Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
8 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 28, 1975)-v. 8, no. 40 (Dec. 17, 1982).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 2, 1976 called v.2, no. 22, but constitutes v.2, no. 1.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: July 28, 1978 called no. 14 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement; Aug. 25, 1978 called no. 16 in masthead and no. 17 in publisher's statement; Aug. 10, 1979 called no. 15 in masthead and no. 16 in publisher's statement; Oct. 22, 1982 called no. 31 in masthead and no. 32 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44607504
lccn - sn 00229550
ocm44607504
System ID:
AA00014311:00148

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
wjiewusin if llama Ha in
OFPALMBEA CH COUNTY
Combining "OUR VOICE" and "FEDERATION REPORTER"
in conjunction with The Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
.3, Number 16
Friday, July 29, 1977
Price 35 Cents
Kessler Accepts Connecticut Federation Post
ROBERT KESSLER
Stanley B Brenner, president of the Jewish Federation of
rairn Beach County has announced that Robert Kessler,
assistant executive director of the Jewish Federation of Palm
beach County has accepted the position as executive director of
the Waterbury. Conn. Jewish Federation and Jewish Com-
munity Center, as of Sept. 1.
Kessler joined the Palm Beach Federation in January 1975.
Since that time he has assisted in the development of the
Leadership Development Program, working with cochairmen
Dr. Howard Kay, Kenneth Scherer and Dr. Dennis Tartakow.
He also helped implement a Leadership Development Program
in Boca Raton this past year.
KESSLER SERVED as acting executive director of tht
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County during the 1976
campaign. For the past two years he worked with the Women's
Division campaign and saw the totals double, to an all time
high of $470,000. During the 1977 campaign he was responsible
for the development of the South County campaign.
Kessler has been instrumental in the growth and
development of the Federation's Community Pre-School and
the summer program at Camp Shalom.
Brenner expressed the sentiments of the Federation Board
of Directors by stating: "The community is aware of the fine
job Bob Kessler did for the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County. I know I speak for the entire board in wishing him and
his wife Marsha, much luck and success in their new com-
munity."
Waxman to Direct Jewish Community Day School
Max Tochner, president of the
btwish Community Day School
[Palm Beach County, Inc., an-
unced the appointment of Dr.
lira Waxman as director.
Dr. Waxman, an ordained rab-
Ibi. holds a Ph.D. in educational
Ipvchology as well as an M.Ed.
[fom Marquette University in
liiwaukee, Wis. His under-
diiate degree and teacher
lining were achieved at
1 University in New York.
1 background includes holding
aitions as certified school
ychologist in the Milwaukee
kblic School ay stem, counselor
cialist with the Wisconsin
bpartment of Industry, Labor
Human Relations, human
ation specialist with the Wis-
consin Equal Rights Division, as
well as college teaching of
education, psychology, and
Jewish studies at Marquette
University, Alvemo College and
Holy Redeemer College in Wis-
consin.
HE HAS served in teaching
and administrative posts in
Hebrew day schools in Colum-
bus, Ohio, San Diego, Calif.,
Winnipeg, Man., Canada, and
Milwaukee. He has served as a
rabbi at various synagogues.
Rabbi Waxman has directed
numerous workshops and
seminars and has lectured widely
to synagogue, church, and civic
groups. He is the author of
numerous articles, studies and
reviews in both Hebrew and
English.
A former chairman of the Wis-
consin Jewish Educators Council
he is an active participant in
various national organizations
for education, psychology and
counseling.
In announcing the appoint-
ment of Rabbi Waxman, Tochner
said, "We look forward to a very
rewarding relationship between
the Jewish Community Day
School and Dr. Waxman. He is
extremely well qualified and will
provide the type of leadership the
JCDS requires to launch into its
next stage of growth, which will
include both expansion in future
years into a high school program
as well as a move to its own
facilities."
DR. WAXMAN stated that he
is looking forward to the con-
tinued growth of the JCDS, the
only school in Palm Beach
County to offer a dual cur-
riculum, in both general studies
as well as Hebrew Language,
culture and religion.
The school, currently housed at
Temple Beth El, receives support
from the Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County, as well aa
from the community at-large
Enrollment is currently being
conducted in Pre-Kindergarten,
Kindergarten as well as grades
one through eight. For further
information, contact the school
office.
DRAVIE WAXMAN

Federation Executives Attend Institute,
m Schimelman Represents Palm Beach Count
BERKELEY, CAL. Alter-
nate Funding Resources for
Jewish Communal Services, zero
base and program budgeting, and
internal Federation fiscal
management, were highlighted in
various sessions of the 1977 CJF
Intermediate Cities Executives
Institute held in Berkeley, Cal.,
July 10-14.
Coordinated by the Depart-
ment of Field Services of the
Council of Jewish Federations
(CJF), the Institute was attended
by leaders of over 40 com-
munities, including Norman J.
Schimelman, executive director
of the Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County, and was led by
Hy Hochberg, executive vice
president of the Jewish Com-
munity Council of Ottawa;
Harold Cohen, executive director
of the Allied Jewish Federation of
Denver; and Murray Schneier,
executive director of the Federa-
tion of Jewish Agencies of At-
lantic County.
SOL KOENIGSBERG, execu-
tive director of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Kansas
City, called on Federation leaders
to fully explore government
funds, private philanthropic
foundations and endowment
funds as additional revenue
sources. He also eccouraged
Federation executives to consult
CJF's Washington Action Office
regarding Federal funding
programs available to local com-
munities, including but not
limited to Section 202 housing
monies.
Zero base and program bud-
geting were discussed by J.
Livingston Kosberg, vice chair-
man of the CJF Intermediate
Cities Services Committee and
past president of the Jewish Cotn-
"f'w girlish pounds. .
Bathing Suits: Summer Trauma
By HELEN MINTZ
I think I just wore out my
"ody For good. Forever! Out of a
election of 400. I finally found
one bathing suit to fit. It's been a
ng winter, and all spring long I
te my way through my religion.
One luncheon after another,
completely oblivious to what my
nrror told me was happening
WOMEN'S WOES
Even the calendar on the wall
seemed to shout, "Summer is
coming, summer is coming!"
WELL THEY knew it, and my
husband knew it for sure. I had
put on a few "girlish pounds."
The rest of the world saw me
cleverly disguised in long tunics
over slim slacks with elaaticized
waists. The layered look was a
natural. Little did they know the
layers were man-made by eating.
I can see why people take mid-
winter vacationa. Halfway
through my hibernation period,
they have a chance) to put right
what I've been putting off, or on
as the case might be. I go
Continued on Page 5
munity Council of Metropolitan
Houston; Daniel Ignatoff, sec-
retary of the CJF Controllers In-
stitute, and Howard Rice, con-
troller of the Jewish Federation
of St. Louis.
Art Mintzer, retiring after 18
years as executive director of the
Jewish Federation of Alameda
and Contra Costa Counties, was
honored by his fellow executives
at the conclusion of the Institute.
Mintzer is concluding 37 years of
service in the Jewish Federation
field
OTHER Institute sessions
were addressed by Irving Kessler
of the United Israel Appeal;
Irving Bernstein of the United
Jewish Appeal; Darrell Friedman
of Rochester; Feme Katleman,
CJF director of Personnel Ser-
vices; James Young, CJF assis-
tant director; Stephen Schreier of
Hartford; Fred Sichel, vice
president of CJF and chairman of
its Intermediate Cities Services
Committee, and Marvin S. Zaret
of Milwaukee.
The Council of Jewish Fe-
derations is the aeeorialiou of
central community organizations
- Federations, Welfare Funds,
Community Councils serving
800 Jewish communities in North
America. It aide thees com-
munities to "wJ>jh+ "**nMm
support for major overseas,
national and local service in-
volving financing, pt.Ug and
operating health, welfare, cul-
tural, educational, community
relations and other programs
h*wHt all rasiilanlB


Page 2
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, j^y 29l9?7
With the
Organizations
HADASSAH
Shalom Hadassah will hold a
flee market and garage sale on
Sunday, Aug. 7, from noon to6
p.m. at the Jewish Community
Center.
Contributions of miscellaneous
items for use in the sale are
welcome. Pickups can be
arranged. For information, call
Ann Becker, Frances Sperber,
Lillian Schack or Mae Podwol
Shalom has formed an arts and
crafts group to work for chapter
bazaar. Next meeting will be held
Tuesday, Aug. 2, 1:30 p.m., at
Southampton Pool. For details
contact Lillian Schack.
INTERNATIONAL ORDER OF
ODD FELLOWS
All past and present Odd
Fellow Brothers residing in or
visiting West Palm Beach and
close by areas are invited to
attend the I OOF assembly on
Wednesday, Aug. 3 and Aug.17,
for "Friendship, Love and
Truth" nights.
The brief meetings will be held
in the IOOF Temple Building in
downtown West Palm Beach.
A collation has been ordered by
Noble Grand Harris W.
Grossman and Chaplain Henry
Kaufman, Chairman of the
collation committee.
TEMPLE EMETH OF
DELKAY
Temple Emeth of the Del ray
Hebrew Congregation announces
the engagement of Leonard Price
of Riviera Beach as cantor for the
High Holy Days and ensuing
year.
Cantor Price was born and
educated in New York and is a
graduate of the college of the City
of New York. In 1945 he was
awarded a full four-year
scholarship to the Franceschetti
School of Music for the study of
voice. He studied with many
leading cantors since early
childhood until he assumed his
own role as a cantor.
Prior to 1955 he made frequent
radio, TV and concert ap-
pearances in the Washington
area and performed leading roles
with local opera companies. From
1956 to 1962 he served as cantoi
of Shaare Tefila Congregation.
CANTOR LEONARD Price
served at Congregation Beth El
of Montgomery County.
Bethesda, Md. for 10 years.
Temple Emeth will be com-
pleted for the High Holy Day
Services. Rosh Hashonah, the
New Year, starts at sundown
Sept. 12 and ends at sundown
Sept. 14. Yom Kippur, the Day of
Atonement starts sundown Sept.
21 with the chanting of Kol Nidre
and ends Sept. 22 at sundown.
Yizkor, the memorial prayer, will
be recited Thursday, Sept. 22.
Seats for the Holy Days may
be obtained from Ben Kessler or
LeoGralnick.
ORT
The Royal Chapter Of
Women's American ORT held its
installation of officers June 12, at
Willows Golf Club.
Sophie Kempner delivered the
invocation. Ann Cohen,
president-elect of Palm Beach
County Region was the installing
officer.
Officers are Min Bard,
president: Sylvia Biller, Lillian
Frank, Helen Resnick and Jane
Silverman, vice presidents; Ruth
Goldman, treasurer; Gerry
Bordoff and Bernice Magram,
financial secretaries; Francis
Robbin, recording secretary; and
Alice Effert, corresponding
secretary.
Bea Mishkitt and her husband
Jason served a collation.
Women's American ORT, Mid
Palm Chapter has suspended
meetings tor July and August.
However, a social function is
planned for Aug. 20. Tickets are
being sold for the Sunrise
Musical Theatre production of
Leslie Caron in Can Can. Contact
Muriel Merer for information.
Our first meeting of the new
season will be In September.
Women's American ORT's
thirft shop, is having a sale on all
merchandise for the months of
July and August. The store is
open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
STAMPS APPRAISED.
AND PURCHASED
Philately has been
our only business for
well over 40 years as
a Licensed Auc
Iioneer in NYC
Now located in Flor
da.Sorry, but we have no stamps to
sell.but we are always interested in
purchasing desirable material.espec
ially USA collections We navel
earned the commendable Semor;Mem
bership in the American Society ot
Appraisers
HERMAN HERST. JR., INC
P O Box 1583, Boco Roion,
Flo 33432 391-3223
DON VOGEL
REALTOR-ASSOCIATE
BROKER-SALESMAN
Coil me for your FREE copy of
'Bvymr's Guide" For Homes Or Condominiums!
700 U.S. HIGHWAY No. 1, NORTH PALM REACH, FLA. 33408
Office Phone: 14**753 teiidenco Phot; 622-4000
L
EVITT
I3SSW Di.Mw,
Sftvn Mvti. f 0
?4-IS
IWI Pn*roUd
Sonny Uwtt. I D
Ml TWO
awiPauaiucii
625 So 0fcve*v
Ptl*plillin. f 0
SP44I3
Carter's Technique Criticized
WASHINGTON (JTA) Rep.
John Rhodes, the House
Minority leader, has criticized the
Carter administration for the
"technique" of its approach to
solving the Middle East Conflict.
He said that while Carter was
continuing the Ford-Kissinger
policy of "even-handedness" in
dealing with the parties, "the
main difference between the
two...is that under the Ford-
Kissinger plan we were an honest
broker. We weren't telling
anybody what we thought the
settlement should be."
THE ARIZONA republican
made his remarks on the ABC
Issue and Answers television
program.
"I think possibly the technique
which the Carter administration
uses is in my opinion not the
technique that I would follow to
get the best results," he said.
He explained, "I can't imagine
it was wise of the President to
indicate that Israel was going to
have to give back the whole West
Bank or that they should give up
the Golan Heights.... As soon as
we take a position, then the other
parties have to take positions
too, and the first thing you know
you end up before you ever get to
the bargaining table with
President Anwar Sadat of Egy*
and King Hussein of jn?ipi
agreed to forge an "explicit ,in7
be ween Jordan and the
Palestinians in order to ensure
roWbc the latter in future p
EGYPTIAN SOURCES did
not spell out details of the
agreement but said it could
circumvent Israeli opposition to
Palestinian participation in the
Geneva conference by unifying
the Palestinians and Jordanian!
in advance.
everything concrete," Rhodes
said.
HE SAID he agreed with what
President Carter "now says he is
going to do, and that is to sort of
cool it until the parties actually
sit down."
He added, "I don't think we
can operate effectively if we are in
the arena. We are not parties" to
the conflict, and "we should not
be parties."
Meanwhile, in another Middle
East development, it was
reported from Cairo that
ENCOUNTER WITH JEWISH HISTORY
Applications are now being accepted for the Federation
sponsored Study Mission to Israel, which will depart in the Fall
for two weeks. The Mission is open to all men and women of
Palm Beach County. All participants will be requested to attend
three seminars that will be scheduled in September, prior to
leaving on the Mission.
For information and applications contact:
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County
2415 Okeechobee Blvd.
West Palm Beach, Florida 33409
Telephone (305) 689-5900
Whenwe put our name on
achapel,
its exclusively a
Riverside chapel.
Announcing a new Riverside chapel
inWest Palm Beach.
Unlike many other Jewish funeral directors in Florida, Riverside is not
represented by any other organization.
Our new West Palm Beach chapel is another example of how this
policy helps us to provide service dedicated only to the needs and wishes
of each family and the requirements of Jewish Law and Custom.
From the original concept to the completed bui Iding, our new chapel
is wholly in keeping with Jewish tradition. It is spacious and comfortable. It
contains a Ritualarium(Mikva) and other required facilities for the observance
of the Jewish Ritual of Washing(Tahara).
And, reflecting another Riverside policy, it is manned by one of the
largest staffs of Jewish personnel available in Florida. They are people who
understand Jewish tradition,and honor it. And in that tradition, we serve
every family, regardless of financial circumstance.
4714 Okeechobee Boulevard, West Palm Beach
683-8676
Other Riverside chapels in the Greater Miami area:
Sunrise, Hollywood, North Miami Beach, Miami Beach and Miami.
Five chapels serving the New York City Metropolitan area.
E9 Riverside
Memorial Chapai. Me./ f uf* 1Diractori
For generations a symbol of Jewish tradition.
p*-*.i.n
ro-r-n-rj


