I did
describe to him our long-standing
position on the settlements and
told him this was a major item of
potential differences between
Israel and the Arab countries and
my hope that nothing would be
done by the Israeli Government
in establishing new settlements
that might exacerbate an already
difficult position," he said.
"Mr. Begin listened very
carefully. He said this was a
major political issue in Israel,
that in many instances he and his
opposition political parties in
Israel felt the same about it, but
that he was aware of our concern.
But he did not give me any
commitments about what he
would do. And he didn't give me
any prior notice that they were
going to recognize the legality of
the settlements involved."
Carter said that Begin is now
in a position of great strength in
Israel and that his voice is
honored by the Israelis. "But he,
like myself, has run on campaign
commitments, and I think he's
trying to accommodate the in-
terest of peace as best he can,"
the President stated.
THAT DOESN'T mean that
the settlements are right, but it
would not be proper to castigate
him unnecessarily about it. His
government has never claimed
that these settlements are
permanent. What they've done is
to say that they are legal at the
present."
The President also said that he
told Begin that it would be easier
for the U.S. to accept an increase
in the population of existing
have frustrated the President. He
said that after he had met with
the Arab leaders there were
"major outcries in Israel and
among the American Jewish
community that I had overly
embraced the Arab cause. After
Mr. Begins visit, there is concern
ON CAPITOL HILL
settlements than it would be to
accept the establishment of new
settlements.
When the President was asked
about the unusual optimism
surrounding the Begin
visitdidn't he "embrace Begin
to the extent that our leverage
with Israel has now been
reduced?"
THE QUESTION seemed to
we have overly embraced the
Israeli cause."
He added that when the
leaders meet with him there is an
effort to understand one another,
to have a base of comprehension
and consultation that can provide
hope for the future.
"Our position on the Mideast
has been carefully spelled out to
Continued on Page 8
Former Dachau PW
Says He Set
Menten House Fire
AMSTERDAM-(JTA)-Rotterdam police reported that
a 53-year-old former inmate of Dachau claimed that it was he
who set fire to the country house of accused Nazi was criminal
Pieter Menten July 17. The man identified only by his initials,
G.P. Van S. was transferred to the Amsterdam police and is
being held here.
The fire, caused by a Molotov cocktail tossed on the straw-
covered roof of the 20-room Menten villa in Blaricum, east of
Amsterdam, destroyed the upper floor and part of Menten's
valuable art treasures. Menten's wife, who was in the house at
the time, was unhurt.
SHE ACCUSED her husband's enemies of having set the
fire. Menten, 78, a millionaire art dealer, is on trial for the
murder of several hundred persons, mostly Jews, in the
Lemberg region of Poland during World War II when he served
as an officer in an SS unit. The trial, which opened in May, has
been adjourned until August.
The person being held is apparently known to the police.
He was described as a man of no fixed occupation who spent 18
months at Dachau and recently has been undergoing
psychiatric treatment. Two years ago he tried to set fire to a
small publishing house in Ridderkerk, a village near Rot-
terdam, which planned to publish a Dutch edition of Hitler's
"Mein Kampf."
POLICE SAID he gave them many details of the Menten
home fire that he could not have learned from newspaper ac-
counts. Meanwhile, the Amsterdam Civil Court has granted a
legal separation to Menten and his wife who is some 25 years
his junior.
The couple requested the separation apparently for
financial reasons as relations between them are clearly very
affectionate. It enables Menten to transfer his property to his
wife in the event that the court orders it seized.
UN Decoration
The Citizen


r
Page 2
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
With the
Organizations
Stuart can
mat ion
provide more infor-
TEMPLE BETH EL
This fall Temple Beth El will
sponsor Operation Alef Bet, a
program which will teach adults
to read Hebrew in nine weeks. A
basic primer and simplified
teaching method will be used for
the one-day-a-week, two-hour
session.
Classes are to be held through-
out the week; mornings, after-
noons and evenings. Operation
Alef Bet will also be available to
all membere of the community.
Temple Beth El will begin the
program on Friday evening.
Sept. 30. The keynote speaker, an
internationally known author,
lecturer and journalist, will
address the congregation
following services.
"May you be inscribed for a
year of beauty" an Temple
Beth El Sisterhood will help you
start your year just that way,
with this flower offer. Fresh
flower centerpieces created by a
local florist. For information on
prices and colors contact Melanie
Wagner.
Temple Beth El Sisterhood will
present their "Harvest Moon
Ball" on Saturday evening. Sept.
24, featuring Joseph Ricardel and
his orchestra. Special entertain-
ment for the evening will be a
professional dance exhibition by
the Harvest Moon Dance team. A
late night supper will be served.
Reserve a table by contacting
Marcia Reiff, Palm Beach
Gardens.
NATIONAL COUNCIL
OF JEWISH WOMEN
The Palm Beach branch of the
National Council of Jewish
Women has announced that due
to their membership increase
they are now considered a sec-
tion.
Last Sunday the members held
a barbeque at the home of Sheila
Stark.
The National Council of Jewish
Women "Welcome Wagon" goes
out to meet all new Jewish
residents of Palm Beach. New
families moving into the area can
contact Marcia Chauncey.
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Temple Israel of West Palm
Reach has announced tne ap-
pointment of Moses Weintraub,
as educational and youth
director.
Weintraub, previously of
Spring Valley, N.Y., has been a
high school and religious school
teacher, as well as a principal of a
New Jersey Hebrew school. He
received his bachelor and master
degrees from the City University
of New York and his bachelor of
Jewish Literature Degree from
the New York Jewish Teacher's
Seminary.
Weintraub will take up his
duties on Aug. 10.
Rabbi Irving B. Cohen has
been spiritual leader of Temple
Israel for the past 22 years and
the new president is Mrs. Jerome
Tishman. Temple Israel serves all
of the Palm Beaches, as the
area's Reform synagogue.
B'NAI B'RITH WOMEN
Masada Chapter 1560, B'nai
B'rith Women, now sponsors a
monthly social club for physically
disabled young persons between
the ages of 18 and 40. The club is
one of the projects Masada
Chapter members participate in
to fulfill their community volun-
teer service.
Upcoming events include the
Royal Palm Festival in August: a
picnic, trip to Disney World, as
well as regular monthly get-
togethers.
Joan M. Stuart serves as
chairman of Community Volun-
teer Services for Masada
Chapter, of which Shirley Bloom
is president. June Cummings
serves as chairman of the
disabled persons project.
June Cummings or Joan
STAMPS APPRAISED
AND PURCHASED
Philately has been
our only business lor
well over 40 years as
a Licensed Auc
tioneer in N Y.C
Now located in Flor
d.i Sorry, but we have no stamps to|
soil.but we are always interested in
purchasing desirable materlal.cspec
ially USA collections We have
earned the commendable Senior Mem
bership m the American Society of
Appraisers
HERMAN HERST, JR INC
P O Box 1583 Boco Roton,
Flo 3343? 391-3223
ufotku* <. Setb0vtt
REGISTERED REAL ESTATE BROKER
AC-KKACK-HOMKS-lXyrS-AI'AKTMKNTS-INCOMKIKOI'KKTV
12 \KO\ M I \l M V, \\
I'AI.M BKACH, M OKIIH
OKFICK: M im.t
RKS: MMIIM
F 1
attors*
DON VOGEL
REALTOR ASSOCIATE
BROKER SALESMAN
Caff me for your fill copy of
"Buyer's Guide" for Homos Or Condominiums!
