Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
8 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 28, 1975)-v. 8, no. 40 (Dec. 17, 1982).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 2, 1976 called v.2, no. 22, but constitutes v.2, no. 1.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: July 28, 1978 called no. 14 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement; Aug. 25, 1978 called no. 16 in masthead and no. 17 in publisher's statement; Aug. 10, 1979 called no. 15 in masthead and no. 16 in publisher's statement; Oct. 22, 1982 called no. 31 in masthead and no. 32 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44607504
lccn - sn 00229550
ocm44607504
System ID:
AA00014311:00123

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)


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Full Text
>Jewish floridiann
if
OFPALMBEA CH COUNTY
Cj-fcW-l "OIK YOKE" ana "FEWAWI^IPOttir' *
m cowfrmctia* with The Jewish Federation of Palm Beach Conty
Palm Beach County, Florida Friday, August 13,1976~
) Frtd K. Shochf Friday, August u,w Price 25 cents
Thins Mini-Camp
sh Community Center
I Beaches is offering a
mini-camp at the
w. 16 through 27. for
I kindergarten to grade
tor Sue Levi and
.tor Wayne Karlin
umed from extended
rael. where they were
he field of education.
L'sprogram integrates
teation schedule with
Kects and special ed-
vents designed to
ers how their com-
ks.
THE EVENTS
presentation at the
members of city,
: state agencies, in-
[descripiions of local
Florida Game and
Division, a fire-
bonstration by the
West Palm Beach Fire Depart-
ment, and an exhibition of
Indian lore by a special order of
the Boy Scouts.
A field trip to the Palm Beach
County Court House, including a
visit to a court in session and a
judge's chambers, has been
arranged for the older children.
Jewish subjects, which have
been programmed as an im-
portant part of daily activities,
include Israeli current events,
folksongs and dance, Jewish
cooking by the campers, Jewish
history through dramatic
exercises and Hebrew con-
versation.
Registration for the mini-camp
has begun and enrollment is
limited to approximately 50
children. For information and
registration, contact the Jewish
Community Center of the Palm
Beaches at 689-7700.
{Salaries for Ministers
iLEM (JTA) New regulations stipulating
reel's top public officials were approved here by the
pse Committee. The President will receive a basic
[ry of IL 6,000, the Premier IL 5,800 and Knesset
5,600.
President's salary is tax-free. In addition to the
\, the officials will receive an average of IL 100 per
lanes will rise with the cost-of-living index as they
praelis and the officials will also enjoy family
Fringe benefits include holiday grants, book,
[id hotel allowances. These will bring the earnings
; officials to about IL 7,000 to 10,000 per month.
I-CIO Takes Stand
Arab Boycott
3N (JTA) -
Executive Council,
| meeting, adopted
on the subjects
the Arab boy-
iinced by Jacob
president of the
nit tee.
preoccupation
Drsement of a
President, the
K-ouncil "con-
people of Israel
aitiative and com-
Me of Kenya."
rTEMENT alsc
sel's courageous
Btrates the only
I of dealing with
[putting an end to
ts. The rescue is a
of how the free
^nceforth deal with
political black-
ly statement called
Nns of the free
ork together for
i of dealing with
w'uding strong
"Gnomic sanctions
l&overnment which
or supports
**t*ment, the
declared that
the Arab boycott "raises issues
which go far beyond those of Is-
rael's rights as a free nation. By
imposing secondary and tertiary
boycotts, the Arabs have put at
issue America's willingness to
defend its own principles and
sovereignty."
IN DEMANDING an end to
cooperation with the Arab boy-
cott on American soil, the Coun-
cil "called upon the Congress and
the Administration to move
swiftly to enact legislation and to
take such other measures as
necessary to achieve this goal."
Sheinkman, who is also
secretary-treasurer of the
Amalgamated Clothing and Tex-
tile Workers Union, hailed the
Executive Council statement and
called for speedy enactment of
the bills which would make the
secondary and tertiary boycotts
illegal
TKe Jtwnh ledtial..-.
Gcfnmunfly R-eSchool
UJed oCa*fW.
'^ Reqfetrdtiorv
dr9
Signing up children for Fall classes at the Jewish Federation's
Community Pre-School is Debra Cohen, staff member of the
preschool summer program. Located on the grounds of Camp
Shalom, the school offers a preschool program for three and
four-year-olds and a kindergarten for 5-year-olds. (Fee in-
formation and an application form are on page 3.)
Russians
Don't Match
Peace Moves
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
| WASHINGTON -
(JTA) The United States
has often tried to persuade
Israel to go beyond its
established position in
American efforts toward a
Middle East settlement,
but the Soviet Union has
not taken a similar step
with any Arab leader,
Continued on Page 7
Bull's Memoirs Focus
On Israel, Arab Relations
ANWAR SADAT
Tough Sadat
Talk Worries
Many Israelis
By DA VID LAND A U
JERUSALEM (JTA)
There is some concern in
Jerusalem at the content of
a major speech to the
Egyptian Parliament by
President Anwar Sadat.
Israeli analysts point to a
tougher line taken by Sadat
vis-a-vis Israel and the
United States and
equally worrisome a very
broad hint thrown out by
the Egyptian leader to
Moscow.
Sadat said Cairo would
be ready to "rebuild its
bridges" with Moscow if
the Soviets honored their
pledges of aid to the Arab
states and if they ceased
supporting Arab radical
states against Egypt.
THIS IS the first time since
the interim Sinai agreement last
September, observers here note.
that Sadat has allowed a more
Continued on Page 3
1976 CAMPAIGN CLOSES AUG. 27
Stand up and.be counted with your fellow Jews in Palm
Beach County!
Make a pledge today to the Combined Jewish Appeal-
i Israel Emergency Fund.
JEWISH FEDERATION OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
2415 Okeechobee Blvd.
West Palm Beach, Florida 33409
LONDON Gen. Odd Bull,
former commander of the UN
Truce Supervisory Organization
in the Middle East, has come out
in strong support of a Palestinian
Arab State.
Summing up his experiences
from 1963 to 1970, the Norwegian
general writes in the English
edition of his memoirs, published
here, that "Justice in the Middle
East means, among other things,
that the rights of the Palestinian
Arabs must be recognised and
that they must be given the op-
portunity for self-determination
in those parts of Palestine which
they occupied before the 1967
war."
Gen. Bull says that "The prin-
ciple of repatriation should be ac-
cepted," adding that since the Is-
raelis would not hand over the
areas to the PLO unless defeated
in another war, "it would
probably be necessary for the
areas to be taken into temporary
UN trusteeship."
THE 1975 Sinai Agreement,
Bull claims, did nothing to halt
the arms race, thus opening the
way to nuclear weapons. It also
did nothing about the main-
tenance of the status quo in the
occupied areas by forbidding the
setting up of new settlements
there.
The book, first published in
Norwegian, sheds light on the ex-
changes between Israel and her
neighbors for which Bull was the
intermediary. Thus he confirms
that on the first day of the Six-
Day War he conveyed to Jordan
Israel's offer of mutual non-
aggression.
However, in Bull's view the
Israeli offer was "a threat pure
and simple, and it is not the
normal practice of the UN to pass
on threats from one government
to another. But this message
seemed so important that we
quickly sent it. King Hussein
received the message before
10:30 the same morning (June
5)."
At 11:25 the Jordanians
opened fire. At noon both sides
agreed to a cease-fire, but
although the shooting slackened,
it did not stop. In all, three dead-
lines were agreed that day, but
were not respected.
REFERRING TO the Jor-
danian troops' seizure of Govern-
ment House, the UN head-
quarters. Gen. Bull said it was a
military blunder and the Jor-
danians should first have taken
the Israeli enclave on Mount
Scopus. He suggests that Israeli
Intelligence might have had a
hand in the Jordanian mistake.
Although the writer's sym-
pathies tend to lie with the
Arabs, he nonetheless confirms
that an agreement to free the
stranded vessels from the Suez
Canal early in 1968 failed when
the Egyptians tried to navigate
the northern part of the canal
before freeing them southward as
had been agreed earlier through
UNTSO's good offices.
Gen. Bull seems to have mixed
feelings about the Israeli leaders
with whom he d It. He describes
Moshe Dayan as being "always a
straightforward person to deal
with." Golds Meir struck him as
"a very impressive and per-
suasive personality.