IJJy. July 29.1977
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 3
High Stakes for U.S.
Bv HENRY GROSSMAN
Codiairman. Community
Relations Council
dur country has a tremendous
ijke in the Middle East.
American corporations are
IhMvily invested. Our energy
Suirements demand -steady
IE,, of Mid-East oil. Our
Uveloping energy policy, years
Lthe talking stage, far from lm-
LmenUtion. means long ysars
lofcontinued Mid-East oU supply.
Control of the pipelines and
Lnker routes is the name of the
lame Israel is the only un-
Ecrving ally of the United
ISUtes in this area. This, lmked to
[the traditional and oft reiterated
| United States commitment to
International morality and
lluman rights, makes our support
|of Israel one of our country's first
principles in foreign relations.
THAT THE Carter Adminis-
Itration is firm in its economic and
military support of Israel cannot
|be doubted. What can be ques-
_pjd is the Administration's
|ttctics to achieve a meaningful
entum in peace negotiations.
President Carter has repeated-
[ stated he is devoted to helping
just and lasting peace.
I on negotiation between the
lbs and the Israelis, without
onditions. The role of the
)jS., President Carter accepts, is
tt of an "honest broker,"
ng the parties to meet, but
out ourselves presenting the
i of settlement. This is not
nsistent with Kissinger's
fwp by step" approach, which
i have some success.
But, let us examine the tactics.
i Administration has stated:
A. With minor exceptions
md some international
guarantees (?) Israel must
give up territory it needs for
security (Never before have
nations victorious in war
been required to relinquish
territories so acquired, viz:
The Mexican session to the
U.S., the Russian ac-
quisitions in middle Europe
ifter World War II, etc.)
Further. Israel does have a
legitimate historical claim to
I these territories.
B. The Palestinian refugees
must be given
"homeland." Israel should
accept a Palestinian state
West Bank.
THE AMERICAN community
Israel itself have grave
ems about these tactics for
(following reasons:
The stage is being set
r the next Middle East
ir The Arabs see a U.S.
tilt toward them. Thus Arab
intransigence is encouraged.
I Israel cannot accept a PLD
West Bank dagger state at
its throat. Nor can Israel
accept undefendable bor-
ders, with only vague
promises of Arab "non-bel-
ligerency" and unsupported
promises of international
security measures.
2) The U.S. energy supply
is in danger, since an Arab
victory will create an oppor-
tunity for the USSR to gain
control of the U.S. oil life-
line. Nature and the Soviets
abhor a vacuum!
3) A serious worldwide
threat to U.S. credibility is
seen. With such a debacle,
how could any nation put its
faith in U.S. promises and
policies?
4) These tactics increase
the danger of a major power
confrontation in the Middle
East. World War III will be
short, but not sweet. Scien-
tists speculate that only
cockroaches will survive an
atomic holocaust.
We applaud Carter's desire to
get negotiations moving. But his
tactics, setting forth precon-
ditions, can only harden already
inflexible positions. His tactics,
opposed to his intent, will in-
crease the probability of another
Middle East war, with super
power confrontation and the
possible final atomic destruction
of our civilization. That is why we
are concerned.
Funeral Held For
Bus Hijack Victim
NEW YORK-(JTA)-Funeral
services were held here for Mrs.
Nettie Blassberg, the 57-year-old
Greenfield, Moss, woman killed
by the hijacker of a bus here July
4. Rabbi Knlman Newfield of
Temple Israel in Greenfield told
the Jewish Telegraphic Agency
that Mrs. Blassberg was an
active member of the temple and
its sisterhood, sang in the temple
choir and was a member of
Hadassah.
She worked as a clerk at the
Mammoth Mart store in
Greenfield. Mrs. Blassberg and
her husband, David, who
operates a newsstand and lunch
counter at the courthouse in
Greenfield, were returning from a
visit to their daughter in
Washington when a gunman
seized a Vermont Transit bus
after it left New York's Port
Authority bus terminal and
forced it to go to Kennedy
International Airport.
Robinson wounded two other
passengers, one of whom, Jimmy
Lo, 36, of Hong Kong, was in
critical condition. Robinson, who
was charged with murdering two
people and kidnapping 25. was
ordered held for psychiatric
examinations.
High Holy Days Service
FOR THE UNAFFILIATED,
AND AREA VISITORS
Temple Beth El's
Senter Hall
Officiated By Rabbi Joshua Goldberg
And Cantor Ellezer Bernstein
SEPTEMBER 12,13*14
SEPTEMBER 21 & 22
$35.00 DONATION PER PERSON
LIMITED SEATING
^RESERVATIONS TO:
Tempi* Beth El
2815 Flagler Drive
West Palm Beech, Florida
33407
Rabbis Group Endorses Textile Boycott
NEW YORK (JTA> The
growing national consumer
boycott against products made
by the giant J.P.Stevens textile
corporation received a significant
boost when the Central Con-
ference of American Rabbis
(CCAR), at its annual convention
held at Grossinger, New York, on
June 23, voted unanimously to
endorse the boycott, it was
reported here by the
Amalgamated Clothing and
Textile Workers Union, AFL-
CIO, Canadian Labor Congress.
The endorsement by the
CCAR. the 1,300-member
organization of Reform rabbis in
the U.S. and Canada, came in the
form of a resolution which urged
"that the boycott of the
J.P.Stevens Company products
be supported until such time as
collective bargaining takes place
in good faith"; and that "en-
couraged" members of the CCAR
"to support and strengthen the
Stevens boycott."
CITING "the condition of the
textile workers at the J.P.
Stevens Company," and the
numerous judgements by the
National Labor Relations Board
and various federal courts that
found the Stevens Corporation
guilty of unfair labor practices,
the resolution said the CCAR
came "to the considered
judgement that the J.P. Stevens
Company has refused to
recognize the legal right of its
workers to organize and
bargain."
The resolution endorsed the
boycott as a means of supporting
the Stevens workers' struggle "to
achieve economic justice and
humane safe working conditions
through collective bargaining."
BBBaaaVi
CANDLEUGHTING
TIME
7:51
14 AB-5737
W
Extradition of Nazi
Requested of Argentina
By A9HER MIBASHAN
BUENOS AIRES-(JTA)-The Argentine government
has agreed to consider a request from West Germany that it ex-
tradite a German accused of Nazi war crimes who has been
living in Argentina since 1948. The German, Eduard Rosch-
mann, allegedly was the commander of a death camp in the
Riga area in which 40,000 Jews were killed.
The government had first issued a statement on July 4,
which said it "decided to accept the request" from West Ger-
many to extradite Roschmann. But July 5, a second statement
was released saying "the national government has only agreed
to give due process" to the request.
POLICE SOURCES said the 69-year-old Roschmann has
not been arrested. According to official source, Roschmann
entered Argentina in 1948 with a passport in the name of Fritz
Wegner.
During the war, he was in the Riga area first as an SS
assault leader, head of the Jewish section of the security police
and then commander of the Riga Ghetto. He was tried in ab-
sentia in Hamburg and found guilty of multiple murders carried
out between 1941 and 1944.
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ENJOY THE HOLIDAYS AMONG FRIENDS
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Sarvicos will bo conducted by a prominent Cantor.


Page 4
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Pr*dy,July29i
Editor's Corner
WASHINGTON
Argentine Bigotry
We noted in these columns last week the closing of the
American Jewish Committee's offices in Buenos Aires and
what that portends for the future. One thing is clear it
was a forthright decision in the face of the anti-Semitic
threats against the organization's representative and his
family.
To counter the apparent indifference of the Argentine
government to the rising tide of anti-Semitism in that
country an indifference which the government denies
exists Richard Maass, president of the AJ Committee,
said that his organization will not reopen the office until it
receives physical, not just verbal, assurances that those
who make anti-Semitic threats will be found and punished.
Such a step has been sorely needed. Jews in Argen-
tina have been threatened, arrested, or have just plain dis-
appeared. Jewish institutions and Jewish-owned proper-
ties have been bombed. An investigation into a financial
scandal has been used by some newspapers in the country
to launch an anti-Semitic campaign. Anti-Semitic and pro-
Nazi literature is sold widely throughout Argentina.
The government of President Jorge Rafael Videla has
condemned discrimination and racism, if not anti-
Semitism directly, partly because it believes that the bad
publicity it has received abroad, particularly in the United
States, has harmed Argentina's image.
But the fact is that AJCommittee believes that the
threats against its representative, Jacobo Kovadloff, a
fifth-generation Argentinian, and his family, were made
by right-wing elements in the government to embarrass
Videla, and so the government's claim that it cannot fully
control the right-wing elements hardly seems to be valid.
The 400,000-some Argentine Jewish community has
made major contributions to Argentina and has proved its
loyalty to the country. It should not have to tolerate the
type of abuse that is being allowed against Jews there as
individuals and as a group.
Another Rumor
Is it true? Is it false?
We have in mind that strange rumor last week about
an intended U.S. base in Israel.
The purpose of the rumor? Why, of course, it is the
purpose of the base itself. A U.S. base in Israel would
"assure" the Israelis of America's "special commitment"
to Israeli security.
Our own attitude is to shrug this off as nonsense, but
with the added observation that the best way of
guaranteeing Israel's security is for America not to force
Israel into impossible compromises of her own capacity to
see to her own security.
If, in the end, there be truth to the rumor, then it is
for the reason that the U.S. may see the need for such a
base for the U.S., not for Israel. To approach the rumor in
any other way is to see Israel, say, as the world saw
Zionism at the beginning of the 20th century when it
proposed the establishment of a Jewish nation in Uganda.
Jew Takes St. John Post
MONTREAL(JTA)For the first time since the Order
of St. John was founded in the 11th Century, a Jew has been
appointed to high office, it was reported here.
Maj. Louis M. Bloomfield. a well-known attorney and
philanthropist of Montreal, has been elected president of the
Quebec Council of the St. John Ambulance Association. Bloom-
field was named Knight of the Order in 1966 and is the only Jew
to hold that position.
The Protestant order, which was founded in England to
help people in distress, has 5,000 uniformed volunteers in
Quebec Province and provides courses in first aid, home nur-
sing and industrial accident prevention. It also provides am-
bulance service and first aid at all public gatherings.
TIM
Jewish Floridian
Of PAU* BBACH COUNTY
Combining "OU* VOICE and "FED*ATION RE POUTER"
In conjunction with Jowlah Federation of Palm Beach County. Inc.
Combined Je wlah Appeal
MU Okeechobee Boulevard, Weat Palm Beach. Florida n0t
OTFICE and PLANT-iaONKth St Miami, Fla (tin Phonem-teOB
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UED K SHOCHBT SUZANNE SHOCHET BttJfA M. THOMPSON
ltor and PubUaher Executive Editor Aaalatant to Publisher
MORTON GILBERT- Advertlsln*- Representative
TIM Jewish FMTWMN Dm Nat Guarantee The Ka.hrt.th
Of The Merchandise Advertised M It* Ceiumni
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FEDERATION OFFICERS: President, Stanley Brenner; Vice Presidents, Rabbi
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Traasuror, Stacay Lessor; Secretary, Bruce Daniels, Executive Director, Norman
Schimelman, Assistant Executive Director. Robert Kessler Submit malarial hr
publication ta Raimi Tartakew, Director of Pafcllc RetaMans.
14 AB 6787
Number 15
Menaehem Begin's Place in History
COLORFUL figure that he
is, Menaehem Begin predictably
gave enemies of Israel an
unexpected chance to recall
horrors of the past and predict
calamities of the future when fate
and a few swing votes boosted
the Likud into power in Israel's
recent elections.
His foes damn Begin as a
terrorist because of his record as
a key Irgun figure. He retaliates
by insisting that he was a
Freedom Fighter. Damascus
brands him a racist. Which
Israeli is not a racist in the
jaundiced view of arabs and their
allies who equate zionism with
racism constantly in United
Nations resolutions?
For comic relief, if there can be
any, Yasir Arafat, chief butcherer
Robert
for the Palestine Liberation
Organization, wants Begin to
face trial as a war criminal.
CERTAINLY, it is instructive
to retrace Menahem Begin s
career from his earliest days in
Brest Litovsk through his ex-
pulsion to Siberia by the
Russians, on to his days as a
soldier in the Polish army and
eventually into the era of Irgun
leadership and as super-
nationalist in the modern Suiti,
Israel.
But before the world ajJ
munity gets enmeshed in tryin
to sort out the vivid strands i
Begin's biography, it will do we
to consider well what mighti
happen now if media hysterial
whipped up over the Begin,
elevation to leadership in Israeli
beclouds much more importantl
issues. "1
It is much more important to J
n^Sr ml h?ndsomely thai
USSR will fare in its quest for!
new friends and new bases in the!
Middle East if editors andl
commentators keep their mindil
and eyes riveted on the Begin I
story instead of hinting day after I
day that the time is ripe now forl
the United States to water down I
its traditional guarantees ofl
support for Israel.
IF TERRORIST tactics em-L
ployed in 1947 and 1948 are to I
dominate the headlines of 19771
and 1978, there is a double need
to keep on the front pages the
acts of carnage, hijackings, andl
bombings planned and executed [
by Arabs and their sympathizers]
in the past several years. Above!
all, shapers of opinion dare not!
forget their responsibility to help I
avoid a universal nuclear)
holocaust touched off by Middle|
East activities.
Those who are inclined to I
review with care the Begin career I
need most of all to line up the
facts of history in orderly, sue-]
cession. Irgun ism had its roots in I
British broken promises; in I
default on mandate respon-
sibilities by the British govern-
ment; in the virulent Jew-hatred]
Continued on Page 9
How to Become Famous in Israel
Friday. July 29,1977
VohtmeS
MY FRIEND Hirsch stops me
the other day. Listen, he says, I
am in a hurry. I've got to catch a
bus, but I want to ask youwhy
don't you Jewish newspaper
people write the right things?
What do you mean, I said, we
always write the right things.
You are always writing about
the troubles in Israel, said
Hirsch. Why don't you write
about the positive side. Look,
said Hirsch, Ann Bancroft is in
Israel meeting with Golds. Soon
a play about Golds will be shown
in America.
OTTO PREMINGER is
preparing similarly a play for
America about Moahe Dayan.
Here are two plays being
prepared for the American
theater goers about Israeli
personalities How many plays
have been written about
American Jewish personalities?
None. Don't you see, said Hirsch,
as he started to rush off, that
Israel is really the land of op-
portunity? Why don't you write
about Israel as the land of op-
portunity?
As Hirsch left I got to
thinking. Maybe he is right.
There are 29 Jews hi the
American Congress. This is an
all-time record, but we may be
sure no one will ever write a play
about any of them for America.
In the past there have been
some prominent Jews in the
PUtical field There was Judah
Benjamin, Senator from
Louisiana and later Secretary of
State in the Southern Con-
federacy. Sometimes he was
dubbed "the brains of the
David
Schwartz