700 U.S. HIGHWAY No. 1, NORTH PALM BEACH, FLA. 33400
Office Phone: 040-9753 Re$rdence Phone: 622-4000
L
EVITT
1335 W 0iHwv
Stevwi Momi .' 0
949-63'5
eunwee
1921 Pembroke Rd
Sonny Uwtt. F 0
921-7200
625 So 0hvAv
Ptidip Wtntttm. f 0
833 4413
Tzedakah Chapter, of B'nai
B'rith Women held their second
annual summer social on Satur-
day evening, Aug. 6, at the home
of Bruce and Susan Oilman,
North Palm Beach.
Barbara Stolzer, vice president
of membership was chairman of
this event.
PIONEER WOMEN
The Golda Meir Club of
Pioneer Women will hold a lun-
cheon and card party at the
Circus Circus on Thursday, Aug.
18, at noon.
Reservations may be made by
contacting Elizabeth Rudnick.
WOMEN'S AMERICAN ORT
Two hundred delegates from
nine southern states representing
18,000 members of Women's
American ORT in District VI,
attended the semi-annual board
meeting at the Konover Hotel,
Miami Beach, on Aug. 2-3.
Mrs. Leonard Pechenik i.
president and Mrs. Dave Roth-
farb. chairman of the Executive
Committee of District VI.
Delegates from Palm Beach
County Region were Mrs. Harvey
J. Cohen, president, Mrs. Walter
Hartman. chairman of the
Executive Committee, Mrs.
Norman Fineberg, Mrs. Nat
Levi, Mrs. Harry Schneider, Mrs.
Jack Friedman, Mra. Murry
Jackel, Mrs. Nat Hiltzik, Mra.
Dave Silverman, Mrs. Barbara
Brams and Mrs. Arthur Bangel.
Delegates from regions, area
councils, coordinating com-
mittees and chapters-at-large at-
tended seminars, workshops and
plenary sessions.
HADASSAH
The Bat Ourion Group of
Hadassah held a "Mid-Summer's
Dav Dream" at the home of
President
Aug. 4.
Friday, Auguat 12,1977
Barbara Wunsch
on
The Twn Group of Hada.>
to planning to donate Xt
the hbrary of the Hadassah i
prehens.ve High School I*
Jerusalem, in memory of thBi..
f^F^-anTocontrSuet^
this fund contact Natalie P]evin
Royal Palm Beach. or p,2
Popper. Royal Palm Beach
ENCOUNTER WITH JEWISH HISTORY
Applications are now being accepted for the Federation
sponsored Study Mission to Israel, which will depart in the Fall
for two weeks. The Mission is open to all men and women of
Palm Beach County. All participants will be requested to attend
three seminars that will be scheduled in September, prior to
leaving on the Mission '
For information and applications contact:
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County
2415 Okeechobee Blvd.
West Palm Beach. Florida .'W409
Telephone 1806) 689-5900
First Marine
National Bank and Trust Company
114 NO "J"
LAKE WORTH.
STREET
FLORIDA
582-5641
Member f.D.I.C.
When we put our name on
achapel,
it's exclusively a
Riverside chapel.
Announcing a new Riverside chapel
in West Palm Beach.
Unlike many other Jewish funeral directors in Florida, Riverside is not
represented by any other organization.
Our new West Palm Beach chapel is another example of how this
policy helps us to provide service dedicated only to the needs and wishes
of each family and the requirements of Jewish Law and Custom.
From the original concept to the completed building, our new chapel
is wholly in keeping with Jewish tradition. It is spacious and comfortable. It
contains a Ritualanum (Mikva) and other required facilities for the observance
of the Jewish Ritual of Washing(Tahara).
And, reflecting another Riverside policy, it is manned by one of the
largest staffs of Jewish personnel available in Florida. They are people who
understand Jewish tradition, and honor it. And in that tradition, we serve
every family, regardless of financial circumstance.
4714 Okeechobee Boulevard, West Palm Beach
683-8676
Other Riverside chapels in the Greater Miami area:
Sunrise, Hollywood, North Miami Beach, Miami Beach and Miami.
Five chapels serving the New York City Metropolitan area.
ED Riverside
Memorial Chapel. Inc./Funeral Directors
For generations a symbol of Jewish tradition.
>4-11-77
>4ti-n
e-u-n


fcy,Auguatl2,1977
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 3
Jovisli Community
Center Presents
c^ly Childhood Education:
I to Jewish Community Center
(Mi On Program (Key of
gd serves children ages 2V4
SUh 5. Its goal is to en-
K children to develop a
I nod self image. physical
iJ^nina and critical thinking
IbjIIs Programs in music, dance,
L Hebrew and movement
Ijtcition are part of the cur-
Inculum A licensed preschool
Lpervisor works directly with
I tie children.
. Unguage Arts and
jUihematics Readmess Program
from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Kab-
Llit Shabbat Program,
minimum enrollment 15; bring
Much and drink. Nature study,
|nce, ecological relevance,
body movement, gym-
. Jewish holidays em-
nap time provided,
provided, small group
Imivity fostering independent
lmwth. Specialists in each
Iffdtive area to support teachers.
Located at the JCC. Activities in
looking, play, communication
i, socialization with peers;
motor and gross motor
itrol. Swim instruction
> for an additional fee.
Preschool enrichment
gram: A child's introduction
Lihe creative & performing arts
lad natural sciences. Goals:
fftild's development in (a) large
development through
and body movement:
I small muscle development
ough exploration of various
1 media: Ic) poise and self-con-
nee through story dramatiza-
and puppet shows; and
I awareness of world around
through basic science ex-
ronents.
Monday and Wednesday from
|Hp.m. are Arts and Crafts with
i Rubin: Body Movement for
i with Diane Soil; Singing
|ad(lanws with Lisa Rubin.
Tuesday and Thursday from 1-
pm are Dramatization of
i with Michael Soil; Kiddie
ce and Nature Projects with
i Rubin; Rhythm Band with
(Soil.
[Friday Shabbat Party from
I p.m.
Sbbbat Magic Cirde and
Hour; Challah Baking;
and Dancing with Lisa
For children in the JCC
Orr Program (Full day
for children of working
there is no additional
enrichment programs.)
\ P m., the children will
te in playground and
fume. Enrichment programs
1 week of Oct. 9. Anyone in
[Pfopam will join in all special
summer programs, no-
holiday programs at no
cost.
1 "fees are as follows: JCC
Membership required;
'ee is $125 payable in
. transportation: 2 ways
P* Per month.
""J0" Kaleidoecope will
Monday Aug. 22 through
,IB" fcf Preschoolers are:
Aeg. 22, Clay Week,
Drsker Park Zoo.
imming. W
Gysanaatica Workout
r. CU. of to. Ckaee
. 8Ma-lont, CM and
t Shabbat. ar~*^"'
wQniH 14 are:
* Plaojat Ocoa
'"tJVnorida State Park
Ckacs School of
-. Swbo aft
I
i
24, Go Carting at South Florida
Cartway, Picnic and Swim at T-Y
Park in Hollywood. Thursday:
Aug. 25, Monkey Jungle b
Miami. Friday: Aug. 26. Roller-
skating at Galaxy Rink, Oneg
Shabbat.
The programs that are listed
run from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. For
JCC members only. Preschool
cost $30, payment upon regis-
tration, $3.60 insurance, where
applicable. Grades 1-6 cost $35,
payment upon registration, $3.50
insurance, where applicable.
