Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
8 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 28, 1975)-v. 8, no. 40 (Dec. 17, 1982).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 2, 1976 called v.2, no. 22, but constitutes v.2, no. 1.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: July 28, 1978 called no. 14 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement; Aug. 25, 1978 called no. 16 in masthead and no. 17 in publisher's statement; Aug. 10, 1979 called no. 15 in masthead and no. 16 in publisher's statement; Oct. 22, 1982 called no. 31 in masthead and no. 32 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44607504
lccn - sn 00229550
ocm44607504
System ID:
AA00014311:00124

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
*Jewish Flcridiiar
OFPALMBEA CH COUNTY
Coding "OUi YOKI" and 'TDfMTIMMKNmr'
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,9-Number 18
Palm Beach County, Florida Friday, August 27,1976
Frl K. $hocht- Friday, August V, W Price 25 Cents
\l976 CJA-IEF Campaign Closes With Record High Total
The 1976 CJA-IEF campaign
ended with an all-time record
.total of pledges: $1,436,000.
is exceeds the voluntary
otoouring of $1,350,000 raised
I the Yom Kippur War.
Stanley Brenner, general
npaign chairman.
"Due to the combined efforts
of the division chairmen, along
with the hundreds of men and
women who volunteered aa
workers, we were able to
establish a well-organized and
effective campaign, with major
breakthroughs in the hi-rises and
Toddlers Can Learn to Swim At
Federation Community Pre-School
The Jewish Federation
._ nunity Pre-School is of-
iring a Toddler Swim Program
t Camp Shalom to children age 8
onths to 3 years. Mrs. Debbie
Ellis, a certified Red Cross-
tined water safety instructor,
II teach the class.
Mrs. Ellis, who recently moved
i Palm Beach County from St.
}ugustine. taught pre-schoolers
tthe Florida School for the Deaf
I the Blind. This summer she
i the swim program for the pre-
1 division at Camp Shalom.
I The fee for the six-week course
i (25. which includes three 45-
nute lessons each week. The
jam begins on Monday,
13. and will be held each
jlonday. Wednesday and Friday
ough Oct. 22. Parents must
Ittend the classes.
For information on the Toddler
nm Program and the Com-
DEBBIE ELLIS
munity Pre-School. contact the
Jewish Federation office, 2415
Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm
Beach; 689-5900.
Changes in Pound Approved
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) The Cabinet has approved two
jor changes in monetary policy, both aimed at strengthening
t marketability of Israel's exports. The most far-reaching
cision was to link the Israel pound to a "basket" of foreign
encies instead of solely to the U.S. dollar as heretofore.
The Cabinet also accelerated the so-called "creeping
valuation." The pound waa devalued by another two per-
nt, and will stand at IL 8.12 to $1.
Peter Investigation
Canceled in Vienna
condominiums. Of major
significance was the successful
campaign in the Boca Raton area.
Much time and effort was spent
in the development of this
southern section of Palm Beach
County."
Mexico President
Strikes Out
At a meeting this month the
Conference of Presidents of
Major American Jewish
Organizations deplored Mexican
President Echeverria's error in
labeling Israel's rescue of its
citizens held hostage in Uganda a
"flagrant violation" of in-
ternational law and predicting it
would "create precedents of
danger for all civilized
coexistence."
The Conference, however,
points out that President
Echeverria speaks not for
Mexico, but for himself. They see
him as a "lame duck," who is
"still seeking to court favor with
the Afro-Asian bloc, who votes he
needs to win election to a United
Nations post."
Further, the Conference
reports, "We look forward to a
more enlightened policy, when
the new administration
(President Lopez Portillo) takes
power, in keeping with the
honorable tradition of the
Mexican people in support of
international respect and
friendship among nations and of
human dignity."
Women's Division chairman
Cynnie List said that "the ladies
really worked diligently on the
campaign, not only to meet but
to exceed their 1976 goal. With
innovations such as the
educational seminars and the new
Century Village Project we were
able to raise well over our goal of
$350,000.
"Other factors in our success
were the Women's Division
Phon-a-Thon and the establish-
ment of a national Women's
Division office here in Palm
Beach County which contributed
substantially to the totals
raised."
Plans are under was for the
development of the 1977 cam-
paign. Cash is urgently needed
and pledges are still being ac-
cepted.
Taking over plans for the national campaign to raise $10 million
for the central blood bank of Israel are supporters of the Magen
David Adorn, Israel's official Red Cross service (from left):
Israel's Ambassador to the United Nations, Chaim Herzog, and
Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Goldman of Palm Beach. Mrs. Goldman
is national cochairman of the campaign, with Sol Drescher of
Miami Beach. The campaign will be aided by the national
Chanukah Festival for Israel and Salute to the Entebbe Rescue
Mission, Dec. 16 at the Miami Beach Theater of the Performing
Arts.
He Knows Who Killed His Mother
VIENNA ,JTA) The
rwtnan State Prosecutor has
led investigations of right-
Freedom Party leader
Peter for alleged war
l1^ prosecutor's office said no
M was found for charges
by Simon Wieeenthal,
' the Vienna Jewish
mentation Center of
J acts committed by Peter
World War II.
lethal charged last fall
r reter was a member of a
Wuien ^ unit 19*2
wt,n?00nU8and'0fJ-W'in
part."
The charges created a stir in
Austrian domestic politics when
Chancellor Bruno Kreisky rushed
to the defense of Peter and at-
tacked Wieaenthal for making
"unqualified charges."
LONDON (JTA) A son
of Mrs. Dora Bloch said here that
he knew the names of four mem-
bers of the Ugandan secret police
who had murdered his mother
and would be willing to testify to
a commission of inquiry in
Uganda if President Idi Amin set
one up.
He did not believe, however,
that the killers had been acting
on- orders from Amin. Bertram
Bloch said the family had
received this information in the
past three weeks.
THE ISRAELI engineer was
addressing journalists at the end
of his stay in Britain during
which he has been investigating
his mother's death in the wake of
the Israeli rescue action at
Entebbe Airport.
He also thought that no more
witnesses of the murder were still
alive in Uganda. However, he
appealed to other witnesses, who
had since left the country, to
come forward to confirm what be
had already been told.
Mrs. Bloch, who held dual
British and Israeli citizenship,
was a passenger on the Air
France plane hijacked by pro-
Palestinian terrorists to Uganda.
Some of the passengers were
freed by the terrorists, and more
than 100 were rescued by Israeli
commandos on July 3.
MRS. BLOCH waa reportedly
taken to a hospital in Kampala
before the rescue operation. On
July 13, a newspaper in Nairobi,
Kenya, reported that the partly
burned body of Mrs. Bloch was
found in a forest 11 miles from
Kampala, Uganda's capital.
Bloch's press conference was
held at the House of Commons
under the auspices of Labor MP
Greville Janner, who has formed
a group of MPs to keep a watch
on the case. Bloch thanked
Janner, his colleagues and the
British government for their
concern at the affair.
ArmyOrders Court-Martial
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
army has ordered a court-martial
for a soldier on charges of man-
slaughter through negligence in
the shooting death of a Nablus
girl during the May rioting in
that West Bank city.
In accordance with what was
described as a routine army
procedure of investigating every
case of death and injury in such
circumstances, an investigation
iconclufiivo ALj SAID ** kad <
koJ^lvev> tT^Uv involved in any of year-old Lena Nabulai, member
crimes, "but It
was very
* should not have taken
year-old
of a family of
influence in Nablus.
considerable
THE GUNSHOT death of the
girl was given widespread
publicity outside Israel and
caused an uproar in Israel. The
girl was hit by a bullet only two
weeks after she returned from eye
surgery in London.
According to one eyewitness
account of the incident, the girl
happened to be a member of a
group of Nablus youngsters who
staged a riotous demonstration in
Nablus.
Israeli soldiers called on the
youngsters to desist and the girl
panicked and ran up the stairs of
a nearby house.
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During August, Camp Shalom held their own Olympic games.
Representing four cities in Israel are the team captains (from
left): Patti Desser, Sue Leibovit, Ricky Brenner and Jim
Bradie. The opening ceremonies included an appearance by the
Military Park Fire Department. siren*. bells. flashing
lights!