Confederacy," but no one wrote
any plays about him.
IF A JEW wants to become
famous, the best thing for him to
do is to move to Israel. The Jew
in Israel also seems to be most
effective in the world at large.
Take the case of Mrs. Meir. No
one, it seems to me, has really
done more for the women's lib
movement than Golds. She
didn't theorize. She just acted.
She avoided extremes.
No man, try aa hard as he may,
can give birth to a child and there
are some things men can do that
women can't Women can't be
football players and are no food
for building construction or
dogging ditches. But Golds
proved that women can be good
Prime Ministers. Woman nave
long experience at that.
Usually, they are the Prime
Ministers in their own homes.
Plato said that statesmanship
was really a matter of house-
keeping and women surely know
more about that than men, so
they should take a foremost part
in the political scene. No doubt it
would be better if they did.
I REMEMBER in the first
World War. the only member of
the House to vote against the war
was Jeannette Rankin. Men want
to be heroes, so we have war. A
woman would rather have her
man alive, so he could support!
her rather than be a dead hero. Sol
women wouldn't permit war. Thai
real thing at the bottom of thai
war is this hero business. If w*|
would get rid of that, there would |
be no war.
The male is too much of al
sentimental creature, but we needl
as much the female realism and it I
seems we are destined from novl
on to get both. Women are in-j
creasingly more in the p*P**j
and that is a good sign.
Recently, Simcha Dinitt, thai
I sraeli Ambassador to the Unitr"
States, revealed that i
American Jewish
woman-Elizabeth Taylor, wb
waa converted f
Judaism-offered at the time
the Entebbe incident to go Wl
Uganda as a replacement hostagej
for the 100 Jews.
SHE WANTED to fly
Uganda and make the offer
Arnin. Elisabeth Taylor "
Israel. She calls to mind a.
case in "cieDi
Israel-Ruth-who said.
people are my people and
thou goeat, I will go ."
Another woman lover of I
in the news is Bess Myerson,
left bar poet of New TortM-
Cotmiiissioner of Cog*
Affairs. She was offered *3W.
to spend six days shooting
vertisements for
automobile company but
it down. I recall Bess M
once telling me that she
never forget the day tt
declared its fa6tpndmU
also the day she gave birth to
baby.
JOE


r^7uly29J977_
_________The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 5
Demonstrators Clash Over Closing
Tel Aviv Thoroughfare on Sabbath
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
TELAVIV (JTA)
Hundreds of police reen-
forcements and soldiers
Ire rushed to Bnei Brak
Friday where religious
youths and non-religious
demonstrators battled on
I the main street over the
controversial closing of the
thoroughfare to traffic on
the Sabbath. Three police-
men were injured. One was
struck in the face by a rock.
The clash occured a week
after a young Israeli, Herzl
Attaya, was killed when his
jeep crashed into a chain
stretched across Hashomer
Street to block traffic. The
street runs through non-
religious neighborhoods as
well as those inhabited by
observant Jews in the ultra-
Orthodox municipality
north of Tel Aviv. Non-
religious groups are chal-
lenging the right of the
township to close the
street.
BUT THE issue appeared to
I hive been resolved at a meeting
between the two groups held
during the week. The Orthodox
I town leaders agreed to allow non-
f observant residents to drive
, through the street on Saturdays.
But apparently political ele-
ments on both sides continued to
agitate. On Friday evening, a
group of non-religious youths
from outside Bnei Brak con-
verged on police barricades to
protest religious coercion.
Although they had no permit to
demonstrate, the police officer in
charge allowed them to assemble
on condition that they were
orderly. The police are under
standing orders to act with ut-
most restraint toward both sides
in the dispute.
But when the demonstration
became unruly and some of the
youths knocked down barricades,
reenforcement8 were called in and
the crowd was forcibly dispersed.
NONE OF the demonstrators
were injured and no arrests were
made. Shortly afterwards,
however, large groups of Or-
thodox youths arrived on the
scene and fighting broke out
between them and the demon-
strators. Police and troops inter-
vened but the area was not
cleared until well past midnight.
Few Girlish Pounds
Continued from Page 1
through my own personal agony
and the ecstasy every year. You'd
think I'd learn by now, "what
you get is what you eat!"
Men pick up a pair of swim
trunks and bring it home. Easy
one, two, three. Let me fill you
men in on the yet to be revealed
fact of life your wife goes
through.
Since you are only allowed
three bathing suits at a time in
the dressing room, the odds are
you'll never make it to the 400
mark. Not only that, the summer
will be over by then. Your only
resource is to take along your
canasta game.
Add it up. Four women times
three suits apiece, gives you an
edge. While you're trying on, so
it shouldn't be a total loss, they
can deal a few hands.
Rackmil to Represent Palm Beach
At Men's Clubs Annual Convention
NEW YORK A prominent
I film Reach Jewish leader,
kmard Rackmil, past national
president of the National Federa-
tion of Jewish Men's Clubs, will
[participate in the International
Convention of the Conservative
F National Federation of Jewish
Men's Clubs which is holding its
I forty-eighth national convention
it the Queen Elizabeth Hotel in
Montreal, Que., Canda. from July
|31toAug. 4.
The convention, which is dedi-
[ated to the theme of "Building
I Future Leadership for World
IJewry" will include laymen who
I Jill act as "resource persons:"
Itocussmg the vital aspects of
I Jewish leadership" on the
| American and world scene.
The Federation has a member-
*p of 40,000 which is composed
"375 Rrotherhoods in Conser-
and is a constituent body of the
Jewish Theological Seminary of
America, the United Synagogue
of America and the World Coun-
cil of Synagogues.
Abraham A. Silver of Erie. Pa.,
is president of the Federation,
Rabbi Joel S. Geffen of New York
City is spiritual advisor and Dr.
David L. Blumenfeld is rab-
binical executive director of the
Federation.
NEXT WEEK, with the
situation in reverse, you'll go
with them. The first try-ons are
the hardest. That's when you find
out you're in the wrong size. A
beautiful size eight in the
dressing room next to yours has
the nerve to ask if she looks fat.
When only one-half of you
looks like her and the other half
matches the lady on the other
side, words are superfluous.
If self-pity weren't so fatten-
ing, you could indulge in that. So
you repeat the whole trying-on
procedure again and again until
you raise a few blisters. That's
nature's way of warning you it's
time to make a decision. By then,
money is no object.
Forget about being exclusive.
Believe me the manufacturer
wouldn't throw away the pattern
after one cutting for his own
mother.
SO THERE are 5.000 of your
style around. Hopefully you
won't run into all of them at once.
But don't count on it. Didn't the
salesgirl tell you how everyone
doesn't look the same? The other
4,000 women believed her, so why
not you?
One thing I can tell you. Mine
will be different. I'll give you a
clue. It has a long tunic top and
sort of resembles what I wore all
winter to hide the you know
what!
Jewish Post
and Opinion
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Max Tochner Re-Elected
President of Day School
The Board of Directors of the
Jewish Community Day School
of Palm Beach County, Inc., at
their recent annual meeting held
at the school, re-elected Max
Tochner for a second term as
president of the JCDS. They also
elected a new Executive Com-
mittee and Board of Trustees.
The Board will serve during the
school's fifth year, 1977-78.
The Executive Committee con-
sists of Max Tochner, president;
Barry Krischer, Max B. Shapiro,
Dr. Arthur Virship, vice
presidents; Phillip Siskin, trea-
surer; Dr. Riva Bickel, secretary;
Dr. Hyman J. Roberts and Ann
Leibovit, past presidents.
BOARD OF Trustees members
are Rabbi Asher Bar-Zev, Dr.
Arthur Bickel, Dr. McKinley
Cheshire, Judge Harold Cohen,
Henry Grossman, Dr. Howard
Kay, Jeanne Levy, H. Irwin
Levy, Cynnie List, Michael
Puder-Harris, Carol Roberts,
Dean Rosenbach, Robert Regal-
buto, Irving Salins, Dr. Richard
Shugarman, Rabbi William H.
Shapiro, Burton G. Sharff,
Caroline Simon, Dr. Gary Simon,
Beth Siskin, Michael Small, Dr.
Dennis Tartakow, Jay Tenzer,
Joan Tochner, Philip Weinstein,
Dr. Peter Wunsh and Esther
Zaretsky.
The meeting included a final
report from Dr. Sidney Selig who
has served the JCDS as director
for the past three years. Dr. Selig
has accepted an appointment as
principal of the Hillel Community
Day School in Hollywood. His
report included a review of the
growth of the school during his
tenure in which the enrollment
grew by 300 percent. He stressed
the need for the school to con-
tinue striving for excellence in
both its general studies and
Hebrew studies. He pointed out
that the "challenge for the newly
elected officers and Board was to
move forward to begin the plan-
ning and implementation of
efforts to secure new facilities for
the growing institution to permit
a systematic expansion into a
high school program.
"The time for the JCDS to
have its own facilities is rapidly
becoming a necessity," Selig
said. The JCDS currently leases
facilities from Temple Beth El.
President Tochner praised the
efforts of Dr. Selig for his efforts
on behalf of the Jewish Com-
munity Day School. He also
looked forward to welcoming the
new director, Dr. Avie Waxman,
into the position, "at this unique
time to lead the school to new
challenges, particularly those of
gaining new facilities to house
the growing institution." The
JCDS program currently runs
from preschool through eighth
grade.
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Page 6
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
pri Sports Stadium to Proceed
By TUVIA MENDELSON
JERUSALEM-(JTA)-May-
or Teddy KoUek announced
that construction will begin in
three months on the con-
troversial sports stadium in
northern Jerusalem despite bitter
opposition from Orthodox
residents of the area.
He denied that the stadium
would destroy the sanctity of
Jerusalem, create noise and
congestion in the religious neigh-
borhoods or represent an ex-
penditure of municipal funds
needed for other projects.
THE MAYOR, in a media
campaign launched here, accused
religious zealots of distorting the
facts about the proposed sports
center and organizing a pressure
campaign from abroad.
Kollek's office has received
close to 000 letters from the U.S.
and Canada objecting to the
stadium. Some contained threats
on the Mayor's life. Many writers
threatened to stop contributing
money to Israel for any purpose
and some accused the Mayor of
wanting to erect a monument to
himself.
The most vociferous protestors
here are Orthodox Jews who
immigrated from the U.S.
Kollek, however, has wide
erupted between non-religious
sports fans and the Orthodox
who seem to have become bolder
in their demands since Premier
Menachem Begin formed
coalition government in part-
nership with the religious parties.
Observers pointed out that the
ISRAEL SCENE
S-bbath^ItwrbebSr^
way from synago "^^
yeahivot thanTafy^lj"*1
sports arenas, the Mayor sS g
IT WILL not be
be." but will conufa JSS
Sate" ~~ SSI
Finally,
Kollek
raised fears, however, that when
construction begins, clashes may
public support for the stadium. A
petition with more than 45,000
signatures endorsing it was
presented to him.
THE CONTROVERSY has
long simmering conflict between
religious and non-religious
elements has already erupted into
street battles in Bnei Brak.
According to Kollek, access
roads to the new stadium will by-
noted, ,w)
government or municipal fund,
re involved. Half of T
estimated IL70 million cost Z
come from the football lottery
and the rest from private donora
here and abroad. The stadium
will take about three yearsZ
complete. w
Camp Shalom Players Present Mnsical
Jack, portrayed by Daniel &xsH "Fe, fi, fo, fum," states the
Katz (left) is warned by his Over BOO campers and parents watched the performance, given by the Camp Shalom Players. 4Taitt, played by Lee Kaplan
mot/ur, played by Nikki May, The production was the first musical presented by the Drama club at Camp Shalom, under H*ft). Also pictured (left to
not to climb the beanstalk, in the direction of Elinor Newcorn, drama specialist. right) are Joan Werun-
the recent production of Jack skythe golden harp, David
and the Beanstalk held at jSgsaaaKSBjas^wWftWS^ Gordonthe giant's assistant
Camp Shalom. *&%*M&&*^^ and Daniel Ka tz -Jack.
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Men's Sportswear, at all jm stores


