Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
8 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 28, 1975)-v. 8, no. 40 (Dec. 17, 1982).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 2, 1976 called v.2, no. 22, but constitutes v.2, no. 1.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: July 28, 1978 called no. 14 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement; Aug. 25, 1978 called no. 16 in masthead and no. 17 in publisher's statement; Aug. 10, 1979 called no. 15 in masthead and no. 16 in publisher's statement; Oct. 22, 1982 called no. 31 in masthead and no. 32 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44607504
lccn - sn 00229550
ocm44607504
System ID:
AA00014311:00147

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
wJemsti It tarndlii(3i m
OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
Combing "0U VOICI" and "FEDERATION REPORTER"
in conjunction with The Jewish Federation af Palm Beach County
Volume
3 Number 14
Friday. July 15.1977
Price 35 Cents
Administration
Awaits Begin
new elections brought more trac-
table leaders to the helm in
Israel
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASH. (JTA) The
[Carter Administration meanwhile. Dinitz and
officially and publicly said Rabbi Alexander Schindler.
: .[^ it will welcome Israeli chairman of the Conference of
Prime Minister Menachem Presidents of Major American
nmnrn Washington and is Jewi8n Organizations. both
Begin to wasmngum.umm as8ertedthat nomalerialcha
looking forward to hearing tag ukm place in the JJ nd
his views on a Middle r*ast Israeli positions as a result of the
settlement. Departments detailed
The State Department
also said that National
Security Affairs Advisor
Zbigniew Brzezinski has
telephoned Israeli Ambas-
sador Simcha Dinitz to this
effect. Dinitz left for Jeru-
salem for a week of consul-
tations in Jerusalem in
preparation for Begin's
scheduled talks with Presi-
|dent Carter here July 19-20.
THE BRZEZINSKI call of re
Insurance came after reports fil-
[fered privately and unofficially to
Uporters that the Adminis-
liniion would have no point in
netting with Begin if he did not
retreat from his position of main
IUining that Judaea and Samaria,
[ammonly known as the West
| Rink, are parts of Israel.
However. Begin has repeatedly
laid that UN Security Council
Unolution 242 is negotiable in all
I its parts, although he would not
I y categorically that Israel will
[kave the territories occupied in
fatSix Day War.
The State Department took
Ipublic dissent from this view
Iwith a statement specifically
Investing that Israel must
ithdraw from territories as a
Ikior in the negotiations for a
Ixulement. In some U.S.
Ijurters there was a view that
|jfap would go much better if
and the Likud Party
ppeared from the scene and
Will Egypt, Soviets
Patch Up Cracks?
Department's detailed state-
ment. Both also emphasized that
they are seeking to preserve har-
mony in Israeli-American
relations.
Comments by Dinitz and
Schindler were made at the State
Department where they were met
by reporters after they held
separate half-hour meetings with
Secretary of State Cyrus Vance.
Earlier. Dinitz also met with
Brzezinski at the White House.
Dinitz was asked by reporters
whether there are differences in
Israeli and American policies.
"There is no secret." the Ambas-
sador replied, "that we had
differences of opinion on some
items before. I don't think as a
result of this statement any of
the differences were either
resolved or augmented. I think
basically it was a restatement of
American policy. I don't think
there was any material change."
DINITZ emphasized that "our
government has said it is pre-
pared to negotiate on all three
fronts with all our three neigh-
bors. This has been our policy
based on Security Council
Resolution 242.
Asked whether American and
Israeli policies are in harmony,
Dinitz replied. "Our aim and our
effort all the time is to keep it in
harmony but that does not mean
we do not have, here and there,
differences of opinion which we
express with candidness and with
friendship, the same way the U.S.
government expresses them to
us."
Ever since Egypt expelled
more than 15.000 Russian
military advisers and technicians
in 1972. relations between the
two nations have resembled the
descent of a roller coaster.
And about two years ago when
President Anwar Sadat
abrogated his country's long-
standing Treaty of Friendship
with Moscow, most people
thought the ride had come to an
end.
BUT LAST month's journey
to Moscow by Egyptian Foreign
Minister Ismail Fahmy raises the
possibility that the ride may be
on again. After two days of talks.
Fahmy and his counterpart,
Andrei (iromyko. both issued low
key but warm pronouncements.
And on his return to Cairo
Fahmy declared he was "con-
fident" a meeting between Sadat
and Communist leader Leonid
Hre/.hnev would be held soon. No
dale or location for the meeting
have been given, but sources
indicate it could lie towards the
end of this month, preceded by a
visit to Cairo by (iromyko When
Sadut and Brezhnev do meet, it
will be for the first time in five
years.
The rift in Egyptian-Soviet
relations is deep and diplomatic
circles caution that the latest
Ansbffls
round of contacts does not neces-
sarily mean the beginning of a
new era of rapprochement.
ON HIS return from Moscow,
Fahmy was careful to point out
that "Egypt is a non-aligned
country" and would continue so.
The clear implication was that
Russia should not raise its hopes
too high of gaining lost influence
in the country.
Even so. a new will to patch up
old quarrels does seem to exist on
lx>lh sides. After his meeting
with Fahmy, Foreign Minister
(iromyko said: "We want to have
good relations with Egypt
Ixt-ause this is the key to a
solution of the Middle East
prohkmi."
Hut it will take every ounce of
good will, and some very tangible
concessions from Moscow, before
relations can be restored to
anything approaching their pre-
1972 status.
THE AREAS of dispute which
kd to the expulsions in 1972 of
lietween 15.000 and 18,000
Russians from Egypt, are
essentially the same as those
straining relations today.
j Republicans Assail Carter I
WASH INC TON (JTA) The Republican National
Committee said in u statement that President Carter "has now
dictated the terms of a Middle Kast settlement and has
seriously undermined the negotiating position of the Israeli
government with its neighbors."
Former Sen. William Brock of Tennessee, the committee's
chairman, said "the reversal of President Carter's strong
support of the State of Israel as he outlined it in the 1976
Presidential campaign is the most serious promise he has
broken since his election."
Plea to Withhold MFN from Rumania
WASHINGTON IJTA) -
Representatives of American
ish organizations urged the
Matt to withhold continuation
most-favored-nation treatment
I Rumania for a third year
pending a further examination of
liMt country's emigration
Nicies. They said they were
Jfwtly disturbed" by the fail-
* of Jewish emigration from
umania.
Testifying before the Senate
"nance Committee'* sub-
wamittee on international trade
I William Korey, representing
Conference of Presidents of
Br. American Jewish
nations, and Jacob Bir-
"*. national director of the
for Russian and East
Jope.n Jewry, who also
!ta the Student Struggle
"Soviet Jewry.
1 testifying was Matthew
State Department
>r, who urged con-
PJ of MFN status for
" meana of bolstering
"ot Carter's initiatives to
[Cater
reduce East-West tensions.
Korey said. "We are en-
couraged by President Carter's
intention to monitor closely
Rumanian compliance" with the
provisions of the Trade Reform
Act that links emigration
practices with U.S. trade benefits
and that if Rumania's per-
formance is not in accord with the
act in the coming 12 months he
will reconsider his recom-
mendation of waiver for
Rumania.
Korey added that while the
American Jewish community
recognized "the extensive
religious and cultural liberty
which the Rumanian Jewish
community has enjoyed, we are
greatly disturbed, however, by
the decrease in Jewish
emigration."
HE SAID that was in "sharp
contradiction to the large number
of Jews who have indicated they
want to leave Rumania to reunite
with their families in Israel."
Birnbaum, who was asked
what is wanted from Rumania,
replied. "Early permission to
leave for those waiting for more
than a year; cessation of the
varied harassments; and steady
growth in the emigration flows to
the United States and a reversion
of the Bow to Israel to the 1973-
74 levels of between 300-400
monthly."
HE NOTED that during the
last five years an average of 2,800
people were able to emigrate to
Israel each year and in 1976 the
number was 2,000. This year, the
emigration rate is down by
almost half from last year.
"The significant decline in
emigration to Israel is very
disturbing," Ribicoff said. "Not
only have emigration trends to
that country differed sharply
from the trends in other coun-
tries, but the decline of
emigration to Israel represents a
serious falling off in the rate of
Jewish emigration."
V
\
i
Meet
Carter's
Lance
By PETER HOBDAY
I
I
i
"Patience," says Burl Lance
who runs the Office of Manage-
ment and Budget, "is what you
need in politics." Yet Lance less
than anyone in Washington these
days is likely to be as frustrated
AL*A1L1
by the slow pace of government
because he has the ear of the
President.
Twice a week on Tuesday
afternoons and over lunch on
Thursdays he spends time with
Jimmy Carter. The Thursday
lunch, in fact, has no formal
agenda and it is said that Lance
is one of the very few people in
the administration who can raise
Coatiaued oa Page 6
ANDREI GROMYKO
At a time when Sadat was pre-
paring for the war against Israel
in 197,'i, Moscow refused requests
for more sophisticated arms and
equipment. This, coupled with a
desire to avoid the involvement
of Russia in the coming conflict,
prompted the expulsions.
The question of arms supply
remains the same. And with the
departing Russians went the
security of spares for Moscow-
supplied hardware, together with
all hope of persuading the Soviet
leadership to reschedule more
than $4 billion worth of military
debts. After the war in 1973 a few
attempts were made to restore
the situation, but all ended in
failure.
IN ADDITION to these
problems, there is the question of
Moscow's disapproval of Cairo's
outspoken stand on what it
regards as growing Russian
influence in Africa. On this issue
tension was heightened for
example when Egypt loaned
pilots to Zaire during the conflict
with insurgents in Shaba
province earlier this year.
An Egyptian diplomatic
spokesman in Ixindon said that it
was Kgypt's policy that "Africa
should not become the battle-
ground for the superpowers" and
that there was little chance of
Sadat compromising on this
position in the pursuit of his own
mini-detente.
This issue then, perhaps more
than all the others, could cause
some sticky moments when the
Egyptian and Russian leaders
get together.
FOREIGN Minister (iromyko
has said that consultations will
now continue "with the aim of
laying down sound foundations
on to solve other problems." But
Moscow's and Cairo's respective
interpretations of "sound ...
political relations" may still be
too far apart.
Towards the end of last year,
Sadat told the People's
Assembly: "We have one con-
dition with regard to the U.S. and
Soviet Union ... It is that he who
wants to deal with ua must deal
with us as we are and not as he
wants ua to be." As contacts
resume there is little reason to
suppose Sadat has altered his
Stand. To the Point international