On Aug. 19. the Jewish Com-
munity Center will have an Open
House Event of the summer
program of the Creative and Per-
forming Arts. On that day, the
children will take the role of
professional staff in a "Topsy-
Turvy" day to make sure that all
their friends register in the
dasses of their choice. The com-
munity is invited to participate.
The program begins at 2 p.m.
Dr. Robert Burger, president
of the JCC announces the pur-
chase of a 45-passenger bus
which will be used for JCC
programs from Boca Raton to
Stuart. Save your Greenstamps
for the purchase of another
vehicle for the future of the
Center.
Ravakot and Ravakim and
Prime Time Club are joining
together for a Steak Barbecue
and Beach Party on Sunday,
Aug. 14. at 4 p.m. at the Lake
Worth Beach in Barton Park.
RSVP by Wednesday, Aug. 10,
at the JCC office. Admission is $4
per person.
Special Announcement: Betty
and Israel Segall are here from
Israel for a brief visit. They are
the founders of the Tel-Aviv
Workers Theatre and developers
of the Munich Yiddish Theatre.
They will perform at the Jewish
Community Center, Aug. 15, at8
p.m. Call for reservations, 689-
7700, limited seating. Minimum
donation $1.
SENIOR NEWS
Activities at the Compre-
hensive Senior Service Center
(CSSC) have slowed down for the
summer but the CSSC van and
its driver are still busy taking
transit disadvantaged senior
adults to physicians' and den-
tists' offices, hospitals, nursing
homes and nutrition sites as well
as food shopping. The office of
the Public Defender sent a letter
thanking the JCC-CSSC for the
special transportation we
provided for one of his clients.
Citizens Information and
Referral Services can help you
find the answer to your problems.
Call the I & R specialist at 689-
7700 today.
CLASSES AND AC-
TIVITIES: Writer's Workshop
meets Mondays at 1 p.m. As one
student said: "A group of
seniors, congenial men and
women, gather weekly at the
Senior Center of the Jewish Com-
munity Center. They take part in
a search for larger dimensions
and a more fulfilling life, com-
bining with enjoyment and study
amidst a relaxed and informal
background. The Senior Center is
no hallowed and stuffy class-
room, rather, it stimulates
camaraderie and a mutually help-
ful atmosphere which induces
self-improvement. Frank A.
Bostwick is the instructor who
guides and criticizes the letters,
narratives, and descriptives
turned in by the students. Learn



J"3
te
| 7875 Belvedere Rd., West Palm Beach, Fla. 33411
Located at Camp Shalom
r- PROGRAMS AND FEES
. > 5 Day Program (Monday-Friday)
" ^ Playgroup2-3 year olds
t^ Pre-School4-5 year olds
3 Morning Program 9 .!.12 noon
Tuition: $52 per month
a non-refundable $40 deposit is payable with ap-
plication.
Afternoon Program: 12 noon3 p.m.
$175 per semester
**FULL-DAY PROGRAM: $400 per semester (a
savings of $25 per semester)
Phyllis Morgan: Pre-School Supervisor
Staci Lesser. Pre-School Committee Chairman
fcmiCATIOaiSOAM
CMM'aNama----------
Parent or Ouardlan.
.Bulhdata.
, TaiapHona.
Adorau.
-Crly-
.Vp.
moll m, cMM M Ma 1t77- COMMUNITY PM-SCMOOL
Morning program only.
Altarnoon program only.
Full day program.
My $40.00 non-ralundaWa application laa ancloaad
Ma________________________-------aonalura _
MAM. TO: OOMMONITY PM-SCHOOt
jawlan FeearMlon <* Pa*" "" Co*"**
to better communicate with
words and enjoy a cup of tea half-
way during the session. Come
join with us and call 689-7700 for
information." Esther Molat.
There is something for every-
one in the Fall Program. Con-
structive recreational activities,
intellectual stimulation and
sources for developing purposeful
interests, as well as companion-
ship. Some programs will be
combined with young people.
Join for the Fall and bring a
lunch, the Center will supply
dirnk. Watch for future ac-
tivities.
Adult Education Classes
include Oil Painting, Monday,
Oct. 10, 9 a.m. to noon; Writer's
Workshop, Monday, Oct. 10, 1-3
p.m.; Know Your Community,
Wednesday. Oct. 12, 1-3 p.m.;
Psychology: Challenges of
Everyday Living, Thursday, Oct.
13, 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.;
Modern Topics, Friday, Oct. 14,
U a.m. to 2 p.m.
Miami on Your Own For the
Day begins Wednesday, Oct. 26.
Go to Miami "to do vour own
thing" and come back to West
Palm Beach the same day. The
bus leaves the JCC at 10 a.m. and
returns at 6 p.m. Destination:
Lincoln Road, Miami Beach. JCC
members, $4.50, non-members,
$5.50... Call Sam Rubin for
reservations at 689-7700.
The seniors have been involved
in a summer fund-raising func-
tion. On Aug. 7, the Senior
Lounge was the location of an
Indoor Flea Market and Garage
Sale. Community agencies as well
as individuals displayed their
wares, refreshments were sold.
The Second Tuesday of the
Month Club held breakfast for
the Flea Market Committee, a
group of super salesmen and
saleswomen.
Chai: The Chai membership
has been so successful that the
JCC Board voted to continue the
SI 8 membership. Senior member-
ship is 825 but a special "Chai"
membership is SI8.
The monthly bulletin which is
chock full of information can be
obtained by calling the JCC at
689-7700.
JEWISH COMMUNITY CEN a ER
of the palm beaches n<
2415 Okeechobee Boulevard, West Palm Beach. Florida 3340
Telephone 689-7700
Chautauqua Society Endows
Courses In Judaism
Four resident lectureships,
accredited college courses in
Judaism, have been endowed by
the Jewish Chautauqua Society
for the 1977-78 academic year in
Florida.
Three of the lectureships are in
the Miami area: Barry College,
located in Miami Shores, is
endowed in honor of Shepard
Broad, and is instructed by
Rabbi Samuel Jaffe of Temple
Beth El, Hollywood: the
University of Miami, being
taught by Rabbi Herbert
Baumgard, Temple Beth Am,
Miami. The lectureships, at the
College of Boca Raton, instructed
by Rabbi Norman Mendel,
spiritual leader of Temple Beth
El, Boca Raton and at Bethune-
Cookman College, Daytona
Beach are two of eight new
courses established this year.
This brings to 206 the cumulative
number of courses in Judaic
studies the Society has endowed
throughout the United States,
Canada and Israel.
ISRAEL '1250
4 WEEKS -3 MEALS DAILY
Monthly departures beginning September
FULL SIGHTSEEING DAILY PROGRAMS
YOUNG ISRAEL TOURS
103 Park Ave New Vom N V 10017
In Florida caw 30S b.V M>4 m b!>i jmi
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FLORIDA 33334
TEMPLE BETH DAVID
MODERN CONSERVATIVE CONGREGATION
Rabbi Hyman Fish man
Cantor Nicholas Fanakel
OPEN HOUSE
SUNDAY, AUG. 21 st 3 P.M.
AT WESTMINSTER PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH ANNEX
10410 No. Military Trail,
Palm Beach Gardens
Wo Welcome You to Join Our Growing
Congregation of Nortrmrn Palm Beach County
A Short Program will be presented.