.July 29.1977
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 7
Black Anti-Semitism Spurs B'klyn Tension
B. BRIAN LIPSITZ
RW fORK (JTA) "Latent
fi*fem" to t the root of
[Tunting tension* between
,,nd Hasidim in the Crown
L section of Brooklyn.
Yehuda K"8ky- *
for the Lubavitcher
dim, told the Jewish
jiphic Agency.
remark came in the wake
.demonstration by Blacks
1-ni.y demanding an end to
rcrown Heights Community
L a civilian anti-crime unit
Uy the Hasidim. which they
ij was deliberately
Bing and physically abusing
BOUT 500 BLACKS
DMtrated outside the local
jprecinct and then marched
t nearby headquarters of the
| Lubavitch movement and
[home of its spiritual leader.
ibiMenachem Schneerson.
jome 300 police were on hand,
[there were no disorders. The
i also criticized the special
ice protection given to
on, calling it preferential
lent.
> protest was sponsored by
(Coalition of People of African
nt. described as an urn-
kfli group for Black
ations in Crown Heights,
jled by the Rev. Heron Sam of
(Mirks' Episcopal Church.
latest clash between
and Hasidim apparently
i from the June 4 slaying of
ir-old Abraham Goldman.
| of a Hasidic rabbi, during
on a Crown Heights
t comer.
HISPANIC youths
custody, charged with
Goldman. Since then,
to Blacks, Hasidim
been terrorizing Black
i and women. They accuse
of. not protecting Blacks
| fiiluw to arrest Hasidim who
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assault Blacks. Black spokesmen
charge that the Community
Patrol is a "vigilante"
organization sanctioned by the
police.
But David Eldad, a member of
the Community Council of Crown
Heights, which sponsors the
patrol, said the patrols will
continue. Mendel Shemtov,
chairman of the Council, has been
quoted as saying that some of the
anti-crime group may have been
over-zealous at times and "acted
more or less on their own."'
However, he said, "They have
never killed or stabbed anybody.
The most they have done is try to
protect themselves." Dismissing
the charges against the civilian
patrol and "Hasidic vigilantes,"
Krinsky said the patrols protect
everyone in Crown Heights and
that Blacks have been invited to
join.
ACCORDING TO Krinsky,
the Blacks "are going to create a
monster...a situation they won't
be able to deflate. (The Black
accusations) awake latent anti-
Semitism and bring hatred into
the open."
The charges that Jews are
physically abusing Blacks are
unfounded, Krinsky told the
JTA, adding that the demon-
stration and tense atmosphere
were racial remarks by Blacks
aimed at Jews are widespread, is
the work of a "few rabble
rousers," mainly clergymen, who
are inciting animosity for reasons
and
of "self-aggrandizement
publicity."
Charging that "100 percent" of
the crimes committed in Crown
Heights are committed by
Blacks, Krinsky likened the
Black accusations to the story of
the youth who kills his parents
and then asks for clemency on the
grounds that he is an orphan.
SEVERAL "inflammatory"
circulars have been distributed
among Blacks in recent weeks,
Krinsky said, "to arouse the ire
of the Blacks...against Jews and
the Hasidim in particular." One
flyer portrayed a Hasid beating
up a Black youth, Krinsky said.
One of the flyers urging Blacks
to demonstrate said: "Never
again! Stop Hasidic attacks on
Blacks!" and "Blacks arise!! End
Gestapo tactics." Krinsky said
the Black assertions are
analogous to when Hitler charged
the Jews of the Warsaw ghetto
with killing Germans.
According to Krinsky, many
Blacks do not understand what
the other Blacks are upset about
because of the relative tranquility
of Crown Heights when com-
pared to the surrounding areas of
Brownsville, East Flatbush and
Bedford-Stuyvesant. "Crown
Heights is an oasis and it remains
a viable commiunity because of
the Lubavitcher Hasidim,"
Krinsky said.
UNABLE TO see a rationale in
the Black point of view, Krinsky
is apprehensive that "some
apologetic Jews will say there is
something wrong with the
Hasidim. Apologetic self-hating
Jews will say there are two sides
of the story." He added: "I really
don't comprehend what they (the
Blacks) want. It is basically
rooted in anti-Semitism."
Street crime is the most serious
issue in Crown Heights, years
ago a prosperous neighborhood
inhabited mainly by middle class
and affluent Jews. Today it is an
officially designated poverty
area, about 60 percent Black and
35 percent Hasidic.
Leonid Brezhnev: "You guys should rather stop this race to
prevent things from becoming serious" DtaVoUubiad
3&*
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CALL DOUG GRANGABD AT 622-7770
Ymi are cordially invited
to attend our
Fashion Preview for Fall '77
Monday, August 1st
9:30 a.m. to 9:30 p.m.
Designer Dresses, Coats, Suits,
Gowns, Sportswear, Accessories and
a superb collection of quality Furs.
You U find a tremendous selection of the
newest styles from the finest names in fashion..
all at prices that have made us famous.
FOR INFORMATION CALL(505) 971-9150
LOCHMANN-S PLAZA AT PALM-AIRE IN POMPANO BEACH
AT THE CORNER OF ATLANTIC BOULEVARD AND SOUTH POMPANO PARKWAY (POWERLINE ROAD)


Page 8
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Borh County
Friday
r
IBIBIBIH
Israeli Scouts enteRtain CampeRs
ii
''IBII
On July 11 a "friendship
caravan" of Israel boy and girl
scounts visited with the
children at Camp Shalom. The
campers had to opportunity to
meet with the scouts and learn
of their travels and ex-
periences. These scouts are
part of the Federation of
Israel Boy and Girl Scouts
that provides Camp Shalom
with scouts for the Camp
Shalom staff. At right, the
Scout Caravan joined hands
together and danced and sang
their way into the hearts of
every boy and girl at Camp
Sahlom. In a demonstration of
friendship between the two
countries, the scouts enter-
tained both campers and
parents. The Caravan is
traveling around the United
States visiting boys and girls
in all areas of the country.
f
A
m\
,xl
"((((((((((IHIHIBIHIHIHIHl.llHIH|H|H|B|H,aiHia||
Hole In Your Image, Dear Henry
nHpd likp H vmrc frnm t he Vipfnnm wnrnnlirv nnaatamnle ______ .. _
It sounded like a voice from the
past, which it was of course,
though not the too distant past.
Henry Kissinger's warning on
the rise of Eurocommunism was
his most telling political con-
tribution since quitting as
Secretary of State. At almost the
same time as President Jimmy
Carter was telling Americans
they were now mature enough,
secure enough, not to let a few
"little ole Communists" worry
them, Kissinger was saying
America must do its utmost to
atop the Berlinguers and Mar
chads.
If Kissinger's counsel had the
nof last year's thinking about
is argument was compelling;
and at least he did not choose
Playboy in which to postulate.
"One need not be a cynic to
wonder at the decision of the
French Communists,
traditionally the most Stalinist
party in Western Europe, to
renounce the Soviet concept of
dictatorship of the proletariat
without a single dissenting voice
among the 1,700 delegates, as
they did at their party congress
in February, when all previous
party congresses had endorsed
the same dictatorship of the
proletariat by a similar
unanimous vote of 1,700 to
none," he said.
KISSINGER has always had a
knack of putting his hands on the
facts when emotion is
threatening to run away with the
argument. In the Middle East
and in Africa, Kissinger brought
belligerents jo the table and set
about finding the middle ground,
or creating it if there was none.
"A good negotiator," Kissin-
ger told the London Observer in a
candid interview recently, "is
somebody who can give others
the confidence to move in what
they must each perceive to be
their own interest, and since they
are responsible for the future of
their country, you would be
reckless if you try to trick them
about that."
But how do you do that with
protagonists as sundered as the
Jews and Arabs? "What you can
do is to affect the margins of their
perception, and I considered that
my principal role," he said in th
same interview.
FOR THE former Secretary of
State, six months after leaving
office, every situation has its owi
irony and absurdity. Looking
back, he says: "Of course, as my
time from office goes on, my
infallibility increases geo-
metrically."
And Kissinger's past is begin-
ning to rear up. Kissinger the
master negotiator, Kissinger the
peacemaker for some has become
Kissinger the architect of the
Vietnam war policy. One example
is the academic fury aroused by
Columbia University's offer to
endow a chair in diplomacy for
him.
Faculty members and students
sharply attacked the idea, saying
the university was engaged in an
unseemly chase after a celebrity.
To endow a chair such as the one
proposed would cost $1-2 million,
and since most of it was expected
to come from Kissinger's long-
time benefactor, former Vice
President Nelson Rockefeller, it
would compromise the school's
academic integrity.
THE PRO-KISSINGER ele-
ments drew a parallel to the free
speech issues raised by the case
of Dr. William Shockley. the
Nobel prize-winning physicist
who espouses controversial
theories about connections
between race and intelligence. Dr.
Shockley was denied permission
to speak at several campuses.
Prof. Seymour Melmen, of
Columbia's engineering school, a
Kissinger opponent and left-wing
activist, said: "This is nothing
like the Shockley case. No one is
denying him a right to speak. If
he were invited here I would be
delighted and I would go.
Fundamentally, the question is
what do we do in this society with
those who were primarily respon-
sible for theVietnam war?"
Another radical, H. Bruce
Franklin, now professor of
English at Rutgers University,
wrote in the New York Times:
"Rather than giving this chair to
a man whose theories were
proved to be nonsensical, why
not give it to one of those
political scientists who demon-
strated as early as 1965 that the
Indo-China war would end with
the military and political defeat
of the U.S."
AN AD HOC group of Colum-
bia students formed to oppose
those attempting to prevent
Kissinger's appointment termed
the campaign "a crude form of
McCarthyism."
In the event none of this
mattered, Kissinger accepted a
one-year appointment as
Professor of Diplomacy in
Georgetown University's School
of Foreign Service in Washing-
ton, D.C. Aides said he had
decided on Georgetown for
geographic and personal reasons.
Critics savage him not only as
the chief architect of America's
war in Asia, but for his passion
for secrecy, his sanction of illegal
surveillance of his own aides and
newspapermen, his icy disdain
for human rights, his Chilean
policy, his belated attention to
Africa.
ALL ARE gone now but not
forgotten in any assessment of
man not yet turned 54. whose
panache his opponents called
if chutzpa captured headlines
worldwide.
His supporters cite his schol-
arly record at Harvard, his eight
years as National Security Ad-
visor and Secretary of State and
point to him as the prime planner
and moving force behind the
opening to China, the thaw with
the Soviet Union, the tortuous
effort for peace in the Middle
East and Rhodesia.
Kissinger himself feels he
helped to solve the problem of
preserving "the American spirit"
and "the American commitments
around the world" as he planned
the disengagement of more than
one-half million Americans from
Vietnam.
Now more relaxed, leaner and
more tanned. Kissinger spends
his mornings in a well-guarded
downtown Washington office,
and his afternoons in a specially
reserved room in the Library of
Congress. He researches his book
to be written for Little. Brown
and Company at a reported $2
million.
HE MEETS with colleagues
from Georgetown where he is
visiting and acts on occasion as a
foreign policy consultant to the
National Broadcasting Company.
For a reported $1.5 million he
serves as vice chairman of the
Chase Manhattan banks inter-
national advisory committee.
He and Nancy go out for
dinner often, on occasion to the
White House. He spoke to the
U.S. Chamber of Commerce at a
meeting down the street for a fee
of $5,000. and to a group of I HI
executives in Bermuda ||
unknown).
Is he laying down the fo
dation for a return to pub
office? Possibly, admirers ,
Kissinger, for the moment, say.
nothing. Except, the other day]
looking back at his career in dij|
lomacy and government, he u
with his usual mockery: "I did i
more than any other geniu
would have done."
To the Point InterrwtionJ
Susan
psychoanalyst
Dr. K: "Did no more than any
genius would have done."

Panoff Recalls fpeud
My Analysis with Freud: Reminiscences by Dr. A. Kardiner. New
York: W. W. Norton & Co.. 1977,123p., $6.95.
Since "all" books of Jewish interest do not cross my desk,
and many of no interest do, it is helpful to have friends on the
lookout for unusual material. Such a rabbi friend lent me his copy
of Kardiner's book several months ago. After being swamped with
a number of vanity press publications of little value, this reviewer
was hesitant to sit down with another "reminiscences" type
volume. Thank goodness I did.
My Analysis is a warm, humorous, well-written personal
account of the author's analysis with Freud and a retrospect of
Freud's technique in analysis. The first chapter, "Meeting with
Freud," which introduces us to the Viennese psychoanalyst,
reminded this reviewer of the presentation of Freud's apartments
and offices in the film' The Seven Per Cent Solution.''
DR. KARDINER. a young New York psychoanalyst in 1921,
was accepted for analysis by Freud in order to complete his
training as an analyst, and to study with the man who had dis-
covered and opened the door to the mysteries of the human mind.
He recounts his early life as he told it to Freud including Freud's
comments on his story. These comments are valuable as Freud
spoke little to other analysts under his analysis.
Kardiner also gives us a revealing peak at the Vienna of the
1920s: replete with opera and anti-Semitism.
THE SECOND part of the book is a discussion of Freud from
Kardiner's vantage point of fifty years ago and again from 19*6
Kardiner examines Freud's remarkable discoveries and contri-
butions through which man can know and direct himself. The
author emphasizes the importance of respectable recognition of
psychoanalysis by society, as be believes "that psychoanalysis
can become a very essential tool in social as well as human sur-
vival." This portrait of Freud and the author's view of f
psychoanalytic technique make for insightful and entertaining
reading.
Jewish Tract Series, New York: Burning Bush Press. Districted
by United Synagogue of America Book Service. 17.90 set of
14 tracts.
Two new titles were recently released in the pocket-sitt
Jewish Tract Series. They are The Mezuzah, by Rabbi Abraham
B. Eckstein, and The Tallit, by Rabbi Dov Peretz EUdns.
THE TRACTS are booklets ranging in sue from sixteen to
thirty-two pages, which present the basic aspects of Jewish life
and thought as held within the Conservative movement Fourteen
titles are presently available as a presentation set, boxed for gin
giving.
Some of the subjects are Avot: The Ethics of the Fathtrs;
The Shema, Mittvah and The Marriage Service.
The authors of these booklets are authorities in their fields
Besides Eckstein and Elkins, Jack Riemer, Ben Zion Bokser i
Ira Eisenstein have written tracts for the series.


