Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
8 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 28, 1975)-v. 8, no. 40 (Dec. 17, 1982).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 2, 1976 called v.2, no. 22, but constitutes v.2, no. 1.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: July 28, 1978 called no. 14 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement; Aug. 25, 1978 called no. 16 in masthead and no. 17 in publisher's statement; Aug. 10, 1979 called no. 15 in masthead and no. 16 in publisher's statement; Oct. 22, 1982 called no. 31 in masthead and no. 32 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44607504
lccn - sn 00229550
ocm44607504
System ID:
AA00014311:00118

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
Ulewuslli Fllariiclliiaiir,
OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
Combining "OUR VOICE" and FEDERATION REPORTER"
In conjunction with The Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
/
Palm Beach County, Florida Friday, June 4, 1976 Fred K- snochet Friday. June 4.1976 Price 25 cents
[-Time Campaign
[ecord Predicted
Stanley Brenner, general chairman of the 1976 Combined
Lish Appeal Israel Emergency Fund, has confirmed that
Anal total will exceed $1.4 million and establish a new
high in the history of the annual local drive.
In reporting on the current and projected campaign totals
line annual meeting of the Jewish Federation on May 26,
Wr based his forecast on the fact that $1,341,000 has
dy been pledged. He also anticipates that between now
1 tne end of the year the campaign will receive a minimum
[$80,000 in new gifts and unconfirmed gifts from regular
htributors.
According to Brenner's analysis, the 1976 campaign will
Ltually show an increase of more than $400,000 over last
W and surpass the record $1.38 million raised in the cam-
U year that included contributions during the Yom Kip-
War. Equally significant, the number of contributors is
dy over 6.000 as compared with 4,300 in 1975.
In evaluating the 1976 CJA-1EF, among the factors Bren-
cited as contributing to its success were the achievement
I the Women's Division in reaching its goal of $350,000, the
|relopment of a campaign organization in the Boca Raton
broadened activity and support from Century Village
new residential complexes, and a first-time effort in or-
nizing the hi-rises.
graeli Scouts Joining Camp Staff
es Jacobson. chairman
anp committee, has an-
Hhet'our Israeli Scouts
n the staff when Camp
begins its twelfth sea-
Monday, June 21.
ause of the success of last
sraeli Scout program,
) committee unanimous-
d to invite four Scouts
cipate in this year's
program.
scouts have added a
I dimension to the program,
as well as helping develop a
better understanding between
American and Israeli youth."
Jacobson said.
Ayelct Dekel of Eilat. Orit
Lavan and Danny Kedar of Hai-
fa and Idan Barak of Tel Aviv
all llth-graders will assist
the Camp Shalom staff in the
areas of Judaic content and
overall camping program.
The Scouts will be the guests
of West Palm Beach residents
during their stay.
AYELET DEKEL
ORIT LAVAN
DANNY
KEDAR
DAN BARAK
CONCESSIONS YES
Ford Sees
No Erosion
Of Ties
WASHINGTON (JTA)
President Ford personally and
publicly has reaffirmed that
"there has not and will not be
any erosion of American-Israel
friendship" and emphasized that
"our role in supporting Israel
honors our own heritage."
In issuing this reassurance
during an address to some 1,000
persons attending the American
Jewish Committee's 70th an-
nual meeting here, the Presi-
dent also declared.
"While America must and
will pursue friendship with all
nations, this will never be done
at the expense of America's
commitment to Israel." This
statement evoked the loudest
applause during his address.
Ford affirmed that "Our com-
mitment to Israel will meet the
test of American steadfastness
and resolve. My Administration
will not be found wanting."
HE ALSO stressed that Amer-
ica "will remain the ultimate
guarantor of Israel's freedom."
Ford's address, at the AJCom-
mittee's annual dinner, con-
firmed the effect the pledges
Continued on Page 2
Arabs Held
On Suspicion
Of Terror
JERUSALEM (JTA) Six-
ty East Jerusalem Arabs have
been arrested on suspicion of in-
citing to riot, a police spokes-
man said. One of them, report-
edly, is Rassan Tahbub, editor
of the oro-PLO East Jerusalem
daily, Al-Shaab.
Jerusalem Police Chief David
Kraus has warned East Jerusa-
lem merchants that if their
shops in the Old City are not
reopened, they would be con-
fiscated by the police and shut
down for a prolonged period.
Kraus summoned members of
the East Jerusalem Chamber of
Commerce and Mukhtarim (lo-
cal chiefs) to his office to con-
vev his warning
MOST OLD City shops were
closed in protest against the
shooting of Arabs by Israeli
forces durinR recent disturb-
ances in East Jerusalem and the
West Bank.
Meanwhile, 15 Arabs from
Tarkumiyeh village in the He-
bron district were detained by
security forces on charges of
membership in El Fatah. An
army spokesman said that at
least two acts of sabotage were
committed by this group.
ONE WAS the placing of an
explosive charge under a United
Nations car last Nov. 2, *
other was planting explosives
at a house on the* Bethlehem
road in December.
Federation Names Schimelman
New Executive Director
Norman J. Schimelman, for-
merly assistant executive direc-
tor of the Jewish Welfare Fed-
eration of Dallas, will become
executive director of the Jew-
ish Federation of Palm Beach
County as of August 1.
A native of Bridgeport, Conn..
Schimelman earned his Bache-
lor's degree at the University
of Bridgeport, holds a Master's
i n social work from Indiana
University and served in the
United States Medical Corps.
Schimelman has been on the
professional staff of Jewish
Community Centers in Detroit.
Indianapolis and St. Louis. He
was assistant executive director
of the Jewish Federation of
Rhode Island and Senior Re-
gional Director of the Middle
Atlantic States for Brandeis
University.
Schimelman and his wife.
Marjorie, have three sons,
Craig. Daniel and Jeffrey.
NORMAN SCHIMELMAN
Red Magen David
In Aid to Italy
TEL AVIV (JTA) Israel's Red Magen David dis-
patched four tons of emergency supplies for the earthquake
victims in northern Italy over the weekend.
Prof. Moshe Many, chairman of the Red Magen David,
said additional supplies would be sent when the Italian
Red Cross, consisted of tents, cots and blankets, items given
THE FIRST RELIEF shipment, consigned to the Italian
Red Cross, consisted of tents cots and blankets, items given
top priority by the Italian authorities. The Red Magen David
has offered medical equipment and blood plasma.
Last year the Red Magen David sent relief supplies
to disaster areas in Turkey, Thailand and Guatemala.
Israel's Ambassador to the UN Chaim Herzog (left),
High Patron of the annual Magen David Adorn Star Gala,
greeted Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Goldman of New York and
Palm Beach during a recent benefit at the Plaza Hotel.
Mrs. Goldman was gala chairman and also is cochair-
man of the American Red Magen David for Israel na-
tional campaign.

The Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
Cordially Invites You To Attend
The Dedication Of
The Conrad Ganz Memorial Sports Complex
At Camp Shalom
Sunday, June 20, 3 p.m.