Page 2
The Jewish Fbridian of Palm Beach County
Friday. J^ ,5, l5ml
Sherman to Chair New Young
Women's Leadership Cabinet
SHERMAN
The United Jewish Appeal
has established a Young Wo-
men's Leadership Cabinet, de-
signed to develop leader-
ship potential a-,
mong younger'
American Jewish
women, General
Chairman Leon-
ard R. Strelitz
announced to-
day. Jane Sher-
man of Detroit, a
member of the
UJA's National
Women's Divi-
sion Board, has
been appointed
chairman.
"American Jewish women
have taken a new direction
during the last decade," Strelitz
said. "While remaining dedicated
to traditional values, they are
oriented toward careers as well as
family life. They are highly
motivated to work for social
change and improvement both at
home and abroad, and it is im-
portant to our community that
their energies be channeled into
the work of UJA and
federations."
RESPONDING to her ap-
pointment, Mrs. Sherman said:
"We envision a Young Women's
Leadership Cabinet that will offer
the emerging generation of
women increased opportunities to
play fuller and more independent
roles in American Jewish life. We
expect to take a broadly educa-
tional approach, offering training
in the fund-raising process, and
dialogue and inquiry in the areas
of Jewish values and respon-
sibilities."
The Young Women's Leader-
ship Cabinet will work in close
cooperation with the UJA's
Young Leadership Cabinet and
its Women's Division.
Recently appointed members
of the Steering Committee are
Vicki Agron, Englewood, Colo.;
Linda Feinstone, New York City;
Karen Firestein, Wayne, N.J.;
Helaine Gould, Roslyn, N.Y.;
Robin Handelman, Evanston,
III.; Sharon M. Jacobs, Williams
ville, N.Y.; Jayne Mackta,
Morristown, N.J.; Rigmor Offer-
man, Old Westbury, N.Y.; Brina
Reinstein, Tulsa, Okla.; Roslyn
Rothstein, Yardley, Pa.; and
Jane Rubenstein, Kansas City,
Mo. Barbara P. Faske, associate
director of the Young Leadership
Cabinet, will serve as director of
the new Cabinet.
MRS. SHERMAN has been a
national and community leader in
young leadership and women's
division activities. A member of
the UJA National Women's
Division Board and National
Campaign Cabinet, whe also
serves on the Council of Jewish
Federations and Welfare Funds
Leadership Development Execu-
tive Committee. From 1972-1974,
she served as Michigan State
chairman of the UJA Women's
Division. In Detroit, she is past
chairman of the Women's
Division campaign of the Jewish
Welfare Federation and currently
serves on its Board of Directors
and as chairman of its $500-and-
over Gifts Division. She is also a
member of the Federation's Com-
munity Services, Budgeting and
Leadership Development com-
mittees and the Jewish Com-
munity Center Board of Direc-
tors. In 1971, Mrs, Sherman was
awarded the Sylvia Simon
Greenberg Award for Young
Leadership.
Furniture and Household
SUPPLIES NEEDED
Soviet Jewry Resettlement
In Palm Beach County
We need ALL household furnishings for Russian Jewish
families being resettled in the Palm Beach County area.
All donations are tax deductible and are greatly needed.
Please call Barbara Wunsh at 967-0554 or the Jewish
Federation office to arrange for pick-up.
Soviet Jewry Resettlement Committee
Lipoff Appointed UJA National Chairman
Lipoff was a recipient of the Jewish Federation and is a past
President's Leadership Award chairman of its Foundation of
(1972) of the Greater Miami Jewish Philanthropies.
First Marine
National Bank and Thist Company
Norman H. Lipoff of Miami
has been appointed a national
chairman of the United Jewish
Appeal, UJA General Chairman
Leonard R. Strelitz announced
here.
"Norman Lipoff will be a
major asset in making the 197K
UJA campaign, conducted
by federations throughout
the country, the largest in
our history," said Strelitz.
"His record of a-
chievement and
effectiveness in
national, regional
and community
campaign activi-
ties is unparal-
leled, and I look
forward to his.
advice counsel!
and active parti-
cipation in the
conduct of our
crucial 1978 ef-
fort."
A MEMBER of the UJA
Executive Committee for the
past several years. Lipoff was
formerly associate national chair-
man of the UJA Young Leader-
ship Cabinet. He is vice president
and director of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation and general
chairman for the Israel Emer-
gency Fund Campaign.
A prominent attorney, he is a
member of the Dade County and
American Bar Associations and a
lecturer in law at the University
of Miami College of Law. He
currently serves in the Tax
Section of the American Bar
Association and is a former
chairman of the Tax Section of
the Florida Bar.
114 NO J STREET
IAKE WORTH. FLORIDA
582 5641
Member F.D.I.C.
LIPOFF
TAPES
CARTONS
POLYETHYLENE
BUSINESS FORMS
TAGS-LABELS
BAGS-BOXES
WIPES
PAIM BEACH
832-0211
HOWARD
APER A
ACKACINC
DON VOGEL
REALTOR ASSOCIATE
BROKER SALESMAN
CoW me for yoor fffff copy of
" toff's Gmde" for Homos Or Condominiums I
700 U.S. HIGHWAY No. 1, NORTH PALM BEACH, FLA. 33408
gfflg Phono: 848*753 tesieW* Ph; 422-4000
STAMPS APPRAISED/1
AND PURCHASED '
Philately has been
our only business for
well over 40 years as
a Licensed Aoc
tiorteer In NYC
Now located in Flor
Ida.Sorry, but we have no stamps tol
sell.but we are always interested in
purchasing desirable material.espec
iaiiy U.S.A. collections. We hav
earned the commendable Senior/Mam-
Bership in the American Society / of
Appraisers '
HERAAAN HERST, JR., INC.
P.O. Box 1583, Boca Raton,
Flo 33432 391-3223
L
EVITT
1)315 W OaieHwy
Steven Marti. F0
949 A3 IS
1971 Pembroke U
Sonny levitt. f 0
971 7200
625 So Olive Ave
Pti*p Wemtem. f 0
133 4413
With the
Organizations
LEON ATLAS
CANCER CHAPTER
Leon Atlas Cancer Chapter of
Century Village, affiliated with
the American Medical Center,
Cancer Research Center and
Hospital of Denver, will meet on
Tuesday, Sept. 6, at Holiday Inn,
Century Village at 1 p.m.
Reservations are now being
taken for Thanksgiving Weekend
at the Deauville Hotel on Miami
Beach. Anne and Len Antelis
can provide more information.
HADASSAH
Annette Cook, incoming presi-
dent of the Chai Group of Hadas-
sah will hold a social brunch for
her new Executive and working
Board at her home on Tuesday,
July 19, at 10:30 a.m.
Members of the new board are:
Vice President of Education,
Sonia Rappaport; Vice President
of Program, Bertha Jacobson;
Vice President of Fund-Raising,
Madeline Miller; Vice P*w .
of Membership. MoHfcT&
Past President Sylvia E
2l3l-rer*B,,lie Ditkf :
Recording Secretary. Dorothy
Greenberg; Financial Secret*/
Beth Kinsey; Corresponfi
Secretary Florence FriC
Also Mesdames Weiss, publics
Vassil and Levetown. bulletin-
Meyerson, telephone aoW
Bernstein hospitality; Chapin"
Donor; Gordon, cards, certifi
cates, HMO. and trees; Hun>
witz. life memberships; Magid-
son, American affairs; Kresch
Zionist affairs; Fox, thrift shop'
Osterman. Dime Banks; Cahn"
wills and bequests.
ShtJom Group of Palm Beach
Hadassah. in conjunction with
Tikvah and Yovel Groups, will
sponsor a four-day Thanksgiving
weekend, Nov. 24-27, at the
Saxony Hotel (Kosher) Miami
Beach. Early reservations may be
secured by contacting Bea Bres-
low, Flora Schwartz, Myra
Ohrenstine or Gert Cetron.
FRED GORDON
REALTOR-ASSOCIATE
Duana C. Heiser Realty Co.
721 No. U.S. Highway No. 1, North Palm Baach 33409
HOME: 622-6840 OFFICE: 842-1568
Board Member Temple Beth David, P.B. Gardens,
Member Friends of the Jewish Community Day School
When we put our name
onacha^itsexxfasively
a Riverside chapel.
h*+^*
Ii4t--af
KSHJI
Announcing a new Riverside chapel
inWest Palm Beach.
Unlike many other Jewish funeral directors in
Florida, Riverside is not represented by any other
organization.
Our new West Palm Beach chapel is another
example of how this policy helps us to provide
service dedicated only to the needs and wishes of
each family and the requirements of Jewish Law
and Custom.
From the original concept to the completed
building, our new chapel is wholly in keeping with
Jewish tradition. It is spacious and comfortable.
It contains a Ritualarium (Mikva)and other required
facilities for the observance of the Jewish Ritual
of Washing (Tahara).
And, reflecting another Riverside policy, it is
manned by one of the largest staffs of Jewish per-
sonnel available in Florida. They are people who
understand Jewish tradition,and honor it. And in
that tradition, we serve every family, regardless of
financial circumstance.
4714 Okeechobee Boulevard, West Palm Beach
683-8676
Other Riverside chapels in the Greater Miami area:
Sunrise, Hollywood,North Miami Beach,
Miami Beach and Miami. Five chapels serving
the New York City Metropolitan area.
H Riverside
Memorial Chaotl. inc / Funaral Director*.
for generations a symbol of Jewish tradition.
l*-77
-MS.77
IW7