.July 29,1977
^ The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 9
Segal: Begin's Place in History
Continued from P8 *
Lm the char,?cter, of
rin Foreign Secretary,
^ Bevin; in the British
I voted in the UN-to
u that kind of vacuum in
Z British-trained Arab
5Lr9 were expected to
-oower, subdue, and an-
Utt the greatly outnumbered
-Tof a poorly-armed and
JJenenced Jewish nation at
c there was terrorism-fierce
K-c9 echoing the cruel
%tems employed by Arhbs;
norism born of gnef suffered
relatives of the dead whose
lined the Hitler furnaces;
nriam bursting through the
of displaced persons
asylum by cowardly
i of great nations playing
games with uprooted Jews.
Determined to see the new
Jewish state wither on the vine of
its miraculous but tenuous birth,
the British schemed to hold
Jewish immigration into Israel to
a trickle.
London's feverish attempts to
crush the Haganah in its efforts
to defend Jews harassed by
Arabs led inevitably to the in-
tensification of activities by
desperate Jewish extremists
personified by Begin and his
small band of followers.
WHEN ONE turns again to
these dark pages of history, much
more than a clear understanding
of Menachem Begin's career as
Jewish Freedom Fighter is
recalled: for in those same pages
is registered the absorption of the
Arab Palestinians into King
Abdullah's Hashemite kingdom.
Synagogues in
Palm Beach County
COMSUYAJIVHUUAl
l|90l North Flogler Drive
IwestPolm Beach, Florida 33407
1(33-8421
|Jobbi Irving B Cohen
Summer Sabbath Services
TidoyotSOOp.m.
IMPLE BETH EL OF
IBOCA RATON
|j33SW Fourth Avenue
Hoco Raton. Fl. 33432
pi -8901
Itobbi Norman T. Mendel
IConior Martin Rosen
ISobbath services, Friday at
HIS p m. Saturday morning
Wvir.es at 10:30 a.m.
TEMPLE ETERNAL LIGHT
P.O Box 3
Boca Raton, Florida 33432
426-1600
Rabbi Beniamm Rosayn
Sabbath services, Fndoy at 8:15
p.m.
at Unitarian Universolist
Fellowship Building
162 W Palmetto Pork Rd
Boca Raton
CONGREGATION
ANSHEISH0L0M
53J8Gro West Palm Beach, Florida 33409
4 3212
IRabbi Harry Z Schectman
ISobh' Fmontos Henrv lrch
FrJoy8 30a m. 8:00 pm.
Wdoy 8 30a.m.; 7:30p.m.
Doily8 30a.m.;7:30p.m.
TIMPIE BETH EL
1*15North Flogler Drive
IWestPalm Beach, Florida 33407
1833 0339
iRobbiAsher Bar-Zev
ISaboaih services Friday at 8:15
Ipm
IWdoy ai o 30 a.m.
Ito'ly Mmyan at 8:15 a.m..
I SunrJoy at 9 a m
IRMPIE BETH SH0L0M
W5N "A" St.
|We Worth Florida 33460
1585-5020
IJobbicmanuel Eisenberg
Iwn'or Jock Elman
E?*- Mondy* and Thursdays
B:l5o.m.
ro'815p.m.
!"'dayat9a.m.
JM BETH DAVID
Qth serv ,ces, Friday at 8 p. m.
Westminister
^bytenon Church
P N M,lory Tra.l. Polm
~T ^'dens 321 Northloke
No"h PQ|m 6^^ Pla
-1)34
'"VKJnFijhman
"or Nicholas Fenakal
^BETHSHOLOM
*venue "G"
^Glode, Florida 33430
"Q'emon, loyleoder
*'v.ces. Fndoy at 8:30
CONStKVATM
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB
275 Alemeda Drive
Polm Vrmn. FlonHn 33460
Sabbath services, Friday at 8 p. m.
Saturday at 9 a.m.
President Jacob Front964-0034
M^nouyr. and Ihursdoysal 9a.m.
Services held at Faith United
Presbyterian Church, Palm
Springs
B'NAI T0RAH
CONGREGATION
PO Box 2306
Boca Raton, Florida 33432
Rabbi Nathan Zelizer
Sabbath services, Fndoy at 8:15
p m.
2nd and 4th Saturdays at 9:30
am
Meets at
Weight Watchers
1775 N.E. 5th Ave.
Born Roton Flo
TEMPLE EMETH of the DEIRAY
NEBtEW CONJUGATION
P.O. Box 1214, Delray Beach,
Florida 33444
Sabbath service* Friday at 8:00
p.m. Fellowship Hall, Cason
Methodist Church, 342 N. Swinton
Ave., Delray Mr. Henry Bloom,
President
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
190 North County Road
Palm Beach. Florida 33480
832-0804
Rabbi Mox t Formon
Cantor David Dordoshti
Sabbath services, Fndoy at 8:30
p m.
Saturday ot 9 a m.
C0NGBEGATION BETH K0DESH
2515 N.E. 2nd Court
Boynlon Beach. Florida 33435
Sabbath services. Fndoy-8:15
m.
.oturday-:30o.m.
Services held at St. Johns
Methodist Church Social Hall
3215 N. Seocrest Blvd.
Boynton Beach, Florida
For information call 732-5147
Jewish Com hi iin i I y Center Presents
On Sunday, Aug. 7, The
Second Tuesday Club will host a
Garage Sale and Flea Market at
the JCC. Standard for Second
Tuesday functions are grilled
Kosher hot dogs and home baked
goods can also be purchased.
Furniture, antiques, bric-a-brac,
jewelry, plants and clothing,
children's toys and hand-made
and specially designed "one-of-a-
kind" pieces will be on sale. The
Garage Sale and Flea Market on
Sunday, Aug. 7 will be held from
noon to 6 p.m. If you take a
space, or make a purchase, you
will be benefitting the Jewish
Community Center Scholarships
program which insures par-
ticipation from all Jewish
families, regardless of ability to
pay. Marion and Sam Rubin will
make pickups.
The Center for Creative and
Performing Art n Program at the
JCC, for children ages 3 to 12,
will end on Friday, Aug. 19 with
a Kosher banquet prepared by
the children, for the children.
Children who were enrolled in the
summer program will be given
preference in the registration of
the Mini-Camp to take place from
Aug. 22 to Aug. 26.
Action Mini-Camp will be a
program for the first 50 children,
in the first through sixth grade,
who are registered. Pre-schoolers
will be placed in a separate
program for creative work and
will participate in short trips to
places of interest. Older children
will visit Ocean World, Coconut
Grove, go bowling, skate and
hike. The Action Mini-Camp fees
are: Grades 16, 835 per child.
Pre-school Mini-Camp 830 per
child.
All children must bring lunch
and a drink or money for same.
Only children from JCC member
families will be able to enroll.
JCC staff and members are
always on the go...If you want to
participate in our Fall programs
and you are not yet on our
mailing list, call the JCC office at
689-7700.
The best guarantee for a listing
is membership. Plans are in the
works for a Fall and Winter
season that will bring new talent,
fun and social opportunities. You
can take part by joining the JCC.
Satellite Programs in North Palm
Beach and Lake Worth area are
among the goals of the JCC
Board this year, according to Dr.
Bob Burger, president.
Newly elected members of the
JCC Board are Alan Cumminga
and Alan Keiser, Palm Beachers
for many years. Cumminga has
been a leader at Temple Emanuel
for many years. Keiser is joining
his wife, Bee, who has been active
at the JCC over the last year, and
has recently taken leadership of
Teen Programs. Dr. Alan Fox
has joined the JCC Board and
will work to represent North
Palm Beach views as the JCC
increases its service. Dr. Fox and
his wife Rosalie are active
members of Temple Beth David.
Alan Bernstein, local attorney,
just completing his term as
president of Knights of Pythias
group, will serve on the JCC
Board of Directors this year.
The Indoor Tennis Crab has
announced its association with
the Jewish Community Center.
JCC Members receive full
membership privileges at the
Indoor Tennis Crab until Sept.
30. Whan sufficient use of tennis
privilege has been expressed
through participation, efforts
will be made to continue the
association.
During the hot summer
months, members and their
familiw can enjoy a cool gems of
tennis indoors. Join the JCC now
and get the most for your money.
Zelda Pincort. membership
chairperson and vice president of
the JCC announces a revised
M-hedulw of membership fees
which became effective July 1 for
the fiscal year Julv 1, 1977 to
July 1, 1978: Life'Membership
825,000; Founders Society,
81,000; Patron Society, 6500;
Sponsor Member, 8250; Family
Member, 8125; Single Parent
Family, 8100; Senior Family,
875; Single Adults, 825; Chai
Membership, 818 (for one-year
only).
Sy Cole will begin to audition
single and group acts for the JCC
Purim Talent Show scheduled for
March 26, 1978, starting on
Wednesday nights at 7:30 p.m. in
October. Sy and his committee
will screen prospective talent.
Call the JCC and let us know if
you want to become involved.
Sen. Richard Stone, Sen.
Lawton Chiles and Congressman
Paul Rogers have all joined in the
JCC effort to get 66.6 million
dollars from Housing and Urban
Development to build a Senior
residence. Sen. Chiles writes
about the JCC as follows: "The
dedication and determined
persistence of s highly motivated
sponsor group should, be
recognized and accorded con-
siderable weight in the selection
process...the Selection Com-
mittee should be fully appraised
of some of the unique
qualifications and affirmative
factors which are offered by the
Jewish Community Center of the
Palm Beaches, Inc.."
Save green stamp*. The JCC is
saving green stamps for the
purchase of a 40-passenger bus.
Bring green stamps to the Senior
Center or the JCC office. The
/ehicle will be for everyone's use.
Shirley Fleishman is chairing the
campaign.
SENIOR NEWS
The CSSC has past the
halfway mark in executing its
federal grant under Title III of
the Older Americans Act, with a
14-passenger van provided by
Jewish Federation. Many transit
disadvantage^ Seniors depend
'upon the van and use it regularly
to take them to doctors' offices,
hospitals, treatment centers,
'nursing homes, nutrition sites
and shopping.
Citizens Information and
Referral Services has been the
vehicle for many troubled per-
sons aiding them to find any
service they may need.
A second grant has already
been written and is being
processed and will provide ex-
pansion of program and staff.
Various activities and classes
are being planned. Adult
Community Education has
awarded us six classes for the
Fall semesterWriter's
Workshop, Oil Painting, Modern
Topics, Know your Community
Services, Home Health Care, and
Psychology. These Classes will
begin in October. Call Max
Berman for information at 689-
7700. Lip Reading and Writer's
Workshop are in session now.
Call Gail Weinstein for in-
formation at the JCC. Channel 5
televised the Lip Reading Class,
Friday, July 8.
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
of the palm beaches, inc.
2418 Okeechobee Boulevard, West Palm Beach, Florida 3340
Telephone 689-7700
The Jewish Community Centers
Keren On-
Program
Education & Enrichment
PreSchool 2%-5 years
Monday Friday
8:30 am-6:00pm
Tuition $125 per month
Registration Fee $50
Transportation Arranged by Request
A Creative Program in a Jewish Environment
A relaxed ataosphere encouraging children
to develop a good aelf laage. physical
stamina, aoclal, logical thinking and read-
* ekllla. Enrichment programs in music,
dance, art, Hebrew and movement education.
Florida State Certified Teachers Supervision.
Sharan Stone, E.C.E. Liaa lubln, B.A. Design
Pre-School Supervisor Enrichment Program Supervisor
W
Vivian Becker, ACSVJ
Executive Director
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
of iha pitim tMMcrws. w
MM OKIICHOH. BLVD. W.ST PALM UACH. rt.A. >S4S
I1SBI tliTTII