Refreshments will be served
FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION CALL
864-1134 OR 844-66M


Page 4
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, August 12,
1977

1
A Political Whip
If memory serves us correctly, we have rarely if ever in
the past given over our editorial prerogative to guest
editorialists. But the following, which appeared originally
in The Oklahoma Eagel, the highly-regarded Black weekly
published in Tulsa, puts the case so pointedly, that we are
happy to make an exception:
Is somebody using the Israeli elections as a political
whip to force the Israelis to accept unpalatable terms for
an Arab-Israeli peace?
The near hysterical outburst over the election of a right-
of-center politician by the Israeli voters has not been
matched by such concern over election returns in any
other country since Allende won election in Chile.
We have no way to gage such concern over Arab
elections since they are practically non-existent.
The overturn of the Israeli labor government should
have been foreseen or at least anticipated, what with all of
the charges of corruption, some of which were proven to be
more than charges; the resignation of the Prime Minister,
the trial of his wife; the rising cost of living in a country
where it is already astronomical, and other internal
problems which had no direct bearing on foreign policy
but which were gut issues for the people.
The boys who read the signs should not have been as
surprised as they have pretended to be over the outcome,
that is if they are the "experts" that they claim to be.
A Propaganda Device
Even us country yokels would have been surprised if the
labor party had not lost. Which makes us wonder if this
change of government by the Israelis is not being used as
a propaganda device to weaken world opinion favorable
toward Israel by painting her as an arrogant war-
mongering people who are determined to resist peace
initiatives except on their terms.
Such a world view of Israel could so weaken her in-
fluence that she could be bludgeoned into accepting a
peace which would be detrimental to her interests.
The Israeli haters are not above using such propaganda
to further their own interests but we are surprised at the
Carter administration joining the yapping dogs.
Quite obviously a country like the United States, where
free elections make sometimes for strange bedfellows
because of overriding domestic concerns, should be much
more sophisticated in assessing the true situation in Israel
than we appear to have been in recent weeks.
The Carter administration especially should know
better since they rode into office strictly on domestic
concerns, not foreign policy.
When inflation is high and employment is low, it should
not be surprising if the voters look around for somebody
else to mind the store.
The 1967 ceasefire line would mean that Israel would
once again have to abandon the Golan Heights, the West
Bank and the Gaza Strip. She would also have to pull her
troops out of the Sinai Peninsula. Hence, she would be at
the mercy of the uncertain diplomatic whims of the UN
whose bias already favors the Arabs and the erratic
whims, dreams and hatred of Arab nations who have
vowed to drive her into the sea.
Oil in Our Spine
This is like having the Russians take over California,
New England, and Texas, all under UN approval and
trusting the Russians not to try for the rest of the country
or if they did, trusting the UN to stop them.
All of which makes us wonder if the U.S. is using this
election as an excuse to join the rest of the western allies
(who are cowed by the Arabs), into demanding a ceasefire
line which would put Israel at the mercy of her enemies
once again. If so it would mean that we are tired of the
problem and we have decided that the best way to solve it
is by the extinction of Israel.
That oily path from Riydh to Houston seems to have
traveled right up our national spine leaving a yellow
streak.
TMC
Jewish Floridian
OF PALM BIACH COUNTY
ntflfl "OUB VOICK MM "FCOCRATION BBr>0TBB"
In conjunction with Jewlah Federation of Palm Beach County. Inc.
Combined Jewlah Appeal
Ml* Okeechobee Boulevard, Wait Palm Beach. Florida M
OFFICB and PLANT-lNEth St Miami, Fla Ml S3 Phone S7I-4M0
ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT! -171-4406
MOAMIADDRE88: P.O. Box JBTI, Miami. Florida SS101
FRED K. SHOCHET SUZANNE SHOCHET SELMA M THOMPSON
Editor and Publisher ExecuUve Editor AaalMant to Publisher
MORTON GILBERT- Advertising Representative
The J ewlh F lor Mian Doei Nat QmrillN The Kathrofh
Of The Merchandise Advertised In Its Cattimns
All P.O. *67 return* are to be forwarded to
The Jewlah Floridian, P.O. Box01-MTt, Miami. Fla. Ml01
Published Bl Weekly Second Class Postage Paid at Miami. Fla. 069030
SUBSCRIPTION BATES: (Local Ares) One Ysar-fr.SB. er By membership to
Jew.sh Federation of Palm Beech County, 141J Okeechobee Boulevard. Watt Palm
Bach, (Ms. 1MB*. PhoneM-SfM (Out ol Town upon Request)
FEDERATION OFFICERS: President. Stsnley Brenner. Vice Presidents. Rabbi
Hyman Fishman, Or. Howard Kay, Kenneth Scherer, Dr. Rlcherd Shuaarman,
Treasurer, Stecey Lesser, Secretary, Bruce Dsniels, Executive Director. Normsn
Schlmelmen. Assistsnt Executive Director, Robert Kessler Submit materiel far
publication to Roml Tartakow. Director of Public Relations
IN GERMANY
New Divorce Laws Brook No Guilt
Continued from Page 1
take the family into consideration
when choosing and pursuing
their professions.
The regulations on divorce are
the main item of the new law. The
new law on divorce is a radical
departure from the old one. In it
the guilt principle is replaced by
that of breakdown of marriage,
i.e., what counts is not the guilt
of one or other partner, but
simply whether or not the
marriage has broken down.
A BREAKDOWN occurs when
the partners are not living
together or are not likely to live
together in the future. If a couple
have been separated for periods
from one to five years this is
taken as evidence of breakdown.
The details are as follows:
If the partners have been
living apart for less than a year,
divorce is only possible if con-
tinuation of the marriage would
be intolerable because of the
partners' behavioral traits.
It will be assumed that the
marriage has broken down
irrevocably if the partners have
been living apart for a year and
both apply for a divorce or if the
partner against when the suit is
being brought agrees to it.
If the separation has lasted
more than three years, the
marriage is to be summarily
dissolved. For special reasons
and in exceptional cases this
period can be extended to five
years.
SERIOUS ILLNESS of the
partner being sued, financial
difficulties or considerations of
the children's well-being can
constitute such exceptions.
0 After a five year period the
marriage is to be dissolved
regardless.
If there is still a prospect of
reconciliation, the court can
suspend proceedings for up to a
year before the three year
separation period has elapsed
and, after three years,
proceedings can be suspended for
up to six months.
Spouses can be separated for
legal purposes even if they are
living in the same flat. The
decisive factor is whether par-
tners are really living together in
the true sense of the word.
The same applies if one spouse
completely rejects the other.
Short periods of living together
for the purposes of reconciliation
are not considered as a break in
the period of separation.
MAINTENANCE: In prin-
ciple each partner is responsible
for his or her own maintenance
after the divorce. If a partner
cannot provide for himself or
herself the other partner can be
required to do this in certain
circumstances. These are:
If it would be unreasonable to
expect him or her to take up
employment a) because of the
need to look after or bring up a
child, b) because of age, or c)
because of other physical or
mental disabilities.
if the partner cannot find,
or loses, suitable employment;
in order to continue or
complete a course of study or
training which he did not pursue
because of marriage;
for further studies or
retraining to compensate for
disadvantages which arose
through marriage;
if for any other grave
reasons the partner cannot be
expected to take up employment
and it would be unjust to refuse
maintenance.
THE RIGHT to claim for
maintenance, expires when the
recipient is in a position to take
up suitable employment.
No maintenance need be paid
for example if the marriage lasted
only a short time or if the
claimant committed a crime
against the maintenance-paying
partner.