fnd.y.J*y^ri
me Jewish tlondian of Palm Beach County
-one.
Up, Up an6 Away
* 7 %
0

>l'p. up am/ uirav '/^nf .900 baloons with postcards attached
\asking the finder to deposit them in the nearest mailbox. The
\nent was Camp Shalom's Annual Baloon Launch demon-
strating the 1977 summer theme "Its' a Small. Small World."


<2

c
S
.<3
.2
^
^\TY ^
7875 Blvdr Rd West Palm Bwch Flo 33411
PROGRAMS
AND FEES
5 Day Program
? M NOON MM'T HMMT
Pre-School 34-year-olds
Child mutt bo 3 by Dec. 31,1977
Tuition: $52.00 per month
Registration Fee: $40.00
--Kl4iO*6TBlMH|-
Application

C*y

Camp Shalom boys and girls anxiously await
the moment when thev will send their helium
baloons aloft. Which baloon will travel the
farthest t Only time will tell.
Extremism Rising, Bonn Reports
By JON FEDLER
BONN (JTA) Incraaaed
activity in Germany by
Palestinian extremist groups is
noted in the 1976 internal
security report of the West
(ierman Interior Ministry. The
report also cites "increasing
aggrearvensM" by neo-Nazi
jrroups. through their member-
ship is estimated at only fKX).
The document states that
several cells of the extremist
Popular Front for the Liberation
of Palestine (PF1.P) have bean
identified in Germany.
BOTH THE PFLP and two
other Palestinian groups, the El
Fatah and the Maoist "PDFLP"
active in Germany, distinguish
between members involved in
"conspiratorial activity" and
those seeking public support for
their goals, the report notes. In
1976 the Palestinian extremist
groups in Germany "made a
determined effort to consolidate
their organizational strength and
win new members from among
the approximately 8,400 Arabs of
Palestinian origin who have
applied for political asylum in the
Federal Republic."
The report says applicants
seeking membership in these
groups are subjected to a
"probationary period." In spite
of this, membership increased
from about 1,000 to 1,200 in 1976.
Statistical tables in the report
show a sharp rise in the number
of Palestinian groups represented
in Germany. The number of
organizations increased from 14
in 1974 to 21 in 1975 and 25 in
1976, while the number of "active
branches" of all groups jumped
from 57 (1973) to 83 (19741 and 95
(1976).
ANOTHER table shows in-
creases in periodical publications
circulated by such groups from
seven publications in 19*4 to 10
in 1975 and 13 in 1976, including
three published in West Ger-
many.
The report says German-
language Palestinian periodicals
call for the "destruction of the
Zionist state," for the "violent
establishment of a 'people's'
democracy" in Jordan and the
fight against the "reactionary
systems" of other Arab states
dependent on imperialism."
In the summer of 1976, the
m
report states. German "affiliate
organizations of the Palestinians
called for donations of money and
goods to aid fedayeen groups
fighting in Lebanon and for the
medical care of their fellow
countrymen living there (in
Lebanon)."
DURING THIS period about
50 to 80 Arabs of Palestinian
origin left the Federal Republic to
take part in the civil war in
Lebanon, or to undergo training
in the use of arms and explosives
in Libya.
The report adds laconically
that "some of them have since
returned to the Federal Rpublic
The re|>ort says richl-wing
German groups posed nodangei
to (ierman security in 1976" as
shown by the severe defeat of the
extreme right National Demo-
cratic Party of (ierman (NPD) in
last year's general elections.
The report says there are 15
neo-Nazi organizations in
Germany with about 600
memlMTs. Their aim is to "replace
the German constitutional
democracy by a system of state
similar to the Nazi dictatorship."
IT NOTES a "considerable
increase" in their activities since
197(i and an "increasing readi-
ness t.) employ violence." In
several cases, police found arms,
ammunition and explosives on
property of Nazi supporters.
Let's talk Turkey
this Summer
j&-?-~
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time for good
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tender, young
turkeys, 6-9 Lbs.
A whole turkey can provide a full meal plus the
fixings for turkey salad or sandwiches. Also
choose from the big variety of delicious Empire
Kosher turkey products, including Cooked Turkey
in Barbecue Sauce, Pan-Roasts, and ready-to-
serve Turkey Rolls and Slices.
CANDLELIGHTING
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MENDEL-SONS', INC. 672 5800