Page 10
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Frida
V. July 29,,
By TRUDE B. FELDMAN
Jewish Floridaa
White Hooae Correspondent
WASHINGTON-Zbigniew
Brzezinski, President Carter's
National Security Adviser, said
that peace in the Middle East will
require more than just the end
of belligerency.
"Real peace," he said, "has to
mean mutual recognition of the
permanence of a settlement,
mutual recognition of the exis-
tence of the parties to that settle-
ment, the undertaking of a com-
prehensive political, diplomatic,
commercial and social relation-
ships, and so forth.
"IN OTHER words, peace is
not just the formal absence of
war, but it's the reality of his-
orical cohabitation in a single
region. It is the acceptance of
that cohabitation, and it is
building on it towards more
cooperative collaborative
relationships."
Brzezinski is the first
American official to spell out his
definition of the kind of peace
that must be worked out in the
middle East in order to end the
current crisis.
In a rare, exclusive interview
the first he has given on the
Middle East crisis Brzezinski
also discussed territorial borders,
as well as the concessions by both
sides that he believes are essen-
tial to a Mideast peace set-
tlement.
ADDRESSING himself to the
question of what assurances he
has from the Arabs that they are
prepared to make this kind of
peace, he said that "in conver-
sations we've had with Arab
leaders, a willingness on then-
part in favor of such an arrange-
ment has bean noted.
"And the purpose of nego-
tiations would be to teat the
degree of their willingness. If
they are prepared to go down this
path, that's all to the good. If, in
negotiations, it becomes clear
they are not, then it's obvious
there would be no settlement."
Discussing the "minor adjust-
ments" which the Carter ad-
ministration has referred to in
asking Israel to withdraw to the
1967 borders, Brzezinski ex-
plained that as a matter of prac-
tical common sense, it's unlikely
that there can be a peace settle-
ment which involves mutually
accepted frontiers unless there is
mutual acceptance that such a
peace settlement meets the in-
terest of both sides.
"IF THE Arabs were totally
defeated (in war) and, on top of
that, were to feel guilty both
for the conflict and for their
defeat, like the Germans after
World War II then it's
possible they could accept truly
significant changes. But the
actual scope of the changes
they're likely to accept has to be
defined in the course of the nego-
tiations.
"The borders we hope Israel
will obtain should be mutually
recognized and also protected by
additional security arrange-
ments. Thus, they will be truly
defensible much more so than
defense lines that are contested."
Leaning back in a swivel chair
in his spacious office, once oc-
cupied by Dr. Henry Kissinger,
and not far from the Oval Office,
the National Security Adviser
observed that one of the Carter
Administration's goals for a
Middle East peace settlement is
to try and make direct nego-
tiations possible by "reducing
the gaps over fundajmental issues
between the Arabs and the Is-
raelis ."
HE ADDED that it was disa-
greement on these fundamental
issues that "in the paat
prevented direct discussions
between them."
Noting that the Israelis have
always said they want direct
negotiations with the Arabs.
Brzezinski said the adminis-
IBH|H|BJBMSJ^BK|BV|BJBJ|BBIBJ|||II
Sees No U.S. Effort to Impose
tration is interested in trying to
promote a settlement between
the conflicting parties.
"The time is now becoming
ripe for more direct explorations
between them," he remarked.
However, he denied that the
Administration is trying to force
a settlement in the region "It
should be clear from everything
we've said that there is ab-
solutely no intention to impose a
settlement, he stressed.
"IT'S OUR desire to create a
framework within which the
parties to the conflict can start
talking about issues that, herto-
fore, they have been unable to
discuss.
"That's why we have tried to
press the Arabs to be more forth-
coming about the scope and the
meaning of peace, and. on the
other two issues critical to a
settlement the nature of
security and territory and the
resolution of the Palestinian issue
we have tried to create a basis
for direct discussions between
Israel and its Arab neighbors."
Brzezinski was asked whether
the Administration has now
adopted a plan like the Rogers
Plan (a Middle East settlement
proposed by former Secretary of
State William Rogers).
"There is no Rogers Plan or
any other plan." he responded.
In response to these mounting
fears, Brzezinski concluded: "I
hope this isn't the impression
they have "gotten. We have made
it clear that any settlement
between the parties will have to
include, as the essential point of
departure, a comprehensive peace
treaty including mutual recog-
nition and comprehensive
relationships.
"IT'S possible and in fact
probable ( that some Arabs
continue to harbor the expec-
tation that peace would only be
stage one and that it 11 lead to
stage two, namely the liquidation
of Israel.
Hi
tives on the issue of J*
of territory Sfc
AS.the iaaZ ftS|
h-ve a plan to impose ^Wedo^
inTsr^Xtte
wordto^^^the
States pU8hi J0>
accepting a solution f"
Arab interest
Course Encouraging Catholic Conversion?
lTl__T* WS W A % W nntmn l(/nnl nvn T ml n J W niu< i n* ________________
By BRIAN LIPSITZ
NEW YORK (JTA) The
Jewish Community Relations
Bureau (JCRB) of Kansas City
has accused the University of
Kansas of sponsoring a series of
humanities courses in which
students are encouraged to
convert to medieval Catholicism.
A memorandum issued by the
JCRB said: "Moreover, a dis-
proportionate number of former
I HP (Integrated Humanities
Program) students are now in the
Benedictine monastery at Font-
gombault, France."
IN A PHONE interview,
David Goldstein, JCRB
executive director, told the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency that
it is "generally conceded... that
in the Abby, there are nine
(former IHP) students" of whom
three are believed to be Jewish.
Goldstein said he is certain two
are Jewish, after their identities
became known when they
returned home to visit their
parents.
According to the JCRB memo
titled,"A Warning About the In-
tegrated Humanities Program at
the University of Kansas," which
was sent as an alert to various
Jewish communities, "The
Catalog (explaining the course)
does not discuss the student trips
to this monastery organized by
the IHP faculty, or the 1976
student trip to a remote island in
Western Ireland where instruc
tion in Roman Catholicism, using
a Roman Catholic catechism, was
given."
According to the JCRB, the
program at the state school in
Lawrence, Kan., is described
by the catalog as a freshman-
sophomore program 'devoted
to an introductory study of great
philosophical, historical dn
literary books of Western
Civilization from Homer to Dos-
toyevski.' "
IT CONSISTS of four six-
credit-hour courses taught by
Profs. Dennis Quinn, Franklyn
Nelick and John Senior.
The memo adds: "While the
IHP faculty deny they are 'brain-
washing,' it seems evident to
many observers that the great
books are used to introduce
young students to only one point
of view, that of medieval Roman
Catholicism.
"All published reports agree
that contrary views are not aired
in the IHP classes. Memorization
is stressed, but not dialogue and
analysis. The Bible is read, but
without scholarly methods of
study. Students are not per-
mitted to take notes in c lass or to
ask questions. They are told not
to read even the footnotes and
commentaries in the editions of
the books they use. They are
warned against television, radio,
newspapers, magazines and
drama."
CONTACTED by the JTA,
Theodore A. Wilson, associate
dean of the College of Liberal
Arts at the University of Kansas,
said: "It is a very ambiguous
issue involving claims of
academic freedom and involving
questions of the separation of
church and state." He added:
"The statements in the release
(JCRB memo) are accurate."
Wilson said the unviersity has
difficulty separating what goes
on in the classroom from what
may occur outside the classroom
as regards the student-professor
relationship. The professors offer
personal counseling, Wilson said.
Yet, there is "no evidence the
professors have stepped over that
line (dictated by the separation of
church and state)," within the
classroom. It would be difficult to
prove, as no written records exist
of the classes since note-taking is
banned, he said. In addition.
Wilson said the university would
have to change its position on
academic freedom before it could
monitor the Hawses.
THE COURSES are not
required. Wilson said, but are
elect rves which satisfy the
humanities requirements. The
professors have been teaching the
program for "about eight years."
Students receive no credit for
their monastery study, he said.
While the university is not in-
Begin Takes Strong Stand
On Media Leaks from Cabinet
By TUVIA MENDELSON
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Prime Minister Menachem Begin
has laid down the law to his
Cabinet: No smoking during
Cabinet "meetings, no talking to
journalists afterwards. The ban
on talking is aimed primarily at
avoiding "leaks" to the press of
senisitive matters, a situation
that distressed previous
governments.
Begin is adamant on the
subject. "There will be no leaks
from this Cabinet." he told his
colleagues. He characterized
"leaks" as "destructive on the
domestic scene and even more so
where our international relations
are concerned."
TO ENSURE a leak proof
Cabinet, the Premier has also
banned the presence of ministers'
aides and advisors at Cabinet
sessions. Under his ruling, any
minister who needs an aide or
advisor during discussion of a
specific subject must apply for
permission beforehand. The aide
would be allowed to attend only
while the particular subject is
being disucssed.
weekly session ended. smoking during Cabinet
BEGIN ALSO made it clear meetings, especially cigars which
that he would not tolerate he called "most disturbing"
Report: PLO Investing In
U.S. Blue Chip Stocks
?U/ VADI/ im These instructions were
followed by Cabinet members
who declined to provide any
statement, as had been the case
in the past, to journalists waiting
outside the Cabinet after it*
NEW YORK- (JTA )-Time
Magazine said in its current issue
that the Palestine Liberation
Organization has built up an
investment portfolio amounting
"to an estimated $60-100 million"
which includes shares in "blue
chip American companies that
have operations in the Middle
East."
Describing the PLO as
probably the richest, best
financed revolutionary-terrorist
organization in history," Time
said its other holdings include
two Beirut hotels, shares in
shipyards and oil tankers and a
youth hostel under construction
in Cairo
TIME' 8AID that "Some of
this money has even been used
for the quiet purchase of land on
the West Bank that local
Palestinians might otherwise be
tempted to sell to the Israelis."
According to the report, "The
Palestinians also claim to make
6 million a year operating an
illegal drug market inside Israel,
using Oriental Jews as pusher."
But the PLO's principal
sources of income are sub-
ventions from the oil-producing
Arab states, notably Saudi
Arabia and from other Arab
states which totals about $70
million a year.
Another $10 million comes
from the 300,000 Palestinians
living in the Arab oil states where
5 percent of their wages are
routinely withheld as a con-
tribution to the Palestinian
movement.
"Every so often, the
Palestinian coffers have been
replenished with income ex-
tracted by terrorism," Time
reported. The magazine referred
to the $26 million ransom paid
jointly by Iran and Saudi Arabia
for the 81 hostages taken at the
OPEC meeting in Vienna in
December, 1976.
According to Time, the PLO's
assets "are mainly held through
numbered bank accounts and
blind names to prevent Israeli
retaliation and also to
camouflage the wealth of a
movement that prides itself on its
warrior image."
vestigating in-class actrvitie
Wilson said the administratk
has interviewed students atx
their outside activities. Altbou
he did not elaborate, he said ,
think the allegations that haJ
been raised are serious."
According to Goldstein,
dents sometimes have lunch
professors' homes, which,
said, in and of itself, would I
constructive activity. But Gv
stein alleged that an atmoaph
encouraging conversion
Catholicism exists at the lunch
FURTHERMORE, he
students and professors
times go to mass tog__
"presumably to help them
their Latin (ecclesiastical Lit
not classical)." And although I
trip to Ireland was "presui
a voluntary activity," Golc__
asserted that there was "a lot i
pressure to take it."
Wilson said college credit
the Ireland program has i
because of reports of i
tizing. According to Goldst
bout 300 students wen in
IHP last year. Wilson said'. .
its height, 100 students
20,000 students at the
were taking the course.
An interfaith committee <
"The Committee for Acai
and Religious Freedom" has I
formed, Goldstein said, with
primary goal being to info
potential students about
actual program. Beyond
Goldstein said the commit
would like to see the pr
modified so that opposite
of view are aired.
HE SAID: "This is not in i
way a Jewish issue."
One well-informed observi
said he felt there was a rehictand
to challenge state officials pul
licly because of. what he believf
to be, grass-roots support (or tlr
program from many small t
parents who fear their chili
will become 'hippies''
radicalized when sent away
college.
Although their children
convert from being Baptists
Catholics, they view this as I
a far lesser evil.
That observer added that
low-keyed approach is prefer
to prevent the issue fr
becoming so controversial th
students will take the course o
of curiosity. Wilson also said tl
program has "very strong deW
ders," particularly parents who
children (with, for example, dr
problems) were straightened i
ONE university official closeJ
the issue, who requested that f
name not be used, said: "The i
ministration is taking a posit"
of benevolent neglect
gradually withholding "PF
for the program... the prosp
over the next year or so a
the program will decline... .
it lose* its publicity and senaej
speciamess." which is <
motivating force."
Beyond that, the official
the university "^J,,
course if legal acUonsho^
professors were proselytix**