If children are involved, then
the divorced partner's claims
have priority over those of the
new partner.
Regulations on provision for
divorced partners in their old age
or in case of incapacity are a
completely new feature of tkJ
marriage law.
According to the ne
regulations pensions and
provision rights which have,
accrued during marriage are to bel
split equally between the d7I
tners when they are divorced.
The total provision ar
cumulated during marriage J
calculated, regardless of which of I
the parners has earned it. I
After the divorce each partner!
is to receive a half. A transfer is I
therefore necessary from the!
partner with the greater en-
titlement to the partner with less I
or none.
ENTITLEMENT TO social I
insurance pensions, official and I
civil service pensions, company
pensions, professional pensions
and pensions from private in-
surances are all to be equalized in I
this way.
With permission of the family
court and notarial verification, j
partners can also make private
agreements, but here, too, "fair
equalization" must be ensured.
By a marriage contract this!
equalization can be completely
excluded up to a year before the
divorce.
There are also special cases in
which this compensation is not to
be paid, for example when a
partner failed to contribute to the
upkeep of the family during the
marriage.
Procedure: A family judge will
in future be responsible for
divorce and matters arising from
it in the civil court. Applicants
are obliged to use the services of
lawyers. The costs of the
proceedings are generally to be
shared equally between both
partners.
20% OFF Verticil!
SHADED
686-7259 '
1833 DONNA ROAO
HighHolidays5738
ENJOY THE HOLIDAYS AMONG FRIENDS
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Sept. 11 Oct. 9
Rosh Hashonah,
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Sept. 11 25
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or Sept. 23 -
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or 10 nights
Sept. 26 Oct. 6
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or if you prefer to split your vacation
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Sept. 12 15 and Sept 21 23.
Packages as low as $160.00 per person double occupancy
HIRSCH'S
Strictly Kosher Under (jj) Supervision
HOTEL
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from 25th Street to 26th Street
Miami Beach, Florida
Friday, August 12,1977
Volume 3
28 AB 5737
Number 16
For reservations and information. (305) 531-6061
Banies* wM ba conducted by a promtnant Cantor.


, August
12,1977
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 5

y
^p* ^^^^^^^^^^^1
m|
r'f ^l^v JB ^k H S w H B B
^^^k ^f_^^^ -^^ ^B ^K ^BAA aBaftasflBaa I
[Oi My 24 rA* Camp Shalom Sluggers, a
mum composed of staff from the Jewish
Mention's Camp Shalom, competed in a
i softball tournament and remained
efeated. The team competed with groups
, Burger King, K-Mart and the Palm
xh Tricenter. Members of the Team are
tted left to right) David Wensofsky, Tony
npert, Dan Schimelman, Herman
lew'te, Phil Wensofsky, Jim Bradie
landing left to right) Michael Boone, team
_ ager and coordinator of the league, Hal
Eossman, Darryl Gam, Marty List, Craig
Schimelman, Steve Kaplan, Michael
Lampert and Steven Grangard Bat girl
(seated center) is Cheryll Ezell. Marty List
was considered outstanding player for the
game as he hit a "grand-slam" home run.
Michael Boone, League coordinator, stated
that the league was formed in order to
"promote friendship and harmony among
groups within the Palm Beach County
community." All members of the community
are invited to attend the next tournament to
be held at the Lake Worth Pony Field on
Sunday, Aug. 14at 9a.m.
I
New Absorption Center
fi Welcomes First Families j
JERUSALEMLooming up
Ion the skyline on the hills that
[border the southern edge of
[Jerusalem stands a long, multi-
Itcrraced structure.
This is the (iilo Absorption
jOnter. which opened officially on
I May I and has already welcomed
I the first group of immigrant
|auilies to Israel, according to a
ipokesman of the Department of
I Immigration and Absorption.
CONSTRUCTED in four
lieparate blocks with connecting
[corridors, the (loli Absorption
[Center contains a total of 100
lipariments designed as tern-
Iforaa housing for new im-
[nigrants id Israel.
Six families, are already in-
|ilM in this radically designed,
dmecturally innovative
IHmcture which evokes the
closed did world courtyards of
to Shearim. There are 52 two-
lwn and 28 three-room apart-
kwits, with the rest reserved for
f .offices and service facilities. Each
Ijpsrtment contains central
Iwting and central gas and
Reserve Now For The
HIGH HOLY DAYS
nd SUKKOTH
kitchen facilities. Each family
will be able to live much as they
would in their own home, the
spokesman said.
The opening of the New
Jerusak-m absorption center is
the fruit of a new concept in
immigrant absorption in Israel.
The 4 families with children. 20
couples and 40 singles who are
scheduled to come to the center
within the coming months will
settle either within (iilo itself or
within the adjacent neigh-
borhoods in Jerusalem.
"LOCATION of the Absor-
ption Center within the com-
munity destined to absorb the
newcomers will substantially
ease the initial phase of ab-
sorption into life in Israel and
avoid the discomfort and dif-
ficulties involved in transferring
from one city to another. In
addition, new olim will be able to
avail themselves of the super
market, postal services, adjacent
nurseries, health clinics, schools
and synagogues in Gilo and will
be within easy reach of their
potential job market, prospective
homes and the essential
municipal services. the
spokesman added.
3C3
12 days* 11 nights
Sept. 12 to Sept 23
SI QC par pwion.
hom I JfJ doubt* occ
1PUT STAY
6 days & 5 nights
Sept 12 to Sent 15
and Sept. 21 to Soot. 23
J140a
ipmnon.
doubt* occ
SUKKOTH FULL STAY
days A 10 nights
Sept. 26 to Oct S
1^220 g>y^
HOLIDAY SPECIAL
25 days o 24 nights
aU ooub< occ.
MTU POM nm CIWS
Horn* of THE ORIGINAL
SpSHM STEAK HOUSE"
** Oc*n 21st Street
- u MIAMI BEACH
IkJour HoM th* QOOOMAN Family
UZ!J:53M114 511-1744
High Holy Days Service
FORTHEUNAFFILIATED,
AND AREA VISITORS
Temple Beth El's
Senter Hall
Officiated By Rabbi Joshua Goldberg
And Cantor Eliezer Barnstaln
SEPTEMBER 12,13 & 14
SEPTEMBERS & 22
$35.00 DONATION PER PERSON
LIMITED SEATINQ
UJA Accepts Grant From
Goldweber Foundation
PINE BLUFF,Ark.-In 1905.
Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Goldweber
left their home in Russia, sailed
to the part of Galveston, and
from there went immediately to
Pine Bluff. The family left Russia
because of "pogroms." Mr.
Goldweber remembered his
experience as a young men and
when he died, at the age of 93. he
left the bulk of his estate for "the
relief of oppressed peoples and to
provide sustenance and tran-
sportation to the State of Israel
for such people."
On June 28. Leon H. Brach-
man. United Jewish Appeal
Southwest Regional Campaign
Cabinet chairman and Mitchell
Rasansky, Regional cash
chairman, both members of the
UJA Executive Committee,
accepted the first annual in-
stallment from the recently
established Goldweber Foun-
dation at the Pine Bluff Airport.
The event was part of UJA's
"Operation Pony Express,"
picking up cash payments on
campaign pledges from com-
munities throughout the South-
west.
PRESENTING the check to
the UJA was Sam Goldweber,
the eldest son of Anna and Aaron
Goldweber, and W.L. Little,
representing the National Bank
of Commerce of Pine Bluff, the
foundation's trustee.