it-age 19
Page 2
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday. j,m. 1
Shavuoth History
Steeped in Ancient
Tradition, Custom
By DR. FREDERICK LACHMAN
Encyclopaedia Jndaica
The festival of Shavuot takes
its name from the Hebrew for
"weeks," "Pentecost" and also
"the 50th day." It is celebrated
on the 6th day of Si van (which
this year falls on June 4). Ac-
cording to Orthodox and Can1
servatiye tradition, it is also
celebrated on the 7th Sivan
(June 5, this year) outside of
Israel.
One of the three so-cailed
"pilgrim festivals," Shavuot
marked the end of the barley
and the beginning of the wheat
harvest.
ACCORDING to the Encyclo-
paedia Judaica, it was probably
a midsummer festival in origin
and taken over froni the Ca-
naanites. It is stated in Leviti-
cus: "From the day after the
Sabbath, the day that you bring
the sheaf of wave-offering you
shall count fifty days, until the
day after the seventh week; then
you shall bring an offering of
new grain to the' Lord." Leviti-
cus also states that the sheaf
was waved on the day after the
Sabbath on the festival of Pas-
sover. Thus Shavuot falls 50
days after this day.
In. rabbinic times a remark-
able transformation of the fes-
tival took place. Based on the
verse: "In the third month after
the children of Israel were gone
forth out of the land of Egypt,
the same day came they into the
wilderness of Sinai" (Ex. 19:1),
the festival became the anni-
versary of ihe giving of the
Torah at Sinai.
THE DESCRIPTION of the
feast in the liturgy is the time
of the giving of our Torah. The
transformation was in accord
with a Drocess to be observed
in the Bible in which the an-
cient agricultural feasts were
transformed into festivals mark-
ing an anniversary of signifi-
cant historical events in the life
of the Deople. Both Passover
and Sukkot are connected with
the Exodus; it was natural to
link Shavuot with this event.
It is customary to adorn the
svnagogue with plants and flow-
ers on Shavuot because, tradi-
tion has it, Sinai was a green
mountain, and with trees, be-
cause Shavuot is judgment day
for the fruit of the tree. Some
authorities disapproved of the
custom because of its similarity
to certain church rites.
In former time girls deco-
rated the windows, and boys
brought field flowers and ivy
from the forest and adorned the
doors, windows and lamps on
Shavuot.
THERE WAS also a custom
of piercing eggs, emptying them
of their contents, drawing a
string through the empty shells,
gluing feathers to them, and
hanging them up in the open to
swing in the wind like birds.
It is a home custom to eat
dairv nroducts on Shavuot be-
C9s the Torah is compared to
:"' (Songs 4:11) and because
the law of the first fruit is
f#'c federation
us "fJTact
Jewish Community Center
offers varied programs and
activitiessocial, cultural, leis-
ure time, recreational for
youth and adults.
placed in juxtaposition to a law
concerning milk (Ex. 23:19).
In some communities it is
customary to eat triangular
pancakes stuffed with meat or
cheese because the Torah is of
three parts (Pentateuch, Proph-
ets, and Hagiographa) and was
given to a people of three parts
(priests, Leyites, and Israelites)
on the third month through
Moses who was the third child
of his parents.
IN ISRAEL, modern social life
has stimulated the adaptation
of religious ceremonies to a
secular society which wants to
keep the traditional national
folk ways. This is evident, for
example, in the Bar Mitzvah
ceremony whose religious signi-
ficance in a secular society is
reduced but not eliminated.
Under the initial impetus of the
Reform movement, the individ-
ual ceremony has been substi-
tuted by a collective "confirma-
tion" ceremony similar to that
of the Christian rite.
This takes place at the Sha-
vuot festival, chosen because
the traditional date of the giv-
ing of the law on Mount Sinai,
it seems the proper season for
adolescent boys and girls to
celebrate their initiation into
full Jewish adulthood.
As the Shavuot festival coin-
cides with the end of the school
year, the Judaica relates, the
ceremony, at times, bears the
character of a graduation.
IN ISRAEL the collective Bar
Mitzvah has been introduced in
non-religious kibbutzim.
The ceremony takes place
after the children have per-
formed some task, usually socio-
educationai, which was imposed
upon each individual child (or
pair) by the community, school,
or youth movement (e.g., a
week's stay in a new settlement
with a newcomer's family in
order to help them; or in a
religious yeshivah in order to
learn Jewish ways strange to
them).
The Bar Mitzvah child then
has to write a composition on
his experiences. He further re-
lates his adventures during the
performance of the task at the
"confirmation" and the lessons
derived therefrom are discussed
by the whole assembly.
Beth El Names
William Shapiro
Interim Rabbi
Rabbi William H. Shapiro has
assumed the pulpit at Temple
Beth El as guest rabbi for an
interim period.
Rabbi Shapiro, who was as-
sociate rabbi at Congregation
Anshei Sholom and honorary
president of the Yiddish Culture
Group at Century Village, is a
member of the board of direc-
tors of the Jewish Community
Day School, secretary to the
Rabbinical Council of Palm
Beach County, board member
of the Mid-County Medical
Group and president of the
Lawyers Club of Century Vil-
lage.
A graduate of Columbia Uni-
versity, Rabbi Shapiro was or-
dained at Yeshiva University,
and earned his Ph.D. at St!
John's University. He has oc-
cupied pulpits in Woodhaven,
Bethpage and Brooklyn, N.Y.
pa ?
Ford Reaffirms U.S. and Israi
Continued from Page 1
made to Israel by Secretary of
State Henry A. Kissinger in the
Chizuk Amuno Synagogue in
Baltimore five nights before.
The President, who receiv-
ed four standing ovations, was
the second Chief Executive to
appear at an AJCommittee func-
tion. President Lyndon B. John-
son attended the AJCommit-
tee's 60th anniversary meeting
in 1966.
WHILE HE emphasized his
support to Israel, Ford also in-
dicated h i s Administration
would continue to press for
Israeli withdrawal from terri-
tories it occupied in the Six-
Day War as a means to achieve
a peace settlement and that he
does not favor funds for Israel
beyond the S4.4 oillion he has
recommended for the 27-month
period ending Sept. 30, 1977.
Israeli supporters in Con-
gress believe the funds should
be increased by a half billion
dollars to take into account the
three months between the end
of the current fiscal year and
the start of fiscal 1977. Legis-
lation on the long-overdue for-
eign aid is facing another show-
down in Congress this week.
"WE APPRECIATE Israel's
dilemma in moving towards
peace," Ford said with refer-
ence to the administered areas.
"Israel is asked to relinquish
territory a concrete and es-
sentially irreversible step in
return for basically intangible
political measures but it is only
willingness to dare the exchange
of the tangible for the intan-
gible that hostility can be end-
ed and peace attained."
On the funding, he said he
favors aid to Israel of more
than $4 billion in the two bud-
gets he has submitted to Con-
gress "because it is so clearly
in the national security inter-
est of the United States and so
essential to preserve and pro-
mote peace in the Middle East."
FOLLOWING the President to
the rostrum, Israeli Ambassa-
dor Simcha Dinitz, after thank-
ing Ford, Congress and the
American people for their con-
tinuing support of Israel, point-
edly alluded to two pillars of
Israeli policy.
With the President listening
intently, a few feet away, Di-
nitz observed that Israel's in-
dependence began in the hills
of Judaea and the streets of
Jerusalem 4,000 years ago, ap-
parently in reference to Israel's
insistence on some territorial
security and Jerusalem as its
capital.
After four wars and 28 years
of statehood, Israel "has not
won peace because the Arabs
have not acquiesced to the thesis
of an independent existence of
the Jewish State," Dinitz em-
phasized. "This is the heart of
Congregation
Anshei Sholom
The Hebrew Adult Education
of Anshei Sholom, under the
leadership of Tamar Barsky
celebrated the 28th anniversary
of Israel's Independence with a
program at the. temple.
The offering combined a
solemn memorial to the dead,
a salute to Israel, including ex-
cerpts from the original tapes
of Independence ceremonies
with the voices of David Ben-
Gurion and Chaim Weizmann.
and several musical selections.'
All are invited to attend.
HAMPTON LIQUORS
WINES ft LIQUORS
FA8T DBIJVBRT SERVICE
Nione: 832-8368
257 Poinciana Way
PALM BEACH, FLA.
Bars & Glasses Loaned FREE
the problem and the core of the
issue," he said, to applause.
FORD'S appearance and
speech were widely considered
in and out of the media as hav-
ing national political overtones
in view of the taut Presidential
primaries taking place and the
national election to come.
But a high-placed Israeli Em-
bassy officer, when asked for
his opinion, declared that his
feeling was only that the ad-
dress was "the warmest a Presi-
dent has ever made about Is-
rael."
The President was introdJ
by Max F.sher, the Cfl
dustnahst who js
chairman of the AJCotnm
National Executive Councih
an intimate friend and
selor to the President
Lawrence Cardinal She*
Archbishop of BaItimoreWj
Clarence Mitchell, directorl
the Washington bureau rf.
NAACP, were other Lf'
The guests included an*
dors and leaders of a foreign countries and high!
ficials of the U.S. gover
At the first annual meeting of the Jewish Cor
I Center of the Palm Beaches, held at the center on
18, the newly elected officers were installed. Mrs.
Murray (left), vice president, presented a certific
of Charter membership to Mrs. Detra Kay, presided!
^ISHGOMMDNl
pelm beaches.mc.
Newly elected members of the board of directors of the\
Jewish Community Center installed at the recent annual I
meeting are (from left) Mrs. Ann Leibovit, Dr. Richard
Shugarman, Max Touchner and Dr. Howard Sabarrd
ESTHER FROELICH
President of P.ft. County
Chapter of American Jewish
Congress is now
ACCEPTING RESERVATIONS
IN THIS AREA FOR ALL
A.J.C. TOURS
CAM FOR YOUR
1976 TOUR GUIDE
689-4884
HOUSE OF THE AND
CARPETS
ABRAMS FLOORING
COMPANY
1117 North Wide
Lake Worth, Florida 3S440
Tola. 585-5428 582-5008
C. E. ABRAMS
Str/Aav y&.-ZeidenHt
REGISTERED REAL ESTATE BROKER
Acreage
Home* Lots Apartments
*** A ROYAL PALM WAV
*ALM BCACM. FLORIDA
Proper*
rricc *" |
as* mk*
mma
I!
9Uafc**
PB-4-7
DON VOGEL
REALTOR ASSOCIATE
Call me for your FREE copy off
"The Condominium Buyer's Guide"
700 U.S. HIGHWAY No. 1, NORTH PALM REACH, "* *jfi
Office Phone: 84*-9753 Residence Phone: 0
PB4-4-7S