^,July_2!U?Zl
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 11
Don't Overlook Million Jews in Far East
_..miiHR LIEBMAN Europeans are the principai ------- ____________________________________________________________
Seymour b liebman
j so preoccupies the atten-
I American Jewry that the
' f of almost one million
S Latin America receives
'Itention. and then only
nneofour national defense
Scries. anti-Semitism!
Z, attention is directed to
U-*ofthe Far East.
be due to the corn-
_ insignificant size of the
inities in Tokyo, Hong
Singapore. Bangkok and
Another factor is that
hism and Shintoism do not
anti-Semitism or even
udaism Far Eastern faiths
ronmarily ethical, philoso
j and humanitarian and are
feompetirive.
(COURSE to demographic
rs in the most recent edition
(American Jewish Yearbook
provides guesstimates"
"should not be considered
U me Sinai This book gives
[Jewish population of Japan
|500 (community reports 400-
Bangkok. the capital of
-and, 0 (community reports
Inembership. "0 families).
i figure variations may be
kloacount of families instead
Individuals, or vice versa.
Kher factor is the existence of
liated Jews. J. I. Fishbein,
of The Jewish Sentinel,
few years ago, anent
jKong Jewry, that "those
p not belong say they 'don't
to mix with Sephardic
j Sephardim did found the
jtunal centers in Hong Kong
ISingapore They are also the
iuest and most powerful in
places, the Ashkenazim
ininate in Tokyo and Bang-
In the former, the Ash-
- Russian, English,
van, French and other
Europeans are the principal
communal leaders.
SINCE \1al\ ma and I spent
some time in the Jewish Com-
munity Center of Japan. (Tokyo
to be exact), with several of its
members and its lay spiritual
leader, I will discuss this Jewish
community. The community was
started (not officially founded in
1921 by the influxof many
Russian Jews who had fled the
Russian Revolution and migrated
to Shanghai.
When economic conditions in
Shanghai became almost in-
tolerable, they moved to Tokyo.
My own research in connection
with the history of Jews in the
New World led to my knowledge
of Jews in the Far East (Macao,
China and Japan) in the 16th and
17th centuries. There was also a
community of Chinese Jews in
Kai-feng Fu, 750 miles west of
Shanghai which was in existence
until 1859.
Rabbi M. Tokayer, a former
U.S. chaplain in Japan, met one
of the descendants of the Jews of
Kai-feng Fu who also left Shang-
hai for Tokyo (Pearl Buck wrote
Peony, historical novel con-
cerning the demise of the Chinese
Jewish community See also Mal-
vina W. Leibman's book Jewish
Cookery from Boston to Baghdad
for more data on the Chinese
Jews).
From 1921 to 1953. the Jews
met in private homes for religious
services. During this period Jews
from America and Europe joined
the founders. After World War II
and the McArthur occupation,
American businessmen, among
them Jews, saw new markets
opening and came to Japan. The
Jews finally incorporated as a
nonprofit religious organization
under the new constitution
drafted by the American ad-
visors.
THE PRESENT Center mem
Jewish Community Center of Hong Kong
bership is 120 families com-
prising 300 souls.The estimated
total Jewish population, in-
cluding a few from Osaka and
other cities, is over 800. The
unaffiliated are the lost sheep of
Israel whose numbers signal a
coming crisis- in the total Jewish
population of the world. Despite
the press releases of the Reform
movement of the early 1950s
about the thousands of Japanese
who either converted to Judaism
or sought conversion, there are
only three recognized Japanese
families which converted. One of
these is in the United States. The
son of one family in Japan is now
studying for his Bar Mitzvah.
The present lay leader and
educator of the Center. Mr. Ab-
raham Aviner. is an Israeli who
studied in the U.S. and is marry-
2815 N
Jewish Community Day School
Of Palm Beach County, Inc.
Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach, Florida 33407
Is now accepting applications for
Pre-School-Full or Half Day
Kindergarten-Full Day
Grade l-Grade Vl-Elementary School
Grades Vll-VIII-Junior High School
Transportation throughout Palm Beach County
Admission Tests Required
Application Forms A Further Information-
Dr. Avie Waxman, Director
832-8423 4
Financial Assistance Available
Deadline May 15. 1977
is; rr::---
ing an American girl employed as
a secretary by a Japanese adver-
tising company. Mr. Aviner is
strictly Orthodox. The Birnbaum
Sabbath Siddur is used.
The boal schachrus and boat
koreh was an Iraqi Jew who is
married to an Israeli. He also of-
ficiated at the mincha services
which followed the kiddush.
I HAD the privilege of speak-
ing at the elaborate kiddush after
the services. Mr. Rimati. the Is-
raeli Ambassador to Japan, who
is completing his tour of service
there, also spoke.
The Center occupies a beautiful
former three-story private
residence. The shut was a 1968
addition to the original structure.
This was financed by a donation
of the Eisenberg family.
The building library contains
hooks on many aspects of
Judaism in English. French and
Hebrew. The Center includes a
mikveh and maintains a Jewish
section of the Yokahama
cemetary, a hevra kadisha and a
kosher dairy restaurant. It
assists members in importing
Kosher meat, 400 pounds at a
time, as well as Passover foods.
THE MEMBERSHIP, almost
as diverse as the places in the
world where Jews live, are
French. American. British. South
bluish Community Day School of Palm Beach County, Inc.
2*15 N. Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach, Fla. 33407
A r Telephone II? tlW / 4
enef icia/y Agency of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
African, Latin American and
others. Inter-marriage between
Jews and Japanese is rare, al-
though we spent some very
pleasant hours with a Jewish
woman who is married to a
Japanese.
To prognosticate on the future
of Jews in Japan is foolhardy, al-
though there are some facts to
consider. There is no anti-
Semitism in Japan, and if one
believes that anti-Semitism is
necessary for the survival of
Judaism this may be a factor.
However, there is little chance
of Jewish assimilation into the
dominant culture. Jews in Japan
are interested in Israel and some
migrate there. Jewish youth is
frequently sent out of the country
for secondary education, usually
to Australia, Canada. England or
the U.S.
MANY OF the Jews now in
Japan, like so many Jews else-
where, are more interested in the
secular and ethnic aspects of
Judaism than in the religious.
Any political change may also
have an effect.
F'rom my vantage point of
limited knowledge of the
Japanese situation specifically,
but with much knowledge of the
Jews. I'd say that almost any-
thing can happen in the course of
years
JEWISH FAMILY AND CHILDREN'S SERVICE
An outstanding professional counseling ogency serving, trie 'c.v.of.
community of Palm Beach Counfy Professional and confidential
*ie'p is available for
Problems of the oging
Consultation and evaluation services
Vocational counseling
Marital counseling
Parent child conflicts
~il problems
.^PriveteOffices: 2411 OkeechobeeBlvd.
^____fc_^ West Palm Beach, Fla. 33409
/^_ 1(2^ Telephone: 684-1991
JEj flf! 3200 North Federal Hwy. Suite 206-
I # ^ Room 12, Boca Raton, Fla.
=3 Telephone: 395-3640
Moderate fees are charged in family an>. individual counseling to
thos- who can pay (Fees are based on income and family si*e)
The Jewish Fam.ly and Children's Serv.ce ts a beneficiory agency of
the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach Counfy.
SBAUM MCMCBTAL PA3K
Pmlm Beech County's Cemetery
Exclusively for the Jewish Community
FEATURING
1. Tribes of Israel Mausoleum
2. Bible Garden
3. Private Estates
4. 24 Hour Counseling Service
OFFICE:
5032 Okeechobee Blvd.
W. Palm Beech, Fla. 33401
_, PHONE
W. Palm-684-2277
De4ray-427-3220


A UMft WCIM,
.....-W
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinCommunity Pre-School 1 977-78bibibibiiiiB,b
Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County
Pre-School Director, Phyllis Morgan, assists Community
Wendy Neville, Jason MacKenny and struction is
Lauren Russel at the Jewish Federation's months.
Pre-School's pool. Swim
provided during the
in-
warm
Pre-School
Morning Program
PLAYGROUP
Since play is child's work, the two-year-olds develop socially in a creative school
environment. Small children develop socially and respond to various stimuli
through the use of movement and their five senses.
THREE-YEAR-OLD GROUP
The three-year-old's intellectual and social growth continues to be guided in an
atmosphere of inquisitive learning. During the year, the children begin to function
as a group and begin to operate on a symbolic level.
I FOUR-YEAR-OLD GROUP
The four-year-old program strengthens the cognitive growth processes. The
program becomes a series of successes for childrenbuilding self-confidence.
Children discover that learning is fun I
Fees for the Pre-School morning program
I TUITION: $52.00 per month
A $40.00 non-refundable deposit is payable with the application.
Pre-School nursery hours are 9:00a.m. to 12:00 noon.
Community Pre-School Program
Of Afternoon Activities
iBEGINS: Monday, September 12(12:00 noon3:00 p.m.)
ART:Artistic understanding is developed in children through experience in using
various media creatively.
MUSIC and MOVEMENT: Music and rhythmic understanding are developed in
students through pleasure in movement, song, rhythm, instruments and musical
drama.
LISTENING and MOVING: The development of body awareness and position in
space.
TUMBLING SKILLS for IMPULSE CONTROL: Activities which provide a sound base
of controlled movement and concentrated physical participation.
NAIL and HAMMER: Experimentation with tools and wood.
Fees for the afternoon program$175 per semester |
Fees for the full day program$400 per semester
(m savings of $25.00 pt semester)
rv. v '* \ i ^|
St. |B>a ^ P ^m earn I \La
JM P^^^H* W 1
E**a 1
H^B mWt WM^Um^M^MWm
Heather Neville, Adrienne Till, Lori Weinstein, Lian\
Jill Jaxon and Christopher Pedersen enjoy the slic
monkey bars and the playground at the Commi
School. Physical development is one of the main ob[
the program at the Community Pre-SchooL
*ScJ.
*H
Estee Brooks and Jennifer Gomberg share an
imaginary boat trip. The children at the Com-
munity Pre-School are encouraged to interact
socially through creative play.
APPLICATION FORM
Child's Name.
.Birthdate.
Parent or Guardian.
Add ress
Telephone,
.City.
Zip.
Please enroll my child in the 1077-78 COMMUNITY PRE-SCHOOL
Morning program only.
Afternoon program only.
Full day program.
My $40.00 non-refundable application fee Is enclosed.
Date
MAIL TO: COMMUNITY PRE-SCHOOL
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
2415 Okeechobee Boulevard
West Palm Beach, Florida 33409
Signature
Liana Dittmar, Heather Neville, Naomi Horo-
wiu, Michael Gordon and Dan Konigsburg
celebrate a tea party in the Pre-School building-
Play is child's work and imagination is nur-
tured at the Community Pre-School