Th0 7*oWcfc m~i*i------* -...
Page 2
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
i&*2!*km
Odd Fellows Plan Season's Events
At a recent meeting the
members of Palm Beach Odd
Fellow Lodge No. 88
unanimously voted to send a
letter of thanks and appreciation
to Fred K. Whitacre, president of
the West Palm Beach Expos
baseball club, for presenting the
society with 1,000 stadium
admission tickets for the Aug. 25
ballgame between the Expos and
the league-leading Miami Orioles.
Noble Grand Frank Kassowitz, a
Century Village resident, was
invited by Whitacre to throw out
the first ball.
Also at the meeting the 56
members' approved the en-
tertainment schedule presented
by the chairman, West Palm
Beach resident Alex H. Kolbe.
Included in plans are a Saturday
night dance in the Party Room at
Century Village Club House, low-
price round-trip by bus for a day
of leisure in Miami, a visit to
Cypress Gardens, a fishing-party
day, a picnic, Open House Ladies
Night including a singalong,
travelogue and educational films.
The theme of the Sept. 7
meeting is "Add a Little Joy to
Your Senior Life." The lodge
meets on the first and third
Wednesdays of each month at
7:30 p.m., with a collation at 9:30
p.m.
CENTENNIAL REBEKAH
LODGE of Palm Beach
Independent Order of Odd
Fellows is being formed. The next
assembly will be held on Friday,
Sept. 17, at 1 p.m. at the IOOF
Temple, 410 Datura St., West
Palm Beach.
Applicants for admission may
become Charter members by
filing applications at this
meeting. The institution of this
lodge is set for Friday, Oct. 22, at
10 a.m. For information, contact
Belva Davidoff. 689-5426.
JCC Presents
The JCC wants to alert all its members and friends to watch for
the Fall Program Guide in the mail. We urge you to read
it carefully. There's something for everybody! Register early for
activities.
The Midsummer Danaant will be held at the Jewish
Community Center, 2416 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach,
Saturday Aug. 28, 8:30 p.m. "The Statnicks" will be there to do
some exhibition dances. Round, square and ballroom dance les-
sons on the spot! Learn the Hustle in one evening. Come dance,
socialize, have bagels and coffee, all for $2.50 per person for
members and S3.50 per person for non-members. Come, and bring
your friends along for a full evening of fun and frolic.
September has been designated Membership Month at the
Jewish Community Center. Rejoin for next year and bring a friend
into the fold.
The following letter has been received from Gov. Reubin O'D.
Askew:
Dear Board, Staff and Members:
Best wishes as you conduct your membership drive during
the month of September to enroll many new members in the
Jewish Community Center.
You are to be commended for formally organizing and
sponsoring this community center. You have now united
your efforts with 164 other Jewish Community Centers in the
United States is providing a beneficial service, not only to
yourselves as individuals but also to the citizens of your
community.
A community center is a most worthwhile project, giving
members an opportunity to form close friendships and work
together for projects which will result in better communities.
May your membership drive during the month of Sep-
tember be a most successful venture as you offer others an
opportunity to join in the enjoyment and other benefits to be
derived from the privileges provided by this community
center.
Sincerely,
Reubin Askew
Goversor
The Jewish Community Center is designed for all Jews of all
ages and together we shall make it a viable center for everyone to
enjoy. Call 689-7700 for your membership card.
LOOK FOR THE JCC PHOTOGRAPH displays at your bank,
starting Sept. 1. Iris Murray, chairperson of the Community
Relations Committee, has announced a program for you to be
proud of.
We invite presidents of organizations in the Jewish community
to call on our executive director, Vivian Becker, a skilled
psychiatric social worker and professional in Jewish communal
service, to speak to their group this fall. Her favorite subject is
"The Potential of Our Jewish Community," and she can also
introduce such activities as values clarification and /or asser-
tiveness training. Her presence will make for an exciting meeting.
The JCC appreciates receiving your old Jewish greeting cards.
Bring them to the JCC office for our children's projects. We thank
those who have already brought them to the center and are ready
to accept many more.
All Singles should have received our card asking them to in-
dicate which group they wish to join in order to be informed of the
many activities that are being planned for them this fall. There,
are four different categories: Jewish Guys & Gals, 18-24;i
Unattached Adults, Widows, Widowers, Bachelors,
Bachelorettes, 25-45; Single Parent; 46 and over. Call the Center,
689-7700, and let us know your preference.
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
of the palm beaches, inc.
2415 Okeechobee Boulevard, West Palm Beach, Florida 3340*
Telephone 689-7700
With the
Organizations
National Council of Jewish Women
PB~*-27-7*
The National Council of Jewish
Women recently held a Chinese
auction at the home of Mrs. Allan
Lifshitz. Many members and
guests attended.
During July and August a
committee under the direction of
Mrs. Ben Seidler conducted a
survey on the needs for a "Meals
Free Sons Of Israel
Palm Beach Lodge No. 221 (a
coed lodge) will hold its first
meeting of the new season
Tuesday, Sept. 21, at 1:30 p.m. at
the Jewish Community Center.
The program for the coming year
will be discussed and six new
members will be initiated.
This is the oldest national
Jewish fraternal order in the U.S.
Anyone interested in joining
should contact Bob Ketzis at 689-
9063.
B'naiB'rith Women
Menorah Chapter of Century
Village will hold its first meeting
of the fall season at the Salvation
Army Citadel, on Tuesday, Sept.
14 at 1 p.m. All members and
their friends are urged to attend.
Beth El
Social Sets
On Aug. 7 members of BESS
(Beth El Social Sets) participated
in a "Swim and Snack" party at
the home of Mr. and Mrs. J.
Altman. The next event will be
open to non-members as well as
members. Fliers will be sent out
listing the activities for Sep-
tember. For reservations and
information on membership,
contact Sheila Lewis, 689-0001,
or Lorraine Virship, 626-5967.
Hadassah
On Thursday, Sept. 9, Yovel
Group will hold an executive
board meeting in the ad-
ministration building at Century
Village, in the Hospitality Room,
at 10 a.m.
The first regular membership
meeting is scheduled for Thurs-
day, Sept. 23, at the Holiday Inn
in Century Village at 1 p.m.
There will be a musical
presentation by Esther and Leon
Colon and Teddy Hershler.
dedicated to the Jewish holidays,
Israel, and the Bicentennial.
Refreshments will be served.
Shalom Group will hold a
board meeting on Thursday,
Sept. 9, in the Hospitality Room
of Century Village.time to be an-
nounced. The general meeting is
planned for Monday, Sept. 20, at
1 p.m. at the Salvation Army
Citadel. Refreshments will be
served at 12:30 p.m. President
Jeanette Greenberg will report on
the August Hadassah Con-
vention in Washington and there
will be a reading of a script.
"What Is Hadassah?"
The group waa represented
at Hadassah s 62nd national con-
vention in Washington by
Jeanette Greenberg, president,
Myra Ohrenstine, Dorothy
Biederman, Gertrude Cetron and
Fran Berliner.
The first Youth Aliyah Chai
luncheon sponsored by the group
is planned for Nov. 17 at the
Colonnades Beach Hotel, Singer
Island. The contribution is 118,
donor credit $12. There will be an
early-bird drawing for those who
have paid by the September
meeting. For information,
contact Anne Koffs, 686-3803.
on Wheels" program for Century
Village residents. It will begin in
the fall.
Meetings will be held on the
fourth Wednesday of very month
from October through May.
Anyone interested in joining
should contact Mrs. Robert
Baum or Mrs. Fred Singer.
Yiddish Culture Groo
The Yiddish Culture Gb.1
will resume its weekly proZ!
Tuesday, Oct. 5, at vSSSM
Century Village ClubC Jl
gj-jt each Tuesday .jj
All are welcome to attend.
Women's American ORT
Over 200 delegates represented
members from nine Southern
states, District VI, at the
Women's American ORT semi-
annual board meeting at the
Deauville Hotel in August.
The highlight of the meeting
was a panel discussion on the
problems facing Soviet Jews
emigrating to Israel and to the
United States. Participating in
the panel discussion, led by Mrs.
Margie Kottler, Jewish com-
munity chairman of District VI,
were Dr. Leon Goure, professor of
international studies and director
of Soviet studies at the Uni-
versity of Miami; Eugene
Greenspan, executive director of
the Miami Jewish Vocational
Service; Marvin Najberg,
assistant director of Miami's
Jewish Family & Children's Ser-
vice; and Joel Hirshhorn, vice
president of the American Jewish
Committee.
ORT is deeply concerned with
the issues of resettlement of
Soviet Jews. Since ORT's in-
ception more than one million
students have been trained, over
100,000 in Israel alone.
Delray Chapter held its in-
stallation of officers on June 1.
Installing officer was Mrs. Judy
Henry, District-level chairman of
health and tours and daughter of
newly installed president MnJ
Pauline Verber. Mrs. Henry d
cussed ORT's aims, purpose and
goals for the coming year. ,
highlight of the program wasil
fashion show sponsored by Rta
to Riches.
Officers installed are president,
Pauline Verber; vice presidents,
Betty Jackel, Sylvia Bronfeia,
Sylvia Waldner, and Henriettt
Riegler; treasurer, RuthJackkr.I
recording secretary, Gertrudtl
Pollack; corresponding secreUiy.l
Lillian London; parliamentahu,|
Natalie Berman.
The chapter will hold it
regular meeting on Aug. 31 at the
Community Center of Delm
Beach, 100 NW 1st Ave., at 12:30'
p.m. The guest speaker will be
Mrs. Shirley Traum, who was i
member of an ORT team viatiag
South America. Mrs. Traum m
speak on "What It Means To Be
a Jew." All members are invited I
to attend.
Beth Sholom
Sisterhood
The Temple Beth Sboionl
Sisterhood will hold a meeting on
Sept. 8 at 12:30 p.m. A Yiddish
program is planned and refresh-
ments will be served.
REGISTERED REAL ESTATE BROKER
ACREAGE-HOMES-LOTS- APARTMENTS-INCOME ri>l'KKTY
at A ROVAI. PALM WAY
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OFFICE: UVMIS
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413 HIBISCUS STREET 4101 PARKER AVENUE
WEST PALM BEACH, FLORIDA
R.L. NEWHART, Mgr.
Phone 832 8121
W.R.ZERN, L.F.D.
"Serving the Jewish Community Since 1?24"
E.B ADAMS. f*V
Phone 833*41
R]
JU
DON VOGEL
REALTOR ASSOCIATE
BROKER-SALESMAN
Call me for your FREE copy of
^m Condominium Buyer'* Guide"
700 U.S. HIGHWAY No. 1, NORTH PALM IIACH, FLA. 33401
Office Phone: 848-9753 Residence Phono: 622-4000
L
EVITT
ntojiitortsl ctisp^fts
HOini MIAMI
13385 W Di.wHwy
Steven Morti, FD
949-6315
PB* 27-7*
1921 Pembroke Rd
Sonny Levitt, F 0
931-7300
fHTPAUtWO
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pWNpWeinsw*.'0
833 4413