Community Day School
Expects Record Enrollment
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
a
I'd the Jewish Community
E school of Palm Beach Coun-
inc has announced that the
'|lment of students for the
,1 year 1976-77 is taking
at a "feverish pace." Dr.
erts noted that the school
has a three-year-old pre-
class, a four-year-old
t-kinderearten class and a
[.year-old kindergarten class
litsPre-School Division. There
programs of study for
one to six in the Ele-
grades seven and eight are of-
fered in the Junior High School
Division.
First grade enrollment is
closed for the new school year
and a waiting list is in effect
for another class. Parents inter-
ested in sending their children
to a school that "combines
quality general studies with
dynamic Hebraic studies" are
encouraged to apply immediate-
ly.
Information and application
forms are available from the
school office, 2815 N. Jlagler
Drive, West Palm Beach.
ary School Division and
The Jewish Community Day School sponsored a Moth-
Day fashion show on May 9 at the Sheraton Inn. Stu-
nts modeled fashions from various local department
ores. Mrs. Eva Krischer and Mrs. Lee Jacobson cochaired
event.
M
DONNA KREISLER
HS%
&,
f the Palm Beaches'
Ages 18 -35
June 6
Kh and Swim Party __
11 a.m.
p* Sarajane Abramson
^ Essex Ct.
I, Palm Beach
" $2; Non-Members $3
June 10
ling9 p.m.
^League Lanes
1 Dixie Hwy
! Worth
June 16
P^ession-"Coffee and
M Dm.
|Pomar Trace-Greenbriar
P Forest Hills Blvd.. Apt. 211
m'n: SO cents
* W and Over
tu June 10
PN-9 p.m.
r League Lanes
. ni Dlxie Hwy-
8 Worth
June 19
7*.Zoberman
Wilkinson Dr.
'Worth
IflT $2: Non-Mei"ber. $3
I* ??h SinZte Club
72 T single
y> the jewish Com_
\ i,be Pkced on the
Slng list' ^tact
E*> < the Federation
at .
MONICA KAV
//'*
a federation
facilities are available to com-
CAMP SHALOM'S spacious
munity and civic organizations
when not scheduled for reg-
ular Federation programs.
ag* 3
GREGG. TARTAKOW
AND
YONITH BICKEL
First Marine
National Bank and Trust Company
582-5641
114 NO. "J" STREET
LAKE WORTH, FLORIDA
Member F.D.I.C.
FALLS KOSHER
POULTRY PRODUCTS
available at your
LOCAL KOSHER BUTCHER
or contact
Arthur Horowitz
Poultry Sales Manager
Zion Corporation
1717 N.W. Seventh Avenue
Miami, Fla 33136
Tel: 324-1855
THE WHITE NATURAL KOSHER CLEAN CHICKEN
JEWISH FAMILY AND CHILDREN'S SERVICE
an outstanding profession*! counseling agency noting the
Jewish community of Palm Beach County. Professional and
confidential help is available for
Problems of the aging
Adoption and child placement
Vocational counseling
Marital counseling
Parent-child conflicts
Personal problem*
Private Offices
2415 Okeechobee mUnlovawi
West Palm Beach. Fla M40t
Telephone: 684-1991
From Boca Raton, call coBect
Moderate 'eat > <">eed M remiiy ma individual counselled, te thsea
>e car. ty JFS
?h y-
Do you have a question relating to a family problem?
Each month, the Jewish Family and Children's Service
will attempt to answer questions of general interest in
this column. Inquiries should be addressed to "Dear
Jenny," Jewish Family and Children's Service, 2415
Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach, Fla. 33409. Tele-
phone 684-1991.
Dear Readers:
Like many of our local ac-
tivities and the people involved
in them, I too feel it is time for
a vacation.
It has been a joy to bring you
the answers to questions in your
letters and to keep your inform-
ed of the services available, not
only from the Jewish Family
and Children's Service, but from
the community at larRe.
Letters of general interest
will be answered when I re-
turn, so please keep on writing
to me. If you need an imme-
diate personal answer, address
your letter directly to Carolyn
Jacobson, director of Case Work
Service, at JF and CS.
Have a wonderful summer.
I'll be back with you in the
September issues of The Jew-
ish Floridian.
Jenny
NOW
IS THE TIME TO CALL
BOB ROSENBERG
AMERICAN SPRAY
& SUPPLY CO.
LAWN TREE SHRUBBERY
INSECT 8 DISEASE CONTROL
585-2385
DYNAMIC RABBI
WANTED
By Newly Formed Modern
Conservative Synagogue in
North Palm Beach County
Area.
Please Write to
RITUAL COMMITTEE
TEMPLE BETH DAVID
321 North lake Blvd.
North Palm Beach, Fla. 33408

H. L. NEWHART.Mgr.
413 HIBISCUS STREET 4101 PARKER AVENUE
WEST PALM BEACH. FLORIDA E.B.AOAMS. Mf
W. R. ZERN. L.F.O.
Phone B33-40C
Phone 832-8121
"SERVING THE JEWISH COMMUNITY SINCE 1SBf
Vh
Pays You To
MAKE RESERVATIONS EARLY.
Save On Our Special Holiday Rates'
A E5RJBBEM
Labor Dav***e
* 7., nv Package*
oSsHHASHANAH
Renowned Canto^
.rf. rnnriuct S*" _
j^^lMTIM SCIaNNIONT Bloc* -
V5
)7W
STRICTLY
KOSHER
HOTEL
e 100% Air Conditioned
Olympic Size Swimming Pool
e Heated Therapeutic
Whirl Pool
e Private Sandy Beach Petio
e Free Parking, Entertainment
e Oceanfront Synagogue
e TV ft Radio in All Rooms
e Children* Oay Camp
Sugar, Salt & Fat Free Diets
Phone: 531 0061
Sam Schechter
Owner Manager
u MM st MIAMI BEACH
fA
r
WHO DOESN'T LIKE A BARGAIN? IfT'S GET ACQUAINT*D SPECIAL MIMI PER LESSON* *U*UV SAVE $2.00 baleens per lesson (Limited Time Offer HURRY!) ova v* century m motets ed ...AND ST III BREATHING NORMALLY!
ALTORMAN AUTO DRIVING SCHOOL
1 734-0500 (After 6 P.M.-737-8613) Especially good for "noivis" people "WE DON'T TAKE YOU FOR A MM ... WE TEACH YOU HOW TO DRIVE"