When the Goldwebers arrived
in Pine Bluff. Goldweber
established a tailoring business.
This was a family trade, the name
Goldweber evolving from "gold
weaver," a military uniform trade
the family had in Russia and,
before that, in Germany.
Mrs. Goldweber died in 1919.
Goldweber had the responsibility
of raising his two children, then
11-and 9-years-old, as well as
running his business. Business
success came to the master tailor,
the tailoring shop growing into a
clothing business for ladies
ready-to-wear, as well as a fur
store.
Goldweber remained active in
his business on a daily basis until
a month before his death.
Concerned throughout his life
about the plight of Jews in the
Soviet Union and Jewish
refugees i everywhere, he was a
steadfast contributor to the
annual UJA campaigns.
Montreal
Rabbi Wins
Top Medal
By BEN KAYFETZ
TORONTO (JTA) A
Montreal professor and rabbi has
become the first Canadian to win
the prestigious Broquette-Gonin
Award for History, from the
French Academy, for an 800-page
work on the emancipation of
French Jews.
Dr. David Feuerwerker, 64,
founder of the department of
Jewish studies at the University
of Montreal, was notified of the
Academy's decision by letter
several days ago. Feuerwerker
said his book, "The Emanci-
pation of Jews in France from the
Old Regime to the End of the
Second Empire," took 30 years to
research.
Feuerwerker, who came to
Canada from France 11 years ago
after teaching at the Sorbonne,
said he was prompted to begin
research during World War II
when he came across a book on
the subject.
"I knew it was worth nothing,
but it was the only book on the
topic and everyone was quoting
it." He fought in the French
Resistance in World War II and
was decorated with the Croix de
Guerre and the Legion of Honor.
Sam Goldweber (center) and W. L. Little (left) representing the
National Bank of Commerce of Pine Bluff, the trustee of the
Goldweber Foundation, presents the first check of the newly
established foundation to Leon H. Brachman, United Jewish
Appeal Southwest Regional Campaign Cabinet chairman. The
presentation took place at the Pine Bluff airport as part of a
UJA Regional Operation Pony Express to pick up cash from
communities throughout the Southwest.
f The Ai*^*D
rsHtRCRonffl
OOJJfSJT @
HOTEL m Street.
RESERVE NOW for the HIGH HOLY DAYS
PCCIAL
[** p*Jrso doubt* occ.ta
II Mf
INClUDIN6 BUTT KOSHER CUISINE
FacNMtes
MAIL RESERVATIONS TO:
Phone
833-0330
Temple Beth El
2815 Flagler Drive
West Palm Beech, Florida
33407
This Service la for Unaff mates of Local Congregations.
VoBeytoaa
FuN Slock of Prhrele teach TV In Rooms
Detf Synagofoe Services
V*ur Moiti
MICHAEL LEFKOWITZ & ALEX SMILOW A
ServtCM
Conducted
By Cantor
LEW RASKIN
ICttujB (nrurr
lACM S UNtil
KOSHER OCEANFRONT RESTAURANT
ROYAL DINNER
*i*o Kothtr CWnese Oiehes Served
_____________Opon Sunday throueh Thu r fteiexioMu Pimm 1 -531 -5771


Page 6
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
^day. August 12,1977
CJF General Assembly
Scheduled for Dallas
NEW YORK Developments
in the Middle East, the harass-
ment of Soviet Jews and
programs to combat the energy
crisis at home will be priority
issues on the agenda of the forty-
sixth general assembly of the
Council of Jewish Federations
(CJF), to be held Nov. 9-13 in
Dallas, Tex.
CJF President Jerold C.
Hoffberger of Baltimore an-
nounced that the five-day
assembly will be attended by
2,000 Jewish leaders and
Federation representatives from
the United States and Canada.
The Jewish Welfare Federation
of Greater Dallas will serve as
hosts for the CJF delegates at the
Sheraton and Hilton hotels. Mrs.
Fannie Schaenen of Dallas, is
program chairman for the general
assembly.
Hoffberger noted that several
sessions will be devoted to the
implications of the new ad-
ministrations in both Israel and
the United States in the quest for
peace, as well as deliberations on
the imprisonment of Soviet Jews,
pressures to fulfill the Helsinki
commitments and pressures for
the rights and emigration of
Jews.
Workshops on energy con-
servation, with the goal of
launching a massive conservation
drive in Jewish communities and
organizations throughout the
nation, will draw on help from
Israeli solar energy experts.
Other key sessions will include
community relations issues
affecting the Middle East;
overseas needs: community
policies on Soviet Jewish
resettlements; final plans for the
1978 community campaigns in
cooperation with UJA. and
delegates' actions on resolutions
and CJF's program, budget and
dues.
The fourty-sixth general
assembly will offer, for the first
time, three institutions for
veteran Jewish leaders to explore
issues such as new concepts on
budgeting and planning;
resource development; volun-
tarism; and Israel-North
American Jewry relations,
among others.
Forums, seminars and
workshops are also scheduled on
endowment fund development;
activities for young Jewish
adults; tax reform and philan-
thropy; Federation-synagogue
relations; CJF's personnel
services; public relations;
leadership development;
Canadian services; and the large
city budgeting conference.
Other concerns on the CJF
agenda will be the changing
needs of the elderly; welfare
reform and national health in-
surance; women's communal
service; uses of federation funds,
and human resources.
For the twenty-first con-
secutive year, CJF will honor
more than one hundred Young
Leadership Award recipients,
cited by their communities for
their outstanding leadership
abilities.
Special sabbath programs,
scholar-in-residence and study
groups are also planned, along
with informal discussion groups
to explore Jewish education and
culture; North Ameircan
responsibility on strengthening
diaspora Jewry; new community
programs on the Holocaust, and
an American-Israeli dialogue
sponsored by CJF's college youth
and faculty division.
CJF Sets Record In
Endowment Funds
NEW YORK Forty seven
Jewish Federations in the United
States and Canada reported net
holdings of $223 million in en-
dowment funds in 1976, setting a
record in endowment fund
growth.
The 47 communities re-
sponding to the annual survey
on the status of Federation
Endowment Funds compiled by
the Council of Jewish Federation
(CJF), showed total receipts of
approximately $44 million by
their funds since 1975.
THE CJF survey also notes
that the responding communities
allocated $20 million in grants
last year from their endowment
funds.
Intermediate and small cities,
the report continues, showed the
greatest percentage growth in
1976. Comparable data for 21
cities in these categories reveals a
net increase of 42 percent in
endowment funds last year over
1975 totals.
Almost half of the 1976 total of
$223 million reported to CJF by
the 47 federated communities
consists of unrestricted funds.
Of the grants made from
endowment funds during 1976,
almost half went to the annual
Federation campaigns, and 39
percent went to various agencies
of the Federations.

CANDLELIGHTING
TIME
7:41
28 AB-5737


Tisha B'Au Was on His Mind
WASHINGTON-Tisha B'Av was very much
in Israel Prime Minister Menachem Begins mind
on the occasion of his being interviewed on Meet
the Press aired on Sunday, July 24, over NBC-
TV.
Before replying, to panelists' questions. Begin
told them that it was the 9th day in the Hebrew
month of Av.
"THIS IS the day when, 1,907 years ago. the
Roman Legions, the Fifth and the Twelfth,
launched their ultimate onslaught on the Table
Mountain, set the Temple ablaze and destroyed
Jerusalem, subjugated our poeple and conquered
our land."