bt-7.l976
The Jewish Flaridian of Palm Beach County
Page 3
lautaugua Society Endows
iourse in Judaism at FA U
, ,0^ b Jewish Thought
i he offered during the Fall
sterofthe! 976-77 academic
,t Florida Atlantic Uni-
uIV Rabbi Norman T.
del of Temple Beth El of
Baton holds the resident
loreship endowed by the
hChautamiua Society.
I Chautauqua Society, the
National project of the
tonal Federation of Temple
rtherhoods. has assigned 600
Ljs to lecture at 2.200 colleges,
owed 200 accredited courses
[judaic studies and donated
] reference books to college
iries The JCS has also
Juced 37 motion pictures on
(venal Jewish ethical themes
I public television and group
kings.
Jjbbi Mendel, who has been
litual leader of Temple Beth
lance 1974. previously served
regations in Kansas City
^Fremont. Cal.
HDAINED IN 1968 after
ling his Master of Hebrew
*k degree at Hebrew Union
liege-Jewish Institute of
gion in Cincinnati, he earned
I permanent teacher's cer-
ition from the Los Angeles
eof Jewish Studies.
ibbi Mendel has been active
| in the Central Conference
lerican Rabbis' Youth Com-
the Greater Miami Rab-
RABBI MENDEL
binical Association, the Broward
Board of Rabbis, the board of the
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County, the Boca Raton Minis-
terial Association and the B'nai
B'rith Olympic XI Lodge. He
serves as Jewish chaplain at
Florida Atlantic University and
is on the Clergy Advisory Board
of the Pine Crest School in Fort
Lauderdale.
Braille Service
Needs Volunteers
Free instruction in Braille is
being offered by the Volunteer
Braille Services of Palm Beach
County. Classes start in the
Braille Workshop in the
basement of Twin Lakes High
School on Wednesday. Oct. 13. at
9 a.m. The program, a process of
lew iiinn the language of Braille,
takes approximately a full school
term to complete, in classes once
a week from 9 a.m. to noon, and
leads to certification by the
Library of Congress.
Those who wish to enroll for
the 1976-77 term or who have any
questions about the program
should call the Braille office at
the Twin Lakes High School. 832-
2618. between 9 a.m. and noon on
Tuesday or Wednesday.
There is a great need for
volunteers in Braille instruction.
The personal satisfaction of
knowing that your efforts have
helped the blind to lead more
normal lives is sufficient reward.
DON'T GET CHINCHYI
LET BOB ROSENBERG
GET THE BUGS OUT
(AMERICAN SPRAY
& SUPPLY CO.
AWN TREE SHRUBBERY
NSECTI DISEASE CONTROL
585-2385
------------------TEMPI!-----------------
B'NAI JACOB
A Conservotive Congregation
Of Palm Springs
INVITES INTERESTED RESIDENTS
TO OUR REGULAR PRAYER SER-
VICES at ROSS HALL, 275
Alomeda Dr.. Palm Springs
AAinyan-AAondays & Thursdays
9AM
Friday Services 8 00 PM
Saturdays & Holidays
9:00 AM
FULL MEMBERSHIP AVAILABLE
AT MODERATE RATES
(Includesall Holiday Seating)
For further information call
Matt Jocobson (lakeside)
967 3260
Irving Newman (Cresthaven)
968-2668
Irving Janowitz (Lakeside)
968-4072
First Marine
lional Bank and Trust Company
I2-S641
114 NO. "J" STREET
IAKE WORTH. FLORIDA
Member F.D.I.C.
t TAPES
CARTONS
HAN6ER6
WLYETHYIENE
BUSINESS FORMS
TAGS-LABELS
BAGS-BOXES
If WIPES
PA '.' HE ACM
832-0211
HOWARD
4PER S.
ACK AGING
|plm Beach Evening Chapter of
Women's American OUT
PRESENTS
^jjgogt Everything Goe"
Sunday, Sept. 19, 1:30-3:30 p.*.
c<"n0 Shalom. 7875 Belvedere Road, West Palm Beach
An Afternoon of Fun and Hilarious Stunts
Performed by Local Organizations' Teams
Admission: adults, $1;
children over 6, 50 f;
children under 6, free
Disabled Israeli Athletes
Win 32 Gold Medals
TORONTO (JTA) Israeli
athletes at the Olympics for the
disabled held here won 32 gold
medals, eight silver and five
bronze. Israel was in second place
in the wheelchair events, with the
U.S. in first place, and was fifth
in the all-round competitions.
The Israelis have two gold
medals in the pentathlon com-
petition, one for amputees and
one for those confined to wheel-
chairs. One gold medal was won
in the fencing division, another
gold medal for amputee volley-
ball and a third gold medal for
women's basketball.
IN THE men's final, the Israeli
wheelchair basketball team
played against the American
team. Israel has also won 15 gold
medals in the swimming events,
setting 10 world records.
Uri Bergman of Kibbutz Givat
Brenner won the 100-meter free-
style men's swimming contest,
setting a world record
GRAND OPENING
15% OFF ON ALL FABRICS
FREE ESTIMATES
We cover ALL P B County
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7875 Belvedere Rd.. West Palm Beach, Fla. 33411
PROGRAMS AND FEES
5 Day Program
9 A.M. -NOON MONDAY FRIDAY
Pre-schooi 3- and 4-year-oids Kindergarten
Child must be 3 by Doc. 31,1976 Child must be 5 by Dec. 31,1976
Tuition: $47.50 oar month Tuition: $55 par month
Book Faa: $5 Book Fee: $10
Registration Faa: $30 Registration Faa: $30
___.____..________[CUP AIONG THIS MM]
Application
Child's
....................................BirtHdot e.
Porent or Guardian ..................................Talophoiio
Address...........................0*7.............Sfata....
Ple.se enroll my child M tha 1976-77 COMMUNITY PRE-SCNOOl.
My $30 non-refundable opplication faa if enclosed.
l>
Data
Mail to: COMMUNITY PRE SCHOOL
Jewish Federation of Pofm Beach County
2415 Okeechobee Boulevard
Wast Palm Beach, Florida 33409


in* Jewish p/W/~- ~ -_- *-
Page 4
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach Count]
Frida
y.Augvttt 27,u
The 'Right' to be Cruel
THERE IS nothing at this point that can be expected
from the nations of the world in the stopping of terrorism.
On the one hand, there is the kind of act such as occurred at
Istanbul Airport, where four passengers waiting to board
an El Al plane were killed and a score of others injured.
On the other, there are the kinds of acts such as the
torturing of political prisoners from Chile to the Soviet
Union.
Torture is already outlawed by the signatories to the
Declaration of Human Rights of the United Nations and,
especially as Moscow is concerned, through the Helsinki
agreement last year.
The sad fact is that those most vocal in their
fraudulent concern for human freedom and dignity, using
the United Nations as a backdrop for the insolent practice
of'their fraud, are in effect the greatest practitioners of
political torture.
How, then, can the world hope to come to a consensus
of opinion against skyjacking and senseless terrorism
directed against civilians when there is no declaration
against it at all?
We Mustn't Give Up
The United Nations, which has had the issue of
terrorism on its agenda for four years, has failed to act in all
of that time, mainly because the Arabs and their supporters
have been effective in their blocking of any and all attempts
at outlawing this most heinous crime.
At a time when the nonaligned countries of the world
were this very week meeting in Colombo to mount their
latest move to drive Israel from the United Nations, was
there any hope at all that they would take some cognizance
of the growing atrocity of terrorism and its impact upon the
world? We doubt it.
Still, in the face of such discouragement, we should not
give up hope. The United States, either alone or in
cooperation with other countries, must begin instituting
their own sanctions against countries which help terrorists
or provide them sanctuaries.
Law into Action
The Senate approval of a provision in the Tax Reform
Act that will penalize corporation executives for compliance
with the Arab boycott against Israel is a most welcome
development. The 86-1 vote for it shows a strong feeling in
the country against the compliance of American companies
with the boycott. Even the one Senator who voted against
the provision, Floyd Haskell (D., Colo.), said he was not
against the provision but opposed the entire Tax Reform
Act.
The provision adopted by the Senate, known as Title Ten
of the Trade Reform Act, would subject corporate
executives to penalties, including a year in jail, for failing to
report any corporate incomes in any country that requires
participation in the boycott.
The thinking in the Senate, as demonstrated by the over-
whelming vote, was that if company executives realize that
they will be held personally responsilbe they will not be so
quick to justify caving in to the Arab boycott.
Issue of Jewish Survival
Jewish leaders are expressing with ever increasing
frequent concern that Jewish survival is endangered more
by assimilation and intermarriage than by physical threats
from their enemies. This was demonstrated recently when
Israeli President Ephraim Katzir suggested that the in-
terpretation of Zionism should include not only aliya but a
more meaningful Jewish life everywhere.
Katzir's remarks are instructive because Zionists, and
especially Israeli Zionists, have always maintained that a
meaningful Jewish life can only be had in Israel.
The need for providing Jewish education for youngsters
is becoming increasingly apparent to American Jewish
leaders. During the past few years more money has been
allocated for education, although perhaps still not enough.
In fact, many Jewish leaders and others involved in Jewish
life are also seeking to educate themselves in Jewish
religion, culture and history.
THE
Jewish Floridian
OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
Combining "OUR VOICE and "FEDERATION REPORTER"
In conjunction with Jewlah Federation of Palm Beach County, Inc.
Combined Jewlah Appeal
MIS Okeechobee Boulevard. Weat Palm Beach. Florida 33*08
OFFICE and PLANT- ISO N.E. Mh St., Miami, Fla. 33183 Phone S73-4S0B
ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 1X73-4006
MIAMI ADDRESS: P.O box 7S, Miami, Florida 33101
FREDK.8HOCHET SUZANNE SHOCHET SELMA M.THOMP80N
Editor and Publlaher Executive Editor Aaalatant to Publisher
MORTON GILBERT- Advertising Representallve
Tha Jewish Flor idian Does Not Guarantee The Kashruth
Of the Merchandise Advertised In Its Clou mn j
All P.O. 5979 return* are to be forwarded to
The Jewlah Floridian, P.O. Box 01-2973, Miami. Fla. 13101
C Fred K. Shochet Friday. Auaust 17, 1f7
Published Bl-Weekly Second Class Postage Paid at Miami, Fla.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) On* yearM.M, or by membership to
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County, 2415 Okeechobee Boulevard, Watt Palm
Beach, Fla. JMtt. Phone M* 5*00. (Out ot Town upon Request)
FEDERATION OFFICERS: President, Stanley Brenner. Vic* Presidents, Rabbi
Hyman Fishman, Or. Howard Kay, Kenneth Scherer, Dr. Richard Shuoarman. Or.
Stanley Stark; Treasurer, Stacey Lesser, Secretary, Bruce Danleli, Executive
Director, Norman Sch lelman, Assistant Executive Director, Robert Kessler
Submit material tor pu, atlen to Ronni Tartakow, Director of Public Relations
Buckley FeltMoynihan 's Breath
NEW YORK The furor
here over Sen. James Buckley's
move to propose himself for the
presidency reached monumental
proportions by convention eve.
Bigwig Louis Lefkowitz,
who is the Empire State's highest
Republican, serving in the ad-
ministration as Attorney
General, offered a stinging
rebuke to the Buckley move as
"not only fostering disharmony
but jeopardizing his own can-
didacy for reelection" to the
United States Senate in
November.
BUT EVEN before the
Lefkowitz statement, it was clear
that most Gothamites believed
the Buckley proposal to be a
Mindlin
preposterous affair intended to
generate more fury than sound.
In what may be shaping up
as the Year of the Democrats, one
of the scions of the Buckley oil
bonanza can bv no *
political conservatism RS
for the nonce on the wane.
And so Buckley nay iv
have felt the pressure of I^_
of Daniel Patrick Mnvnikl
candidacy for the fijf
upon his own seat, and it
possible that he offered
as an alternative to
ideologically divisive
politically debilitating
Reagan impasse nuunh,
interest am
own
in his
Republicans
cumbency.
, _1R1IT. Possible that |
feared losing himself in .
shadow of Bella Abrug'shit..
the-day, not to mention
torrential winds of her
maw.
For a single moment
Buckley s Republican collet
Sen. Jacob Javits, got E]
act by dismissing the Budi
ProPaal n the basis that I
wouldnt "make any natej
difference to President Ford."
All of which reminded raj
the nightmarish eventuii
were Javits up for reelectiontl
year, of another Javits-Bud
contest such as the one'
fought in 1968, when But.
polled only 17.3 percent of I
vote.
THE FACT is that Bu
faces more than Moynihan
Abzug. First, he must win i
Rep. Peter A. Peyser in a I
way Republican primary
14. If successful, and theres
little doubt that he will be, I
must face the winner of 11
way Democratic primary
that.
I raise the what ifi
of a Buckley-JaviU rematdii
more than idle speculation. At
issue would be Javits' Je
ness, and the ultimate what\
would be the choice open
Jewish voters in the event of|
Continued on Page 9
Bad NewsEven on Vacation
Friday. August 27,1976
Volume 2
1ELUL
Number 18
I imagine it has always been
like this when one descends from
the mountain, whether it be
Martin Luther King's spiritual
height or the awesome spectacle
of the Canadian Rockies where I
spent most of my recent
vacation: confrontation with so
much of the ugly reality of our
daily lives in the valley.
A media addict, I never
realized how good it can be
without newspaper, radio or
television for as many as four
days. What could I have missed?
READING THE last two
issues of The Jewish Floridian, I
noted with stomach-twisting
effect that Sadat's tough talk
worries many Israelis, the
Russians don't match peace
moves, George McGovern has
rented some property to the
Syrian Ambassador, we're still at
it with Agnew, there's something
new to complain about Carter,
U.S. contacts PLO, the boycott
they haven't stopped bugging
us Jews even during vacation
time.
Nor is the agony ameliorated
by the news that Schweiker has
a good record on Israel issues; so
did Gerald Ford until he became
President.
It must be confessed that the
churning stomach did not last
long. Aesop was right with his
story of "cry wolf." One learns to
live with Jewish paranoia, real
and imagined, some of the trivial
blown up beyond reason, some of
the important ignored. I include
Joseph Polakoff's Agnew article
in last week's issue among the
latter.
HIS interpretation of the
Stephen Birmingham piece in the
journalism review (MORE)
Cohen
focuses on the "refutation" of the
common criminal's charge of
Jewish control of the media and
who needs more of the same
defensive tune? What seemed to
me of real concern, something to
kick the stomach around, was
that "The Jews in the 'impact'
media that he is talking about
are, without exception, as they
say, 'only a little bit Jewish.' "
"None," Birmingham writes,
"are religious Jews and most
have never set foot inside a syna-
gogue or Temple and tend to feel
about their Jewishnees as one
New York Times executive says,
'Well, I was married by a rabbi.'
These are not people who have
been major supporters of Zionist
causes, financially or otherwise
Most are ambivalent about
their Jewishness, uncertain what
it means and unclear as to what
to do with it" and many, in-
cluding local gal Barbara
Walters, fail to include their
religion in their Who's Who
biographies.
IT SHOULD be added that
they are not Federation, or B'nai
B'rith or other organized Jews,
and while it may appear futile,
given our history, here's where
our concern should lie.
Or in the mindset of a Rabbi
Phineas Weberman, who, to give
him credit, has no hesitation in
again publicly announcing
bigotry in a letter published
the Miami News (Aug. 10).
He writes commending Di
officials for refusing to
ticipate in a program wk
would "bring the poor into I
better neighborhoods. They i
right in wanting to maintain I
economic level and the eth
purity of their city" and goes I
to speak of garbage-str
streets, muggings, assaults
shootings as inevitable in suchl
program.
TO BOLSTER his argun
he might have cited the PoBJ
Commissioner of New York l
who wrote that "It i
astonishing that with
Hebrews, mostly Russians, in
city, perhaps half of the anna'
should be of that race when ]
consider that ignorance of
language, more part in*
among men not physically 1
hard labor, is conducive tor
. They are burglars, "
pickpockets and highway I
ft
That was in 1908, but given'
garbage-strewn streets or
Lower East Side of the tunM
prostitution, pimping and era
one can hardly blame
wealthier WASPs nw"IW
up zoning bsrriers and
restrictions to keep the
Jews out of their better '
borhoods.
COMING OUT of the,
tains one sees more cweny, i
imagine, the negative efl* 1
the shtotl mentality, wbJWJJ
be the wall of "ethnic PuntJt
Phineas Webermans wouMII
us retreat behind, or theenca'
of self-defense that our
sophisticated spokesmen
creating.
I deem them both dart
of American Jewish life.