JKige u
Page 4
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday,-June 4,
The Shavuoth Holiday
As we. celebrate Shavuoth June 4, we will b# more
than ever conscious of the relationship between this
holiday and Passover.
Shavuoth is the "fiftieth day," or the seventh week
after the Exodus from Egypt. It is a festival in remem-
brance of the 40 years of wandering in the Sinai, and of
the giving of the Law to Moses on Mount Sinai.
Customarily, we adorn the synagogue with plants
and flowers on Shavuoth. And at home, we eat dairy
products.
The adornment of the synagogue is in recollection
of the traditional belief that Mt. Sinai, where Moses re-
ceived the Ten Commandments, was a mountain cover-
ed by trees. The emphasis on dairy foods comes from
the historic comparison between the Torah and milk.
Quite naturally, these traditions and beliefs reach
back to Jewry's ancient past, and it is through Shavuoth
that this historic continuity of custom and tradition is
preserved.
But in the larger sense, we are still wanderers in
the desert. Though the Exodus has ended for many, there
are still countless numbers of Jews, in Russia and other
lands of oppression, trying to get to Israel.
As for Israel herself, the future remains perilous
and uncertain.
Shavuoth emphasizes this "incompleteness" of so
many millions of Jews across the world, who are at
home, but have not yet ended their wandering.
Dr. Belkin Memorial
The recent death of Dr. Samuel Belkin leaves a
void in the spiritual and intellectual leadership of the
American Jewish community. Dr. Belkin will be sorely
missed in the leadership echelons of higher education
generally.
Under Dr. Belkin's forceful direction, Yeshiva
University, which he led as chancellor and president
for 32 years, rose from its modest beginnings as a rab-
binic seminary to become one of the nation's major
educational institutions incorporating schools of social
work, social science, science, the humanities, law, and
the Albert Einstein College of Medicine.
Over the years, Dr. Belkin saw Yeshiva grow from
a student body of 850 to 7,000. In equivalent manner,
the faculty enlarged from 94 to 1,500, and its annual
operating budget from $440,000 to $100 million.
Impressive though these are, they are mere statis-
tics. It is the man behind them who counts the man
behind them who will be missed.
A memorial service to Dr. Belkin will be held on
Tuesday evening at the Hebrew Academy on Miami
Beach. On that occasion, we will be afforded the op-
portunity to join in the tribute to this distinguished
educator and to show just how much we will miss him.
Award to Mrs. Meir
We are not quite sure what the AFL-CIO's honor-
ing of Golda Meir in Washington portends for Novem-
ber, but the turnout was surely a brilliant one over
the weekend.
It was nice to hear President George Meany punc-
ture the by-now flatulent myth that Israel is "too rigid,
not flexible enough" in negotiating with the Arabs
a myth Secretary of State Henry Kissinger and Presi-
dent Gerald Ford are increasingly recounting these
days.
It was also nice to see the tremendous outpouring
of affection for Mrs. Meir, who declared that never has
Israel demanded negotiations with the Arabs "as vic-
tors or losers" but as equals.
Mrs. Meir received the Murray-Green Award ol
the AFL-CIO before some 1,700 celebrants of the occa-
sion. But millions of Americans across the nation are
joining in to offer their congratulations.
Jewish Floridian
OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
Combining "OUR VOICE" and "FEDERATION REPORTER"
In conjunction with Jewish Federation of Palm lieach County. Inc.
Combined Jewish Appeal
2415 Okeechobee Boulevard. West Palm Beach. Florida S3409
OFFICE and PI>ANT 120 N.E. 6th St., Miami, Fla 33132 Phone 373-4*05
ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 1-173-4*06
MIAMI ADDRESS: P.O. Box 2973. Miami. Florida 33101
FRED K KHOCHET SUZANNE 8HOCHET 8EIJHA M. THOMPSON
Editor and Publisher Executive Editor Assistant to Publisher
MORTON GILBERT Advertising Representative
The Jewish Floridian Does Not Guarantee The Kaehrvth
Of The Merchandise Advertised in its Columns
AU P.O. 3579 returns are to be forwarded to
The Jewish Floridian, P.O. Box 012973, Miami. Fla. 13101.
________________O Frsd K. Shochst Friday. June 4. 1S7S
Published Bi-Weekly
Second Class Postage Paid at Miami. Fla
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) One year St.00, or by membership
to Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County, 241S Okeechobee Boulevard, West
Palm Beach, Fla. 33409. Phone SBS-6000. (Out of Town upon Request )
FEDERATION OFFICERS: President, Bette Gilbert: Vica Presidents Stanley
Brenner, Rabbi Hyman Fishman. Charles Jacobeon, Jeanne Levy, Dr. Richard
Shugarman; Treasurer, Robert A. Wiener; Secretary, Staci Leeeer; Acting
Executive Director, Robert Keseler. Submit material for publication to Ronnl
Taraakow. Director of Public Relations.
Number 12
6 SIVAN 5736
French Sauce on Lebanese M<
PRESIDENT Valery Giscard
* D'Estaing's offer to send
French troops to Lebanon to
mediate in the civil war there
raises two possibilities:
Among all of Europe's
western nations, France has the
least humor about its bankrupt-
cy as a world power and still
proposes for itself a meaningful
role in international affairs;
The French offer was at
least in part the brainchild of
Henry Kissinger, who would
like Giscard to act as a surro-
gate for western interests in
the present Lebanese agony.
IN EITHER CASE, what is
occurring in Lebanon particu-
larly, and in the Middle East
generally, demonstrates that we
have no understanding of, and
what is worse, no plan for
dealing with the forces at
work there.
French egomania may be ex-
cused on the ground that it is
the only way left to French na-
tional survival.
But American ignorance can
not be excused; we have not
yet fallen, although our decline
has long since begun and will
run its course to a bitter end if
we do not learn to reverse it.
THE FRENCH proposal,
whether it is merely with our
approval, or whether it was in
fact our idea, is based on the
erroneous view that what is oc-
curring in Lebanon is little
more than a family quarrel ag-
gravated by the admittedly
serious fact that the opposing
forces there are of different re-
ligions.
And so, the view goes, all we
have to do is knock some heads
together in private: to tell the
Moslems and the Catholics that
in a modern world religious
wars are an absurdity that a
decent respect for the opinions
of mankind finds intolerable if
not entirely inadmissible.
This is Gallic, indeed, a posi-
tion the French are easily able
to afford to propose and
from which they may well prof-
it personally if given the op-
portunity to meddle in the Mid-
dle East in the same way that
Le Grand Charles de Gaulle
once meddled as a self-appoint-
ed surrogate for the West in
our affairs with the Soviet
Union.
BUT FOR us to accept this
view would not only add fur-
ther proof to the growing
mountain of evidence that we
are giving up our role as lead-
er of the free world without
so much as a whimper.
It would also underscore our
failure to see the civil war in
Lebanon for what it is beyond
any confession we may, by our
inactions, have acknowledged
thus far.
The religious struggle, real
though it may be, is in fact a
disguise for the far more pow-
erful struggle beneath it: the
struggle between have and
have-not, between East and
West, between capitalism and
communism.
WHAT OBSCURES this cold
reality is that Lebanon's Cath-
olic majority are the haves; the
Moslem minority are the have-
nots. As the Moslem minority
have grown in numbers, they
have risen in rebellion to chal-
lenge their Catholic masters.
What obscures it all even
further is that the heretofore
Catholic majority are western
generally and European specif-
ically, who see themselves as
constituting an exotic Switzer-
Volume 2
Friday, June 4. 1976
MOOT GILBERT
IS AN
Advertising Raprasentotiva
Of THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN
OF PALM BEACH COUNTY.
His Telephone Number is
683-1193
land in the Middle East.
For their part, the Moslem
have-nots can see themselves
as oppressed Arabs only.
AND SO, the civil war is not
a religious war but, in the end,
a political war, a social war, an
economic war whose object is
to change the Lebanese order
of things in short, whose ob-
ject is revolution.
Furthermore, the have Cath-
olics are aware of their reli-
gious ties in the same sense
historically that the western
Christian bourgeois is aware of
his own religious ties. That is
to say, Christianity is a system
that confirm God's design, the
bourgeois order.
But for the beleaguered
Moslem in Lebanon, his reli-
gious ties can not confirm
God's design; if they did, they
would confirm his oppression.
For the beleaguered Moslem in
Lebanon, his convictions are
far more hotly revolt
than religious.
THE BELEAGUERED ]
lem in Lebanon wants to
the "foreign" Catholic '
erner" from his midst
though the Catholic "^
er" be, in precisely the a
way that he wants to oust,
foreign Jewish westerner
Israel.
Inched, in Lebanon his j
is harder than in Israel, b 1
rael, he can speak of j^,,
foreigners and as western
without having to explain ,
terms in the same way that I
must explain them in Leo
where they seem to be
doggerel, hence religious,
they are not, rather than ,
olutionary. which they are.
UNTIL WE come to
the war in these terms, t
we can not, for example,
derstand the OPEC meeting
Vienna last menth, when I
oil producers split off from I
tin American and African
producers to d.scuss in pri
sessions ways in which the I
lem world can ultimately
front and triumph over C
tian and other nor-Moslem
tions.
(It would be interesting
speculate on how the Christ
and other non-Moslem memo
Continued on Page 5
L
EVITT
memorial chapels
NOtTN HHAM4
13385 W. Dixie Kwy.
Steves Marti, F.O.
9494313
Koumooo
1931 Ptsaereke ftf.
SMs Levitt, J.
921-7200
WIST PALM HUH
625 So. Olhri [
Philip Wtiaifeia, M
33-4413
BEN R0THENBERG
Counselor and
Sales Representative
SHALOM
MEMORIAL PARK
"Palm Beach County's
First Cemetery Dedicated
Exclusively to the Needs
of the Jewish Community"
Office) 6*4-2277
Hem* 686-0646
Newspaper
Deadline
AU copy from organiza-
tions and individuals must
be submitted to the Federa-
tion Office no later than 12
days (Monday) prior to
publication (every other
Friday).
Articles ot current events
and activities should be ISO
words or less, typewritten,
double-spaced with pictures
clearly and properly iden-
tified, together with the
name of the person submit-
ting the story, address,
phone number and name of
organization.
Photos should be 5 x 7",
black-and-white glossy, and
of good quality. Charges
will be made for photo-en-
gravings.
The papei reserves the
right to edit.
Editor
'tail material to:
Jewish Floridian
c/o Jewish Federation
^15 Okeechobee Blvd.
West Palm Beach, FU.
33409
JEFFER
FUNERAL HOMES. INC
OKCTOftS:
kwaJsHsf UmtmMlm K*Ja*
MMI HUSOf W. HOUJS. U. Ht
1283 C0SJYISLAM) AVf. MM,M
212/776-8100
0MX COUNTY 133K W OlOf hWt
947-1185 AwsYUt
bwmuw musty -1821 phaww
925-2743 r >. *
HIM KACH COUNTY 6K 5 OWES*
1-925-2743 +*m*\
SewKavjijemi**
sjssei n IMe tot dsY*W
0
WH0..WHAT..WHfik*|
COMMUNITY PROGRAMS
AND AGENCIES
JEWISH FEDERATION Of
AIM KACH COUNTY
Camp Shalom Day Camp
Community Calendar
Community Pre-School
Friendly Visitors
Information-Referral Service
Jewish Community Day
School
Jewish Community Forum
Jewish Community
Relations Committee
Jewish Family 4 Children*
Service
Jewish Floridian of
Palm Beach County
Jewish Singles
Jewish Students Union-
Florida Atlantic University
Leadership Development
Program
"Mosaic" TV Program
Service to Institutions
Transient & Emergency
Relief