Page 4
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, July,6 19?7
Nazi Threat Delayed
Skokie, 111., a predominantly Jewish suburb of
Chicago, happily avoided the prospect of a Nazi Party
march through its streets over the July 4 weekend. Such a
march would have been a travesty on the meaning of the
Independence Day celebration.
But the Nazis do not think so. They are anti-Black.
They are anti-Jewish. They are anti just about everything
except of course themselves.
What would have happened is hard to imagine if the
party leaders did not change their minds. The Jewish
Defense League had made some national utterances about
interfering in the event the Nazis carried out their original
intentions.
In any event, the delayed confrontation is simply that
delayed. Chicago Nazis vow they'll make it to Skokie
yet. We can only hope that the City of Chicago, Skokie
and their general communities have firmer plans in mind
to deal with the Nazis' intentions should they ever carry
their march plans out better, that is, than counter-
action by the JDL.
Vietnamese Refugees
American Jews are justly proud that Israel has of-
fered asylum to 66 Vietnamese refugees rescued by an
Israeli freighter in the South China Sea. It is an example
that other countries, including the United States, should
take heed.
The Vietnamese were rescued by the Israeli freighter
Yuvali after their ship had sunk, and they were floating on
a raft off the Vietnamese coast. The outgoing government
of Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin said it would offer the
Vietnamese temporary haven until some government
would take them in. When no government came forth,
Menachem Begin, as his first act as Prime Minister,
announced that the Vietnamese would be granted a
permanent haven in Israel.
The plight of the Vietnamese touched a painful
reminder for Jews. Begin noted how there was a time
before and after World War II when Jewish refugees went
from port to port seeking entry.
Coincidentally, the incident occurred as the film The
Voyage of the Damned, was playing in Israel. This movie
is about German refugees from Nazi German in the 1930s
who were shunted from port to port aboard the St, Louis
after they were denied entry to Havana.
It seems that the world has not learned much since
the 1930s. The international community must be made to
take action and open its doors for these homeless people.
The United States has a special obligation in Vietnam and
Southeast Asia and should begin by granting a haven to a
group of 249 Laotian refugees living on the deck of an oil
tanker off Singapore because no country allows them to
land.
Matter of History
Who can ever forget the emotion felt by Jews
throughout the world in June, 1967, when it was learned
that Israel had regained the Old City of Jerusalem and
particularly the Western Wall?
As we celebrate the tenth anniversary of the
reunification of Jerusalem, Jews everywhere are as one in
the conviction that Jerusalem can never be divided again
and must remain the capital of Israel.
The city of Jerusalem has been central in Jewish life.
It has sustained Jews in prayers and poetry for the 2,000
years of the diaspora. Three times a day for 2,000 years
Jews faced Jerusalem and prayed to return to Jerusalem.
Jews bless each other on festivals by saying, "Next Year
in Jerusalem."
We take this opportunity to emphasize the need for a
united Jerusalem in the face of a toughening U.S. policy
toward Israel and the possibilities of a Middle East peace
settlement. If President Carter thinks that Israel will
barter Jerusalem away, we are all in for dark times, in-
deed. History militates against it.
Just what Israel may or may not barter away is, of
course, up to the Israelis. That is pretty much what the
outcome of their May 17 election was largely about.
But Jerusalem is non-negotiable, and even non-Israeli
Jews must feel free to say that.
TMf
Jewish Floridian
O* PALM M ACM COtMTY
Combining "OO* VOICE and "FCDCRATION *EPO*Teil"
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FEDERATION OFFICERS: ProtMhMf. Stenley ronNOr; Vice -residents. Rofefe
Hy man Fishman. Or. Howard Kay. KomhoJ* ScRoror. Or. -,chord Shvaarmsn, Or
Stanley Stars, Treasurer, Stacoy Lesser; Secretary. Bruce Danish). Biecutivt
Director. Normtn Sehimtlman, Assistant tseeelive Oirecor, Robert Kettler
Submit material lor publication lo Rowii Tarfaltow, Director of Public Rotations
Friday. July 15. 1977 29TAMUZ573T
Volume 3 Number U
CJF Board Stresses Israel,
Arabs Negotiate Face-to-Face
New York, N.Y.-The impor-
tance of face-to-face negotiations
between Israel and the Arab na-
tions, with complete flexibility to
negotiate their own peace
agreements by themselves, was
stressed at last week's Board
meetings of the Council of Jewish
Federations (CJF), held in New
York City.
Community leaders and
Federation representatives from
the U.S. and Canada were told
that assuring secure borders for
Israel, as outlined in UN Security
Council Resolutions 242 and 338,
will continue to be the nation's
principal concern.
OTHER KEY issues on the
five-day Board meetings of CJF
officers, led by President Jerold
C. Hoffberger of Baltimore,
included community budgeting
of 1977 campaign funds, Soviet-
Jewish resettlement, Federation
Personnel Guidelines Standards
and Federation-Synagogue
relations.
Leonard Strelitz, the new
general chairman of UJA,
reviewed plans for the Prime
Minister's Mission in August,
and the October UJA-Federation
Leadership Seminar in Israel, in
his address to the Board.
The Guidelines for Personnel
Codes in Jewish Federations was
formerly adopted as prepared by
CJF's Personnel Service Com-
mittee. The Guidelines provide
recommendations to federated
communities to assist in
establishing sound personnel
practices, and will be available in
brochure form this Fall.
CJF'S BOARD also re-
viewed a guideline statement
on grants and loans for the
resettlement of Soviet-Jewish
immigrants in North American
communities. It advocates loans
for services such as rent, food,
clothing, utilities and certain
work and education expenses,
while grants are suggested for
casework and vocational
guidance services, center and
synagogue membership. To date,
a formal loan-grant policy has
been adopted by Chicago, Los
Angeles. Miami, New York,
Philadelphia, Kansas City,
Milwaukee and Minneapolis,
among others.
CJF efforts to promote close
ties between Federations and
synagogues were further
demonstrated at the Board
meetings when representatives of
both institutions affirmed the
need for a more activist
leadership role by Federations to
involve the lay leadership of both
in concentrating on cooperative
community endeavors. Model
community programs in Chicago
and Southern New Jersey, to
promote dialogue and encourage
synagogue membership and
school enrollment, were also
presented.
Other major meetings included
a CJF Public Social Policy
discussion on welfare reform; a
Budgeting Workshop to assist
communities in enlisting support
for local agencies from United
Way and governmental sources:
a CJF Community Planning
Steering Committee meeting,
which recommended the
establishment of a subcommittee
on service enrichment to study
regionalize Uon concepts, and
deliberations to consider energy
conservation and its political
implications in the Middle East
situation, as a major theme at
CJF. 46th General Assembly, to
be held Nov. 9-13 in Dallas.
A REPORT FROM the
Committee to review CJF's
purposes and procedures in
building stronger Federations
and strong communities revealed
that over 50 personal community
visits have been made to date by
the five consultants and 14
professional review members,
who intend to visit every
Federation in the U.S. and
Canada.
The Jewish Media Service of
CJF, initiated as a demonstration
program of the Institute for
Jewish Life, received Board
approval to continue as a per-
manent resource organization to
build greater Jewish com-
munication knowledge via film,
tapes and audio-visual programs.
CJF will share the sponsorship of
the Media Service with two other
prime sponsors and several
smaller organizations.
Other CJF workshops on
College Youth and Faculty,
Women's Communal Service,
Public Relations. Small and
Intermediate Cities, Jewish
Education and the American
CRC Update
Association for Jewish
Education, were also held. At the
tatter, approval was given for
CJF assistance in a AAJE study
to determine priorities for Jewish
education in the future.
THE COUNCIL of Jewish P
derations is the association oj
central community organizations
- Federations, Welfare Funds
Community Councils serving
BOO Jewish communities in North
America. It aids these coo-
muruties to mobilize maximum
support for major overseas
national and local services in'.
volving financing, planning and
operating health, welfare
cultural, educational community
relations and other programs
benefiting all residents.
Visitors' Report on Israel
By HENRY GROSSMAN
Cochairman, Community
Relations Council
It was a privilege to hear Ben
Klinow speak about his recent 21-
day stay in Israel. "When I left
here I felt four-feet tall. When I
returned I felt 12-feet tall. All
Israelis are giants.
He reports the mood of the
people is confident and firm. The
Begin government has strong
universal support. The people feel
there is no way for Israel to give
up anything without a
meaningful secure peace.
THE IMPORTANCE to Israel
of the immigration of Soviet Jews
cannot he overestimated. Soviet
Jews have infused new spirit,
meaning and results into im-
portant industrial and economic
areas. The Soviet Jews he met the
is completely fluent in Russian)
are happy in Israel and proud of
the contributions they are
making.
Yea, he says, he visited
relatives. No. they didn't want
anything from him. The gifts and
clothes he brought were given to
refugee Jews-Jews from Arab
countries. His relatives are self-
supporting, proud to be able to
say they have enough.
He was astonished lo learn
that UJA contributions are not
used for defense purposes. But he
was pleased to hear about the
many essential social services
bought for Israel by our
American dollars.
DOES HE WANT to go back?
"I'm ready to go right now!
When is the Palm Beach
County mission to Israel? Call
us there might be room for you!
Never Heard Of
Israel Before, Says
Viet Refugee
TEL AVIV-(JTA)-A group
of 66 Vietnamese refugees who
were rescued by an Israeli
freighter in the South China Sea
June 9 are now in Israel. The
refugees, who were greeted by
Yehuda Avner, a special
representative of Prime Minister
Menachem Begin, were happy to
be in Israel, the only country that
offered them a haven.
. .after the ship on which
the group has fled Viet-
nam sank, five ships
passed their raft by and
"refused even to give us
water". .
But as one of them admitted to
reporters, "The truth is I don't
really know where we are. I'd
never heard of Israel before the
Yuvali (the Israeli freighter)
saved us."
Dr. Tran Quanq Hoa, a 32-
year-old former surgeon in the
South Vietnamese Army,
speaking for the group, thanked
Israeli authorities in an emotion-
choked voice.
HE SAID that after the ship
on which the group had fled Viet-
nam sank, five ships passed their
raft by and "refused even to give
us water" until the Israeli
freighter rescued them.
The refugees, who included 16
children and several pregnant
women, were given visas and
work permits along with pocket
money, toys for the children, and
large quantities of fiah, rice and
vegetables which are Vietnamese
staples.
They were taken to an absorp-
tion center in Ofakim in southern
Israel which usually houses
Soviet immigrants. Officials here
said about half of the refugees
want to go to the United States,
the rest will remain in Israel.
WHO. .WHAT. WHERE?
COMMUNITY PROGRAMS
AND AGENCIES
JEWISH FEDERATION Of
PALM BEACH COUNTY
Camp Shalom Day Camp
Community Calendar
Community Pre-School
Friendly Visitors
Information-Referral Service
Jewish Community Day
School
Jewish Community Forum
Jewish Community
Relations Committee
Jewish Family A Children's
Service
Jewish Floridian of
Palm Beach County
Jewish Singles
Jewish Students Union
Florida Atlantic University
Leadership Development
Pr ogrom
"Mosaic" TV Progrom
Service to Institutions
Transient # Emergency
Relief