"Historically, this is the beginning of all the
sufferings of our people. Today, we remember
that, and now we have the responsibility to make
sure that never again will our independence be
destroyed and never again will the Jews become
homeless or defenseless. Actually, this is the crux
of the problems facing us in the future."
JFCS PROVIDES INFORMATION
ON HOME REPAIRS
The Jewish Family and Children's Service is in-
terested in hearing from members of the community,
especially seniors, who may be in need of minor home
repair services, but who are unable to afford such
repairs.
Under the terms of a recent grant to a county-wide
welfare agency, such repairs will be offered free of
charge to those who qualify.
To learn more about the program, interested
persons should contact the JF & CS in West Palm
Beach or at the South County office in Boca Raton.
!
. I
Newspaper
Deadline
- i
i
i
- i
; i
JEWISH FAMILY AND CHILDREN'S SERVICE
An outstanding professional counseling agency serving the Jewish
community of Palm Beoch County. Professional ond confidential
~ Problems of the aging Morital counseling
Consultation and valuation service* Parent-child conflicts
Vocational counseling Perv il problems
Privet* Offices: 2411 Okeechobw Blvd.
West Palm Beach, Fla. 33409
^K Telephone: 684-1901
F^ 3200 North Federal Hwy. Suite 206-
L-- Room 12, Boca Raton, Fla.
5 Telephone: 395-3640
Moderate fees are charged in family and individual counseling to
thos* who con pay (Fees are based on income and family size)
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the Jewish Federation of Palm Beoch County.
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(every other Friday).
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Jewish Floridian
r /o Jewish FeoVratioa
2415 Okeechehea Bred.
West Pahn Beach, Fla. 33409
Scarecrow'
The Argus
Synagogues in
Palm Beach County
REFORM
TEMPLE ISRAEL
1901 North Flogler Drive
West Polm Beoch, Florida 33407
833 8421
Rabbi Irving B Cohen
Summer Sabbath Services
Friday at 8:00 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL OF
BOCA RATON
333 SW Fourth Avenue
Boca Raton, Fl. 33432
391 8901
Rabbi Norman T. Mendel
Cantor Martin Rosen
Sabbath services, Friday at
8:15 p.m. Saturday morning
services at 1030a m.
CONSERVAWEWERAl
TEMPLE ETERNAL LIGHT
P O Box 3
Boco Raton, Florida 33432
426 1600
Rabbi Beniamm Rosayn
Sabbath services, Friday ai 8 15
p m
at Unitonon-Universolist
Fellowship Building
162 W Palmetto Park Rd
Boca Raton
CONSERVATIVE
I
I
CONGREGATION
ANSHEI SH0L0M
5348 Grove Sin
West Palm Beoch. Florida 33409
684 3212
Rabbi Harry Z Schectman
Rabh' F">ontus Henrv lererh
Friday 8 30a m 8:00 pm
Saturday 8:30 a m 7 30 p m.
Daily 8 30a m .7 30 p m
TEMPLE BETH EL
2815 North Flogler Drive
West Polm Beach. Florida 33407
833 0339
Rabbi Asher Bar Zev
Sabbath services Friday at 8 15
p m
Saturday at 9 30 a m
Daily Mmyan ot 8 15 am,
Sunday i'9o m
TEMPLE BETH SH0L0M
315 N "A" St.
lake Worth, Florida 33460
585-5020
Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg
Cantor Jack Elman
Services, Mondays and Thursdays
at 8:15a.m.
Friday at 8 15p.m.
Saturday at 9 a. m.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID
Sabboth services. Friday ot 8 p m.
At Westminister
Presbyterian Church
10410 N Military Trail. Palm
Beoch Gardens 321 North lake
Blvd., North Palm Beach. Flo
33408
845 1134
Rabbi Hyman Fishmon
Cantor Nicholos Fenakel
TEMPI! BETH SH0L0M
N W Avenue "G"
Belle Glade. Florida 33430
Jack Statemon, lay leader
Sabbath services, Friday at 8:30
p m.
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB
275 Alemeda Drive
P An c'
Sabboth services, Friday ot 8pm
Saturday ot 9 a.m.
President Jacob Front 964 0034
N .1,1, I i i lays at Vii m
Settn held ot Foith United
Presbyterian Church Polm
Sprinqs
B'NAI T0RAH
C0HGREGATI0N
P O Bo 2306
Boco Raton, Florida 33432
Rabbi Nathan Zeli/er
Sabbath services, Friday a' 8 15
p m
2nd and 4lh Saturdays at 9 30
a m
Meets at
Weight Watchers
1775 N.E. 5th Ave
Rnrn Roton Flo
TEMPLE EMETH of the DILRAT
HEBREW CONGREGATION
P.O. Box 1214. Delroy Beoch,
Florida 33444
Sabbath services Friday at 8 00
p.m. Fellowship Hall. Coson
Methodist Church, 342 N. Swmton
Ave., Delroy Mr. Henry Bloom,
President
TtMrU EMANU-EL
190 North County Road
Palm Beoch. Florida 33480
832-0804
Rabbi Mo I Formon
Cantor David Dordashti
Sabboth services, Fndoy ot 830
p m.
Saturday ot9a.m.


Ly. August 12. 1977
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page
r
Camp Shalom Kites
The boys and girls of the Jewish representing his or her group. Competition
Federation's Camp Shalom competed included "first kite up," highest flying kite,
recently in a kite-flying contest. Each and most persistant flyer!
camper constructed and decorated a kite
Karen Gilbert, a Camp Shalom staffer
assists with the flying of her group's kite at
the recent "Kite Flying Contest" held at
Camp Shalom.
Newsman Quits Top Post
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Journalist Dan Margalit resigned
from his job several days ago as
spokesman for the Defense
Ministry, the same day that he
A began it. He quit when Defense
Minister Ezer Weizman informed
him that he was not to be ap-
Jewish Community Day School
Of Palm Beach County, Inc.
2815 N. Flagler Dtive, West Palm Beach, Florida 33407
Is now accepting applications for
Pre-School-Full or Half Day
Kindergarten-Full Day
Grade l-Grade Vl-Elementary School
Grades Vll-VIII-Junior High School
Transportation throughout Palm Beach County
Admission Tests Required
Application Forms & Further Information-
Dr. Avie Waxman. Director
832-6423 4
Financial Assistance Available
Deadline May 15. 1977
">!
3> rr::--
pointed a "political aide" 89 well.
Margalit, the former Washing-
ton correspondent of Haaretz,
said he was not interested in the
information post without the
higher level assignment. A
political aide "has full access to
government and diplomatic
documents and serves as an
advisor to the minister on the
basis of the widest possible in-
formation. Asher Ben-Natan. a
diplomat who served as Israeli's
Ambassador to West German
and France, was political aide to
Moshe Dayan and Shimon Peres
when they were Defense
Ministers.
ACCORDING to press
reports, Dayan, now Israel's
Foreign Minister, persuaded
Weizman not to elevate Margalit
to the rank of political aide.
His reasons were not clear, but
some observers speculated that
Dayan regarded a political aide
for Weizman as something of an
inroad into his bailiwick at the
Foreign Ministry.
Weizman is married to the
sister of Dayan's former wife.
Ruth, and while the two retired
generals are no longer brothers-
in-law. thev remain close friends.