Full Text
Page 10
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Frida
y, July 29, ]
= Brzezinski Sees No U.S. Effort to Impose Peace
By TRUDE B. FELDM AN
Jewish Florida*
Whhc House Correspondent
WASHINGTON-Zbigniew
Brzezinski, President Carter's
National Security Adviser, said
that peace in the Middle East will
require more than just the end
of belligerency.
"Real peace," he said, "has to
mean mutual recognition of the
permanence of a settlement,
mutual recognition of the exis-
tence of the parties to that settle-
ment, the undertaking of a com-
prehensive political, diplomatic,
commercial and social relation-
ships, and so forth.
"IN OTHER words, peace is
not just the formal absence of
war, but it's the reality of his-
orical cohabitation in a single
region. It is the acceptance of
that cohabitation, and it is
building on it towards more
cooperative collaborative
relationships."
Brzezinski is the first
American official to spell out his
definition of the kind of peace
that must be worked out in the
middle East in order to end the
current crisis.
In a rare, exclusive interview
the first he has given on the
Middle East crisis Brzezinski
also discussed territorial borders,
as well as the concessions by both
sides that he believes are essen-
tial to a Mideast peace set-
tlement.
ADDRESSING himself to the
question of what assurances he
has from the Arabs that they are
prepared to make this kind of
peace, he said that "in conver-
sations we've had with Arab
leaders, a willingness on their
part in favor of such an arrange-
ment has been noted.
"And the purpose of nego-
tiations would be to test the
degree of their willingness. If
they are prepared to go down this
path, that's all to the good. If, in
negotiations, it becomes clear
they are not, then it's obvious
there would be no settlement."
Discussing the "minor adjust-
ments" which the Carter ad-
tration is interested in trying to
promote a settlement between
the conflicting parties.
"The time is now becoming
ripe for more direct explorations
between them," he remarked.
However, he denied that the
Administration is trying to force
a settlement in the region "It
should be clear from everything
we've said that there is ab-
solutely no intention to impose a
settlement, he stressed.
"IT'S OUR desire to create a
framework within which the
parties to the conflict can start
talking about issues that, herto-
fore, they have been unable to
discuss.
"That's why we have tried to
press the Arabs to be more forth-
coming about the scope and the
meaning of peace, and, on the
other two issues critical to a
settlement the nature of
security and territory and the
resolution of the Palestinian issue
we have tried to create a basis
for direct discussions between
Israel and its Arab neighbors."
Brzezinski was asked whether
the Administration has now
adopted a plan like the Rogers
Plan (a Middle East settlement
proposed by former Secretary of
State William Rogers).
"There is no Rogers Plan or
any other plan," he responded.
In response to these mounting
fears, Brzezinski concluded: "I
hope this isn't the impression
they have gotten. We have made
it clear that any settlement
between the parties will have to
include, as the essential point of
departure, a comprehensive peace
treaty including mutual recog-
nition and comprehensive
relationships.
"IT'S possible and in fact
probable that some Arabs
continue to harbor the expec-
tation that peace would only be
stage one and that it 11 lead to
stage two, namely the liquidation
of Israel.
Sir *" "M' n&
"Bl)TWEd<,n-th.v.
Course Encouraging Catholic Conversion?
By BRIAN LIPSITZ
NEW YORK (JTA) The
Jewish Community Relations
Bureau (JCRB) of Kansas City
has accused the University of
Kansas of sponsoring a series of
humanities courses in which
students are encouraged to
convert to medieval Catholicism.
A memorandum issued by the
JCRB said: "Moreover, a dis-
proportionate number of former
I HP (Integrated Humanities
Program) students are now in the
Benedictine monastery at Font-
gombault, France."
IN A PHONE interview,
David Goldstein, JCRB
executive director, told the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency that
it is "generally conceded...that
in the Abby, there are nine
(former IHP) students" of whom
three are believed to be Jewish.
Goldstein said he is certain two
are Jewish, after their identities
became known when they
returned home to visit their
parents.
According to the JCRB memo
titled,"A Warning About the In-
tegrated Humanities Program at
the University of Kansas," which
was sent as an alert to various
Western Ireland where instruc-
tion in Roman Catholicism, using
a Roman Catholic catechism, was
given."
According to the JCRB, the
program at the state school in
Lawrence, Kan., is described
by the catalog as a freshman-
sophomore program 'devoted
to an introductory study of great
philosophical, historical dn
literary books of Western
Civilization from Homer to Dos-
toyevski.'
IT CONSISTS of four six-
credit-hour courses taught by
Profs. Dennis Quinn, Franklyn
Nelick and John Senior.
The memo adds: "While the
IHP faculty deny they are 'brain-
washing,' it seems evident to
many observers that the great
books are used to introduce
young students to only one point
of view, that of medieval Roman
Catholicism.
"All published reports agree
that contrary views are not aired
in the IHP classes. Memorization
is stressed, but not dialogue and
analysis. The Bible is read, but
without scholarly methods of
study. Students are not per-
mitted to take notes in class or to
ask questions. They are told not
to read even the footnotes and
commentaries in the editions of
Jewish communities, "The
Catatog (explaining the course)
SK^S^it^ SKS.?* doss not discuss the student trips the books they use They are
asking Israel to withdraw to the to this monastery orgwized by warned against television, radio,
the IHP faculty, or the 1976 newspapers,
student trip to a remote island in drama."
1967 borders, Brzezinski ex-
plained that as a matter of prac-
tical common sense, it's unlikely
that there can be a peace settle-
ment which involves mutually
accepted frontiers unless there is
mutual acceptance that such a
peace settlement meets the in-
terest of both sides.
"IF THE Arabs were totally
defeated (in war) and, on top of
that, were to feel guilty both
for the conflict and for their
defeat, like the Germans after
World War II then its
possible they could accept truly
significant changes. But the
actual scope of the changes
they're likely to accept has to be
defined in the course of the nego-
tiations.
"The borders we hope Israel
will obtain should be mutually
recognized and also protected by
additional security arrange-
ments. Thus, they will be truly
defensible much more so than
defense lines that are contested."
Leaning back in a swivel chair
in his spacious office, once oc-
cupied by Or. Henry Kissinger,
and not far from the Oval Office,
the National Security Adviser
observed that one of the Carter
Administration's goals for a
Middle East peace settlement is
to try and make direct nego-
tiations possible by "reducing
the gaps over fundamental issues
between the Arabs and the Is-
raelis."
HE ADDED that it was disa-
greement on these fundamental
issues that "in the past
prevented direct discussions
between them."
Noting that the Israelis have
always said they want direct
negotiations with the Arabs,
Brzezinski said the adminis-
magazines and
CONTACTED by the JTA,
Theodore A. Wilson, associate
dean of the College of Liberal
Arts at the University of Kansas,
said: "It is a very ambiguous
issue involving claims of
academic freedom and involving
questions of the separation of
church and state." He added:
"The statements in the release
(JCRB memo) are accurate."
Wilson said the unviersity has
difficulty separating what goes
on in the classroom from what
may occur outside the classroom
as regards the student-professor
relationship. The professors offer
personal counseling, Wilson said.
Yet, there is "no evidence the
professors hsve stepped over that
line (dictated by the separation of
church and state)," within the
classroom. It would be difficult to
prove, as no written records exist
of the classes since note-taking is
banned, he said. In addition,
Wilson said the university would
have to change its position on
academic freedom before it could
monitor the classes.
THE COURSES are not
required, Wilson said, but are
electives which satisfy the
humanities requirements. The
professors have been teaching the
program for "about eight years."
Students receive no credit for
their monastery study, he said.
While the university is not in-
Begin Takes Strong Stand
On Media Leaks from Cabinet
By TUVIA MENDELSON
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Prime Minister Menachem Begin
has laid down the law to his
Cabinet: No smoking during
Cabinet meetings, no talking to
journalists afterwards. The ban
on talking is aimed primarily at
avoiding "leaks" to the press of
senisitive matters, a situation
that distressed previous
governments.
Begin is adamant on the
subject. "There will be no leaks
from this Cabinet." he told his
colleagues. He characterized
"leaks" as "destructive on the
domestic scene and even more so
where our international relations
are concerned."
TO ENSURE a leak proof
Cabinet, the Premier has also
banned the presence of ministers'
aides and advisors st Cabinet
sessions. Under his ruling, any
minister who needs an aide or
advisor during discussion of a
specific subject must apply for
permission beforehand. The aide
would be allowed to attend only
while the particular subject is
being disucssed.
These instructions were
followed by Cabinet members
who declined to provide any
statement, as had been the case
in the past, to journalists waiting
outside the Cabinet after its
weekly session ended. smoking during Cabinet
BEGIN ALSO made it clear meetings, especially cigars which
that he would not tolerate he called "most disturbing"
Report: PLO Investing In
U.S. Blue Chip Stocks
NEW YORK-(JTA |-Tim*
Magazine said in its current issue
that the Palestine Liberation
Organization has built up an
investment portfolio amounting
"to an estimated $60-100 million"
which includes shares in "blue
chip American companies that
have operations in the Middle
East."
Describing the PLO as
"probably the richest, best
financed revolutionary-terrorist
organization in history," Time
said its other holdings include
two Beirut hotels, shares in
shipyards and oil tankers and a
youth hostel under construction
in Cairo
TIME' SAID that "Some of
this money has even been used
for the quiet purchase of land on
the West Bank that local
Palestinians might otherwise be
tempted to sell to the Israelis."
According to the report, "The
Palestinians also claim to make
$6 million a year operating an
illegal drug market inside Israel,
using Oriental Jews aa pusher."
But the PLO s principal
sources of income are sub-
ventions from the oil-producing
Arab states, notably Saudi
Arabia and from other Arab
states which totals about $70
million a year.
Another $10 million comes
from the 300,000 Palestinians
living in the Arab oil states where
5 percent of their wages are
routinely withheld as a con-
tribution to the Palestinian
movement.
"Every so often, the
Palestinian coffers have been
replenished with income ex-
tracted by terrorism," 7Y'm
reported. The magazine referred
to the $26 million ransom paid
jointly by Iran and Saudi Arabia
for the 81 hostages taken at the
OPEC meeting in Vienna in
December, 1976.
According to Time, the PLO's
assets "are mainly held through
numbered bank accounts and
blind names to prevent Israeli
retaliation and also to
camouflage the wealth of a
movement that prides itself on its
warrior image."
vestigating m-class activiti,
Wilson said the administratiol
has interviewed students aboi
their outside activities. Althouir
he did not elaborate, he aaid^
think the allegations that hay
been raised are serious."
According to Goldstein, sti
dents sometimes have lunch i
professors' homes, which,
said, in and of itself, would I
constructive activity. But Go
stein alleged that an atmosph
encouraging conversion
Catholicism exists at the lunch
FURTHERMORE, he
students and professors son
times go to mass togeth
"presumably to help them
their Latin (ecclesiastical Lat.
not classical)." And although I
trip to Ireland was "presumably
a voluntary activity," Gok
asserted that there was "a lot (
pressure to take it."
Wilson said college credit
the Ireland program has st
because of reports of
tizing. According to Goldsti
about 300 students were in
IHP last year. Wilson said "
its height, 100 students out
20,000 students at the school.1
were taking the course.
An interfaith committee i
"The Committee for Acaden
and Religious Freedom" hast
formed, Goldstein said, with
primary goal being to info
potential students about
actual program. Beyond
Goldstein said the commiti
would like to see the pr
modified so that opposite poii
of view are aired.
HE SAID: "This is not inanj
way a Jewish issue."
One well-informed observe
said he felt there was a reluct
to challenge state officials pub
licly because of, what he believe
to be. grass-roots support for th
program from many small tow
parents who fear their children
will become 'hippies'' od
radicalized when sent away ttj
college.
Although their children majj
convert from being Baptists
Catholics, they view this as beii
a far lesser evil.
That observer added that
low-keyed approach is prefer
to prevent the issue fn
becoming so controversial
students will take the course ouB
of curiosity. Wilson also said thij
program has "very 9irong defer.
ders," particularly parents who
children (with, for example, dmd
problems) were straightened out.|
ONE university official closet
the issue, who requested that r
name not be used, said: "The i
ministration is taking a paJM
of benevolent neglect. W
gradually withholding suppo
for the program... the prosp
over the next year or so
the program will decline... '
it loses its publicity and 'sen*'
specialness," which is "
motivating fores.
Beyond that, the official
the university www 2
course if legal action showw
professors were proselytuang


L July 29.1977
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 11
'poii't Overlook Million Jews in Far East
,sEYMOUKB.LIEBMAN
ls0 preoccupies the atten-
ffAmerican Jewry that the
Ire of almost one million
Latin America receives
action, and then only
...f our national defense
crjes. anti-Semitism!
jiess attention is directed to
Ijewsofthe Far East.
L may be due to the com-
.me insignificant size of the
"Ki-gin Tokya Hong
Singapore. Bangkok and
_, Another factor is that
fem and Shintoism do not
Z anti-Semitism or even
Cudaism. Far Eastern faiths
primarily ethical, philoso-
and humanitarian and are
[competitive.
ECOL'RSE to demographic
ts in the most recent edition
(American Jewish Yearbook
provides guesstimates"
should not be considered
U me Sinai. This book gives
j Jewish population of Japan
|500 (community reports 400-
Bangkok, the capital of
nd, 0 (community reports
[membership. 70 families).
> figure variations may be
lo a count of families instead
[individuals, or vice versa.
jther factor is the existence of
rffiliated Jews. J. I. Fishbein,
of The Jewish Sentinel,
a few years ago, anent
^ Kong Jewry, that "those
jdonot belong say they 'don't
to mix with Sephardic
Sephardim did found the
nunal centers in Hong Kong
JSingapore. They are also the
Uiiest and most powerful in
places, the Ashkenazim
ninate in Tokyo and Bang-
In the former, the Ash-
;im Russian, English,
can, French and other
Europeans are the principal
communal leaders.
SINCE Malvina and I spent
some time in the Jewish Com-
munity Center of Japan, (Tokyo
to be exact), with several of its
members and its lay spiritual
leader, I will discuss this Jewish
community. The community was
started (not officially founded in
1921 by the influxof many
Russian Jews who had fled the
Russian Revolution and migrated
to Shanghai.
When economic conditions in
Shanghai became almost in-
tolerable, they moved to Tokyo.
My own research in connection
with the history of Jews in the
New World led to my knowledge
of Jews in the Far East (Macao.
China and Japan) in the 16th and
17th centuries. There was also a
community of Chinese Jews in
Kai-feng Fu, 750 miles west of
Shanghai which was in existence
until 1859.
Rabbi M. Tokayer, a former
U.S. chaplain in Japan, met one
of the descendants of the Jews of
Kai-feng Fu who also left Shang-
hai for Tokyo (Pearl Buck wrote
Peony, historical novel con-
cerning the demise of the Chinese
Jewish community See also Mal-
vina W. Leibman's book Jewish
Cookery from Boston to Baghdad
for more data on the Chinese
Jews).
From 1921 to 1953, the Jews
met in private homes for religious
services. During this period Jews
from America and Europe joined
the founders. After World War 11
and the McArthur occupation,
American businessmen, among
them Jews, saw new markets
opening and came to Japan. The
Jews finally incorporated as a
nonprofit religious organization
under the new constitution
drafted by the American ad-
visors.
THE PRESENT Center mem-
Jewish Community Center of Hong Kong
bership is 120 families com-
prising 300 souls.The estimated
total Jewish population, in-
cluding a few from Osaka and
other cities, is over 800. The
unaffiliated are the lost sheep of
Israel whose numbers signal a
coming crisis, in the total Jewish
population of the world. Despite
the press releases of the Reform
movement of the early 1950s
about the thousands of Japanese
who either converted to Judaism
or sought conversion, there are
only three recognized Japanese
families which converted. One of
these is in the United States. The
son of one family in Japan is now
studying for his Bar Mitzvah.
The present lay leader and
educator of the Center, Mr. Ab-
raham Aviner, is an Israeli who
studied in the U.S. and is marry-
Jewish Community Day School
Of Palm Beach County, Inc.
2815 N. Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach, Florida 33407
Is now accepting applications for
Pre-School-Full or Half Day
Kindergarten-Full Day
Grade l-Grade Vl-Elementary School
Grades Vll-Vlll-Junior High School
Transportation throughout Palm Beach County
Admission Tests Required
Application Forms & Further Information-
Dr. Avie Waxman, Director
832-8423 4
Financial Assistance Available
Deadline May 15, 1977
*'i
Zf 8PHW
Jewish Community Day School of Palm Beach County, Inc.
2815 N. Flagler Drive, Wet Palm Beech, Fie. 33407
Telephone 13? MM / 4
A Beneficiary Agency of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
ing an American girl employed as
a secretary by a Japanese adver-
tising company. Mr. Aviner is
strictly Orthodox. The Birnbaum
Sabbath Siddur is used.
The baal schachrus and boat
koreh was an Iraqi Jew who is
married to an Israeli. He also of-
ficiated at the mincha services
which followed the kiddush.
I HAD the privilege of speak-
ing at the elaborate kiddush after
the services. Mr. Rimati, the Is-
raeli Ambassador to Japan, who
is completing his tour of service
there, also spoke.
The Center occupies a beautiful
former three-story private
residence. The shut was a 1968
addition to the original structure.
This was financed by a donation
of the Eisenberg family.
The building library contains
books on many aspects of
Judaism in English, French and
Hebrew. The Center includes a
mikveh and maintains a Jewish
section of the Yokahama
cemetary, a hevra kadisha and a
kosher dairy restaurant. It
assists members in importing
Kosher meat. 400 pounds at a
time, as well as Passover foods.
THE MEMBERSHIP, almost
as diverse as the places in the
world where Jews live, are
French. American. British. South
African. Latin American and
others. Inter-marriage between
Jews and Japanese is rare, al-
though we spent some very
pleasant hours with a Jewish
woman who is married to a
Japanese.
To prognosticate on the future
of Jews in Japan is foolhardy, al-
though there are some facts to
consider. There is no anti-
Semitism in Japan, and if one
believes that anti-Semitism is
necessary for the survival of
Judaism this may be a factor.
However, there is little chance
of Jewish assimilation into the
dominant culture. Jews in Japan
are interested in Israel and some
migrate there. Jewish youth is
frequently sent out of the country
for secondary education, usually
to Australia, Canada, England or
the U.S.
MANY OF the Jews now in
Japan, like so many Jews else-
where, are more interested in the
secular and ethnic aspects of
Judaism than in the religious.
Any political change may also
have an effect.
From my vantage point of
limited knowledge of the
Japanese situation specifically,
but with much knowledge of the
.lews. I'd say that almost any-
thing can happen in the course of
years.
JEWISH FAMILY AND CHILDREN'S SERVICE
An outstanding professional counseling agency serving the 'c.v.jf.
community of Palm Beach County Professional and confidential
help is available for
Problems of the aging Marital counseling
Consultation and evaluation services Parent child conflicts
Vocational counseling Per*, nl problems
^^ Private Offices: 2411 Okeechobee Blvd.
y^ >v. West Palm Beach, Fla. 33409
y^ 2)s* Telephone: 684-1991
in F^ 3200 North Federal Hwy. Suite 206-
|fl L_- Room 12, Boca Raton, Fla.
KJJkal 5 Telephone: 395-3640
Moderate fees are charged in family anu individual counseling to
thov who can pay (Feesare based on income and family size)
The Jewish family and Children's Service is a beneficiary agency of
the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County._____________
SBAIOM MSMDaTAI PAHS
Pmlm Beech County's Cemetery
Exclusively tor the Jewish Community
FEATURING
1. Tribes of Israel Mausoleum
2. Bible Garden
3. Private Estates
4. 24 Hour Counseling Service
OFFICE:
5932 Okeechobee Blvd.
W. Palm Beach, Fla. 33400
PHONE
W. Palm-6a4-2277
Detray-427-3220

*


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