r.July
15.19^7
The Jewish Fforidian of Palm Beach County
Page 5
jctt'fcH Commiuiity Center Presents
. h*alf f the Jewi8h ^P
L the Jewish Community
7'wishes to thank the hun-
0{ persons who helped
to the petition in support
E Application for Funding
11 under Section 202 of the
Authoriiation Act of
M petition was addressed to
tabard Stone, Sen. Lawton
, ind Rep Pul Roge-
8 000 signatures were
j ii, less than three weeks
i the aid of the following

I wd Marion Rubin, Joe
Max Shapiro, Harry
, Lou Brenner, Esther
Ijoe Molat. Phil Hilsenrad.
t Sherman, Herb Goodstein.
i Asch, Sam Hartman, Jack
Jules Kolton. Charles
^ Hy Bonnan, Anne
Seymour Greenberg,
&m Cohen, Shirley Fleish-
J and the Village Royale on
ICreen-Owners League.
Sexuality is the sub-
[if > series of workshops led
jby Tanner. ACSW, profes-
t the medical school of the
nity of Miami. The JCC
_i'i League has arranged
Holy 23 and 24 weekend at the
i Inn on Singer Island.
ier I'lpan is under way at
_. Beth El in West Palm
A nd in the southern tip of
County. Call Sue Levi at the
f office now to enroll for sum-
or Fall courses. This start-
method of learning
m Conversation is catching
iPalm Beach County. Begin-
yintermediates and advanced
nts can transfer in from any
s courses taken.
news for dance freaks!
Daniels will be teaching
to men and women.
[class starts July 17 at the
, every Monday night at 7
e the Indoor Tennis Club as
| member and get the royal
treatment. The profes-
! and other personnel of the
' Tennis Club are waiting
ve you as part of a special
lement with the JCC.
rthe experience without the
i Aug. 7 from noon to 6 p.m.
[Second Tuesday Club will
' a Garage Sale and Flea
(tat the JCC to benefit the
[ Call Marion Rubin at 686-
J all Teens remember
f Wednesday night is your
the Teen Lounge. If you
Ft already met Michael Soil
P the place to do so.
I biggest news around town
1 ummer program of the
' Community Center, the
R"erve Now For The
MH HOLY DAYS
and SUKKOTH
t2'mi 11 nights
"PI 12 to Sept 23
m I 3 dou
a am an.
..WJTtTAV
^V** 5 nights
1*^2 to Mil
-ri*1Ont0hte
S**** to Oct. a
\*ThL8rlTeM "oust-
ESS? *****
y3MlUorMH744
Creative A Performing Arta.
There is still time to register and
get in on the fun of learning the
fundamentals of ballet, to play
the chalil, a bit of karate and lots
of good fun. Call 689-7700 to find
out how to register for the
remainder of the summer.
The CSSC has been in full
operation four months and
already we are an integral part of
many people's lives. The staff
works as a team and whenever
possible provides requested
services whether it be transpor-
tation, information and referral
volunteerism, classes new
programs and activities and
socialization. Transportation is
available to the transit disad-
vantaged person 60 years or older
who is not on a bus line, who does
not own a car, or is unable to
drive if she or he does own one.
Call at least 24 hours in advance.
The I & R specialist is always
ready to provide a helping hand if
you need one. This is your link to
locate services you require. Call
689-7700 and ask for I & R.
Volunteers are our dream
machine. Become involved;
become a JCC Volunteer.
Garage Sale and Flea Market:
Marion and Sam Rubin are
organizing a Garage Sale and
Flea Market for Sunday, Aug. 7,
from noon till 6 p.m. Items old
and new are needed plus home
baked cookies and cakes. Tables
and space for sale; one Table is
SI5 and two Tables are S25. For
more information call the JCC at
689-7700 or the Rubins at 686-
9592.
Summer Classes: Once again
Adult Education has provided us
with fine instructors. Two classes
have begun and enrollment is still
open.. .Lip Reading on Friday at
1 p.m. and Writer's Workshop on
Monday at 1 p.m. Call Gail
Weinstein at the JCC for more
information.
Here is a letter written by one
of the Class Members of Aduit
Education: "The Jewish Com-
munity Center sponsored its first
class in creative writing on June
27 under the direction of Mr.
Frank Boetwick. The partici-
pants experienced a thrilling two
hours and came away imbued
with finding an outlet to
emotions and experiences which
could be put into words. Mr.
Bostwick proved himself to be an
understanding and interesting
personality with a great deal of
charm which was felt by all those
assembled. All those registered
left with the feeling that the next
session would be something they
would be looking forward to most
eagerly." ... Lee Golden.
New Classes will be forming in
the Fall.. Watch for more infor-
mation.
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
of the palm beaches, inc.
241S Okeecbobee Boulevard. West Palm Beach, Florida 3340
Telephone *89-77M
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F'aKe fi
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday.Julyi5
? ?Question Box? ?
By RABBI SAMUEL J. FOX
Question: Why does Jewish
law forbid Jews to intermarry
with people of other faiths?
Answer: Generally, this is
traced to a Biblical command-
ment where the Jewish people
were told "not to engage in mar-
riages with other nations"
(Deuteronomy 7:3). Medieval
Jewish sources have, attempted
to explain this prohibition in a
number of ways.
Some (e.g. Chinuch) have
claimed that such a marriage
would mislead the Jewish partner
in regard to his own faith. If the
other partner is stronger in
character and overwhelming in