He received international fame
earlier this year when he broke
the story of the bank account
kept in Washington by Prime
Minister and Mrs. Yitzhak Rabin
in violation of Israel's currency
laws, a disclosure that pre-
ciptated Rabin's resignation as
head of the Labor Party.
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Jewish Community Day School of Palm Beach County, Inc.
2815 N. Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach, Fla. 33407
Telephone 832-8423/ 4
A Beneficiary Agency of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
jay/.
R L (Bob I Newhurt. L FD Colin J Rage v. I..FD.
Lawrence S Faville. L FD William R Z*m. Jr. L FD
Michel K WkI.I. FD ClfWl Manager
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Del ray427-3220


Page 8
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, August 12, u
FEMINIST FRONT
At 14, She's Very Much Overweight-
f*1
Continued from Page 1
them wonder if they are really
ready to do things for them-
selves. Just as they are required
to give up certain things from the
past because they are childish,
they are expected to be more
independent and to take on more
responsibilities for themselves as
well as being more helpful and
cooperative around the house.
ALONG WITH all this, a
number of the left-overs of
childhood problems, like sibling
rivalry and competitiveness now
come to the fore. Feeling inferior
to an older sibling of the same
sex, the youngster wonders if she
will be as successful as her sister
is when she starts to engage in
social activities or enters a new
school.
The conflicts and ups and
downs which you are now ex-
f;riencing are perfectly normal,
our older sister whom you
admire has positives in aU the
areas where you feel you have
only negatives.
You were very contented when
she left home to go to an out-of-
town college. You may have felt
that when you became the one
and only at home you would get
all their love and attention, and
that this would banish all your
problems. But, somehow, even
after your sister left home, your
difficulties did not go away.
Strangely, too, being the
center of attention meant being
the object of criticism even more
often.
YOUR PARENTS are proud of
your academic accomplishments,
but blame themselves, in the
main, for your being overweight
and not having much of a social
life.
In addition to the simple
satisfaction you get from eating,
you feel you are giving yourself
symbolically that which has been
denied you. As long as you can
blame your overweight for your
lack of a social life, you do not
feel you are a failure.
On a deep level, you may
reason that as soon as you are
ready, you will give up this fat
coverage. Until then, you can
observe and evaluate the people
and activities around you which
will help you deckle what you
want to do and with whom.
BUT THE questions you ask,
and the step forward you took
when you joined "Weight
Watchers" although you gave it
up afterwards, indicate that you
are ready to bring about changes.
The best way to lose weight is
to eat less. Keep a private ac-
count of everything you eat for
one week. Then deckle what you
can easily cut out the next weak.
from
Carter Eyes West Bank
Continued from Page 1
the degree of specificity that I
choose," the President continued.
"We've always made it clear that
ultimately the agreement had to
be approved and mutually
beneficial to the Israelis and also
to their Arab neighbors.
"WE HAVE a good chance to
go to Geneva. There are obstacles
still to be resolved. I hope that
very leader directly involved in
the discussions will join with us
and the cochairman of the
prospective conference, the
Soviet Union, in restraining their
statements not being so
adamant on issues and trying to
cool down the situation until all
can search out common ground,
and then hope to minimize the
differences."
The President indicated that
after Secretary of State Vance's
trip to the Mideast, the ad-
ministration will have a clearer
picture of the differences that
still dividie the countries.
"I think the major stumbling
block at this point is the par-
ticipation in the negotiations by
the Palestinian representatives, '
he concluded.
"OUR POSITION has been
that they ought to be represented
(in Geneva) and that we'll discuss
with them these elements that
involve the Palestinians and
other refugees at the time they
forego their commitment publicly
espousedthat Israel should be
destroyed.
"But until the Palestinian
leaders adopt the proposition
that Israel is a nation, that it will
be a nation permanently, that it
has a right to live in peaceuntil
that happens, I see no way that
we would advocate participation
by them in the peace
negotiations.
"But these matters are still
fluid. I believe all the leaders with
whom I've talked genuinely want
to go to Geneva to try to work
out a permanent peace. We're
trying to get them to change
from positions of distrust to one
of genuine search for peace.
"Both sides now have at least a
moderate amount of confidence in
the U.S., and I've tried to take a
balanced position to enhance that
trust in us.
Cantor and Ba Al Koray
(Torah Reader) Available.
Write CD, c/o P.O. Box
012973, Miami, Fla. 33101
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MOST MODERN COMPLETE KOSHER SUPERMARKET
Following this program
week to week, you would eat less
and lees in time and your body
weight would diminish ac-
cordingly.
Honesty with yourself in
keeping this account is the best
and most basic way to establish
Demonstrate Against
Attack on Pro-Left
Group in Paris
PARIS-(JTA)-Several hundred
protested here against the attack on the "Movement Amirl!
Racism and Anti-Semitiam" (MRAP) and three of ffa?
torneys. Representatives of the French Bar Association tru>
Union of Magistrates and the Association for Civic UbaVub
self-control. This is also the best were am0ng the demonstrators who gathered in front n, ,u
preparation for entering the new MRAP offices tne
high school. There you will
naturally be a high achiever THE ORGANIZATION'S Paris headquarters wer#
scholastically but will also make damaged by an explosion July 14. The following night July H
friends and be sought out by bombs exploded near the homes of three attorneys working f
people how are creative and on MRAP. There were no injuries and the police have no known
clues as to the identity of the assailants. The MRAP is a pro-
left organization active in the fight against anti-Semitism and
racism. Far to the left of the better known League Against
Racism and Anti-Semitism (LICA), it is especially detested bv
extreme-right wing and neo-Nazi groups.
Postponement of a problem
instead of facing up to it in-
creases instead of reducing it.
National Jewish Post
Doesn't it bother
youtopay
arec lease
when you can
*t the same
lings free?
At Holiday Springs we don'i have
a rec lease. What we do have is one
of the greatest recreation and social
programs anywhere. And it's all
included in the price of your home.
A better place to spend your
money. A busier place to spend
your time.
There's no limit to the fun you
can have, and the things you can
accomplish at Holiday Springs.
We surround an 18-hole cham-
pionship golf course. And we have
acres and acres of parks and picnic
grounds, plus broad waterways for
fresh water fishing.
At Holiday Springs you can play
volleyball, shuffleboard. croquet,
horse shoes, or badminton. You can
play a great bridge or canasta game
in one of our card rooms. Or you
can have a party in one of our party
rooms. You can expand your creative
abilities in our Arts and Crafts
Building. Or you can reduce your
waistline in our fully equipped
health spa.
We're even building an audi-
torium for community functions and
shows with top name entertainment.
It's not too late.
There arc already over 500 happy
families that call Holiday Springs
home. But we still have a good
selection of beautiful apartments
available. One bedroom from
$18,990; two bedn>oms from
$27,490. With financing currently
available at 8Wi over 25 yean
A Rec Lease? Who needs it.
When you can live at Holida)
Springs and get all the same won-
derful things (and probably even
more) for free.
Models and Sales Center open
daily from 9 to 5 at 3300 Holiday
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(Take 1-95 or U.S. 441 to Sample
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Boulevard.)
Holiday Springs
From $18^90 to $35^90.
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This is not intended as a full suiemenl
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Financing Example: I bedroom/I bath
apartment thai sells for $18,990 3CW
down payment of $5,697 leaves a balance
of $13,293 to be financed for 23 >cars
Term is 300 payments of $107 (X) principal and 8W* interest APR: 8.94*


Full Text
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