U.S. Firms Cooperating With Boycott
NEW YORK (JTA) The
Anti- Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith has charged that four
American firms have cooperated
with the Arab boycott against
Israel by certifying that goods
they provide their Arab cus-
tomers are not manufactured in
Israel and do not contain Israeli
materials.
The ADL said one of the
companies, York, a division of
Borg-Warner of Chicago, made
such a declaration for the air-con-
ditioners it sent to Saudi Arabia.
The other companies were iden-
tified as IRI Research Institute,
a non-profit organization, Berger
and Plate, a San Francisco im-
port-export firm, and Fruin-
Colnon, a St. Louis construction
company. Officials of the com-
panies denied cooperating with
the boycott.
The ADL said that the con-
tinued compliance with the boy-
cott shows that public opinion is
not having any effect and com-
pliance can only be stopped by
strong laws such as pending
legislation that would deny
certain tax benefits to companies
that cooperate with the boycott.


Thf fontfck Vl^^^i -* r- w
Page 2
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Charges Fly at Press
Conference with Rabin
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Premier Yitzhak Rabin and
Israel's journalistic establishment clashed angrily at a meeting
of the Israeli Press Council here. The Premier accused the press
of being unfair, unbalanced and alarmist in its presentation of
the news and accused it of publishing stories without checking
the facts.
The journalists retorted that the government suppressed
information or gave misinformation. The only agreement to
emerge from the meeting was that the debate begun Friday will
be continued.
RABIN CLAIMED that if Israel had libel laws as tough as
those in Canada, newspapers here would forever be paying
damages. He differentiated between freedom of the press and
what he said was the responsibility of the press to check facts.
He cited examples of what he considered the Israeli press'
carelessness with facts. He said that during his five years as
Ambassador to Washington. American journalists invariably
checked with his office and solicited his viewpoint before
printing stories related to Israel. "Be hostile, but be accurate,"
Kabin declared.
JOURNALISTS RESPONDED to Rabins remarks by
accusing the government of failure to provide facts or providing
erroneous facts.
They noted that the Rabin Administration has abolished
the weekly press briefings. "At least give us the right to ask
questions even if you retain the right to refuse to answer," one
ournalist told Rabin.
OddFellows
Going To
Ballgame
Take Me Out to the
Ballgame" is the theme of the
Wednesday, Aug. 18, meeting of
Palm Beach Odd Fellow Lodge
No. 88, at 7:30 p.m. at the temple
building in downtown West Palm
Beach.
The night of Aug. 25 has been
set aside by Fred K. Whitacre.
president of the West Palm
Beach Expos, as the date for the
Kxpos vs. Miami game.
All Odd Fellows and Sister
members of Kebekah lodges in
the area are invited to attend the
meeting and to come to the ball-
game, at which Brother Frank
Kassowitz, noble grand of the
lodge, will have the honor of toss-
ing out the first ball.
Odd Fellow Lodge No. 88
meets on the first and third Wed-
nesdays of each month, says Alex
H. Kolbe, public relations direc-
tor, who also says to contact him
at 686-0440 for tickets. Free
tickets to the game are available
to past and present members of
IOOF organizations.
10
Cinder and Michael Puder-Harris will cochair a Simchai Ti
Rally for Freedom on Oct. 17 for the Jewish Community C'J
of the Palm Beaches. Invitations to speak hare heenextn
to national, state and local persons.
urnausitoia Kaoin. O "_ 1 T"R J T r>t
tomb Wrecks Jewish Office school Board Integrates School
By EDWINEYTAN
PARIS (JTA) A bomb today wrecked the
offices of a local Jewish organization active in fighting
anti -nitism and resurgent Nazism. The bomb, a home-
ma;:" (jVvice consisting of a gas canister, damaged the
Paris bureau of the International League against Racism
and anti-Semitism (LICA). There were no casualties as
the bomb exploded early in the morning before the staff
arrived for work.
Police officials link the explosion to other attacks on
Jewish organizations in Marseilles, Nice and Paris. Police
say they found on the wall against which the bomb was
set the inscription, "Peiper Will Be Avenged."
JOACHIM PEIPER is the former SS colonel whose
charred body was found last month. Police believe thf
former Nazi officer was killed by former resistance
fighters or deportees who resented his presence in France.
Arab Visitors to Territories
On Summer's Rise
JERUSALEM (JTA) During the first 45 days
of this year's summer visit program, which allows visitors
from Arab countries into the administered territories,
some 46,000 visitors crossed the Jordan River bridges, it
was reported here. The summer visits have taken place
since the Six-Day War.
It is expected that the number of visitors will reach a
new peak this year. The number of visitors last year was
almost 100,000, bringing the total since 1968 to 730 000
Arab citizens visiting their relatives in the Israel'ad-
ministered areas.
By BEN KAYFETZ
TORONTO (JTA) The
Board of Education of North
York, a borough within Metro-
politan Toronto, has voted un-
animously to integrate part of a
Jewish day school into its struc-
ture and pay all costs. The in-
tegration will take place in
September if the province's
Ministry of Education gives
approval.
This move, which may be a
historic one. culminates negotia-
tions, campaigns and discussions
which have been going on for
years to obtain tax aid for the
Jewish day school and alleviate
the heavy burden on Jewish day
school parents whose full tuition
fee for such schooling has been
$1,525 per year and who pay
school taxes as well.
THE PROPOSAL is regarded
as an experiment and will affect
grades 7, 8 and 9 in effect, the
400 pupils of the Junior High
School of the Associated Hebrew
Schools, one of Canada's largest
Jewish all-day schools.
During the two-year ex-
periment this Jewish junior high
school will be treated the same as
all other North York public
schools, with the teachers receiv-
ing regular North York salaries,
and with the same student-
teacher ratio and the same sup-
port services such as health.
Hebrew-languages courses will
be considered as part of the
general curriculum. Purely relig-
ious studies, however, will be
given after official hours and will
be paid for out of Jewish com-
munity funds. No fees will be
paid by students.
It has not yet been announ
which studies will he consid
"Hebrew-language" and trh
"religious." Because thesch
part of the public system, _
dren of all faiths will be admit)
providing they are willing
accept the Hebrew part of
curriculum.
RECEPTION OF the news!
not been unanimous.
Toronto Star, the count
largest daily, last week headedi
editorial with the caption
Jewish School is No Pub
School."
It criticized the plan
"merely a method of openingt
door to public funding of priv
schools" ant1 advising
minister of education "to nil
it."
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1V August 1JU976
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 3
Women's American ORT
. Southeast Region held its
d meeting at the Deauville
Jin Miami Beach on Aug. 10
11 Representatives of the
- Beach County Region who
oded were Miriam Marks,
Cohen. Judy Glatt, Sylvia
mis Harriet Paul, Marcy Fine,
[Hiitzick. Ann Feinberg and
mcheSilverman.
Women's American ORT
-ports the worldwide network
[ORT schools, which through
educational training in vocations
such as electronics, replaces
squalor and despair with
livelihood and life.
Hadassah
Bat Gurion Group held a
membership tea recently at the
home of Joan Dober. More teas
are planned for the coming
months. For membership in-
formation, contact Barbara
Wunsh, 967-0554.
Teen-Age Band Wins
Big Festival Award
riNEAU. N.D. (JTA)
The symphony band from
yatOno, a suburb of Tel Aviv,
'ough Sadat
'alk Worries
[any Israelis
Continued from Pae 1
itive tone on the Soviets to
jinto a public address.
He flayed at the Americans for
ring the pace of Mideast
-making and cited them, by
blication. as Syria's allies in
Binding the Palestine
deration Organization in
anon
adat was especially tough in
assault on President Hafez
ad of Syria over the Lebanon
e returning in full measure
ad's own strictures delivered
speech earlier last week.
TWO speeches were
^Ivzed in depth by officials and
my intelligence men at
arday's Cabinet meeting. The
ensus, according to informed
pros, was that the Sadat
Iress presages no immediate
feat of a change in policy.
Nevertheless, the markedly
pnged tone has kindled
ptionary lights in Jerusalem.