emotion, the Jew might easily be
swayed to give up his own faith
or at least to disregard the tenet
and observances of his faith.
Some (Chinuch) claim that the
children resulting from such a
union would either be confused as
to which faith to follow or might
leave the Jewish faith.
STILL OTHERS (Abrabanel)
explain that such a marriage
would not have the full ex-
perience of an ideal marriage and
might only be an accommodation
of sexual desire which is not
regarded as a sufficient ground
for marriage.
Modern authors have seen
another explanation. They have
become aware of the possibility
that intermarriage might greatly
reduce the numerical population
Synagogues in
Palm Beach County
REFORM
CONSERVATIVE LIBERAL
TEMPLE ISRAEL
1901 North Flogler Drive
West Palm Beach. Florida 33407
833 8421
Rabbi Irving B Cohen
Summer Sabbath Services
Friday at 8:00 p.m.
TEMPLE BETN EL OF
BOCA RATON
333 SW Fourth Avenue
Boca Raton, FI 33432
391-8901
Rabbi Norman T Mendel
Cantor Martin Rosen
Sabbath services. Friday at
8:15 p.m. Saturday morning
services at 10 30a.m.
TEMPLE ETERNAL LIGHT
PO Bo* 3
Boca Raton, Florida 33432
426 1600
Rabbi Ben|omin Rosayn
Sabbath services, Friday at 8 15
p.m
at Unitanan-Universalist
Fellowship Building
162 W Polmelto Park Rd
Boca Raton
CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION
ANSHEI SH0L0M
5348 Grove Street
West Palm Beach, Florida 33409
684 3212
Rabbi Harry Z Schectman -
Robhi Fmpritus Henry |errcb
Friday 8:30a m 8:00 p.m.
Saturday 8:30a m, 7:30p.m.
Daily 8 30a.m.,7:30p.m.
TEMPLE RETN EL
2815 North Flogler Drive
West Palm Beach. Flor.do 33407
833 0339
Rabbi Asher Bar Zev
Sobbath services Friday at 8 15
p.m
Saturday at 9 30a m
Daily Minyan at 8 15 a.m.,
Sunday at 9 a m
TEMPI! BETN SM0L0M
315 N. "A" St.
Lake Worth, Florida 33460
585 5020
Robbi Emanuel Eisenberg
Cantor Jack Elmon
Services. Mondoys and Thursdays
at 8:15a.m.
Friday at 8:15 p.m.
Saturday at 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETN DAVID
Sabbath services, Friday ot 8 p m.
At Westminister
Presbyterian Church
10410 N Military Trail. Palm
Beach Gardens 321 Northlake
Blvd North Palm Beach, jfla
33408
845 1134
Rabbi Hyman Fishman
Cantor Nicholas Fenakel
TEMPLE BETH SH0L0M
N W Avenue "G"
Belle Glade. Florida 33430
Jock Statemon. lay leader
Sabbath services. Fridoy ot 8 30
p.m.
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB
275 Alomedo Drive
Polm Springs. Florida 33460
Sabbath services, Friday at 8 p.m.
Saturday at 9a.m.
President Jacob Front 964 0034
Mondays and Thursdays at 9 a m.
Services held at Faith United
Presbyterian Church. Polm
Springs
B'NAI T0RAN
CONGREGATION
P O Bo. 2306
Boca Raton. Florida 33432
Rabbi Nathan Zeli/er
Sobbath services. Friday at 8 15
p m
2nd and 4lh Saturdays at 9 30
a m
Meets at
Weight Watchers
1775 N.E. 5th Ave
Bnrn Roton Flo
TEMPLE EMETH of ft* DELRAT
HEBREW CONGREGATION
P.O. Box 1214, Delroy Beoch,
Florida 33444
Sabbath services Friday at 8:00
p.m. Fellowship Hall, Cason
Methodist Church, 342 N Swinton
Ave.. Delray Mr. Henry Bloom,
President
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
190 North County Rood
Palm Beach, Florida 33480
832-0804
Rabbi Mo I Forman
Cantor David Dardoshti
Sobbath services, Friday at 8 30
p m
Saturday at 9 a m
CONGREGATION BETH K0DESH
2515 N.E. 2nd Court
Boynton Beach, Florida 33435
Sabbath services, Fnday-8:I5
p.m.
Saturday-9:30 a. m.
Services held at St John's
Methodist Church Social Hall
3215 N. Seacrest Blvd
Boynton Beach, Florida
For information call 732-5147
of the Jewish people and even-
tually lead to total assimilation,
if not the extinction, of the
Jewish identity.
Basically, it might be under-
stood on the grounds that
marriage requires an experience
of sharing the most essential
experiences of life. Obviously,
among Jews, one of these most
essential experiences is fafth. An
ideal marriage requires the
sharing of deep faith in one's
religion. If the two partners are of
two different faiths there might
be great friendship between the
two people but not the deep-felt
sharing of a common faith ex-
perience. Marriage partnership is
involved in a family faith ex-
perience whereas people of dif-
ferent faiths cannot share suf-
ficient family experience, thus
leaving the marriage short of
fulfillment.
STH0PSIS OF THE WEEKLY T0RAH PORTION*
Mattot
"And Moses gave unto. Gad. Reuben and ,,
half-tribe of Manasseh. .the kingdom of ST "*'
32.33). '
ion
" Waw.
iK
MATTOT-Moses informed the tribal heads ran**.
the laws concerning vows. He sent 12,000 armS -1
(1.000 from each tribe) to war with the MidianiS T\
expedition was successful. Among those killed
Balaam. The tribes of Reuben and Gad who had i*88
herds of cattle, asked to be allowed to settle on ir"8"
land in Transjordan. Moses agreed, on condition"?!!*
these tribes lead the other tribes across the Jwda I a\
not return to Transjordan until all their brother trihpc H
been provided for. Part of the tribe of SZH
conquered half of Gilead. and were granted it for tk?
territory. l
(Th,V!c,?n,'19 Ww *"* Portion of the Law i.,t,f.-
upon "The Graphic History ot the Jewish Heritaoe edit.- k o lnd *
Tsamir. 115. published by Shengold. The volume ii muSJ? P,Wo"m*
Lane. New Yor* NY. 1003.. Joseph Schlan, JESS?0, M,idM
distributing the volume. uresioent of the society
Now that you Ve spent
your money, how are
you spending your time?