June 4, 1976
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
tz&piS
MINDLIN
\Pouring French Sauce on Lebanese Mess
incompetence in foreign affairs
is especially frightening.
And Giscard's French sauce
that h:; has cooked up to pour
over our stinking Middle East
melange makes none of it even
a whit more savory.
Continued from Page 4
f OPEC felt about this.)
[What is *orse- we wUI con"
L to regard the Arabs as a
molithic force in essence,
i French proposal does pre-
selv this when the truth is
lit there are differences
jiong Arabs as sharp as the
Hferences between, say, us
I the Soviet Union.
FROM A logistical point of
view, this deprives us of ex-
ploiting the split among the
OPEC members themselves or,
say, the antagonisms that Lyb~
ia's Qaddafi feels for Egypt's
Sadat, or that Syria's Assad
surely feels for Saudi Arabia's
Khalid.
All of this has meaning not
only for U.S. policy in the Mid-
dle East generally, but in Is-
4 PROFESSIONAL OPENINGS
(ALL PART-TIME POSITIONS)
1. Religious School Supervisor
2. Temple Administrator
3. Religious School Teacher (no Hebrew)
4. Secretary (including Sunday Mornings)
EXPERIENCE AND QUALIFICATIONS NEEDED
Contact: TEMPLE ISRAEL
1901 North Flagler Drive
Telephone 833-8421
rael specifically.
Similarly, this has meaning
for Israeli policy, as well, par-
ticularly since there are sig-
nificant signs that Israel suf-
fers from the same lack of in-
sight with respect to the Arabs
and the alleged monolithic Arab
entity that also plagues our
State Department.
HOW CAN it be that we do
not understand that the revo-
lution being fought in Lebanon
today is surely odious to the
monarchic petrobillionaire Kha-
lid?
But the fact is that we believe
all Arabs are Khalids, and our
foreign policy is shaped to ac-
commodate this belief. Like
Khalid, we conceive of all
Arabs as petrobilionaires and
the war in Lebanon as a reli-
gious war.
When we recall that the word
is already out that whoever
wins the presidency in Novem-
ber, Israel must be prepared
for radical American amputa-
tion of her borders, America's
HEBREW t SUNDAY
SCHOOL TEACHERS
Needed for Conservative
Synagogue.
2 hours on Wednesdays and
3 hours on Sundays.
Please write to
Education Committee
TEMPLE BETH DAVID
321 North lake Blvd.
No. Palm Beach, FL 33408
PEOPLE
Among the Jewish War Veterans who
participated in opening ceremonies of a
special 28th anniversary celebration for
the State of Israel, sponsored by the
Palm Beach County State of Israel Bond
Committee, were (from left) Sidney Katz,
officer of the day; Alexander Block, com-
mander; Irving Cohen, past commander;
Raymond Salomon, junior vice comman-
der; Sam Mindel, senior vice commander;
and William Luchin, chaplain.
I NEW
88
mi
fifes
sl0!2S0* MMHa
r^T?*U tron MUM

"" ""'rate,
FREE
RIDE OUR BUS
-.SkMc and from Msr
NffWMl TEA* -MM
'ton St Pticftbuig.
fcMKMon. SmuU. Num.
,M " "W* Ortindo Melbourne.
& Vwo Batch, toe* **.
**> '** B.ch fi Pierce.
'"Pino Beech 1
" LMeroele
FAMILY SAIL
sur