> the Sinai interim agreement
approaching its first an-
Tsary and its first renewal
' Israel is watching
**illy to detect any sign of
cktracking on Egypt's part as
* the Ubanese im-
-' Sinai agreement resulted
UvPtl alignment with the
* "* Syria was backed by
tovieu in opposing the
_*ncajH>rchestrated Pac*-
|llT THE Lebanese war has
up that alignment to
," extent, and observers here
F muwu lest the repercussions
P" mter-Arab feuding over
lr*Mn could affect Egypt's
toward the Sinai agree-
' and toward the U.S. aa the
Mideast peace-making
made its first trip to the United
States a resounding success when
it won the top award in the Inter-
national Youth Band Festival
here. Thirty-three bands from 22
states and nine countries com-
peted in the three-day music
festival.
The Israeli group, composed of
50 teen-agers between the ages of
12 and 20, were awarded the top
prize on the basis of musicianship
in the symphony competition, the
highest of three categories.
THEY PLAYED "Symphonia
Noblissima." by Jaeger;
"Hebrew Suite," by Petrushka;
and the "Slavonic Dances," by
Dvorak.
The teen-agers, who have been
in the U.S. since July 12, warmed
up for their competition by
playing 11 concerts, including
one last week at Mt. Rushmore
and another at the Centennial
celebration in Rapid City, S.D.
The latter concert also marked
the 51st birthday of the sym-
phony's founder and director,
Aharon Alkalay
The band, which has won
international competitions in
Britain, Austria and the
Netherlands, was formed in 1961
by Alkalay.
TtMPlt
BNAIJACOB
A Conservative Congregation
Of Palm Springs
INVITES INTERESTED RESIDENTS
TO OUR REGULAR PRAYER SER-
VICES at ROSS HALL, 275
Alamedo Dr., Palm Springs
Minyan-Mondoys & Thursday*
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Saturday* & Holiday*
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(Include*all Holiday Seating)
For further information call
Matt Jacobson (Lakeside)
967-3260
Irving Newman (Cre*thaven)
968-2668
Irving Janowitz (Lakeside)
968-4072 _______
High Holy Days Services
, for the unaffiliated and area visitors
^PLE BETH EL'S SENTER HALL
Officiated by
RABBI HYMAN FISHMAN
_ and
CANTOR LEONARD KLIGER
September 24th, 25th, 26th
October 3rd., 4th, 1976
Limited Seating
$35 00 DONATION PER PERSON
MAIL RESERVATIONS TO:
TEMPI! BETH EL
2815 North Flogler Drive, W.P.B.
330339
Jewish Chapel OK'd at West Point
Secretary of the Army Martin
R. Hoffman formally presented a
right-of-entry document and a
license authorizing the con-
struction of a Jewish chapel at
West Point. N.Y., by the West
Point Jewish Chapel Fund.
Witnessing the historic event
was a distinguished group of
Academy alumni, military of-
ficers and leaders of major Jewish
organizations, including Judge
Paul Ribner of Philadelphia,
National Commander of the Jew-
ish War Veterans of the U.S.A.
The chapel, which will be the
first Jewish house of worship in
the Military Academy's 174-year
history, also will serve as a center
in which cadets and visitors can
learn about Jewish contributions
to America's defense in every war
fought by the United States.
DESIGNED BY Max Abram
ovitz, the facility will be located
at a focal point on Academy
grounds, midway between the
Protestant and the Catholic
chapels, overlooking the parade
grounds and the Hudson River.
Its stonework and architecture
will be the color and character of
that used in the Cadet chapel and
other Academy buildings.
Teen Travelers Visit Texas
SAN ANTONIO Eighty
young adults from the Teen
Travel Camp of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County who are spending some
time this summer in San Antonio
with the local Jewish Community
Center here, recently toured the
Institute of Texan Cultures.
The group toured the
Institute's vast exhibit floor,
where they learned that the State
of Texas owes its development to
the accomplishments of 26
different ethnic groups.
During their visit they were
able to view the preparations for
an ethnic celebration. In the
Institute's entro-area, they
viewed a multimedia slide show
highlighting the many activities
of the Texas Folklife Festival
accompanied by lively toe-tappin'
Cajun music.
The 1976 Texas Folklife
Festival is a commemorative of
the many cultures and customs
that formed the diverse history of
Texas. Six thousand participants
will assemble on the gounds of
the University of Texas at San
Antonio Institute of Texan
Cultures to show all interested
their unique role in this country's
formation.
TV
Highlight.
TUNE IN TO "The
Jewish Service...a program
conducted by the rabbis of
Palm Beach County in
cooperation with WPTV-TV,
Channel 5, Sundays at 10
a.m. Sponsored by the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County.
The Jewish chapel will include
classrooms, a library, a gallery-
museum and a seminar room in
addition to the sanctuary and
rabbi's quarters. The library and
the gallery-museum will house
books, manuscripts and other
items noting military services of
Jewish alumni and non-alumni.
Among them was Simon Levy,
one of two men commissioned
second lieutenants in the
Academy's first graduating class
in October, 1802.
The construction of a West
Point Jewish chapel has been dis-
cussed by Jewish alumni of the
Academy for nearly two decades.
In mid-1975 an ad hoc committee
headed by Herbert M. Ames of
Wilmington, Del., was formed to
organize a campaign. Sub-
sequently a National Advisory
Committee for the West Point
Jewish Chapel Fund came into
existence. Besides Judge Ribner,
its participants include Senators
Jacob K. Javits, Abraham Ribi-
coff and Barry Goldwater.
"The Jewish War Veterans
anticipate playing a major role in
bringing about the construction
of the chapel building," Judge
Ribner said. "We feel this is one
of the most important projects
involving the military."
I
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Member F.D.I.C.
MYRON M. PERS0FF, MD
Announces the Opening of His
Office For the Practice of Plastic
and Reconstructive Surgery.
Aesthetic Cosmetic, and Hand
Surgery
399 W. Cammo Gardens Blvd.,
Suite 301
Boca Raton. Florida
By A
yAppo
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368-9455
Community Pre-School
7875 Belvedere Rd., West Palm Beach, Fla. 33411
C\ PROGRAMS AND FEES
fc^rQ^ 5 Day Program
^jj^YjT 9 AM.-MOON MONDAY FRIDAY
kS-^4, JSSSBE^
*. 3 by Doc. 31, It74 T^to^L^i
TMm: $47.54 pM-MMtli ^Z? WlltttfiJ por ,
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Application
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My $30 iMMi-ref undoele ooaHcotloo fee is endosod.
State.
Dote
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Mail to: COMMUNITY PRE SCHOOl
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
2415 Oiretchoooe BWovord
West Palm Beach, Florida 33409
9


IgC 1W
Page 4
The. Jewish Flnr**K~~ ~< n- ---- -
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday. AUp-t
13,

afW9OTtlt4.
r
, <^
fct m. i.i i
Watermelon ... a treat for all who attended the Parents I
The parents and families of the children at Camp Shalom had the opportunity to share in some of picn^. at Camp Shalom. Serving (from left) are Michael L
the summer fun at a Parents Day picnic held on Aug. 1 at the campgrounds. The festivities unU head Liz Qalloway, preschool counselor; Sue Bail
included field games, swimming, a sing-a-long and a lesson in Israeli dancing. counselor; and Cathy Dreyfoos, unit head.
Cohen Seeking New Judgeship
Everyone into the pool ...an excellent opportunity for campers to demonstrate what they have
learned in the American Red Cross swim program at Camp Shalom. Parents and campers en-
joyed a refreshing swim during the Camp Shalom Parents Day picnic.
Mrs. Keen Seeks Commission Seat
Florence Keen has qualified for
Commissioner of Palm Beach
County District 5. A lifelong
Democrat, she has spent most of
her life in Florida and was edu-
cated here and thus has a strong
community involvement.
Mrs. Keen has more than 20.
years' experience in real estate
and considerable executive back-
ground, which, she believes, will
permit her "to meet the problems
and serve the best interests of the
county's taxpayers."
The Keens have a home in
Pahokee and Palm Beach, where
they live year-round.
Executive Assistant State At-
torney Harold "Hal" J. Cohen
has announced his candidacy for
one of the new nonpartisan
judgeships created this past ses-
sion by the State Legislature. He
is seeking election to County
Court Group 6 and has filed his
qualifying papers in Tallahassee
for the election scheduled for
Sept. 7, the day after Labor Day.
Cohen, who has been with the
County Prosecutor's office for the
past five years, has been one of
the State Attorney's chief
prosecutors and administrators.
When he announced his can-
didacy, he vowed not to accept
campaign contributions from at-
torneys, in order to avoid any ac-
cusations of judicial favoritism
toward contributing lawyers. He
has filed a treasurer's report and
sworn statement of contributions .
reflecting no contributions from
lawyers other than himself.
Cohen endorsed the concept of
a volunteer citizen court ob-
servation project and, after
meeting with civic groups to
discuss the idea, believes that re-
actions are generally favorable.
He noted that his support for
weekend and evening court ses-
sions for public convenience has .
FLORENCE KEEN
hal COHEN
needs YOUR support and YOUR vett
on TUESDAY, SEPT. 7th
ELECT COHENyOUR
COUNTY COURT JUDGE
Non Portison Group 6
Harold (Hal) J. Cohen b an ective member of yowr cow worry.
Member of Board of Directors of B'nai B'rith local chapter.
Active member of Federation UJA-IEF Attorney's Division. Executive
Asst State Attorney. Former Asst. County Solicitor. Member Fla. Bar,
P.B. County Bar Assn., Natl. D.A. Assn., Fla. Pros. Ally. Assn.!
American Bar Assn., Bar of U.S. Supreme Court. Bar of U.S Dist. Ct.,
Specialist Designation in Trial Practice ft Criminal Low, Former Chief
Felony Trial Div., Misdemeanor ft Traffic Div., Career Criminal
Prosecutor, Special Investigations ft Consumer Affairs.
Paid Political Adv. Paid for by
Campaign Fund of Harold (Hal) J. Cohen,
E. Stone, Treasurer.
* YOUR CHOICE *
Florence Keen

Keen it Keenly
interested in
YOUR community I
DEMOCRATIC CANDIDATE
FOR
COUNTY COMMISSIONER
District #5
PAID FOR BY KEEN CAMPAIGN COMMITTEE
i hardship.
met with some resistance,
has been well received by i
ing people, for whom
court sessions are a 1
Hal Cohen is a member i
board of directors of Palm L
Lodge B'nai B'rith and has I
active for several years in L
UJA-IEF Attorneys Division.
IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIM.....imilMM*]
ELECT
DEMOCRAT
HOWARD
ARNOLD
PALM BEACH
COUNTY
SHERIFF
"A" The most qualify
candidate for the off**
+ Financial secretary,
Tempi* Emanu-EI for
eight years
"%k Five-year membtr
Sheriff's intelligent*
division (auxiliary)
Poid Political Advemsemer"
Paid lor by "*;"L
Arnold campaign *und
Eu|wn Arnold, Tiff*.


August 13,1976
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
page i
lfs All Sweetness Between Israel and Mexico
LcHAlMLAZDEISKI
.rvirn CITY (JTA) -
'ES-officia. daily El
JaJ reported that Israeli
Clcari diploma* shook
." and drank coffee together
the Israelis heard an ex
,tion by Foreign Ministry
Is of the letter Mexico sent
UN Security Council last
i letter was widely viewed
w implicit attack on Israel for
Wue of the Air France hijack
Ces at Entebbe Airport in
nda July 3.
HNCENTE MONTANO,
htinein El Nacional. said Israel
Uassv officials visited the
Ministry here to com-
ut the letter. The letter's
plete text was read to them
rove that no attack on Israel
jintended since Israel was not
tnlioned in the text.
[Afterwards, Montano wrote,
. Israelis and Mexicans "shook
R
|SHS(N
^E,
Ol the I'M, II,,,, /
Aug. 17
y-Reading Group, 8 p.m.
Mess: Flo Kaufman
74Oleander Dr.
I Palm Beach
intact: Alice Kackmill, at
33
Aug. 18
(,9 p.m.
League Lanes
IS Dixie Hwy.
(Worth
Aug. 22
I Party, 8 p.m.
lr. Edward Mencher
bb House, Gulf Stream Harbor
SAve.
nton Beach
At*. 26
Together and Dance to
thy
t Moo toy as, 9 p.m.
Inn
Dttura Street
t Palm Beach
Aug. 29
y Party and Barbecue, 3
up Shalom
SBelvedereRd.
nbership Drive, Free to all
"tact: Flo Kaufman, 793-0535
'Jewish Singles Club plans
* for single adults of the
'""community,
for membership information
[to be placed on the club's
*S list, contact Flo Kauf-
president, 793-0535, or the
' 'office.
[HAMPTON LIQUORS
wines t liquors
F*STDELIVERY SERVICE
Phone: 832-8368
257 Poineiana Way
PALM IUCH, FU.
rs & Gles Loaned FREE
'Hlj\_Cl*II
SEAGULL
^Mjrve Now for The
Services by
JWownedCanior
*rve lo, Synae
S^lHSnSStSS*
HjinffiLYOSYS"
J2Jays& 11 night,
6 SPLIT STAY
,6,&Y* 5 nights
'*) rior OoMfct* act
*lud.
l^tAJlitOSMea Cutaina
y^T^-----" "van
I****!
hands, drank coffee and ended
(their meeting) as friendly as
ever."
Nevertheless, the PLO repre-
sentative here, Marwan Tahoub,
expressed high praise for Mexi-
co's foreign policy and its letter
to the Security Council. Speaking
at a reception at the Egyptian
Embassy, Tahoub, according to a
report in El Nacional, stated that
Mexican policy coincided with
that of the PLO and that both
condemned air piracy.
MEANWHILE, Foreign
Minister Alfonso Garcia Robles
said at a press conference that he
did not expect a new Jewish boy-
cott of Mexico because such
action was contrary to the in-
terests and wishes of Israel ex-
pressed by Israeli Foreign Min-
ister Yigal Allon during his
lofficial visit to Mexico last
March.
The newspaper Excelsior pub-
lished an economic study today
made by the financial trust,
Banamex, which attributed the
decline of tourism in Mexico to
factors other than the Jewish
boycott instituted last winter
after Mexico voted for the
General Assembly resolution
equating Zionism with racism.
According to the survey, Mex-
ico suffered a loss of tourists
because of high prices and the
competition of cheaper package
tours to Hawaii and Puerto Rico
marketed by American travel
agents.
Herzog Says Free World Can Help
News
^E
Notes
from around
the county
Congratulations and best
wishes to Mr. and Mrs. Morton
Gilbert on the marriage of their
daughter, Marsha, to Robert
Kessler, assistant executive
director of the Jewish Federation
of Palm Beach County.
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Chaim Herzog, Israel's
Ambassador to the United
Nations, observed here that the
Western bloc emerged united
from the debate in the Security
Council on the Israeli rescue
operation in Uganda, while the
African bloc and its Communist
and Arab supporters were
divided to the point where the
Africans had to withdraw their
anti-Israel resolution.
Interviewed on WABC-TV
"Eyewitness News," Herzog
MOOT GILBERT
IS AN
Advertising Representative.
OF THE
JEW SH FLORIDIAN
Of PALM BEACH COUNTY
His Telephone Number it
6831193
I ndrrstrlrl
Orthodox
Suprr\lk>n
Ql^b^H.fr.
THt NEW IMAGE"
Gentur?
Open* 7
|Mon Thori
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MSon.
CiowdSjt
IDJnTlAMWET
"i3 it:
4774 OK EECKOBEE BLVD.. WEST PALM BEACH
KriMppflMllltart Trail Hatrrttlll In the Mini Mall
THE MOST MODERN 4 COMPLETE KOSHER SUPERMARKET
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a Unique Weight Reduction Program
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An "In residence" program
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Utilizing 'behavioral
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Includes thorough medical
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Diet, educational and
xercise programs under
direction of our doctors,
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Families welcome special
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Health insurance and
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Call 374-6100
mwtmwm or mm school or ihmcini
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e.O. BOX MHt- FLAOLIA TATtOM HIM*, H.OWDA Mttl
Lara m a "!
stressed that international
terrorism can be defeated only by
a concerted effort of the free
world.
He said that Libya can be
pressured on this subject by
countries which have economic
and political relations with it by
severing all relations with Libya
until it stops its support of terror.
Herzog disclosed that many
African delegates privately con-
gratulated Israel during the
Security Council debate on the
spectacular rescue mission at En-
tebbe Airport in Uganda.
HE SAID that the free world
countries should boycott any
country that supports terrorism
in any way. The Israeli envoy
accused Libya of being the
"paymaster" of international
terrorism.
"THE FEELING that we
got," Herzog said, "was thi Africa can no longer tolerate
President Idi Amin."
Asked why 20 Ugandan
soldiers were killed during the
rescue operation, Herzog said
they were killed because they
guarded the hostages.
The Wine Cellar
AND
Nosh-A-Rie
AT OLD PORT COVE MALL
Lower Level
1216 U.S. HIGHWAY No. 1
NORTH PALM REACH
626-2122
We now carry a full line of N.Y. Delicatessen and Appetizers.
Hot Corned Beef and Pastrami, Nova Scotia Salmon, Lox,
Smoked Fish, Baked Salmon, Pickled Herring, Bagels. Sour
Rye, Pumpernickel, Homemade Salads and Soups, Imported
Cheeses.
EVERYTHING SLICED TO ORDER
EAT HERE OR TAKE OUT
L Buffet Catering Our Speciality
MON. SAT. 7:30 AM 6:00PM SUN 9:00 AM 12 NOON ^J
ANNOUNCING..
~^
a new addition to the
Falls Signature Collection.
Consumers, in our opinion, should be label
conscious, and we at Falls are very proud
of what we call our signature collection of
labels.
First we have the Falls name, recognized
nationwide as one of the finest all natural,
Kosher, clean Chickens.
Next, we have the signature of the United
States Department of Agriculture, assuring
you of unrivaled wholesomeness.
And now, we,.have added the signature of
the most respected name in National
Kosher supervision, the granted by the
Union of Orthodox Jewish Congregations.
The Falls Signature Collection....
a status symbol for your table
THE NATURAL KOSHER CLEAN CHICKEN
FALLS KOSHER POULTRY
SOUTH FALLSBURG, NY 12779


Page 6
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Frida
^Augmnj
Agnew's New Bigotry
It is sad to see the extent to which a former high
American official has fallen, not only in his personal
life, but in his new and vengeful ways.
We mean, of course, Spiro T. Agnew.
Let it not be forgotten: Agnew is a convicted
felon. The unhappy fact is that, in addition, he has
taken up a new life of anti-Semitic activity.
So far as he, himself, is concerned, we could care
less. One variety of anti-Semite is neither better nor
worse than another. That Agnew is a former Vice
President of the United States makes his bigotry all
the more breathtaking, but not particularly more
virulent or dangerous.
With one exception: And that is that the in-
creasing incidence of his anti-Semitic activity gives
credence to the anti-Semite's general conviction that
Jews are especially untrustworthy because they are in
alleged control of mass communications and have an
allegedly inordinate amount of power in the high halls
of government.
These are the basic premises of Agnew's anti-
Semitism today, and because he is a former Vice
President, the premises in the mind of the uninformed
take on a tone of authority they would not otherwise
have.
We can only hope that most Americans are not
fooled by Agnew's statements and that they recognize
them as spiteful attempts to justify his own felony.
The Fruit of Anger
Anger and resentment can often be creative and
fruitful. An example is New York Timesman William
Safire.
Safire is a former speech writer for former
President Nixon and former Vice President Agnew.
Safire is one of those Americans who still cannot
believe that the Nixon-Agnew tragedy ever took place.
Safire's adulation of Nixon and Agnew is well-
documented. Whether he can believe the tragedy or
not, he lives day-to-day in the cold reality of its af-
termath.
The result has been a sense of personal betrayal in
him leading to a series of brilliant journalistic tri-
umphs mainly centering on exposing Agnew's recent
anti-Semitic movements.
Now, the Times columnist has set his sights on
newer fields, and the latest fruit of his work is the
expose involving Democratic hopeful Jimmy Carter's
pollster, Patrick Caddell.
It turns out that Caddell owns 35 percent of an
organization doing public relations work for Saudi
Arabia. Other Caddell clients are such oil-rich Amer-
ican enterprises as Exxon, Arco, Shell and Sun.
Praise for a Newsman
Carter, who at least publicly has shown explicit
concern for the so-called Jewish vote, insists that
Caddell's highly-specialized clientele (to say the least)
can have no ideological effect either on his own
Presidential aspirations or on the campaign
generally.
But Safire observes that any Carter decision,
either as a nominee or in the event of his election iii
November, might readily be purchased "to help lay
the basis for Arab propaganda in America" should
Carter continue to insist that Caddell's extra
curricular activity can have no ideological effect on
him.
We agree with Safire. Carter's stand is in-
comprehensible. And Safire must be praised for
having dug out the information in the first place.
THE
Jewish Floridian
Of PALM BE ACM COUNTY
Combining "OUR VOICE and"FEDRATION REPORTER"
In conjunction with Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County. Inc.
Combined Jewish Appeal
MU Okaachoboo Boulevard. Waat Palm Beach. Florida SMO*
OFFICE and PLANT-130 N.EathSt .Miami. Fla. Ml B Phone S7S-MOC
ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 1 J7S-40D6
MIAMI ADDRESS P.O. boa 2S73, Miami. Florida SS101
FREDK SHOCHETl SUZANNE SHOCHET SELMAM. THOMPSON
Editor and Publisher I Executive Editor AaaUtant to Publlahar
MORTON GILBERT-Advertlln Representative
The Jwl$h F lor Mian Does Nat Guarantee T ha Kaihruth
Of the Merchandise Advertised In it Cloomnj
All P.O. 8B7B raturna are to be forwarded to
The Jewish Floridian, P.O. Box01 2971, Miami. Fla. 8U01
C.Fred K. ShochetFriday, August IX 17
Published Bl Weekly Second Class Postage Paid at Miami, Fla.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) One year*.0O, or by membership to
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County, 241S Okeechobee Boulevard, West Palm
Beach, Fla. SMW. Phono Mt-SOM. (Out of Town upon Request)
FEDERATION OFFICERS: President, Stanley Brenner, VICO Presidents, Rabbi
Hyman Fishman, Or. Howard Kay, Kenneth Scherer, Dr. Richard Shutarman, Dr.
Stanley Stark; Treasurer, Stacey Lesser, Secretary, Bruce Daniels, Executive
Director, Norman Schlmelman, Assistant Executive Director, Robert Kessler
Submit material for publication to Roimi Tartokow, Director of Public Relations
Friday, August 13,1976 17 AB
Volume f Number 1',
Jewish Participation in Olympic
ByHASKELLCOHEN
While the Jewish male athletes
have made their mark in Olympic
competition, they have not out-
done the accomplishments of
their female counterparts in
many instances. As a matter of
fact, it was the Jewish female
athlete who played an important
role in the pioneer work of paving
the road into sports for women as
a whole.
When female swimming was
first introduced in the Stockholm
Olympics, the Austrian team,
which won the bronze medals in
the 4x100 meter relay, introduced
three Jewish swimmers. Many
years later, swimmers like Eva
Szekely of Hungary and Marilyn
Ramenovsky of the United
States, a Maccabiah Games
champion, carried on the same
winning tradition.
FEMALE participants were
first permitted to compete in
track and field in the Amsterdam
Olympics, and Fanny Rosenfeld
of Canada became the only
winner of two gold medals. Also
in those Games found among the
medal winners was the late Lil-
lian Copeland of the United
States, who came back in 1932 to
win the discus throw gold medal
at the Los Angeles Games.
So far as numbers of medals
won by female Jewish athletes is
concerned, Agnes Keleti of
Czechoslovakia ranks second to
Mark Spitz in the number of total
medals won by an individual per-
former. Miss Keleti won five
gold, three silver and two bronze
medals in gymnastics at the
Games in Helsinki and Mel-
bourne.
Her achievement at these two
sets of Olympics has been out-
done only by Spitz's total of nine
gold medals, one silver medal and
one bronze medal. Spitz, in-
cidentally, ranks fourth among
Olympic medal winners, serving
as a runner-up of Ray Ewry,
Larissa Latynina and Paavo
Nurmi.
MISS KELETI'S achieve-
ments have served her well since
at this moment she serves on the
staff of the Wingate Institute of
Physical Education in Netanya,
where for the past 16 years she
has headed up her segment of the
physical education staff. Today
she is known as Mrs. Keleti-Biro.
The honor of being the best
Jewish female athlete in recent
years belongs to Irene Kirszen-
stein of Poland. Miss Kirszen-
stein, known as Szewinska today,
is one of the best sprinters in the
Newspaper
Deadline
All copy from organizations
and individuals must be
submitted to the Federation
Office no later than 12 days
(Monday) prior to publication
(every other Friday).
Articles of current events
and activities should be 150
words or less, typewritten,
double-spaced with pictures
clearly and properly identified,
together with the na me of the
person submitting the story,
address, phone number and
name of organization.
Photos should be 5"x 7",
black-and-white glossy, and of
good quality. Charges will be
made for photo engravings.
The paper reserves the right
to edit.
Editor
Mail material to:
Jewish Floridian
c /o Jewish Federation
2415 Okeechobee Blvd.
West Palm Beach, Fla. 33409
world and has stayed at the top
in the 100 and 200 meter sprints
for close to a decade.
All in all, we know that the list
of Jewish medal winners in the
Games ranging from Athens to
Tokyo includes 98 gold, 62 silver
and 59 bronze by athletes of the
Jewish faith from all over the
world.
TODAY, of course, the Olym-
pic Games possibly serve little
purpose, and, quite frankly, may
be on the way out. There is no
question that the Games have
become a political football, and
students of the history of the
Games realize now that the first
political disturbances began with
the Olympic Games in Berlin in
1936, when they actually became
a means toward political ends
and where discrimination on the
basis of creed was practiced
openly.
At that time, considerable
pressure was exerted on the late
Avery Brundage, the Olympic
czar, to have the Games trans-
ferred out of Germany, but after
visiting that country, he pro-
claimed. "Hitler is going to make
this set of Games the finest
ever."
IN ORDER to overcome the
avalanche of protests which came
in from all over the world, the
Nazis at that point nominated 21
Jewish athletes for training
camps to participate in the Ger-
man Olympic Games in 1934. Ac-
tually, none of the 21 were ever
invited to attend the camps.
In desperation, in order to
show their impartiality, the Nazis
finally selected a half-Jewish
fencer, Helene Maver, who was
*Ui
victory 8tand
greeting of the
n
studying in California ,
ticipat* as a fencer Sh to
of the finest fernaj ^'
they did aassa
RudiBala'SeyTC
included on the Genwn
MISS MAYER, to b.
lasting discredit, i(jjj
on the *-* -
Nazi
raised right hand.
The height of h
was reached in the fas.
ceding World War II
United States pro Fascist
Charles H.SherriluS
to justify the discrimi,
against the Jewish peonle
stating, "There never
prominent Jewish athlet,
history."
To their everlasting
many prominent Jewish at
from all over the world
proudly to represent their
tive countries in Nazi Gei
As a matter of fact, many
punished for their refusal i
so. Perhaps the most famous
was that of Austria's sw:
Judith Deutsch. who now
in Israel.
IT SHOULD be noted in.
elusion that Israel's flag enti
the Olympic arena for the l_
time in 1952 in Finland, whend
United States Committee So
for Israel, under the
leadership of the late Ha
Henshel and the late Ch_.
Ornstein, was instrumental
getting the IOC to recogna]
Israel as an entity and
immensely in helping to raise t
necessary funds to get the I
from the Holy Land to the!
dinavian country.
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US Acknowledges
Contacts WithPLO
nnl a KOFF secretnry of Slate Philip Habib,
[JOSEPH POLAKUtr the personnel of the Sixth Fleet
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 7
WASHINGTON
r/u President Ford
\ed the delicate issue of
ial American relations
' ^e Palestine Libera-
Organization in ex-
ting his thanks and
Uatulations to all
JTaided in the evacuation
La of some 300 Amen-
ds and other foreign na-
pals from si rife-torn
banon.
The State Department
Iknowledged that it has
"dealing" with the
orist organization to
Bin assurances that the
fccuation would be con-
led safely.
WAS the first time the
[ted States ha- said it was in
.act with the PLO. Declared
policy has been that it would
leal with the Palestinians
ihcv recognized Israel's
It to exist as an independent
The Israeli position is
fast dealing with the PLO
|er any circumstances.
sidential news secretary
i Nessen said that Ford had
litored the evacuation
dures in Lebanon on tele-
for 80 minutes at the
lie House. Nessen noted that
| evacuation was "completed
ufully without incident*'
that the evacuees were
the USS Coronado en
i to Athens.
ADDED that Ford con-
ciliated Defense Secretary
Rumsfeld, Under-
and the American Kmbassy in
Beirut for the "safe and orderly
evacuation." Nessen added:
"The President also wants to
express his gratitude and sincere
thanks to all others who gave
their cooperation to facilitate
their departure."
ORIGINALLY it was to have
been a movement overland to
Damascus, like previous trans-
fers. American officials were in-
formed, however, that this time
guarantees of safe conduct by
land could not he given.
The sources for the uncertainty
of safety were not disclosed.
Nessen, in response to a re-
porters question, said that "all
parties" to which the State De-
partment referred included the
PLO.
The State Department had
said that the U.S. was in contact
with "all parties" involved in the
strife in Lebanon to arrange the
evacuation which was carried out
a week after it was scheduled.
When the Department in-
dicated that it was com-
municating directly with the
PLO, Israeli Kmbassy press
counsellor Avi Pazner said the
Kmbassy had raised the question
of U.S. contact with the PIX).
Meanwhile, speculation varied
on the ultimate result of the U.S.-
PLO communication. Some
Israeli sources indicated they
accept the U.S. contention that
no change in American policy has
taken place in view of the fact
that the PLO is a shrinking force
in the Arab world and it would be
unwise for the U.S. to change its
policy now toward the PLO.
evitt to Chair Meeting of Funeral Directors
bnny Levitt, vice president of
Memorial Chapels, Inc.,
I returned from Quebec City,
where he attended the
meeting of the Jewish
1 Directors of America and
L
J member of the J FDA board
directors for the past three
^. he has been appointed na-
il chairman of the convention
duled for September, 1978.
Bj has addressed many
P'es, civic organizations
rondomuiium groups on
Newish Way of Dying and
"">% and is available to
upon request by calling
["Memorial Chapels.
SONNY LEVITT
Russians
Don't Match
Peace Moves
Continued from Page 1
according to former Under-
secretary of State Joseph J.
Sisco.
In an interview here with
CBS, the former diplomat
said the "commitment" of
the U.S. and of the West is
for a "practical solution" of
the Arab-Israeli dispute.
"WHAT I have found wan-
ling," Sisco observed, "in Soviet
policy based on my own ex-
perience has been this: that when
there has been a negotiation, and
when the United States has
played a role, I have never found
that the Soviet Union has been
willing to apply its own per-
suasion vis-a-vis those with
whom it is close that would go
beyond a position that a given
Arab leader or a given Arab state
was taking at the time."
Continuing, Sisco said; "There
are many occasions in our re-
lationship, special as it is, with
Israel, where we have tended to
try to encourage them (Israelis)
to go perhaps beyond where their
established position may be" but
" I cannot find any really concrete
evidence where the Soviet has
taken this sort of position."
Sisco, now president of the
American University here, said
the U.S. and the Soviet Union
"have always agreed to disgree
when it comes to the substance of
a settlement."
HE SAID he has always felt
that the U.S. and the West have
much more to gain from a peace-
ful resolution than does the
Soviet Union.
"We can out-compete the
Soviet Union in circumstances of
peace," Sisco said.
Sisco's remarks followed CBS
interviewer Richard Hottelot's
comment that some in Washing-
ton think Soviet public support
for the PLO and coolness toward
Syria in the Lebanese situation,
*HAT. .WHERE?
COMMUNITY PROGRAMS
AND AGENCIES
WISH FEDERATION OF
pAlM BEACH COUNTY
'Sholom Day Camp
""""y Calendar
*"""* Pre-School
yVhiton
^-ReWalServce
rrConwnun.iyOov
wool
,Co">"uniiy Forum
n"iuniiy
^"0n'Comm.i.oe
^fom,|y4Cni|d
"vice
^'dionof
lB*xh County
" $g|es
rl,Ud*n,JUn,r,-
"*A,la">'cUn,ve,sity
'ipD".lopmen,
Fom
^"'ogram
J'0ln"ut.onS
""u8fgency
BEN ROTHENBERG
Counselor and
Sales Representative
SHALOM
MEMORIAL PARK
"Palm lleoch County's
First Cemetery Dedicated
Exclusively to the Needs
of the Jewish Community"
Office 684-2277
Home 686-0646
SKAIOM MwMSBTAL TKSOt
Pelm Beach County's Only All Jewish Cemetery
Serving the entire Jewish Community
PRE-NEED or in TIME OF NEED
Ask about our FEATURE MAUSOLEUM
INFORMATION CENTER PHONE
5932 Okeechobee 8lvd W Palm 684-2277
W. Palm Beach. Fla. 33409_________Qelray 427-3220
JEWISH FAMILY AND CHILDREN'S SERVICE
An outstanding professiono/ counseling agency serving the Jewish
community of Palm Beach Counfy. Professional and confidential
help is available for
Problems of the aging
Adoption and child plocemenl
Vocational counseling
Marital counseling
Parent-child conflicts
Personal problems
Prtvete Of licet:
2415 Okeechebee Mehvrd
West Mm Beach, Fla. 33409
Telephone: 644 1991
From Boco Raton, call collect
Moderate fees ore charged in family ond individual counseling to
those who can pay (Fees ore based on income and family size)
JCC Presents...
Special for teens (senior and junior high)! Aug. 16 to 27, 2 to
5. Free. Teen Game Room. Drop in! Open daily for jukebox, pool,
ping-pong, pinball. Coke machine, table games.
Midsummer Dansant! For adults of all ages. Exhibition
dance. Round, square and ballroom lessons on the spot! Social-
izing and lots of action! Bagels and coffee. $2.50 per person: $3.50
per person for non-JCC members. Everyone is welcome to meet
the well-known dance team "The Statnicks"! Tickets may be
purchased at the JCC office, 2415 Okeechobee Blvd., or call 689-
7700. Saturday. Aug. 28. 8:30 p.m. A wonderful evening is in
store. "Hustle." anyone?
PET Class: Parent Effectiveness Training class begpn Aug.
10 for 8 Tuesday evenings with Dr. Myles Cooley. All you ex-
pectant mamas and papas take the course now!
Ulpan Classes, to begin in September at the JCC, will employ
the newest innovations for teaching Hebrew conversation. Cer-
tified Ulpan teachers will work with you for 15 weeks in beginner
and intermediate classes. Results are certain to enrich your life
and your understanding of the world around you.
The language is the people and the people is the language.
! Learn the language of your people. A rare and intensive ex-
, perience will be yours. Call the JCC for details.
The JCC Jewish Guys and Gals, for Singles ages 18 to 35,
will begin when you call the JCC and say "I Do!" want to
work to make a Young Single Adult Group swing in Palm Beach
County! Ms. Brona Rumper is the JCC chairperson.
LOOK for the JCC photograph displays at your bank,
starting Sept. 1. Iris Murray, chairperson of the Community
Relations Committee, has announced a program for you to be
proud of. Governor Askew will proclaim September as Palm
Beach JCC Membership Month. Everyone who reads this column
will want to join in order to participate in JCC programs. Be sure
to receive the Fall Program Guide. Call the JCC (689-7700) to be
placed on the mailing list.
The JCC needs your old Jewish greeting cards. Save them
and bring them to the JCC office for our children's projects.
Thank you.
Volunteers are needed who can devote at least one day a week
to the JCC office on a regular basis. Office skills are helpful but
not necessary.
Mini-camp is a maxi program. Under the mature and skilled
guidance of Sue Levi and Wayne Karlin a two-week camp
program (Aug. 16 to 27), 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., to serve children in
grades K-6 has grown from a playschool experience.
Every day is planned as a special day for the youngsters and
the program includes a Wildlife Day, presented by Lt. Butler of
the Florida Game and Fresh Water Division: Smokey the Bear
Day, presented by Ms. M. Waldron of the Division of Forestry:
Indian and Pioneer Day, by the Boy Scouts; "Bumps and Bruises
Day," by American Red Cross safety officer E. Friend; "Be Nice
to Your Bike Day," by B. Husky; People for Pets Day by the
PBB Animal Regulation Division; Citizenship Day, a guided tour
to Palm Beach County Court House: Hook and Ladder Day, with
a live fire engine.
The Judaica program includes films, slides, music, etc., on
events in Jewish history. Sabbath parties, Hebrew conversation,
Jewish cooking. Music, arts and crafts will include instruction in
the flutaphone as well as all the arts and crafts geared to the
children's ability as well as a full physical fitness program.
For your child to end the summer with a good feeling, we
urge you to register NOW! Fill out the registration application
and mail it immediately to the Jewish Community Center of the
Palm Beaches. Inc.. 2415 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach.
Florida 33409.
Fee: JCC members: $15 per week plus insurance ($2 pet
| child); non-members: $25 per week plus insurance.
Camper's Full Name
i Last i
Sex
Hirthtiale
Father'* or
Guardian's Full Name
Phone
I-hour
.......I'tMIIH'
i Middle I iKirsli
Current A(!e Current Grade
Mother's Name.......
Home Address
Father's Hus Address
Mother's 'Jus Address
Are you members ofthe.IOC? ...........................
In IS* of emergency contact KelalKsiship
Family Oortor Office Phone Itwine
Full payment must be made In advance. Pleaae make all check* payable to the
Jewish Community Center of the Palm Beaches We accept BankAmerlcard
and Master Charge. .
I hereby authorize the Jewish Community Center to take my child to a doctor
or hospital for any emergency or surgical treatment which may be necessary
Date
. Signature of Parent
or Guardian
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
of the palm beaches, inc.
MIS Okeechobee Boulevard, West Palm Beech. Florida 3340 i
Telephone e89-77te


Page 8
i nr. jrtmsn Finn/tin- -** n..* o----*. ~
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
FHfry.Aut.,
i 2fyt 71
Sabbatical fagc
devoted to diseut$ion of themes and issues relevant to Jewish life past and present
co-ordinated by the
Palm Beach County Robbinical Council
Editor
Rabbi William H. Shopiro
????Question Box????
By RABBI SAMUEL J. FOX
Question: What is the opinion of
Jewish tradition in regard to
dealing with kidnappers or
hijackers when it is a question of
saving the victim's life or
jeopardizing the rest of the
community to farther incidents?
Answer: It must be stated at
the outset that such cases require
individual review in each incident
and can never rely upon a blanket
rule covering all cases. In
Talmudic literature we have a
strange enigma of analysis.
On the one hand, redeeming
captives ("Pidyon Sh'vuin") is
considered among the greatest of
virtuous deeds (Baba Batra 8a).
One may even sell a Holy Scroll
in order to be able to ransom such
a victim (Tosafot Baba Bathra
8b).
Judaism: A Social System
By Rabbi Barry Tabachnikoff
Congregation Bet Breira
Issue: "Rabbi, I don't need a
synagogue to be Jewish."
Answer: This oft-repeated
comment is a self-indictment and
reflects a total lack of sensitivity
to the fundamental values of
Judaism. One cannot live a Jew-
ish life in isolation. From the time
of Hfllel, who is quoted in Avoth
as saying "Do not separate your-
self from the community," to our
own time, when Federation's
rallying cry is "We Are One,"
Judaism in theory and in practice
has been a social system as well
as an individual belief system.
It is true that one is Jewish by
birth or choice and that this
identity carries through for a life-
time. It is likewise true that one
retains a Jewish dimension in-
dependent of the level of ob-
servance, ritual involvement,
study commitment or organiza-
tional participation. However, of
the many facets of Jewish ex-
pression, the synagogue is unique
as a vehicle that not only teaches
and practices Judaism but also
protects its very existence.
Historically, the synagogue
has been the place where Jewish
values have been preserved,
practiced, passed on to the next
generation. Philanthropy has
taken root out of the synagogue.
Scholarship has flourished,
because of the synagogue. Ritual
observance, personal identity,
cultural growth all of these
have flourished because of the
central strength of the religious
community, the "qahal" or con-
gregation whose heart is the
synagogue.
Today, more than ever,
vicarious fulfillment is in-
adequate. We cannot let Israel
speak for us any more than we
can speak for them. We cannot
forfeit the very opportunities
that our Soviet cousins long for.
Our dollars will be wasted if we
fail to commit ourselves in deeds
as well as dollars to the
strengthening of our individual
synagogues.
SYNOPSIS OF THE WEEKLY TORAH PORTION
Ekev
"For the Lord thy God bringeth thee unto a good land.....
a land of wheat and barley ... a land of olive-trees and
honey" (Deut. 8.7-8).
kev Moses declares: "And it shall come to pass,
because ye hearken to these ordinances, and keep, and do
them, that the Lord thy God shall keep with thee the
covenant and the mercy which He swore unto thy fathers,
and He will love thee, and bless thee, and multiply thee"
(Deuteronomy 7.12-13). The Israelites are not to fear the
Canaanite nations: witness the providence and supervision
of God over His people in the desert, though they sinned. In
passing, Moses makes a general reference to the incident of
the Golden Calf. The Israelites were not to inherit the land
of Canaan because of their own virtues: "Not for thy
righteousness, or for the uprightness of thy heart, dost
thou go in to possess their land; but for the wickedness of
these nations the Lord thy God doth drive them out from
before thee, and that He may establish the word which the
Lord swore unto thy fathers" (Deuteronomy 9.5). After
mentioning God's powerful miracles in Egypt and the.
desert (particularly in reference to Dathan and Abiram),
Moses dwells on the importance of the Promised Land. The
portion continues with the second part of the Shema,
beginning "And it shall come to pass, if ye shall harken
diligently unto My commandments" and ending "that your
days may be multiplied, and the days of your children, upon
the land which the Lord swore unto your fathers to give
them, as the days of the heavens above the earth"
(Deuteronomy 11.13-21). And the portion concludes with
the promise: "There shall no man be able to stand again
you: the Lord your God shall lay the fear of you and the
d of you upon all the land that ye shall tread upon, as
He hath spoken unto you" (Deuteronomy 11.26).
rwVwwVwwMwVWVVW^fyWWftrVVWrVWW^wVlrWWVVWV
Inside Judaica
On the other hand, the amount
to which one can go in payment is
limited "for the sake of the
preservation of order in society"
(Gittin. Mishnah 4:6).
Medievalists are well aware of the
case of the famous Rabbi Meir of
Ruttenberg in the 13th century
who forbade the community to
pay the excessive ransom that
was asked for his release lest it
unleash a pattern of kidnappings
which would endanger the lives of
many in the community.
He eventually died in captivity
and his body had to be ransomed
in order to receive the proper and
traditional Jewish burial. It is
thus obvious that the Jewish
community has had to face this
issue squarely a number of times
in the past. Yet each case
received individual con-
sideration.
By Dr. Frederick Lachman
Q. What has been the Jewish
attitude toward sports?
A. There is only one clear
reference to sports in the Bible,
namely, to archery as can be seen
from the story of David and
Jonathan (I Samuel 20:21-22),
but this omission might have
been purely coincidental.
At the beginning of the Mac-
cabean periods, in the second
century B.C.E., circumatai.ces
conspired to make sporting
activities as such, "for the sake of
the game," repugnant to Jews as
the very antithesis of Jewish
ideals, and this approach
remained characteristic of
Judaism until the dawn of the
modern period, according to the
Encyclopaedia Judaica.
One of the overt signs of th<
attempt to Hellenize Judea was
the establishment in 174 B.C.E.
of a gymnasium in Jerusalem
where the participants engaged
in their sporting activities in the
nude. Sport thus became
associated with the alien and
dangerous Hellenistic culture.
The Olympic Games were con-
nected with the idolatrous cult.
There is evidence nevertheless
that in countries under Greek
influence sports were indulged in
by Jews. The opposition to sports
became more outspoken when
Roman theaters and circuses
were linked together as the very
antithesis of "synagogue and
school," according to the EJ.
An added factor was the great
cruelty associated with Roman
sport, which was not confined to
the characteristic aspect of
gladiatorial contests, and the
humane aspect of the Jewish op-
position finds expression in the
ruling that "one is permitted to
go to stadiums if by his shouting
he may save the victim's life."
The first Jewish ruler to en-
courage sports was Herod, who,
between 37 and 4 B.C.E.. erected
sports stadia in some cities
and introduced a Palestinian
Olympiad for which he brought
athletes from all parts of the
world.
There are few references to
organized sport during the
Middle Ages. Jews in Spain dis-
tinguished themselves in the art
of fencing, but otherwise the
sports Jews indulged in belonged
either to recreations or in-
tellectual pastimes or to chil-
dren's games. The most popular
sport in the Middle Ages appears
to have been ball games, which
were permitted even on Sabbath,
though the Midrash gives as one
of the reasons for the destruction
of Jerusalem that "they played
ball on the Sabbath."
In 1386 there were Jewish
tournaments in Germany, where,
later in the 15th century, Jews
participated in competitions in
running, jumping, throwing and
bowling. Jews distinguished
themselves in sports com-
petitions in Rome in 1487, 1602
and 1596. There is even a song
about Jewish runners composed
CANDLELIGHTING
TIME
M 7:39 m
17AB-5736 I
in 1513.
Though most of the Jews in the
19th century lived in conditions
unfavorable to athletic pursuits,
a number of them did well in
Europe and America: in 1896
seven Jewish athletes won 13
medals at the first modern Olym-
pic Games in Athens.
In a speech before the Fifth
Zionist Congress in 1901 Max
Nordau asked the Jewish people
to renew their interest in
and physical fitness. His call,
answered by the Maccabi mo
ment which spread around I
world. It was Hungary l
produced the most succt
Jewish athletes in Europe. I
in the 20th century unnia,
children learned the ^^
their new countries, ,
professional sports attn
many Jews throughout
world.
Synagogues in
Palm Beach County
REFORM
TEMPLE ISRAEL
1901 North Flogler Drive
West Palm Beach, Florida 33407
833-8421
Rabbi Irving B Cohen
Sabbath services. Friday at 8.15
p.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL OF
BOCA RATON
P.O. Box 568
Boca Raton, Florida 33432
391 8901
Rabbi Norman T. Mendel
Moray ion Church, 12th Ave and
Palmetto Park Rd.. Boca Raton
CONSERVATIVE lIBtlATi
TEMPLE ETERNAL LIGHT 1
P.O. Box 3 1 ^a
Boca Raton, Florido 33432 H
426-1600 H
Rabbi Benjamin Rosayn
Sabbath services. Fridoy ot 8:15 1 1
p.m.
at Unitorian-Universalist
Fellowship Building
162 W. Palmetto Park Rd
Boca Raton V
H tu 1 r
CONGREGATION
ANSHEI SH010M
5348 Grove Street
West Palm Beach, Florida 33409
684-3212
Robbi Henry Jerech
Daily services ot 8:30 a.m. and 7
p.m.
Friday services at 8:30 a.m., 6
p.m. and 8:30p.m.
Sabbath services ot 8:30 a.m.
and 7 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL
2815 North Flogler Drive
West Palm Beach, Florido 33407
833-0339
Rabbi William H. Shapiro
Sabbath services Friday at 8:15
p.m
Saturday ot 9:30 a. m.
Sunday at 9 o.m
TEMPLE BETH SH0L0M
315 North "A" Street
Lake Worth, Florido 33460
585-5020
Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg
Services, Mondays ond Thursdays
ot8:30o m.
Friday at 8:15 p.m.
Saturday at 9:30 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID
Sabbath services, Friday at 8 p.m.
At Westminister
Presbyterian Church
'0410 N. Military Trail, Palm
Beach Gardens. 321 Norrhloke
Blvd., North Palm Beach, Flo
33408
854-1134
Contor Nicholas Fenokel
"MniriiAiJAco.
275 Alemeda Drive
Palm Springs, Florido 33460
Sabbath ervice, Friday ot 8
p.m.
Saturday at 9a.m.
CONSERVATIVE
Mondays and Thursdays ot 9 a m.
Services held at Faith United
Presbyterian Church, Palm
Springs
B'NAITORAH
CONGREGATION
P.O. Box 2306
Boca Raton, Florida 33432
Rabbi Nathan Zelizer
Sabbath services, Friday at 8:15
p.m.
2nd ond 4th Saturdays at 9:30
a.m.
At Boca Federal Savings & Loon
Association
3901 Federal Highway, Bod
Raton
DELRAY HEBREW
CONGREGATION
Meets ot Methodist Fellowship
Hall
342N. SwintonAve Delray
Philip Bialer, Lay Leader
For information, call Mrs Corl
Miller, 278-1985
TEMPLE BETH SN0L0M
N.W. Avenue "G"
Belle Glode, Florida 33430
Jock Stateman, Lay .Leader
Sobboth services, Friday ot 8:
p.m.
TEMPLE EMANU-f L
190 North County Road
Palm Beach, Florida 33480
832-0004
Robbi f*ox I. Formon
Contor Ernest Schreiber
Sabbath services. Fridoy ot 8*
p.m.
Saturday ot9o.m.


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