\'i
t
U-
"szr-j

ir ij
"u' ***
If you've bought an apartment in a
condominium community, vour life
should be very exciting. You should
be involved in all kinds of interest-
ing sports and activities with all
sorts of interesting people. And if
you're notyou should have bought
at Holiday Springs.
All kinds of recreation.
But no Rec Lease.
Holiday Springs has one of the
greatest recreational and social pro-
grams anywhere. And there's no
Rec Lease.
We are a planned community sur-
rounding an 18-hole championship
golf course. You will find all-
weather tennis courts, a heated pool,
parks, picnic grounds, even fresh
water fishing in our broad waterways.
At Holiday Springs you can play
volleyball, shuffleboard. croquet,
horse shoes and badminton. You can
play bridge or have a party in one ol our card and pan)
rooms. You can expand your creative abilities in our
Arts and Crafts Building. Or reduce your waistline in
our health spa.
Best of all, a spectacular auditorium for community
functions and shows with top name entertainment is
soon to be completed.
In short, there's no limit to the fun you can have and
the things you can accomplish at Holiday Springs.
It's not too late.
There are already over 500 happy families that call
Holiday Springs home. But we still have a good selec-
tion of beautiful apartments available. One bedroom
from $18,990; two bedrooms from $27,490. With
financing currently available at 8'/i5r over 25 years.
Life should be fun.
And it is at Holiday Springs. It's a better place to
spend your money, because it's a busier place to spend
your time.
Models and Sales Center open daily from 9 to 5 at
3300 Holiday Springs Blvd.. Margate. Phone 7524200
From Dade, 944-3035. (Take 1-95 or U.S. 441 to
Sample Road, go west to Holiday Springs Blvd.)
Holiday Springs
From $1S\990 to $3590i
Another fine community by Nationwide Building & Development, Ltd.
Florida's Last Great Buy
This in n. .i intended as .i lull statement
about Holiday Springs For complete
details, please refer to the Prospectus and
related documenis available to purchasers
Financial Example: I bedroom/I bath
apartment that sells for $IK.9 down payment of S.S.6V7 leaves a balance
of $13,293 to be financed for 2.S years
Term is 300 payments of $107.00 for
principal and 8'/i<* interest. APR; 8.W*


Lv.July
15.1977
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 7
jviets Don't Realize Support for Sharansky
YORK- r Toth who recently
Jj w the United States
RJJee years as the Moscow
chief of the Los Angeles
said here that Soviet
His do not realize the depth
Report for Jewish activist
^Sharansky in the U.S.,
nijlv among American Jews.
I Mid that is the USSR
out its threat to fry
wkv for treason and
.. "they will tu him
[the first Jewish martyr in
ivirt Union since the Stalin
TOTH. who was questioned for
nearly 14 hours by the KGB on
charges of collecting secret
political and military information
and later about Sharansky,
answered questions about his
experiences to more than 100
person in the auditorium of the
B'nai B rith Anti-Defamation
League headquarters.
The meeting was sponsored by
the National Conference on
Soviet Jewry and was attended
by newsmen and members of the
Conference and chaired by
Eugene Gold. Conferenc
chairman, and Jerry Goodman
its executive director.
\j}AHC Admits Affiliates \
Plantation Jewish Congregation near Fort Lauderdale and
al Springs Hebrew Congregation of Coral Springs have been
tjally admitted as the newest affiliates of the Union of
itrican Hebrew Congregations, representative body of 740
form synagogues in the United States and Canada serving
I million members.
JEWISH FAMILY AND CHILDREN'S SERVICE
I* outstanding professional counseling agency serving the 'c.v.,1.
[community ol Palm Beach County Professional and confidential
Intio a available lor
[tojblems of the oging Marital counseling
[Comultotion and evaluation services Parent child conflicts
|Vocotionol counseling Pers-'ol problems
Private Offices: 2411 Okeechobee Blvd.
West Palm Beach, Fla. 33409
Telephone: 684-1991
Or
3200 North Federal Hwy. Suite 206-
Room 12, Boca Raton, Fla.
Telephone: 395-3640
|*ode'oie fees ore charged in family 01. naiviOuai <.on.>eiing to
'who con pay (Fees are based on income and family si/et
(Jewish Fomily and Children's Service is a beneficiary agency of
[Jewish Federaiion of Palm Beach County.
In
F
C
Calling Sharansky a "mar-
velous person. Toth said the
Jewish activists "only purpose
was to get out and help other
Jews to get out of the Soviet
Union (and go to Israeli. All this
nonsense about espionage and
treason was just a lot of
baloney."
HE SAID that everything
Sharansky did was legal and
aimed at helping himself and
other Jews emigrate to Israel.
Toth said that all of his dealings
with Sharansky were held out in
the open as were Sharansky's
meetings with other Western
correspondents.
Toth said when he was first
arrested by the KGB it was on a
charge of illegally obtaining a
document on parapsychology. He
said that KGB first said he was
questioned on the charge of
collecting secret information but
later the questioning turned to
Sharansky and other Jewish
activists and Soviet dissidents.
THE NEWSMEN, whose next
assignment will be in
Washington, said he had ex-
Hfted to bfl held for al least a
/^
JEFFER
FUNEIJAL HOMES. INC.
mow
InwiJeftei MmMM MrniJafl*
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925-2743 > tsono,iev-i id
PAIM HACK COUNTY W, S Otivf Avc
1-925-2743 RfpD,PHnmim 10
Semen i muntiin Ihe &Niei Mam nu
Jewish Community Day School
Of* Palm Beach County, Inc.
2815 N. Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach, Florida 33407
Is now accepting applications for
Pre-School-Full or Hall Day
Kindergarten-Full Day
Grade l-Grade Vl-Elementary School
Grades Vll-VIII-Junior High School
Transportation throughout Palm Beach County
Admission Tests Required
Application Forms & Further Information-
Dr. Avie Waxman, Director
832-8423 4
Financial Assistance Available
Deadline May 15. 1977
mi/ zr'"--
Jewish Community Day School of Palm Beach County, Inc.
2815 N. Flagler Drive, West Palm Beech, Fla. 33407
.a Telephone 832-8423 / 4
A Benef icia/y Agency of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
month. But he believed that
public reaction by the American
press and government as well as
the strong pressure by the U.S.
government convinced the
Soviets to let him go.
While acknowledging that his
interrogation may worry Western
correspondents still in Moscow,
he said he believes they will be
more aggressive now because
they are angry.
YOU CAN FIND IT ...HERE
*f
AT
CAMP SHALOM 1977
CAMP SHALOM ItV td x>l. Element*yl
Mt I i.UN A I UNi.l TO CAMP Ol I ICI
J.yyi\h F rtk'i.moii ol Pjlili (lei I County
?4tb Okiix-holwv Biwl Wril P.1I111 BakIi. Flumfi JJ409
I'Iim^i' enroll my 1 had 'ttvldienl Ihi' MMWWI 1l.1v i.iinp
MM I
1 CMd 1 Hum.
N.MIH' Ol SlI'lKlt .
> Child* NjiM .
N.imnof S. II.
r.iM-m'N N.ini. __
A. hi. Ll*
' cm.He I I
Bnl.l D.ll.._________
, (WjmJH "' bi-VI //__,
M..... i
I..........I
; Hi Hi 11.in
, 1,1... HI S.l.l /'.
i'i..... No
Bmiiwa pimmu- N.
I I P......I Inn. .11 It.ly If
I !
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1