.^

The Deluxe Cruise Ship
to the Bahamas from Miami
i sad Inert hi tat I
You never have had the opportunity to
MM on 3 night and 4 night cruises to the
Bahamas In such splendid stylet And, H
to Meaty that you have seldom seen such
beautiful ship, specifically designed
tor world cruising. For spaciousness, tor
luxury, lor a aretes, tor attention, tor
magnHlcerU teclHttos end
Ms the Monarch Surf
Super-epectous staterooms, each with
private facilities, phone, music console,
todMdueity controlled air conditioning
(and, 92% of rooms am outside
* oubles). A magnmcent dining room
vitti superlative continental cuisine and
service. Theater, Lounge. Night Clubs,
S Bora, 3 Elevators, Swimming Pool,
Outy-Free Shops, Gymnasium...and.
Casino Facilities! Entertainment, Shows,
Oovuos and world-renowned Cruise
Director end Staff.
-%m IBYOWTllaraMBiT...
amum crube \m
HsnjsfVMa
M1
:|SH| 374-eStl
1
otaacM cauist unu mc
miui. n.omo m*i
NAMt_____,
*oomss__
CITY
54^500 Tons Of Rin!
IV "Fun Ships" C \R\I\AI.K lad
MAKDI (;KAS, 27,250 grow tow each.
offer you more than any other 7-day
Miami-hasril Caribbean cruise .-hip. We
have mnrr swimming pools, (even in-
door pools). More loungm, more ship-
hoard activities, more entertainment
(including two different shows each
night), more public deck space and the
largest stalennnns. The reason we have
so much space is that each of the "fun
tee CARNIVALE, Departs
Every Saturday From Miami
For San Juan, St Maarten
And St Thomas
ships'" are UAI.rVt; A l.\ l.AKCKK
than jii\ other 7-da\ cruise ship out of
Miami! We alao offer the finest Inter-
national and Viuericaii cuisine, full
^auihling casinos, the most popular
porls-of-call. and we're the only 7-day
fleet that dock- at every port.
When you think ahout going on a
cruise, think of "the Fun Ships". We
offer more bounce to the ounce. More
fun to the ton!
tea MARDI GRAS, Departa
Every Sunday From Miami
For Nassau, San Juan And
St Thomas
H
For information or reservations see your Travel Agent
Carnival Tours, 820 Biscayne Blvd., Miami, Florida 33132
H
Cruise "the Fun Ships"
*Carlihlc
< " mewi. aosnt m
each 27,250 gross tons registered in Panama
$365-$565
per person double occupancy
rates are for base season sailing dates and
are higher for certain peek season sailing dates.


--.ige 10
tage o
Thm T*mieh PJ~*f*i
'ineJewish''tioruTidn'of 'Palm tieach County
Friday, JuneT
With the
Organizations
community

Delray Hebrew Congregation
The congregation has sched-
uled Shavuoth services for Sat-
urday, June 5, at 9 a.m., in the
Fellowship Hall of the Cason
United Methodist Church, 342
N.' Swinton Ave. Yizkor memo-
rial prayers will be recited. All
are invited to attend.
High Holy Day services will
be held in the auditorium of
the Kings Point Clubhouse. For
information, contact Ben Kess-
ler or Carl Miller.
Temple Beth El Sisterhood
\
The election of officers for
the term of June 76 through
May '77 was held on May 18.
Officers elected are Mrs. Alan
Lifshitz, president; Mrs. Stan-
ley Stark. Mrs. Phillip Siskin,
Mrs. Victor Ratner and Mrs.
Phillip Sakowitz, vice presi-
dents: Mrs. Morris Walkover,
treasurer, Mrs. Henry Gold-
stein, financial secretary; Ms.
Esther Levy, corresponding sec-
retary; and Mrs. Louis Barrish,
recording secretary.
The President's Award for
outstanding service was pre-
sented to Mrs. Walkover. Reci-
pients of the Certificate of
Honor for distinguished service
were Mrs. Esther Bayer, Mrs.
Edward Hanser, Mrs. Sakowitz
and Mrs. Samuel Katz.
their achievements. Mrs. Ann
Hopfan was named Florida Re-
gion certificate chairman.
On May 11, at a luncheon,
the group honored outgoing
president Dorothy Segelin and
presented her with a plaque
commemorating her outstand-
ing work for the 1975-76 sea-
son.
6 Aviva Group held its annual
installation of officers on May
25. They are: presidium, Sylvia
Thaler, Helen Hoffman and
Anita Appelbaum; vice presi-
dents, Frieda Kammerman, Ruth
Steinberg, Gladys Abrams, Syl-
via Cohn and Ethel Segal.
Odd Fellows Meet
Lawyers Club
Palm Beach Odd Fellow
Lodge No. 88 met on June 2
and set an attendance record at
their temple in West Palm
Beach: more than 60 brothers
were on hand for the presenta-
tion of a complete speaker sys-
tem by brother David Brown-
worth, assistant sales manager
of the Sholem Funeral Parlors.
During the past year 68 new
members were admitted, bring-
ing total membership to about
200 largest in the state.
The next meeting is sched-
uled for June 16, same time,
same place.
The first open Bicentennial
luncheon meeting of the Law-
yers Club of Century Village
will take place at the Ramada
Inn at noon on Tuesday, Jufie
15. The guest speaker is Alice
C. Skaggs, director of the Of-
fice of Consumer Affairs for
Palm Beach County. Reserva-
tions can be made by contact-
ing Mrs. Bertha March, 683-
9443.
Hadassah
At the recent Hadassah Re-
gional Conference in Miami
Beach the Yovel Group was
awarded the silver cup, second
place, and eleven ribbons for
BB Women
Menorah Chapter of Century
Village will hold their last meet
ing of the season on Tuesday
June 8, at 1 p.m. at the Salva
tion Army Citadel. Helen Nuss
baum will review Sam Levin
son's "EverythinR But Money.'
Refreshments will be served.
7 Congregation Anshei Sholom Sisterhood board
Jewish Family and Children's Service
Friends of Jewish Community Day School
8 Yiddish Culture Group
B'nai B'rith Women No. 1496
B'nai B'rith Women No. 174
B'nai B'rith Lodge No. 2939
9 Congregation Anshei Sholom board
Pioneer Women Golda Meir Club
10 American Israeli Lighthouse
Temple Beth El Men's Club
Temple Beth Sholom board
Temple Israel Men's Club board
13 Temple Emanu-El board
Temple Beth David board
14 B'nai B'rith Women No. 1523
Pre-School committee meeting
15 Yiddish Culture Group
Congregation Anshei Sholom
B'nai B'rith Women No. 1496
Temple Beth David Sisterhood
16 WOMEN'S DIVISION
Jewish War Veterans Auxiliary
Temple Beth Sholom Sisterhood board
17 ORT Region
ORT Evening
Teen Travel Camp orientation meeting
Women's
American ORT
The eleven chapters of the
Palm Beach County Region will
hold their planning conference
on Thursday, June 17, at the
Westward Elementary School,
on Golf Rd.. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
The new officers to be in-
stalled are Miriam Marks, presi-
dent; Harriet Paul, Enid Kauf-
man, Judith Glatt, Anne Fein-
berg, and Sylvia Bunis. vice
presidents; Esther Banish,
treasurer; Frances Hiltzik, fi-
nancial secretary; Blanche Sil-
verman, corresponding secre-
tary: and Bettv Levi, parlia-
mentarian.
B'nai B'rith
Centurv Lodge No. 2939 will
meet on Tuesday. June 8, at
7:30 p.m. at the Salvation Army
Citadel. The program will focus
on the life of "Chaim Weiz-
mann." All members and their
wives are invited to attend.
Guests are welcome.
Beth Sholom
Sisterhood
On Wednesday. June 16, at
1 p.m.. the Sisterhood will hold
a ..general meeting. Highlights
of the meeting include a "Straw-
berry Festival" and card party.
Refreshments will be served.
JCC Presents...
Something for Everyone
Starting July 6, the Jewish Community Center will launch
its Senior Citizens' Cultural Camp. The program will be con-
ducted for five weeks, on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. There will be calisthenics, art, copper
enameling, music appreciation, Chalil group, crafts, folk dan-
cing, etc.
The program will be highlighted by outstanding speakers
on topics of Jewish interest as well as weekly trips to such
places as Redlands Spice Park, Vizcaya, Fairchild Gardens
Venetian Pool, a boatride and antiquing in Dania
$60. Call the Center at 689-7700 for a registration form Only
. 25 people will be accepted. Act immediately!
it -to &
Senior High Stndents will enjoy the JCC coffee house
every Saturday night beginning June 5th. From 9 to 11 pm
Israeli folksmger Lolik Levy will be on hand to help every-
one enjoy records, folk dancing, guitar jamming, etc. The eve-
ing fee is $1 for members and $2 for non-members.
6 9 Jl!ZSf2Z?mTi.happening is scheduled for June
9 the JCC starting at 12:30 p.m. Everyone will enjoy a
barbecue lunch and a film followed by a discussion. A gooq
afcfc_*yfcr* The fee for the entire afternoon*
m # for,members' $2 for non-members. It's a good time for
Call S^r, I? ""V"81 eVeryne t0 et to^
Call 689-7700 to let us know that you'll come.
in\nCh!Uren',*JWeWalk m Show wiU he" Sunday
June 20, from 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. All children in grades K,6
T 2"; C.0,0red ChaUt WiU provided for *orng on the
sidewalk. Judging will be in these categories: K-2 grade? 3?
grades 5-6. Ribbons will be awarded to first, second and tlurt
place ,n each. Call the JCC. 689-7700. for complete details
& & a
Teens will be delighted with the new craft workshop that
w?i7nc,r ?*7 v-nthe cmt- excMa* wSS
will include 'do-over" denims, recycled silver jewelry pots
from paper and combinations of macrame and weaving Mem-
bers pay only a materials fee of $5 and non-members'$20 fee
includes instruction and materials.
1975-76 Community Pre-Sehool
Programs and Fees
5 Day Program
9 AM. 12 NOON
MONDAY FRIDAY
3 and 4 yo.r old*
CCfclW mutt h 9 by Dk. 91, 1*75
Kindergarten
(Chd mutt b. 5 by Doc. 91, 1073
TuWon: par month $47.50
K0itrtion F $30.00
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
of the palm beaches, inc.
2415 Okeechobee Boulevard, West Pain, Beach, Florida 3340
Telephone 689-7700
A FEW OPENINGS ARE STILL AVAILABLE
REGISTRATION
CAMP SHALOM 1976
RETURN AT ONCE TO CAMP OFFICE
941. l W F#dr>"on of Palm Roach County
Plea*lSSrehlT.5,vd" W#rt Pa,m "' FferkU 334W
pZZ- m my Ch"d Parents Name ................. pbone
Address -_"
City o^ Em Pho~
1 Child's Name *P"'
BJOt c u P Fema,e "i^Wsilllllll^
rXAnC. Gr*einSept76
iLUt c ? *"* Birth Date L.............
Name of School ............. Grade in Sept. 76
I wish to enroll my child (children) for
Eight weeks June 21 Aug. 13
1 Period June 21 July 16 ......................
t k- w 2nd Period JuIy 19 A"i- w
i Hereby apply for admission of my child(ren) to the day camp
program of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County.
Parent Signature (Date)
Note: Each child's application must be accompanied by pay-
ment of Registration and Activity fee. Check payable to:
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County.
CAMP FEES
Preschool, Elementary Division:
8 weeks$210 A $40 Registration and Activity Fee
4 weeks$no $20 Registration and Activity Fee
For each additional child from same family:
8 weeks$190 A $40 Registration and Activity Fee
4 weeks$100 A $20 Registration and Activity Fee