C*y.AuguBt271WTO
'Legion Fever' Seen
As Act of Terrorism
jackandefson
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 5
. There is a distinct possibility,
JSlligence analysts, that the
I .tPrious 'Legion fever" which
E" though Pennsylvania
Sly mayhave been the"""
lofan act of terrorism.
The epidemic kUled 27 people
Ld hospitalized 128 others who
IZnded an American Legion
KnUon in Philadelphia late
I last month.
FEDERAL EXPERTS en-
Itered the case as soon as it was
detted. The Pentagon, for
lexample, quietly checked the
lemployes and stocks at Fort
Detrick. Maryland. This is where
Ithe secret laboratories are located
Ithat developed deadly germs for
biological warfare.
Biological weapons were out-
lawed in 1969 But some virus
land bacteria strains are still kept
lit Fort Detrick for immunology
studies. The Pentagon in-
Ivestigators discovered, with
pam Rubin, an active Senior
\dult of the Jewish Com-
Unity Center, enjoyed the
pea market sponsored by the
JVC.
MORT GILBERT
IS AN
| Advertising Representative
OF THE
JEW SH FLORIDIAN
OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
Hi Telephone Number is
683-1193
*H0. .WHAT. .WHERE?
COMMUNITY PROGRAMS
AND AGENCIES
JEWISH FEDERATION OF
PAIM BEACH COUNTY
CompSholom Day Camp
|CommunilyColer>dor
Community Pre-School
[**> ViWoa
j*""ion.Ref.rral Service
**'hCommuniiyDoy
Sthool
h'*h Community Forum
l*sh Community
Mlion Committee
l^hFom.lyi Children',
I Service
l^hFlondianof
^ Beach County
1**^ Single,
h** Students Union-
|Jr* Atlantic University
I ^'P Development
g. "V Program
P'^'o Institution,
great reliet. that all the deadly
cultures were intact.
There was concern that
radicals might have stolen some
disease germs and infected the
Legionnaire. This possibility
hasn't been completely
dismissed. The American Legion
supported the Vietnam war, the
draft and military spending. This
makes the Legion a tempting
target for a leftwing terrorist
attack.
INVESTIGATORS have
learned, for example, that most
of the fever victims attended an
American Legion parade in
Philadelphia. It is conceivable,
one source told us, that a toxic
substance could have been hand-
sprayed here and there along the
parade route.
But there is no hard eveidence.
Most organized terrorists want
publicity for their outrages. And
no one has stepped forward to
claim responsibility for the
outbreak in Philadelphia. So the
malady is still a mystery.
As we previously reported,
however, terrorists are trying to
get their hands on nuclear
weapons. This would give them
the ultimate weapon to blackmail
nations. We have reported,
nevertheless, that our nuclear
security is sloppy.
NOW WE have obtained a
classified government study
confirming this. The General
Accounting Office, in a con-
fidential report, warns that our
ability to keep track of nuclear
materials is poor. Our physical
security systems, the report
adds, are weak.
The report explains what this
could mean: "In addition to
being suitable for the fabrication
of bombs, plutonium is an ex-
tremely toxic substance .
"Such materials could be used
in an explosive device or as a
radioactive poison by terrorists,
criminals or agents of other
countries."
CARTERS COMING: The
Democratic Presidential can-
didate, Jimmy Carter, already is
affecting legislation. Both
congressmen and lobbyists are
now basing their strategy on the
odds that Carter will be the next
president. Therefore, some bills
are being delayed, others with-
held, in anticipation of a Carter
administration.
Maine's Sen. Edmund Muskie,
for example, has introduced a
zero-baaed budgeting bill. This
would require the review of all
federal programs every five
years. But Muskie is quietly
holding the bill back until next
year, in the hope that he can get
stronger legislation if he waits
until Carter is in the White
House.
i THE SENATE Government
Operations Committee has also
been investigating how to
streamline the federal regulatory
agencies. But no legislation will
be introduced until the new
administration takes office next
year.
Environmentalists are also
trying to hold up a bill that would
allow private manufacturers to
produce nuclear fuel for the first
time.
If they can delay it long
enough, the environmentalists
believe Carter as president would
veto it.
BYRON'S BOYS: An itinerant
legislator, Rep. Goodloe Byron
(D., Md.), traveled all the way to
Alaska last month to inspect the
trans-Alaskan pipeline com-
munications network.
His report to the House
Commerce Committee is
probably one of the shortest and
most expensive ever submitted.
It runs only a page and a half. It
contains no information that
couldn't have been obtained by a
telephone call.
The report also omits one key
factor, which may explain the
real reason Byron flew to Alaska.
His two sons, Goodloe, Jr., and
Barton, are working on the
Alaska pipeline this summer.
The congressman spent more
time visiting his sons than in-
specting the pipeline.
AMB ASS ADOR-in-Exile:
Turner Shelton, our former
ambassador to Nicaragua, has
finally found a home. His per-
formance in Nicaragua was so
poor that he was rebuked and
recalled by the State Depart-
ment.
But he has powerful friends on
Capitol Hill. They twisted
Secretary of State Henry
Kissinger's arm to give him
another job. Shelton even showed
up at the State Department to
examine pictures of am-
bassadorial residences he would
like to live in.
First he was appointed am-
bassador to the Bahamas. But
both the U.S. Senate and the
Bahama government turned him
down. Then he was nominated
Consul General to Bermuda.
Again the host government
rejected him. Then he wangled an
appointment to the romantic, old
Moroccan city of Casablanca.
Once more, he was denied the job.
NOW IT LOOKS as if he has
found a safe haven. He has been
assigned as Diploma tin-
Residence'' at the Navy war
college in Newport, Rhode
Island. His duty will be to make
occasional talks to military
classes on the subject of foreign
affairs.
He will have no official
residence, no staff, no respon-
sibilities. But at least Shelton
will have a title.
Entebbe Hostages To Speak Here
HAMPTON LIQUORS
WINES ft UQUOftS
FAST NLIVMY SBRVICI
Mmiw: ttt-ftfttt
257 Poinciana Way
PALM NACH, PLA.
Ban & Glasses Loaned FREE
Janet and Ezra Almog, two
Israeli citizens on the hijacked
plane held hostage at Entebbe
Airport in Uganda and later
rescued by Israeli commandos,
will address a general commun'ty
meeting at Temple Beth El on
Sunday, Aug. 29, at 8 p.m.
The Almogs, Americans who
emigrated to Israel and live on
Kibbutz Ein-Dor, were captured
by the terrorists en route to visit
their parents in Madison, Wise.
Sponsored by Palm Beach
County State of Israel Bonds,
their trip to Palm Beach is one of
five appearances they are making
in the United States before
returning to Israel. Says Michael
B. Small, general chairman of the
MYRON M. PERSOff, MD
Announces the Opening of His
Offke For the Proctice of Plostic
and Reconstructive Surgery;
Aesthetic-Cosmetic, ond Hond
Surgery
399 W. Camino Gardens Blvd..
Suite XI
Boca Raton. Florida
infment 3H-M55
vAgo
Temple B'nai Jacob of Palm Springs
A Conservative Congregotion-A congenial atmosphere
INVITES YOU TO COM! AND WORSHIP WITH US AT
ROSS MALL-17S ALAMEDA DKIVK
Sabba,ui8ervleea:ri1.-Plf:Sat.-*Alf Mlnyn: MoiulayndTtiurdyat9 A.M.
MEMBERSHIPS AT MODERATE RATES
TICKETS AVAILABLE FOR MtOMNOLIOAYS
FOR INFORMATION CALL:
ntvmo jANOwrra a n* HeV4f
MATTHEW JACOBSON (L*kmM) ter-SMi
BYDBJaHBAUM>>mvl)MT !
Palm Beach County State of
Israel Bonds Committee, "We
are most fortunate that Mr. and
Mrs. Almog are willing to share
their experience with us. I sin-
cerely hope that the entire
community will come out to meet
them and hear their incredible
story of how they were captured,
how they lived through the
drama of their captivity in
Uganda, and how they were
saved by the heroic efforts of the
Israeli commandos."
Although not mandatory,
reservations should be made by
calling the State of Israel Bond
office in West Palm Beach, 659-
1445.
Send your child to the
Jewish Community Day School
"We Do!"
MIMI STEIN, accountant
"Because I value detailed work and
concentration on basic studies to build up
a comprehensive knowledge. My three
children are thoroughly grounded in all
aspects of general studies and are treated
as developing human beings by concerned
teachers."
BERNARD STEINHOFF.
automotive engineer
"Because each part of the studies in the^
JCDS fits together to make an integrated
body of knowledge. I want my two sons to
have respect for their Jewish cultural
heritage and be properly prepared for
advanced college studies by superior
teachers."
JOAN TOCHNER. librarian
"Because the general and Jewish studies
are systematized and integrated into a
classification of total learning experience.
My sons benefit from the innovative
experimental course of studies with a
healthy respect for the book and for the
mind and its vast horizons."
Pre-School through Junior High School
Director: Dr. Sidney Selig
THE JEWISH COMMUHITY DAY SCHOOL
IS A BENEFICIARY AGENCY OF THE
JEWISH FEDERATION OF
PALM BEACH COUNTY
High Holy Days Services
for the unaffiliated and area visitors
TEMPLE BETH EL'S SENTER HALL
Officiated by
RABBI HYMAN FISHMAN
and
CANTOR LEONARD KLIGER
September 24th, 25th, 26th
October 3rd., 4th, 1976
Limited Seating
$35.00 DONATION PER PERSON
MAIL RESERVATIONS TO:
TEMPLE BETH EL
2815 North Flogler Drive, W. P. B.
133-0339


Page 6
The Jewish Floridian pfPalm Beach.County
piay, Auguit27
IWjj
\ Camp Shalom Celebrates Israel Day
_

\
J
I
- ii ii iii Bin m .....wmnm
IVafing Israeli flags, the boys and girls of Camp Shalom join together in songs and dances to
pay tribute to the State of Israel. This was part of a total program devoted to learning about the
country.
k^L "^H
11 9 m
1[ <5 *j km -A. *

. 1 i 5^^ *** v Mr ft
t_ ^ 1 Ss 1
The future looks bright for Leslie Brenner (center), Jewish]
content specialist and coordinator of Israel Day at Camp]
Shalom. Kim Saxton (left) and Kim Calloway. members of the
counselor-in-training program, proved to be very capabkl
fortune tellers.
A visit to a 'Tel Aviv Art Show' finds campers busy creating individual art projects. Under the
direction of Lisa Rubin, the arts and crafts instructor, they decorated banks and constructed
mobiles using Israel's cities as their theme.
Shave a balloon. eat from a candy tree. try vourW
'ink. win a prize. A carnival on the streets of Israel. A\
fun nay to spend a summer afternoon!
A trip to Israel would not be complete without samP^ngfLm I
by the boys and girls during their imaginary trip to Israel.
I
left) Pearl Murray, Andrea Jacobson, Danny
Dekel and Idan Barak.
J


August 27.1976_
The Jewish PlorididnofPalm Beach County
Pa*e7
Terrorists Were Out to KillNot Hijack
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
, a viV (JTA) Two terrorists killed four
and wounded 24, 14 of them seriously, at
KVs Yasilkov Airport Aug. 11 minutes before they
Uboard a Tel Aviv-bound El Al plane.
|Fi htv.tWo passengers were already on the plane
the killers opened their machine-gun and hand
, attack on the remaining passengers in the''
* i ii,o dead retaliation for the Israeli rescue
01 of more than 100 ho t.,es held
dead
lers were identified
I Harold Rosenthal,
lWanttoUS. Sen-
(bK.Javits (R., N.Y.),
was on his way to
to participate in an
lemic seminar at the
] Leer Institute, and a
neSe tourist guide,
Hiramo, who was in
of a group of
lists from Japan on
rway to Israel.
SERIOUSLY injured
c^ers were taken to
tuls in Istanbul. The other
eriously injured were flown
to Tel Aviv. Among the
j were two Turkish police-
Lid an Israeli security of-
1 Many of the injured were
by splinters from the
des and shattered window-
terrorists, a Palestinian
i Pakistani, were captured.
[captured killers identified
elves as Mohamed Mehdi
Kohamed Husein al-Kashid
nitted they were members
Popular Front for the
on of Palestine led
irge Habash and that they
| in the pay of Libya.
two were traveling with
Kuwaiti passports. The
of the attack was pieced
jther by passengers who
1 to Ben (iurion Airport,
iptain of the El Al plane.
ov Roman, the Israeli Vice
ul in Istanbul. Ephraim
or. who was at the airport
the attack occurred, the
or of Istanbul and a
entative of the Turkish
Btry of Justice who were at
| airport and conducted an
tigation of the tragedy.
M SOME of the accounts,
bpeared that the terrorists
not trying to hijack the
but to kill or capture as
es as many of the
n*ers as possible in
IWUSE OF THE AND
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iJ2^nj by terrorists at Entebbe Airport
in Uganda.
One passenger told reporters at
Ben Gurum Airport the attack
occurred as the passengers were
emerging from the terminal
building toward the bus that was
to drive him to the plane. The
terrorists opened fire, aiming
directly at the passengers, she
said.
The killers appeared to be
coming from the terminal
building. The passengers
scattered, screaming. Another
passenger said he heard a loud
explosion followed by machine-
gun fire and people falling all
around him. crying in agony and
bleeding. The explosion was
apparently that of a hand
grenade.
Two other passengers, Abra-
ham Papou, and his wife, Rachel,
said the gunmen tossed grenades
and opened fire when the Turkish
police thwarted their attempt to
seize hostages.
PAUL BARKER of England,
another passenger, reported that
the entire incident took about 20
minutes. He said he was in the
group that was about to board
the plane when he heard two loud
blasts.
"We were ordered out of the
bus and told to lie flat on the
ground. We heard a lot of auto-
matic fire. But the El Al security
agents and the Turkish police
seemed to have gained quick
control of things."
Another aspect of the attack
was pieced together from various
accounts, namely, how the 82
passengers aboard the plane were
saved. Credit was given to the
quick thinking of the captain who
decided to take off as soon as
possible after the attack began.
HE ORDERED the doors of
the plane closed as soon as the
last of the earlier groups of
passengers, who had been bused
to the plane, were aboard. Those
left behind were the injured, the
dead and several others who were
waiting to board the bus taking
them to the plane.
At a midnight press con-
ference, about an hour after the
El Al plane landed at Ben (Iurion
Airport, Gad Yaacobi. Minister
of Transportation, and Mot-
dechai Ben Ari, General Director
of El Al. said they supported the
captain's decision.
Yaacobi said the attack was
the continuation by terrorists of
their war against Israel. He
added that the attack was further
proof that Israel's national airline
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most be constantly on the alert
for terrorists. He said that since
the hijacking of the Air France
plane, Israel has taken extra
special security measures to
thwart terrorist attacks.
THE TRANSPORT Minister
added that in spite of the Air
France hijacking the world has
still not grasped the awesome
meaning of air piracy and
terrorism. Premier Yitzhak
Rabin, who received the news of
the latest tragedy as he was ad-
dressing a delegation of Israel
Bond leaders from the U.S. and
Canada, said he doubted that the
world was fully aware of the con-
sequences of continuing air
terrorism.
There were conflicting reports,
official and unofficial, as to how
the terrorists gained access to the
terminal building. One report was
that they arrived earlier in the
day aboard a Pakistani plane
from Libya.
ANOTHER was that they
arrived from Pakistan on an
Italian airliner. A third report,
deemed most authentic, was that
they arrived in the morning in
Rome from Benghazi, then took
an Alitalia plane to Istanbul
where they remained in transit,
thus having access to the
departing passengers lounge.
Meanwhile, Yaacobi announced
Aug. 12 that Israel would seek to
extradite the two captured ter-
rorists if the law allowed.
He said he had already
discussed this with foreign
ministry officials.
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Page 8
i rtr. ur.wfsn r* inrrnir
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday
I 2% Tl

iRabbtmral fage
devoted to discussion of themes and issues relevant to Jewish life pest and present
co-ordinated by the
Palm Beach County Rabbinical Council
Editor
Rabbi William H. Shapiro
Inside Judaica
Your Rabbi Speaks
By Dr. Frederick Lachman
Q. How were the Danish Jews
rescued during the Holocaust?
A. For almost three and a half
years, from the day of Denmark's
occupation by Nazi Germany on
April 9, 1940, the nearly 10,000
Danish Jews and Jewish refugees
were not molested. The Danes,
while collaborating with the Ger-
mans in the so-called policy of
negotiation, simultaneously
extended full political, social,
juridical, and personal protection
to thte Jews and their property.
The behavior of the Danish
authorities and the population
was so steadfast that the Ger-
mans did not think it profitable
to injure the Danish Jewish
population, the Encyclopaedia
Judaica states.
Things changed when Ger-
many, on August 28, 1943,
abolished the Danish-German
agreement. In September, 1943,
martial law was declared. The
representative of the German
Reich, the Nazi Werner Best, ad-
vocated using this opportunity to
deport the Jews.
The attache for shipping af-
fairs, F. G. Dukwitz, who main-
tained good relations with
leading Danish Social Demo-
crats, informed them of the im-
pending danger for the Jews. His
warning was quickly spread by
Danish citizens, organizations
and by the Jews themselves, and
overnight a rescue organization
sprank up that helped 7,200 Jews
and about 700 non-Jewish rela-
tives escape to Sweden in less
than three weeks.
Danish captains and fishermen
carried out this operation. What
began as a spontaneous popular
movement was developed into an
organized action by the Danish
resistance movement. The cost of
the transfer amounted to about
12 million Danish kroner, of
which the Jews themselves paid
approximately 6.5-7 million. The
rest was provided out of private
and public Danish contributions.
During the night of the per-
secution (October 1-2, 1943) and
following it, fewer than 500 Jews
were seized by the Germans.
They were sent to Theresienstadt
and remained there until the
spring of 1945, when they too
were brought to Sweden by the
action of the Swedish Red Cross
headed by Count Bernadotte.
Upon their return from Sweden
to Denmark at the end of the war
most of the Jews found their
property intact, the E J notes.
It may be estimated that ap-
proximately 120 people perished
because of the persecution: about
50 in Teresienstadt and a few
more in other camps. Close to the
same number committed suicide
or were drowned on their way to
Sweden. Leas than 2 percent of
the Jewish population of Den-
mark perished.
Denmark, during the Holo-
caust, was a beacon that the rest
of Europe should have followed
... but did not, so that the
Holocaust came to represent the
European attitude toward Jews
and the humane love of the Danes
for*their fellow men was simply a
benevolent postscript in a brutal
and inbMrnan time.
Q. Why is the dance such an
important element of Hasidism?
A. In the communal and re-
ligious life of the Jewish people,
says the Encyclopaedia Judaica,
dance was always regarded as an
expression of joy and religious
ecstasy. In summarizing the
activities of man, Ecclesiastes
observes: "To everything there is
a season ... A time to mourn,
and a time to dance" (3:1,4).
The symbolic role of dance is
evident in the poet's description
of the destruction of Jerusalem:
"The joy of our heart is ceased:
our dancing is turned into
mourning" (Lamentations 5:15);
and in Jeremiah's vision of its
reconstruction: ". Again
shalt thou be adorned with thy
tabrets. And shalt go forth in the
dances of them that make merry
. .," and in his words of com-
fort: "Then shall the virgin
rejoice in the dance" (Jeremiah
31:4.13). Bible literature abounds
in references to dance and in
descriptions of dance festivities,
showing how deeply rooted was
dance in the ancient culture of the
Jewish people.
With the rise of Hasidism in
Eastern Europe in the 18th cen-
tury, dance assumed great im-
portance for the Jewish masses.
Israel ben Eliezer Ba'al Shem
Tov, the founder of Hasidism,
used dance to attain religious en-
thusiasm and communion with
God, the EJ states. He taught his
followers that "the dances of the
Jew before his Creator are
prayers" and quoted the Psalm-
ist: "All my bones shall say:
'Lord, who is like unto Thee?' "
(Psalms 35:10).
EhilA Month of Preparation
Hasidic dance assumed the
form of the circle, symbolic of the
Hasidic philosophy that "every-
one is equal, each one being a link
in the chain, the circle having no
front or rear, no beginning or
ending." The Hasidim would
start their dancing in slow tempo,
and as the music became faster
they held arms upward and leapt
in the air in an effort to reach
spiritual ecstasy. The ac-
companying melodies were com-
posed to brief texts from either
the Bible or the Talmud.
Nahman of Bratzlav, great-
grandson of the Ba'al Shem Tov,
believed that to dance in prayer
was a sacred command, and he
composed a prayer which he re-
cited before dancing. He and
other Hasidic rabbis, says the
Judaica, called for dancing on all
festive occasions and even on the
solemn days of the Ninth of Av,
Rosh Ha-Shanah and the Day of
Atonement.
During the celebrations on
Simhat Torah, the usual proces-
sions with the scrolls reached a
climax in the rabbi's own dance.
Wrapped in a prayer shawl, with
a scroll held high in his hands,
the rabbi danced with spiritual'
ecstasy as the Hasidim sang and
dapped hands in a circle around
him.
RABBI HYMAN FISHMAN
Administrator and Religious
Counselor, Shalom Memorial
Park
There is a classical Jewish joke
which tells of a gentleman who
kept wishing his friends that they
live to 120 years and six months.
One day a friend, having received
this blessing, asked: "I know the
Jewish tradition of 120 years, but
why do you add the 6 months?"
The gentleman faced his friend
and seriously replied: "A Jew
doesn't want to die suddenly."
We are a people who try to
prepare for all eventualities.
Whenever and wherever
possible we do our best to an-
ticipate the future. As a result of
this preparation. certain
characteristics are noticeable
among the Jewish people.
When a Jew came to a new
community, he organized a place
to worship God. Rabbis and
teachers were brought in to
satisfy the spiritual needs of the
Jew and to educate the members
of his family in the ways of
Jewish life. As soon as possible a
Jewish cemetery was purchased
and dedicated, because that, too,
was a Jewish necessity that had
to be taken care of before the
actual need.
AS COMMUNITIES GREW,
the synagogue and its activities
were expanded, centers were built
and many other institutions were
created to serve the needs of our
people. A newcomer to an
established Jewish community
expected to find all the necessary
institutions which made Jewish
life meaningful.
Everything was planned, from
the cradle to the grave. Careful
planning has always been the
Jewish way. leaving nothing to
chance. Some of these very
characteristics helped make our
people very successful in their
business endeavors.
From whence did these traits
come? It would be difficult to
point out the exact source.
Perhaps it has a religious origin.
The Torah told the Jew to count
days from one holiday to the next
(Sfira), thus in a sense preparing
himself for what was about to
come. The High Holy Days are
also that kind of example.
Self-examination and
repentance for sin are the themes
of Rosh Hashonah and Yom
Kippur, but these do not come
upon us suddenly. They are
introduced with elaborate
planning. One month before Rosh
Hashonah, from the first of Elul
(August 27, 1976), the Shofar is
sounded in the synagogue every
weekday. Its message is to
"awaken sinners and urge them
to repent."
CANDLELIGHTING
TIME
X 1ELUL-5736 i
TV
Highlight,
TUNE IN TO "The Jewish
Service". a program con-
ducted by the rabbis of Palm
Beach County in cooperation
with WPTV-TV. Channel 5,
Sundays at 10 a.m. Sponsored by
the Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County.
Synagogues are busy making
arrangements for the High Holy
Days services. The temples will
be crowded. People will visit the
cemeteries where loved ones are
buried, to meditate and pray.
ALL THIS IN preparation for
a New Year. At this time, we
assure each other, orally and in
writing, that we hope to I
happy and healthy New Ye
Having prepared well -
ready for what is about to,
and we have paved a snoot!
for ourselves and our lovedo
Do you take time to prew
eventualities? Remember^ j
our best tradition to do so.
Synagogues in
Palm Beach County
RHORM
TEMPLE ISRAEL
1901 North F log I er Drive
West Palm Beach, Florida 33407
833 8421
Rabbi Irving B. Cohen
Sabbath services, Friday at 8:15
p m.
TEMPLE BETH EL OF
BOCA RATON
P.O. Box 568
Boca Raton, Florida 33432
391 8901
Rabbi Norman T Mendel
Moravian Church, 12th Ave. and
Palmetto Park Rd., Boca Ralon
TEMPLE ETERNAL LIGHT
P.O. Box 3
Boca Raton, Florida 33432
426-1600
Rabbi Beniomin Rosayn
Sabbath services Friday old
p.m.
at Unitarian-Universalist
Fellowship Building
162 W Palmetto Park Rd.
Boca Raton
CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION
ANSHEISH0L0M
5348 Grove Street
West Palm Beach, Florida 33409
684-3212
Rabbi Henry Jerech
Daily services at 8:30 a.m. and 7
p.m.
Friday services at 8:30 a.m., 6
p.m. and 8:30 p.m.
Sabbath services at 8:30 a. m.
and 7 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL
2815 North Flagler Drive
West Palm Beach, Florida 33407
833-0339
Rabb.WilliomH. Shapiro
Sabbath services Friday at 8:15
p.m.
Saturday at 9:30 a.m.
Sunday at 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SH010M
315North"A"Slreel
lake Worth, Florida 33460
585-5020
Rabbi Emonuel Ersenberg
Services, Monday* and Thursdays
at 8:30 a.m.
Friday at 8:15 p.m.
Saturday at 9:30 a.m.
TEMPLE BfTH DAVID
Sabbath service*, Friday at 8 p.m.
At Westminister
Presbyterian Church
10410 N. Military Troll. Palm
Beach Gardens. 321 North lake
Blvd., North Palm Beach, Flo.
33408
854-1134
Cantor Nicholas Fenakel
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB
275 Alemeda Drive
Palm Springs, FI or .da 33460
Sabbath services, Friday
p.m.
Saturday ot 9 a.m.
Mondays and Thursdays at9o.
Services held at Faith United
Presbyterian Church, Po|
Springs
B'NAI TORAH
CONGREGATION
P.O. Box 2306
Boca Raton, Florida 33432
Rabbi Nathan Zelizer
Sabbath services, Friday at t],
p.m.
2nd and 4th Saturdays ot 9 30|
a.m.
At Boca Federol Savings 4 to
Association
3901 Federal Highway,
Raton
DELRAY HEBREW
CONGREGATION
Meets at Methodist Fello
Hall
342 N. Swinlon Ave., OtlfOY
Philip Bioler, lay leootr
For information, call *
Miller. 278-1985
at 8
TWPUBITHSItOUH.
N.W. Avenue "G"
Belle Glade, Florida 33430
Jack Slatemon, layltad"
Sobbath services, Friday ot
p.m.
TEMPLE IMANU-El
190 North County Rood
Palm Beach, Florida 33480
832-0004
Robbi Max L Fdrmon
Cantor Ernest Schreibt*
Sabbath services,
p.m.
Saturday at 9 a. m
Friday


August 2V1976_
The JewishFUmdian of Palm Beach County

Page 9
>ILMHX\
Buckley Hoped to Startle
N. Y. Electorate
Continued from Page 4
ihan Democratic can-
oyn
Would Javits get the nod
them over Moynihan on
basis of sheer sectarian
M_xtion?
THE FACT is that Javits
had a singularly undia-
pushed career as one of
mral Court Jews in the Senate.
ft a member in good standing
[that vast club of senatorial
jrity that lies like a blob
^Capitol Hill.
Still, arguments would be
0 that to lose him would
^ to the Senate, from a Jew-
I point of view, what the un-
mpulous Johnson "elevation"
J Arthur Goldberg and the
Btal Nixon demotion of Abe
meant to the Supreme
All of this would be
jdicated on the assumption
iFit is good for the Jews" to
IrtJews in high places.
, I WONDER if that is always
K. Few Jews in high places
1 been eloquent defenders of
j faith in the same sense that,
\, a Herbert Lehman was;
> frequently, they are like a
I Kissinger, who is not.
From an empirical rather
i a speculative point of view,
tissue for Jewish voters here is
efive-way Democratic primary.
addition to Moynihan and
mg, it features Ramsay Clark,
bnner U.S. Attorney General;
O'Dwyer, president of the
ky Council here, who was urged
|run as the best way to get him
t of the Council, which has just
I had its fill of him; and Abe
chield. who made a similar
three years ago and was
nped.
Hirschfeld and O'Dwyer can
easily discounted. Abzug,
e capacity to chatter can
letiraes be enchanting, most
carping and cheeky, must
ttheless be taken more
usly precisely because she is
|the U.S. House of Representa-
i right now and has at least
e political base.
GIVEN THE what if again,
choice between an Abzug and
Pvits, or indeed between an
I and any other Jewish
. distinguished or
"inguished, there would be
arian problem.
w^Ug' 'l might ** arued.
ft be a far greater asset to the
te than Javits and certainly
*%, himself, if only because
need to function verbally
ZU T Pennit her to become
1 of the kind of Senate
,. "ability" that demands
I eloquence of silent politics
1 "I081 revolting form of rule
Keeps the government's
w from being the people's
or Jewish voters, this
,e especially true, par-
y when ne considers the
a1 iik t,raditiJ Jewish
> liberalism. But it would
'te^00 Pounds of Jewish
lAG'" ^ntification
t** ""sea is legion. By
TLuf? 8tar on **
ktshke circuit mainly
1 own election cam-
fh'ciaS!" 8Ub8tituto for
pj" that former Attorney
l^ttark would be less likely
^Jewish New Yorker
X"vf hk votin
"hat about a choice
^"Srand- Ahw*
u "ntlusm u an issue.
l"?initatLi8 -*
*< the dictum that "it
!bSh^ Jew" to have
C w "w-uitereat. can on*
imagine Dr. Kissinger arguing
the Israeli position at the United
Nations as effectively as
Moynihan did as U.S.
Ambassador there?
PERHAPS because of her
multitudinous Jewish iden-
tifications, even if for no other
reason, it would certainly be a
sheer absurdity to contemplate
Abzug in that role a piece of
satire in the best tradition of the
political cartoon.
And so, what faces the
Jewish voter here in the
Democratic primary who resolves
to choose between Moynihan and
Abzug will be effective per-
formance and proven distinction
vs. the alleged need for Jews to
have Jews in high places. My
own hope is that it will not be a
sectarian choice the voter makes
but a choice governed by quality
of political potential.
That should always be the
paramount principle in American
political life for all of us. A
corruption of that principle is
what keeps so much mediocrity
in the Senate, and indeed in
government office generally,
term after term It is what has
kept Javits interred there.
I RATHER suspect that
Sen. Buckley, in proposing
himself for the presidency, had
many of these thoughts about
Jewish voters in mind.
The major obstacle to his
reelection come November may
well be shaped by how Jewish
voters performed in the
Democratic primary whether
they succumbed to the ex-
pediency of sectarianism or
avoided it by aspiring toward the
larger issue of political ex-
cellence.
Reckoned in these terms,
hopes for Buckley's incumbency
may well have been weakened.
For his presidential ploy was in
no way characteristic of the
larger issue of political ex-
cellence.
HE NOTED that security
measures for passengers in
transit are less tight than
otherwise.
He declared that despite the
number of injured, the attack was
not a success, considering what
the terrorists could have done in
the Istanbul airport. He also
drew a distinction between two
kinds of terrorist action those
meant to achieve a bargaining
position and those aimed simply
at murder, as at Istanbul.
Rabin said it should be kept in
mind that holding hostages for
bargaining purposes was simply
a means to assure continued acts
of murder. Terrorist acts for
bargaining purposes, he said, are
designed to enable other
terrorists to continue with their
acts of murder, knowing that if
they are caught, their friends will
do everything to free them.
El Al Captain's
Quick Decision
Saved Lives
Warner Bros. Will Film
Official Entebbe Version
JERUSALEM (JTA) Warner Brothers will
produce the official version of the Entebbe story, the
Ministry of Commerce and Industry has announced here.
An agreement to that effect was signed between Com-
merce and Industry Minister Haim Barlev and Ted
Ashley, chairman of the film company's board of direc-
tors.
The government will assist the producers with official
information on the operation, and will provide them with
army units and rent military aircraft and vehicles.
IN RETURN, Warner Brothers promised to use local
production services as much as possible. The director will
be Franklin Sheffner and the script writer is Kenn Ross.
The two chief photographers are already in Israel.
More than 12 film companies competed for govern-
ment assistance in the production of a film on Entebbe.
Warner Brothers will donate part of the revenues of
the film to an Israeli soldier benevolent fund.
Rabin Draws Istanbul,
Athens Hijack Parallel
JERUSALEM (JTA) Premier Yitzhak Rabin
said here that the assignment of the terrorists at Istanbul
was to kill passengers of the El Al plane rather than to
board the plane to hijack it. Rabin made that observation
during a visit to an anti-terrorist unit of the border patrol.
Rabin drew a parallel between the Athens airport
attack last year and the Istanbul raid in that, in both
assaults, the terrorists planned their arrival at the airport
to coincide with that of the passengers who were their
target.
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Yaacov Roman, the El Al
pilot who was captain of the
El Al plane whose pas-
sengers were attacked Aug.
11 at the Istanbul airport
terminal, said here he had
decided to taxi the plane to
a far side of the airport
because the landing site
was an excellent target for
the attackers.
He said that when the
attack began, the plane was
parked exactly opposite the
terminal, so his first
reaction was to move the
plane in a hurry. He started
two of his four engines and
taxied to a far end of the
airfield, well out of the
range of small fire.
IT IS El Al practice to move
passengers from an airport
terminal to its planes by bus. One
busload of passengers had
boarded the plane when the
attack began.
After he moved the plane,
Roman said he decided not to
take off until he knew what was
happening to the rest of the pas-
sengers. Then a second busload
of passengers came to the plane,
including several of the injured,
but because of the confusion that
accompanied the attack, it was
impossible to locate the final
group of passengers due to board
the plane, so he decided to take
off for Tel Aviv, Roman said.
Meanwhile, Israeli officials at
Istanbul reported by telephone to
the army broadcasting station
that the Turkish authorities were
demonstrating efficiency in
handling the aftermath of the
attack.
THE INJURED are now in
several hospitals in Istanbul.
Israeli Legation personnel have
visited all of them. It was
reported that there are 12 Israelis
among -the 14 seriously injured
passengers in Istanbul hospitals.
The two others are a Swiss
national and a Spanish national.
Another less seriously injured
victim is a Turkish Jew employed
by El Al in Istanbul.
Almost all of the injured
brought to Israel on the El Al
plane had suffered superficial
wounds caused by splinters
hitting them in the legs and other
lower parts of the body, ac-
cording to Dr. Itzhak Shani,
director of the Sheba Medical
Center, who examined them.
The names of six injured
Israelis brought here were given
as Levi Zahav, Uri Ron, whose
condition was found to be much
better than had been initially
reported, Miriam Yahav, Nina
Sheinman, Rivka Basin and
Israel Male hi.
Turkish officials are
questioning the captured
terrorists and were to bring them
before a judge this week, it was
reported here.
Q*
BEN ROTHENBERG
Counselor and
Sales Representative
SHALOM
MEMORIAL PARK
"Palm Beach County's
First Cemetery Dedicated
Exclusively to the Needs
of the Jewish Community"
Office 684-2277
Home 6S4-0646
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THEREFORE, he said, he was
certain that Arab terrorists
would continue to try their
murderous activities, especially
since they have the support of
some Arab countries, plus the
laziness and lack of action
against them by other countries.
Rabin, who was escorted in the
town by Police Minister Shlomo
Hille, watched new anti-terronst
techniques. The border patrol
was active in coping with riots m
the West Bank.
Border patrol police also help
keep law and order in some of the
cities in Israel proper. Mean-
while El Al officials here
reported that the Istanbul
assault not only has not caused
any loss to El Al bookings but
that on the contrary, more people
are shifting to El Al flights.
STIALOtt M:MC2tT/U T7LZK
Palm Bench County's Only All Jewish Cemetery
Serving th entire Jewish Community
PRE-NEED or in TIME OF NEED
Ask about our FEATURE MAUSOLEUM
INFORMATION CENTER PHONE
5932 Okeechobee Blvd W Palm 684-2277
W. Palm Beach. Fl. 33409 Oelray 4273220
JEWISH FAMILY AND CHILDREN'S SERVICE
An outstanding professionol counseling agency serving the Jewish
community of Palm Beach County. Professional ond confidential
help is available for
Problems of the aging
Adoption and child plocement
Vocational counseling
Marital counseling
Parent-child conflicts
Personal problems
Private Offices:
2415 Okeocliobet Bokvrd
Watt Palm Roach, Fla. 33409
Telephone: 634-1991
From Boca Raton, call collect
Moderate fees ore charged in family and individual counseling to
those who can pay (Fees are based on income ond family size)


Page 10
TheJ
f%m -.r
eu
risk Floridian of Palm Beach County
Fri GOP Urges Soviets
To Act on Rights
KANSAS CITY (JTA) The Republican Party's
platform, drafted by a committee of 108 delegates, calls on
the Soviet Union to "implement" the United Nations
Declaration on Human Rights and the 1975 Helsinki
Agreement that "guarantee" emigration rights and the
termination of "all forms of harassment" of those wishing
to emigrate.
In dealing with equal rights and ending
discrimination, the platform calls for "vigorous en-
forcement of laws to assure equal treatment" in job
recruitment, hiring, promotion, pay credit, mortgage
access-and housing, but "the way to end" discrimination
"is not by resurrecting the discredited quota system and
attempting to cloak it in an aura of new respectability,"
the plank said.
It recommended "alternative means of assisting the
victims of past discriminations," including educational
opportunites. Saying "diversity in education has great
value," the platform recommends "Public schools and
non-public schools should share in education funds on a
constitutionally acceptable basis." It also says that
private colleges and universities should be assisted.
Jews Buying
Work Permits
BONN (JTA) The
state prosecutor in the
West German city of Offen-
bach, near Frankfurt, is
investigating allegations
that more than 1.000 Soviet
Jews with Israeli citizen-
ship have paid large sums
to obtain work and
residence permits in the
city.
This followed a report in
the Israeli paper Yediot
Achronot claiming that the
emigres were paying inter-
mediaries up to $1,000 to
obtain the necessary
permits.
THE OFFENBACH local
authorities have conceded that
there has been a rapid rise in the
number of Israeli citizens in the
area, from 458 at the start of 1974
to 1,100 presently.
Israel Denies Sinkm
Cypriot Arms Ship
TEL AVIV (JTA) Israel denied any knowl
about the sinking of a Cypriot ship carrying arms ou
of the southern Lebanese port of Tyre Aug. 9. "u/el
nothing about it," an army spokesman said. Palest
sources in Lebanon charged that Israeli frogmen cr
the explosion of the ship, "Athens," outside theent
of the port at Tyre causing the port to be blocked.
However, another source in Lebanon said the
was sunk by a torpedo. A report from Cyprus said th
the Athens was sunk by the same elements responsible!
the sinking of another arms ship near Sidon last week
PALESTINIANS and Moslem leftists reactin
the reports from Israel that its navy patrols have I
intensified near Sidon and Tyre are blaming Israel f{
sinking of the ships. But the Syrians and Leb
Christians have also been conducting a siege of tb,
ports to prevent the Palestinian and Lebanese Mi
forces from receiving arms.
hal COHEN
needs YOUR support and YOUR vote
on TUESDAY, SEPT. 7th
YOUR
ELECT COHEN
COUNTY COURT JUDGE
Non-Partisan Group 6
Harold (Hal) J. Cohen is an active member of your community.
Member of Board of Directors of B'nai B'rith local chapter.
Active member of Federation UJA-IEF Attorney's Division. Executive
Asst State Attorney Former Asst. County Solicitor. Member Fla. Bar,
P.B. County Bar Assn.. Natl DA Assn., Fla Pros. Atty Assn..
American Bar Assn., Bar of U.S. Supreme Court, Bar of U.S. Dist. Ct.,
Specialist Designation in Trial Practice & Criminal Law, Former Chief
Felony Trial Div., Misdemeaner & Traffic Div., Career Criminal
Prosecutor, Special Investigations & Consumer Affairs.
Paid Political Adv Paid for by
Campaign Fund of Harold (Hal) J. Cohen,
E. Stone, Treasurer.
-NOTE-
Reading Material and Advertising on this page is not to be
construed as an endorsement by the Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County.
Small Announces For Florida House
ON SEPT. 7th VOTE
!n"comm.ss.omi
democrat oistric |
ELECT
JIM De LONGA
PALM BEACH COUNTY
SCHOOL BOARD DISTRICT 7
A sound education is the best heritage we can leave our children. I
will strive to improve
BASIC EDUCATION 3R's TEACHER MORALE
DISCIPLINE ECONOMY OF OPERATION
> Degrees; certificate In the Engineering Sciences Rensselaer Polytechnic
Institute; Degrees: B.S. in Education-State Teacher* College. California.
Pa.; Graduate Studies in Business Administration-Florida Atlantic
University; < ommunlty Activities: Former Mayor and City Councilman
Palm Beach Gardens. Florida-1970-76. Member of North County School Bl-
Raclal Committee. Palm Beach Gardens High School Advisory Committee.
School Bond Referendum Committee (1971 and 1973). Ad Hoc Committee for
School Financing, and Ad Hoc Committee for School Legislation
pd. for by Campaign to Elect James C. De Longa Myrna P. De
Longa, Campaign Treas.
Mike Small, civic and com-
munity leader and former County
Attorney for Palm Beach
County, has announced his
candidacy for the Florida House
of Representatives in District 80,
which includes the extreme
northern portions of Deerfield
Beach in Broward County to
North Palm Beach in Palm Beach
County, with a population of
about 600.000.
In announcing his candidacy.
Small stressed his involvement in
community and civic activities,
his tenure as chief civil legal
officer while County Attorney,
his experience in local govern-
ment and service as a member of
the Palm Beach County Area
Planning Board, his exposure to
state government, affairs and
issues as president-elect and
member of the board of directors
of the State Association of
County Attorneys.
THE 37-YEAR OLD
Democratic candidate and his
wife, Ann, live in Palm Beach
with their four children. They are
active in the general and the Jew-
ish communities.
Small, who is chairman of the
State of Israel Bond Campaign
for Palm Beach County, was
honored recently in New Orleans
with the Israel Solidarity Award,
presented by Israel Ambassador
Simcha Dinitz. Small is also a
recipient of the State of Israel
Scroll of Honor.
Small has been a member of
the board of directors and was
chairman of the legal and review
committees of the Jewish Com-
munity Day School, the board of
directors of the Jewish Family
and Children's Service and the
program committee of the Jewish
Community Center. He is vice
president and a member of the
board of trustees of Temple
Israel.
Betty Jordan is completely
knowledgeable in the work-
ings of Local and State
Government and served as
Secretary to the Palm Beach <
County Legislative Delega-
tion, 1974-76.
AS COUNTY COMMBSmB
Will seek one County
Commission Meeting
each month in the
evening at various
county locales
Will serve you on a lull-
time basis.
PULL LEVER 21C
or
PUNCH No. 72, Pg. 4
Pa Poi Ad. Pd lot by El Btiii
Jo'dnLmp Fund J Jordin fnH
FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONER
Koehlcr
* Democrat
District 3
Your voice for a change!

FINALLY...THE MAN WHO CAN !
Chief William1
BooncJMtoEN
is the man who can bring 30 years of LAW ENFORCE-
MENT EXPERIENCE.working knowledge of police work
learned from the ground up. PROVEN administrative
ability demonstrated through five years as Chief of
Police of one of the largest Municipal deportments in
the County and EDUCATION on the Groduale level in
Criminal Justice. Boone Darden is the man who can
deliver improved police services at a lower costl
awards:
PurplefteartW.P.B. Police Dept. Wounded in
line of duty
American LegionCertificate of Commendation
Jewish War Veterans of U.S.A.Outstanding
Leadership Award
Palm Beach Chapter of HodemahMyrtle Wreath
Award
Temple Beth ElMan of the Year
Plus Many OthersI
Boonc
"Paid for byl"Boone" Darden for Sheriff Fund| Harold Monchick, Treasurer"
Sheriff
OF PALM BEACH COUNTY,


Aogut2U976_
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
pagan Emphasized Need For Mideast Compromise
insEPH POLAKOFF sponae to request fmm Am nriimi.___i ____ ..
(Page 11
cMNGTON ? bid to bolster hi.
. presidential hopes,
i Reagan proposed that the
Iblican Party platform
d declare that compromises
aired for a settlement of
b-Israel conflict. Reagan,
illenged President Ford
Republican nomination
response to a request from the
JTA on how the former California
Governor felt on several issues of
particular interest to the Jewish
community.
In his statement on the Middle
East to the JTA, Reagan said
that "a reasonable and just
solution can only be reached by
the parties themselves,
negotiating in good faith" and
"compromises will be
e nepu"-" tnat compromises will be
, on Soviet Jewry,
-on and the school prayer
fc a message to the Repub-
platform committee in
City.
id's prop038'8 on l*?e
East were contained in
Untences: "In the Middle
| the United States should
ready to contribute to a
ind durable peace. Such a
[must absolutely assure the
lued security and survival
IState of Israel with recog-
Iboundaries accepted by all
V At the same time, it must
it the legitimate needs and
fofthe Palestinian Arabs."
I TEXT of Reagan's policy
was made available to
Irish Telegraphic Agency
tr Hanneford. of Los An-
| research director for the
campaign. Hanneford
vided a statement ex-
on Reagan's views in
iiilillllllllllniiiliiiiiiiiiiniiiHi'u
=
=
le
ELECT
DEMOCRAT
I0WARD
1RN0LD
N BEACH
COUNTY
SHERIFF
^""WquaJifitd
"** 'or the office
M'"wcial lecretary,
*** Emanu-El for
Wyaan
** mamber
^'''ntalligence
*"<*xiliary)
rol"'Cal Arf
fe*^[d T,eQ,
'""muimnm.
protect the rights and position of
the Jewish people while at the
same time respecting the
legitimate needs of the
Palestinian Arabs."
REPEATING his statement
to the GOP committee about the
need to assure the survival of
Israel within secure and
recognized boundaries, Reagan
declared that "The United States
must maintain its support and
commitment to this moral
principle and must constantly
encourage all other nations to do
the same.
"The United Nations can help
promote a peaceful solution to
the Middle East conflict,
provided it accords fair treatment
to both sides and does not allow
its sessions to be used as a forum
for one-sided propaganda at-
tacks."
On the Lebanese conflict,
Reagan said that U.S. "leader-
ship" is "absent" and "Syrian
enforcement of a ceasefire would
prove helpful provided it does not
mask designs on the southern
portion of Lebanon which borders
on Israel."
IN HIS statement to the JTA,
Hanneford said "on the matter of
emigration of Soviet Jewry, Gov.
Reagan believes that it is a basic
human right that individuals
should be able to emigrate to
other countries. As President he
would favor policies designed to
encourage all nations to recognizt-
this right."
Reagan's statement to the
Republican platform committee
also said that "school prayer is a
major important family issue.
Children should be permitted to
take part in nondenominational
prayer in school if that is the wish
of the parents of that community.
Our platform should recognize
this right of local choice."
On abortion, which has become
a major issue in the platform
committee, Reagan wrote the
committee members that "in
preserving the family, we must
recognize once and for all that to
perform an abortion is to take a
human life" and "the federal
government has no business
whatever underwriting abor-
tions."
MEANWHILE, the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith urged the platform
committee to include planks
which would reject racial quotas
and preferential treatment in
hiring and college admittance
practices and outlaw American
participation in the Arabs'
economic boycott of Israel.
-NOTE-
?,LMateriai Td Advefain8 on this page is not to be
BeachaJS an endrsement ythe Jewiah Federation of Palm
Shadlen Runs For Tax Collector Shalloway Seeks County Judgeship
West Palm Beach resident
Arthur Shadlen has announced
his candidacy for the office of Tax
Collector in Palm Beach County.
Shadlen has served as official co-
ordinator for the County Tax
Collector and was instrumental in
unifying the five regional tax
offices in the county.
A graduate of Bayonne (N.J.)
High School and of the Dale
Carnegie Institute in Chicago,
Shadlen attended the Pace
Institute of Technology. The
Spencer International Press (a
division of Grolier Enterprises)
named him a Master Printer, and
he also directed printing services
for the U.S. Army's arsenal in
Raritan, N J. Also in New Jersey
he was a business consultant and
union negotiator.
* YOUR CHOICE *
Lake Worth Municipal Judge
C. Michael Shalloway is seeking
the Group 7 County Judgeship
The term for which Shalloway
was elected as Municipal Judge
will be cut short by the imple
mentation of the recent Amend-
ment to Article V of the Florida
Constitution.
The cases handled by the Lake
Worth Court are identical to
those handled by the County
Court, except that the latter also
conducts jury trials and hears
civil matters.
Shalloway has been in private
practice as a Florida civil at-
torney for 14 years and holds a
specialist designation in trial
practice from the Florida Bar.
Judge Shalloway and his wife,
Bobbi, live in Lake Worth, where
they are members of Temple Beth
Sholom.
! ^
Florence Keen
Keen is Keenly
interested in
YOUR community!
DEMOCRATIC CANDIDATE
FOR
COUNTY COMMISSIONER
Districts 5
PAID FOR BV KEEN CAMPAIGN COMMITTEE.
MANVA D. JOYCE. TREAS.
c.
/<--> '
FOR
Non-Partisan
C. MICHAEL SHALLOWAY was educated in the Palm Beach
County Public Schools and Temple Israel Religious School.
He is a member of Temple Beth Sholom. In 1972, he was
chosen by the Palm Beach County Bar Association to serve
on its advisory committee to the Small Claims Court and
the County Judges Court.
C. MICHAEL SHALLOWAY is best qualified because he has:
14 years in the private practice of FLORIDA CIVIL
LAW.
7 years as a Criminal Jury Trial specialist with the
Palm Beach County Public Defender.
4 years as a MUNICIPAL JUDGE.
S years as a local COURT PROSECUTOR.
Poid for by C. MICHAEL SHALLOWAY CAAAPAIGN FUND.
D.l. Van Eldik, M.O. Treasurer
Ed Healey, your
State Representative
(District 81) is running
for re-election, and he
needs your help.
Two years ago,
when you sent Ed
Healey to Tallahassee
he promised to repre-
sent you, and not the
special interest groups
He's done just that
But the work is
unfinished. Healey is
already at work on a
tough schedule for the
next legislative session
RE-ELECT
CANDIDA KEEf) a G0QD M^ QN THf JQB
DEMOCRAT
P.td P01...V.JI Advrtlln PiW For By Cimpj^n TrMturar,


age iu
Pg12j
The Jewish Floridiun of Palm Beach County
Frida
^Aogu*,
ONCE AGAIN THE JEWISH COMMUNITY
OF THE PALM BEACHES HAS RALLIED
TO THE CAUSE OF JEWS EVERYWHERE
Once again we have reached the end of a
campaign, the formal close of the Combined
Jewish AppealIsrael Emergency Fund,
enriched by the knowledge that our neigh-
bors have demonstrated their commitment
to the survival of our people.
And so it is with deep appreciation that
we take this opportunity to give credit
where it is due: to the leaders and cam-
paigners, who worked so diligently to make
the CJA-IEF, sponsored by the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach County, a
success, and to the contributors, who were
so generous in our mutual cause.
STANLEY BRENNER
General Chairman
CYNNIE LIST
Women's Division
Chairman
We Are One
Give to the
COMBINED JEWISH APPEAL-ISRAEL EMERGENCY FUND
of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
2415 Okeechobee Boulevard,West Palm Beach,Florida 33409 Telephone:689-5l


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