1

I wish fi.....toll my child (1 llilil.....f fit*
I u|lil wri-lv Juno 70 Ai| i? I 7ml P.....Hi July IK Aimi 1/ '
CAMP HIS
fiqhl Weeks S??S | S0 Registration and Activity Fee
four Weeks 5 l?S | S?0 Registration and Activity fee
lot each additional child trom the same tamily fight Weeks S205 | S40
tour Weeks S Hi ( i?0
I hi'.ibv .U'lily loi ..lin.v...... ol -iy 1 .. J. I" nl ||, |he i|.it .iiiip |.mhh ,, nl 11.,
hrwMh Tmkntttun .> I'.iin. h.mi i, County
P.i'rill Sh|ii.j|ih 1
Null- F.Kh.n.ld |ll r........^' (. < ...ni'.ii.i. .1 |.v (..,,......I nl H.^iiM.,111011
A Al iiv.lv f:ii. 1 .i .111., Mi i'i,i..
SPECIAL MEMORIAL
INVITATION
JSHAL0M MEMORIAL PARK!
INVITES THE JEWISH COMMUNITY
TO IT'S SECOND ANNUAL
KEVER AV0T MEMORIAL
SERVICE AND HOLOCAUST
DISPLAY ON SUNDAY SEPT.
11, 1977 AT 1 PM
IF YOU ACT NOW!!
As port of this special package it is now possible to
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This pre need speciol is tor a limited time only, so act now To
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COUPON------../*


i lie OKU.ian i Ri iuwi uy i iwm **!.' v>wt*j
i i iua
Meet Carter's Burt Lance
>..M^
Continued from Page 1
ny issue with the Chief
Executive.
As Jimmy Carter has said of
Burt Lance, "He's my closest
friend in the world.''
YET LANCE. 45, is no
friendly appointment, nor is he a
political lightweight.
Lance served under Carter'
when the President was governor
of their home state, Georgia. He
was running the highway depart-
ment, and his term is remem-
bered as the one that got rid of
the deep-rooted corruption that
had prompted local people to
refer to highways as the "depart-
ment of politics and paving."
After Carter stepped down as
governor, Lance ran for the office
but was defeated. He then went
back into banking, joining the
National Bank of Georgia as its
president, nearly doubling its
assets in two years and
making himself some money as
well. When he was given the job
at the office of management and
budget he declared assets of just
over S3 million.
LANCE HAS given all that up
now and there is some
speculation in Washington as to
whether his salary in government
will be enough to sustain the
standard of living to which the
former Georgian banker has
become accustomed.
He now has a key job in the
administration. As director of the
Office of Management and Bud-
get he is responsible for coor-
dinating all the government's
budget targets and programs.
"Every government knows how
much it spends but it doesn't
know how effectively it spends it.
We at OBM aim to change all
that."
The budget director is very
keen on a technique called "zero
based budgeting" which in
simple terms means that every
department has to account for
every penny it spends in its
annual budget not just for the
increase it might get. "It makes
everyone at every level more
involved in the decision-making
process," Lance told me in his
high-ceilinged office on the
second floor of the "old building"
of the office on Pennsylvania
Avenue, almost next door to the
White House.
LANCE aims to balance the
budget. "There's nothing in the
OBM numbers that I have seen
in the first few months in this
office that leads me to think that
we won't be able to carry out our
commitment to a balanced
budget by the fiscal year 1981,"
he says.
Equally important is his
relationship with the man who
sits in the Oval Office iust a block
OftDER MOW From Our LarjKf
Selection <* Personaliied ... .,.,
New Year* Cards -a17
CoftAolftj QJouas
inajrfjvMif-Fmm Stationary
MS So. Cowftty **., Palm Stach
HAMPTON LIQUORS
WINES A UOUOtS
past osLivaav sea vies
*: 32 8368
257 Poindana Way
PALM BEACH, PIA.
Bars & Glasses Loaned FREE
ORGANIST WANTED. EX-
PERIENCED BALDWIN
ORGAN FOR CONSERVA-
TIVE TEMPLE. SERVICES
REQUIRED FRIDAY EVEN-
INGS AND HOLIDAYS.
SEPTEMBER THRU APRIL.
PHONE DAVID 964-6497
away. Lance is generally credited
with being the man who per-
suaded President Carter to drop
his controversial S60 tax rebate
it took him, it is said in
Washington, about three hours of
tough talking.
BUT THEN Lance is the man
who can get to see the President
for three hours and talk tough if
drought is causing increasing
concern.
YET LANCE has one great
asset going for him, and that is a
fear of inflation. The lessons of
the great American recession
have been learned. Even the
merest flicker of an increase is
enough to send the Dow average
plunging on Wall Street and
the occasion warrants it. Lance
himself will not be drawn on his
power to influence the President;
all he says with a slow smile and
an even slower Georgian drawl is
that, "we do all right."
But having the President's ear
is one thing. He also has to get
Congress on his side. Here, too,
he seems to have found the infal-
lible knack of talking to the right
people at the right time. He
reckons he is just a "country
banker," but his easy and relaxed
style masks a mind that's sharp
and tough.
He's going to have to take
some tough decisions he's
already trying to persuade
Congress to cut back on some
major water projects, and this in
a year when a West Coast
when I was there last month
everyone I spoke to was scared at
the chances of double digit in-
flation by the end of the year.
So when Lance told the
bankers of America that they
should hold off increasing the
prime rate the rate of interest
that they charge their favored
customers because it was
inflationary, even Wall Street
agreed with him. It means that
Lance is taking on though he
dodges the question the most
respected central banker in the
world, Dr. Arthur Burns, who
looks set to serve President
Carter at the Federal Reserve
Board as he served the two
previous Presidents.
If Burns is the great survivor,
then it takes quite a character
and someone more than "just a
country banker" to take him on.
Lance is convinced that he is
right that high interest rates do
not curb inflation.
"There are those," he tells you,
"who think that tight money
fDliciea are the best. I just don't
ppen to be one of them." As
one headline put it: "When Lance
speaks. Carter means it."
MEANWHILE, apart from
the problem of inflation, Lance is
convinced that the economy is at
last moving along the right lines.
Unemployment is coming down,
growth is looking more assured,
and investment, he reckons, will
start soon. "The only problem we
have is food prices which have
stayed higher longer than we
thought because of the worst
winter in our history."
Lance is sure that given the
impetus the President gives to
the economic team ol
prune member, life LT5
Democrats will \g*
when the story con*. ,
written of the Z<*?Z
mflatjon. hewiflberemeS
M the man who balanc^
budget: "As we ^g
Georgia .you can write this*
wail, sp.t on it. and walk
trom it: we are goine t/i k.i
the budget by 1981" U
bil
HUSBANDING the l
wealth the average An-,
worth S28.000, Eg.
new figures would noTj
Ux> difficult. But the Z!
have, the harder it is baUiw
books. n
If anyone can do it. it wj
this tennis-playing Gear
banker who is President Car
very good friend.
To the Point intemn
ENCOUNTER WITH JEWISH HISTORY
Applications are now being accepted for the Federati*
sponsored Study Mission to Israel, which will depart in the Pa
for two weeks. The Mission is open to all men and
three seminars that will
larticipan
be sched
women c
Palm Beach County. All participants will be requested to at
luled in September, prior i
leaving on the Mission. v "
For information and applications contact:
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County
2415 Okeechobee Blvd.
West Palm Beach. Florida 33409
Telephone (3051689-5900
"Mintage is solving
a lot of my problems
about smoking."
'You see, I really enjoy
smoking. To me, its a pleasure.
But it was no pleasure hearing
all the things being said against
high-tar cigarettes.
"Of course, 1 used to kid
myself a lot about giving up the
taste of my old high-tar cigarette
for one of those new low-tar
brands. But every one I tried
left my taste unsatisfied.
'Then someone offered
me a Vantage. Sure Id read
about them. But 1 thought they
were like all the others. I was
wrong.
"Vantage was right. It satisfied
like my old brand. Yet it had nearly
half the tar
Warning: The Surgeon General Has Determined
That Cigarette Smoking Is Dangerous to Your Health.
"Its been
about a year
since I started
smoking
* Vantage. And it
looks like I'm
going to be smoking
them for a long time
to come"
^/M~/d
Bernard ScrmenJeU
Winchester. New M
r^st
Regular. Menthol.
and Vantage 100
rUER K) m, W.Ufl| incmim. MFJTH01 II s"W.07 I .
p* cifMiu. FTC boon 0F.C 7fc FH.TER Wr. n at. "W. 0.9 m%
fc, FTC atftod


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