June 4, 1976
The Jewish Floridiahof Palm Beach County
Page 7
m
^aMmttcai |Iag*
Coordinated by the
Palm Beach County Rabbinical Council
co-editors
Rabbi Sheldon Harr
Rabbi William H. Shapiro
devoted to discussion of themes and issues relevant to Jewish life past and present
Your Rabbi Speaks
tcceptance of Torah
B, RABBI WILLIAM SHAPIRO
Temple Beth El
It is a sad reflection on the
distorted notions of Judaism
I the mistaken sense of values
RABBI SHAPIRO
i
is that the festival of Sha-
is not very widely ob-
Rosh Hashanah and
i Kippur are referred to as
"High Holidays" by most
i, but their Hebrew name is
"Solemn Days." The latter
anon, let it be noted, does
suggest any priority.
Shavuoth is not distinguished
by any characteristic rite. Rosh
"lashanah has the blowing of
Shofar, Succoth has the
Mh, the Lulav and Esrog, and
ch the matzo. Yet Shavuoth
uld occupy the most import-
I rlace in the Jewish festival
lendar, for without it there
wild be no other festival. The
Bving of the Torah at Sinai was
beginning of Jewish respon-
ses, the taking of a solemn
by our people.
Perhaps subconsciously, Jews
recognize the implications of
Shavuoth and prefer to evade
them. After all, Rosh Hashanah
and Yom Kippur, Pesach, and
Chanukah come and go. They
do not carry with them any con-
tinuing obligations. Like the
nations of antiquity, which ac-
cording to a legend, refused the
Torah when they realized what
its acceptance meant, so our
contemporaries are averse to
taking it.
To celebrate Shavuoth pro-
perly means to take upon one-
self the obligation to be a con-
stant student; to seek to en-
large one's knowledge in every
way.
It involves a recognition of
our responsibility for the wel-
fare and happiness of our fel-
low men. It demands a rigorous
adherence to the ideals of jus-
tice and truth. It asks that in
word and deed we abstain from
doing anything which may
wound our fellow man's feel-
ings.
It commands us to live in
such a way as to help bring
about the establishment of God's
kingdom on earth.
Whet is the eating of matzo
for a week compared to a life-
time of religious commitment?
What is abstinence from food
for a day compered to years of
resisting the temptation to pro-
fit at the expense of others?
It is harder to "live" Sha-
vuoth than any other holiday
because what is involved is the
very core of our religious be-
lief. While the festival is called
the Festival of the Giving of
the Torah, it is more important
to recognize that it is likewise
the occasion for the acceptance
of the Torah.
Unless we celebrate a per-
petual Shavuoth, we fail in our
duty as Jews.
Question Box ? ?
f RABBJ DR. SAMUEL J. FOX
.J^o^Whyisa Jew for-
JMen to labor on the Sab-
Answer: Of cfcurse, the pro-
"on is of Biblical origin
the Bible expressly pro-
C \0ftrk on > ^bath
Hoi 20:9). A variety of rea-
are offered by rabbinic
!* 0ne of these cjms
F to Sabbath prohibition
i labor was meant to remind
the world is the crea-
1 w the Almighty.
.^KKbieactua,,y 8tates tot
sabbath is thus observed be-
|ne Almighty created the
> sut days and rested on
nventh. on the one hand,
V*& ,0 fol,ow to -
* ms creator, i.e., by
I Md creating during the
resting on the Sab-
> ked\Je !her hand- mi
wto realize that he too
creation of the Almighty
W an absolute creator
inw,t ,herefr cannot
.>' to Almighty
h0m he has to depend
J indicate that the Sab-
'Wminder of heExo-
(."J? Egypt- The Bible im-
1 iathS?R In ,hi8 re8peCt
man S an opportunity
"5d achieve freedo
ZZlSUres of the every-
is the day for the full expres-
sion and freedom of the soul
which is often suppressed dur-
ing the week because of the
bodily activities that provide
the basis for man's physical
sustenance. '^!
The Sabbath has also been
regarded as a sign of the cove-
nant between the Jew and the
Almighty. By observing the Sab-
bath, the Jew demonstrates his
covenantal tie with the Al-
mighty, i.e., not working on the
Sabbath was part of the mutual
agreement.
It is also claimed that the
Sabbath is a sample of the
world as it will be in the days
of the Messiah, when, according
to some, man's emphasis on
physical labor will cease and
he will be transformed into a
highly spiritual being, leading
a spiritual existence all the
time.
Others look for a social mo-
tive, i.e., indicating that man
refrains from work on the Sab-
bath so that he can fully enjoy
the company of his family and
friends for which he has only
limited time during the week.
HI
CANDliUGHTING TIM!
6 SIVAN 7:49
m
Inside Judaica
By DR. FREDERICK LACHMAN

Q. What is the story of
converts to Judaism in the
United States?
A. In which country could
you find the last Jewish slaves?
The United States.
In the 17th century Jewish
slaveowners converted their
slaves to their faith and many
black Jewish congregations to-
day are made uq, in part, of
descendents of these early con-
verts, the Encyclopaedia Judaica
states.
This conversion was one of
the more unusual, but by no
means unique, aspects of Jew-
ish growth among Gentile
groups.
During the first quarter of
the 18th century a community
of German Baptists, in what is
now Schaefferstown, Pa., volun-
tarily "Judaized." They observ-
ed dietary laws and the Sab-
bath, built a "shul" and a log
home for their hazzan and in
1732 laid out a cemetery. The
community lasted from about
1720 to 1745. The cemetery
now destroyed was still in-
tact in 1885; the home of the
hazzan still stood in 1926 but
was destroyed later. Whether
these "Judaizers" in fact be-
came Jews is questioned, how-
ever.
One of the earliest and best-
known proselyte converts was
a Quaker, Warder Cresson, who
became U.S. Consul in Jeru-
salem in 1844. There, in 1848,
he converted and assumed the
name of Michael Cresson Boaz
Israel. His American wife di-
vorced him and he then mar-
ried a Palestinian. He was a
prominent member of the Jeru-
salem Sephardic community and
is buried on the Mount of
Olives.
The first incorporated Jewish
missionary society in modern
times, the United Israel World
Union (UIWU), was established
in New York City in 1944 by
the journalist David Horowitz.
Groups of UIWU proselytes have
their own congregations in Wil-
bur, W. Va., and West Olive,
Mich. Another such missionary
society, the Jewish Information
Society of America, was found-
ed in Chicago in 1962.
In 1954, the EJ, states, ap-
proximately 3,000 persons were
being annually converted to
Judaism in the United States.
In 95 percent of the conver-
sions an impending or existing
marriage to a Jew was involved;
female proselytes outnumbered
males five to one; the number
increased yearly.
U.S. Reform Judaism has
maintained that Jews have an
obligation to teach their reli-
gion to all mankind and to at-
tract like-minded non-Jews into
TV
Highlight,
TUNE IN TO "Shabbat"
... a program conducted by
the rabbis of Palm Beach
County in cooperation with
WPTV Channel 5, Sundays
at 10 a.m. beginning June 6.
Sponsored by the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County.
the Jewish community. This
theoretical determination was
followed by the establishment
in 1951 of a Committee on the
Unaffiliated by the Central Con-
ference of American Rabbis to
develop "practical means for
extending the influence and ac-
ceptance of the Jewish reli-
gion." The Conservative rab-
binate declined tp undertake
such efforts, although it ac-
cepted prospective converts.
The Orthodox remained ex-
tremely reluctant to accept con-
verts making stringent de-
mands of all prospective can-
didates.
RESOLUTION
The Rabbinical Council of Palm Beach County proudly
and gratefully expresses its appreciation to its outgoing presi-
dent, Rabbi Sheldon J. Harr, for his leadership and endeavors
in guilding our orgnization toward its goal as a fountainjread
of spiritual inspiration, coordinated communal projects and the
enhancement of Jewish religious life in this growing com-
munity. We wish him the fullest measure of success in his
new pulpit, where he may continue his devotion to the cause
of Judaism.
Rabbi William H. Shapiro, Secretary
Rabbi Max L. Forman, President
Synagogues in
Palm Beach County
REFORM
TEAAPLE iSRAft
1901 North Flegler Drive
West Palm Baach, Florid* 33407
833-8421
Rabbi Irving B. Cohan
Aaaoc. Rabbi Sheldon J. Harr
Sabbath aarvlce*, Friday at 8:15 P.M
TEAAPLE BETH EL OF
BOCA RATON
P.O. Box 568
Boca Raton, Florida 33432
391-8901
Rabbi Norman T. Mandal
Sabbath services, Friday at 8:15 P.M.
Moravian Church, 12th Ave>. anal
Palmatto Park Rd., Boca Raton
CONSERVATIVE-LIBERAL
TEMPLE ETERNAL LIGHT
P.O. Box 3
Boca Raton. Florida 3343i
426-1600
Rabbi Benjamin Roaayn
Sabbath tarvica*, Friday at 8:15 p.m.
Service! held at Unitailan-
Univartaiitt Fellowship Building
162 W. Palmatto Park Rd.
"oca Raton
CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION
ANSHEI SHOLOM
5348 Orova Straat
West Palm Baach, Florida 33409
684-3212
Rabbi Henry Jerech
Daily service!, 8:30 a.m., 7 p.m.
Friday services, 8:30 a.m., 6 p.m.,
830 p.m.
Saturday aervicei, 8:30 am., 7 p.m.
TEMPLE BiTH El
2815 North Flegler Drive
Watt Palm Baach, Florida 33407
833-0339
Rabbi Hyman Fithman
Sabbath tarvicat, Friday at 6t75 P.M.
Saturday at 9:30 A.M.
Daily Minyan at 8:15 a.m.
Sunday at 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
315 North "A" Street
Lake Worth, Florida 33460
585-5020
Rabbi Emanual Eiaanbarg
Se-vicet, Monday* & Thurtdayt
at 8:30 AM
Friday at 8:15 P.M.
Saturday at 9:30 A.M.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID
Sabbath aarvica*. Friday at 8:00 p.m.
Service! held At Weitmimter
Prebytarlan Church
10410 N. Military Trail, Palm
Garden*. P.O. Box 9924
Riviera Baach. Fla. 33404
Cantor Nicholat Fenakal
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB
275 Alameda Drive
Palm Spring*. Florida 33460
Sabbath service*. Friday at 8:00 p.m
Saturday at 9:00 a.m.
Mondays & Thurtdey* at 9:00 a.m.
Service! held at Faith United
Pretbytarian Church. Palm Spring*
B'NAI TORAH
CONGREGATION
P.O. Box 2306
Boca Raton, Florida 33432
Rabbi Nathan Zelizar
Sabbath services, Friday at 8:15 PM
2nd & 4th Saturdays at 9:30 AM.
Services held at:
Boca Federal Savings It Loan Bank
3901 Federal Highway, Boca Raton
DELRAY HEBREW
CONGREGATION
(Meets at Methodist Fa'rowthip Hall)
342 N. Swinton Ave., Delray
Philip Blaler, Lay Reader
For information call
Mr*. Carl Millar-278-1985
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
N.W. Avenue "G"
Balk* dado. Florida 33430
Jack Stateman. Lay Leader
Sabbath services. Friday at 8:30 PJA
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
190 North County Road
Palm Baach, Florida 3348C
832-0004
Rabbi Max L. Forman
Cantor Ernest Schreiber
Sabbath services, Friday at 8:30 p.m.
Saturday at 9 a.rrc


*age 10
Page 8
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

Friday, june ^
Shavuot (The Season
of the Giving of Our
Torah) commemorates i
that day, centuries ago.
when Moses pro-
claimed theTen
Commandments to
the Children of Israel
and all mankind. It is
.the Ethic upon which
Western Civilization is
based. It established_______
the Faith, character and destiny of the Jews
as a free people.
Shavuot asserts the God-given principle
that man was made free. That he was
endowed with a unique personality to be
fashioned and developed in accordance
with his own will and power of selection.
It is this fundamental concept which
provides meaning and purpose to the Laws
given on that day in the Sinai Desert. It gives
testament to the principle that man-made
laws, unless they are
rooted in a higher
moral discipline, are
no guarantee of free-
dom. For without due
? concern for the legi-
timate needs and
aspirations of \i<
individual members.
a healthy society
cannot be established.
Today, when indivi-
dual freedom is threatened in Israel and is
being abridged in the Soviet Union, Syria
and other areas of the world, it is fitting that
on Shavuot we, who value our freedom,
reaffirm our resolve to stand together to
help our less fortunate brothers and sisters
elsewhere realize their destiny to be free. This
is the significance of the Faith of the Jewish
people. This is our great legacy to mankind.
THE DAY
OUR DESTINY WAS
REVEALED.
We Are One
_____ Give to the
COMBINED JEWISH APPEAL-ISRAEL EMERGENCY FUND
of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
2415 Okeechobee Boulevard, West Palm Beach, Florida 33409 Telephone: 63*5900


Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID ERYIVY200_DO447A INGEST_TIME 2013-06-11T00:23:50Z PACKAGE AA00014311_00118
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES