Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
8 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 28, 1975)-v. 8, no. 40 (Dec. 17, 1982).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 2, 1976 called v.2, no. 22, but constitutes v.2, no. 1.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: July 28, 1978 called no. 14 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement; Aug. 25, 1978 called no. 16 in masthead and no. 17 in publisher's statement; Aug. 10, 1979 called no. 15 in masthead and no. 16 in publisher's statement; Oct. 22, 1982 called no. 31 in masthead and no. 32 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44607504
lccn - sn 00229550
ocm44607504
System ID:
AA00014311:00117

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
pJewlsti Florid far,
OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
Combining "OUR VOICE" and FEDERATION REPORTER"
in conjunction with The Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
/
2 Number 11
Palm Beach County, Florida Friday, May 21, 1976 f) *">* shochet May i97
Price 25 cents
trenner Assuming Presidency
i Federation's Annual Meeting
Stanley B. Brenner, prominent accountant with the firm
Ganz, Brenner, Lustig, Oken & Anderson, will be installed
president of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
t its annual meeting on May 26 at the Sheraton Inn in West
m Beach.
General chairman oi the successful 1976 Combined
sh Appeal Israel Emergency Fund campaign, Brenner
tas been vice president and treasurer of the Federation.
ist August he was invited to participate in the United Jew-
Appeal's Prime Minister's Mission to Israel.
tonner will succeed Mrs. founder of the Jewish Federa-
tion of Palm Beach County and
now president of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation. To
be installed with Brenner are
Rabbi Hyman Fishman, Dr.
Howard Kay, Kenneth Scherer,
Dr. Richard Shugarman and Dr.
Stanley Stark, vice presidents;
Staci Lesser, treasurer; and
Bruce Daniels, secretary. New
members of the board of direc-
tors are Neal Robinson, Louis
Silber, Barbara Tanen, Ronald
Kaplan and Paul Pariser.
Highlighting the annual meet-
ing will be a report on the new
by-laws and recommended
amendments to the charter; an-
nual reports on the Federation's
campaign, programs and serv-
ices;, the presentation of Awards
of Merit to campaign leaders
and of Community Service Cita-
tions.
Dicimvi ..... -
tie Gilbert, who completes a
j.year term as head of the
leration. During her tenure
Federation secured new
quarters, improved and en-
the program at Camp
j, initiated the Young
lership Development pro-
^i and saw the incorporation
| the Jewish Family and Chil-
i Services as an independ-
J agency.
[Conducting the installation of
r officers will be Morton Sil-
o, a past president and
Annual Meeting Notice
The annual meeting of the membership of the Jewish
Federation will be held on Wednesday, May 26, at 6:30 p.m.
at the Sheraton Inn on Palm Beach Lakes Blvd.
The business of the meeting will include:
Election and installation of officers.
Report on new by-laws and recommend amendments
to the charter.
Annual reports on the Federation's campaign, programs
and services.
Presentation of Awards of Merit to campaign leaders.
Community Service Citations.
All members of the Federation are invited to attend.
Reservations for dinner are limited. Members unable to be
present for dinner are welcome to attend the business session,
which begins at 8 p.m.
STANLEY BRENNER
Poets Receive Bialik Prize
TEL AVIV (JTA) The poet, Yehuda Amichai,
and the author, Yeshurun Keshet, were the joint recipients
of the Bialik Prize for literature. The prize for Jewish wis-
dom Chochmat Yisrael went to Benjamin Kosovski
for his monumental masterpiece of publishing the treasures
of Talmudic literature and his annotations to the Bamidbar
and Devarim (Numbers and Deuteronomy). The IL 3000
prize, given annually by the Tel Aviv municipality, was
presented at Beth Sokalow by Mayor Shlomo Lahat.
Find Days Will Determine
CJA-IEF Campaign Success
| In the opinion of Stanley
nner, general chairman of
Jewish Federation's 1976
mbined Jewish Appeal-Israel
urgency Fund, which is
iduled to close formally on
6, community response in
final days will determine
ft degree of success of the an-
1 drive.
[This year's campaign is al-
dy well ahead of last year1!,
i $300,000, and seems assured
[surpass the record $1,380,000
ed during the campaign year
[the Yom Kippur War. Citing
flwth of the local Jewish
ramumty and an extended
"lore effective campaign
MO, Brenner is hope-
final push may yet realize
l^recedented $1.5 million
goal set by the campaign cabi-
net.
Augmenting an intensive per-
son-to-person solicitation dur-
ing the last two weeks will be
a phon-a-thon Monday through
Thursday evenings by division-
al leaders and workers to reach
prospective contributors who
may not have been seen in per-
son.
Though the campaign official-
ly ends on June 6 with the clos-
ing of national United Jewish
Appeal, the local drive will con-
tinue for the remainder of the
year via mail reminders to non-
contributors and a folkm-up on
a special list of people who have
requested that they be contact-
ed at a later time.
Royal Couple's
Visit Purely Private
iiDhAaMSTfRDAM ~~ (JTA) The Dutch government has
v asized the strictly "private character" of Crown Prin-
Beatnx's visit to Israel. The government has forbid-
"e "nncess and her husband, Prince Klaus, to visit
NamIed ,erritories and even the ho,y Places in East
be con6 Dutch government's restrictions are such that
feek t Wh were due t0 vi8it Masada during their one-
i as '" Israe1, wiU have t0 fly in a roundabout way
not to fly over occupied Judaea.
'"t GOVERNMENT'S orders also prevent the Prin-
icialm makin8 anv public statement or attending any
TinrPcCei'emony apart from the inauguration of the
hich i vBea,rix Floor" at the Tel Aviv Medical School.
J the official reason for the visit.
%abi 80Vernment. apparently in order to avoid un-
* Dutrh reDercussins in the Arab countries, has asked
, press t0 Play down the visit and Dutch newsmen
1 are not kept informed of the detailed program
meats his ysiow of Yom mm mmmm
Schlesinger Charges Ford Policies
Place Unfair Burden on Israel
WASHINGTON (JTA)
The Ford-Kissinger poli-
cies toward Israel have been
sharply attacked by former
Defense Secretary James R.
Schlesinger here. He said,
"It is improper pernicious
to blame the failure to
achieve a settlement (in the
Middle East) on the one na-
tion prepared to accept a
settlement," an obvious al-
lusion to the Ford Adminis-
'ration's open criticism of
Israel's alleged failure to of-
fer initiatives for peace.
Schlesinger made his re-
marks in an address at the
seventh annual policy con-
Continned on Page 3
Next President, Whoever, Will
Force Return to Pre '67 Borders
; Israel
'the
visit.
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Dr.
Nahum Goldmann, president
of the World Jewish Con-
gress, predicted here that no
matter who is elected Presi-
dent of the United States
this year, Israel will come
under increasing pressure
soon after the elections to
withdraw to its pre-June,
1967 borders with only mi-
nor modifications.
Goldmann, who arrived
here from a series of meet-
ings with statesmen and
other leading personalities
in several countries, based
his forecast on his belief
that the U.S. is fed up with
the Middle East problem and
wants a final settlement.
HE TOLD a crowded press
conference here that he was
optimistic over the chances of
a final settlement in the Middle
East because of several factors,
including the American desire
to end the status quo which may
lerd to another war and a cor-
responding desire by the Soviet
Union.
He said the Americans have
reached the conclusion that a
and that the Soviets will have
to share in the peace-making
progress.
Another factor, Goldmann
said, was the Arabs' realization
that they cannot win a military
victory over Israel and their
desire to concentrate on build-
ing up their own countries while
they still control much of the
world's oil wealth with almost
no competitors.
GOLDMANN said that Arab
terms for a settlement with Is-
rael are admittedly tough but
not insuperable. They want
withdrawal from the occupied
territories, demilitarization and
guarantees. The most difficult
problem would be the status of
Jerusalem, but a solution may
be found without dividing the
city again, he said.
According to Goldmann, the
American solution for the Pales-
tinian problem envisions a ple-
biscite on the West Bank and
the Gaa Strip to decide whe-
ther there should be a Pales-
Coathmed oa Page
Activists In
Hunger Strike
NEW YORK (JTA) So-
viet Jewish activists in Kishi-
nev, in the southern Soviet
Republic of Moldavia, declared
a hunger strike May 1 and 2 in
protest of a new Soviet harass-
ment technique which forces
applicants to give up their
apartments before they can fil*
out an application for a visa to
Israel, it was reported by tht
National Conference on Soviet
Jewry
"If a visa is denied," the let-
ter addressed to United Nations
Secretary General Kurt Wald-
heim pointed out, "which is the
usual procedure of the Soviet
government, the applying fami-
ly is left not only homeless, but
without a shelter from the ele-
ments."
THE 15 signers, who set
aside two days to stage a pro-
test against the "continuing
discrimination of Jews by the
USSR government," said in
their letter, "We hope this pro-
test will reach the people of the
world and they will sympathize
with our plight."


Th* Jrorivh pi/,4//.. < n--
n-------t- ^
Page 2
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, May 2\t 19
Federation Thanks Congressman Paul Rogers Farewell to the Community
For His Support of Israel
The following is a letter recently sent to Congressman Paul G. Rogers, expressing the
gratitude of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County for his vote in support of the ap-
propriations bill that will increase aid to Israel.
April 29, 1976
Congressman Paul G. Rogers
2417 Rayburn House Office Building
Washington, D. C.
Dear Congressman Rogers:
At last night's meeting of our Board of Directors and the
representatives of our affiliated organizations, I was
pleased to announce that earlier in the day you had voted
in support of the appropriations bill which compliments
the Foreign Aid Bill.
You can well understand how appreciative we are of your po-
sition on this vital matter which will strengthen Israel
and has the potential for developing a meaningful peace in
the Middle East.
The Board members and representatives assembled asked that
I convey to you our personal expression of thanks for your
interest and support.
Sincerely,
BG:jr
Bette Gilbert
President
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
By RABBI SHELDON J. HARK
It is never easy to say good-
bye. It is never easy to uproot
oneself and begin over again.
And it is certainly never easy
to leave behind dear friends
and warm acquaintances. But
such is the lot of all of us liv-
ing in this fast-paced mobile
contemporary world. And how
much more so is it the lot of
a rabbi!
My four years in the Palm
Beaches have been most won-
derful years for my wife, Fern,
and myself. It is here that our
two children were born. It is
here that in my position as
assistant rabbi at Temple Israel
I was "initiated" into the pul-
pit rabbinate. And it is here,
too, that I first became involved
in an intensive manner in com-
munal matters.
Many have been the rewards
of the first four years of my
career as a rabbi I And I sin-
cerely believe that the rabbi-
nate can indeed be one of the
most rewarding professions
available to men and women.
THERE ARE times when a
word of friendship or advice
can make a difference to some-
one. Or when some guidance
and helpfulness can assist others
in making important decisions
for their own lives. And there
are moments, too, when after
laboring for a great length of
time, one can be satisfied that
one not only did his best, but
even contributed in some de-
gree to the success of the proj-
ect at hand.
Oh, there are disappointments
and frustrations, to be sure.
What would be the excitement
and challenge of life if all went
ATTENTION TELEBANK SUBSCRIBERS
Telebank subscribers who were charged an additional $5.10
on their April bill should advise Western Union of the error,
so that the bill can be adjusted.
Call, toll free, 1-800-257-2241.
Rabbi Harr Takes New Pulpit
Muhammed Ali
Tells it All:
'Look for Peace*
WASHINGTON (JTA)
World heavyweight boxing
champion Muhammed Ali, when
asked about the Arab-Israeli
conflict, said he is "looking for
peace one day with all people."
Ali, a devout convert to the
Muslim faith who has contrib-
uted financially towards a Jew-
ish charity in New York, made
his comment in the CBS televi-
sion program, "Face the Na-
tion."
FOLLOWING is the question,
posed by CBS news commenta-
tor George Herman, and Ali's
response as shown in the tran-
script of the telecast provided
to the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency:
"Herman: let me ask you one
question which I don't know
whether it's out of left field or
right field, about Muslims in
America. One of the things that
people think about is the con-
flict in the Arabic world be-
It's
^ CTederation
a Jewish Community Forum
annual series, January
March, is dedicated to deep-
ening understanding of our
Jewish heritage.
tween Moslems and Jews. Some
people who are Jewish in this
country get worried about Black
Muslims, and yet you show very
little in the way of signs of
anti-Semitism. Doesn't seem to
be any parallel there."
"ALI: No, well I like you to
look at me as a true one as far
as true beliefs are concerned.
We don't have Black Muslims
that a press word. We have
white brothers, we have brown,
red, and yellow, all colors can
be Muslims.
"And as far as the conflicts
is concened, in these countries,
I don't know too much about
it, and I'm look for peace one
day with all people."
TAPES
CARTONS
HANGERS
POLYETHYLENE
BUSINESS FORMS
TAGS-LABELS
BAGS-BOXES
WIPES
PBS-2L7S
Rabbi Sheldon J. Harr has
accepted the position as rabbi
of the Plantation Jewish Con-
gregation. He will begin serving
this new, young Reform congre-
gation in suburban Fort Laud-
erdale after Shavuot.
Rabbi Harr has been with
Temple Israel as assistant rab-
bi for three years, having serv-
ed in 1972 as a rabbinic intern
prior to his ordination in 1973
at Hebrew Union College-Jew-
ish Institute of Religion.
While a resident of the Palm
Beaches. Rabbi Harr has been
deeply involved in Jewish com-
munal and interfaith activities.
He was the recipient of the
Jewish Federation's Community
Service Award for 1974 because
of his service as producer and
host of the Federation's radio
program. This year he was co-
host of the Federation's televi-
sion program. "Mosaic." and
was cochairman of the profes-
sional Division of the Federa-
tion UJA Campaign.
In 1974-75 Rabbi Harr was
president of the Jewish Com-
munity Day School, and this
year he was president of the
interfaith and interracial Min-
isterial Fellowship of the Palm
Beaches and of the Rabbinical
Council of Palm Beach County.
Rabbi Harr has also served on
the boards of the American
Jewish Committee, the Jewish
Family and Children's Service
and B'nai B'rith. He was re-
cently appointed a member of
the National Interfaith Commis-
sion of the American Jewish
Committee
Rabbi Harr is married to the
former Fern J. Katz and they
have two children, three-year-
old Elizabeth Shoshanna and
three-month-old Bryan Joshua.
ABE WILNER
HAS JOINED THE
SALES STAFF OF
GOLDEN LAKES
VILLAGE
686-1120
HAMPTON LIQUORS
WINES A LIQUORS
FAST DELIVERY SERVICE
Phone: 832-8368
2S7 Poinciana Way
PALM BEACH, FLA.
Bars & Glasses Loaned FREE
RABBI HARR
as planned,, if there were
valleys as well as peaks?
taken as a whole, in the
spective of looking back
the past few years, the
of it all is that the valleys I
been few, and, thank God, i
peaks have been many.
I am grateful to many [
in the community who gave i
the opportunity to particip
in the growth and develo
of the Jewish community in t
Palm Beaches. Especially do |
owe a debt of gratitude to l
fine leaders and members
Temple Israel whose sop
along the way has been unw
ering.
Additionally, the leaden
Federation have been most I
as we have worked together f
proper programs to try to i
the needs of the entire Je
community.
I leave, then, with a
of ambivalence: thrilled at
prospects of working with :
leading a new congregation I
eager Jews whose farsig
goals will undoubtedly prove)
be an exciting challenge for i
professionally; yet sad at
prospect of saving goodbye
many with whom I have '
come close, and to a commu
which my family and I hs^
called our own.
And so, perhaps it would sis]
ply be best for me to close I
"Shalom Uv'rachah," a tn
tional Jewish ending which bkj
vou all lives of peacefulness i
harmony, as together we
tinue to work for the
ment of our people and t^
strengthening of our heritagi
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Friday, May 21, 1976
The Jewish Flohdian of Palm Beach County
Page3
Israel Bond Sales
Pass $2 Million
Temple Beth-El recently honored Eve and
ieon Lassen at a Cafe Tel Aviv in conjunc-
tion with State of Israel Bonds. The event
produced more than $105,000 in Bonds
pledges. Mrs. Isidore Moskowitz and Mrs.
Melvin Tanen were cochairmen of the
Temple Beth-El State of Israel Bond com-
mittee. Above (from left) are Mrs. Tanen,
Mr. and Mrs. Lassen, Azaria Rapaport, Is-
raeli Press Consul in New York who was
guest speaker, and Mrs. Moskowitz.
SCHLESINGER SAYS POLICIES ARE ONE-SIDED
The achievement of an his-
toric milestone in constructive
financial support for the de-
velopment and progress of the
State of Israel was marked by
the Palm Beach County State
of Israel Bond committee as the
sale of Israel Bonds reached
the unprecedented figure of
$2.25 million.
Michael B. Small, general
chairmen for the Palm Beach
County State of Israel Bond
committee, made the announce-
ment at a celebration of Israel's
28th anniversary at the Break-
ers Hotel on May 13. "Israel
depends more than ever before
on our continued help to main-
tain the pace of economic de-
velopment," he said, "to build
more factories and farms, es-
tablish more settlements, and
move ahead with the many
pivotal projects in this very
important year."
The Palm Beach County Is-
rael Bond effort is part of a
worldwide drive to provide Is-
rael with vital investment capi-
tal to help build a strong eco-
nomy as the basis for peace in
the Middle East.
The 1976 Palm Beach County
State of Israel Bond committee
included Mrs. Henry Blum as
Women's Division chairman,
Louis Barrish as associate chair-
man in charge of neighborhoods
and many other dedicated work-
ers.
Unfair Burden Charge Voiced Palm Beaches joining Rally
Continued from Page 1
ference of the American-Is-
raei Public Affairs Commit-
tee at the Shoreham Hotel.
IN REPLY to questions, he
offered an account of the 1973
Yom Kippur War airlift to Is-
rael in which he alleged that
President Nixon and Secretary
of State Henry A. Kissinger
procrastinated in resupplying
Israel with urgently needed
arms until the war was in its
seventh day.
Schlesinger was Secretary of
Defense at the time and served
in the same capacity in the
Ford Administration until late
last year. In his address, be
referred to two themes of the
Ford Administration's Middle
East policy momentum and
even-handedness.
He said the tendency is to
blame the slow progress in ne-
gotiations on Israel and to assert
"the failure to achieve momen-
tum is a direct responsibility
of Israel."
"MOMENTUM is fine," Schle-
singer said. "The auestion is
momentum toward what? To a
just and comprehensive settle-
ment? To a reduction or the
end of terrorism? To the recog-
nition of state entites? It is
improper pernicious to
blame the failure to achieve a
wttiomont on the one ration
Prepared to accept a settlement,
ton is an improper judge-
ment."
Schlesinger added that if the
US. "is to be the guarantor of
freedom it must be prepared to
support democracies" because
"if we are not prepared to sup-
Dort democracies, we must ask
who will we support?"
whh respect to even-handed-
"5 ^'"inger, who is cur-
22 a Visiting Scholar at
Johns Hopkins University, ob-
rved that "even-handedness is
Afferent from forcing either
nf, inc ""cewions. If the
Un ted States is to be the leader
the diverse nations it must
* responsible for all nations
it cannot be in a position
01 forcing one side."
a!? PilfM! raUiury **
sTLE ,*** Middle *** today
uiUrvrteked OoM
Wh lance nd uPPort *
by the U.S. is "a baro-
"* of American intentions
hririi.,t!Megic infflcance of
in m. growing importance
^worldwide^nuUUuVbS
W^^^itis-'anindica-
HE NOTED that Israel is
"highly dependent" on the U.S.
"far more than the Israelis ex-
pected after the 1967 war."
This, he said, put the U.S. in
a position to extract conces-
sions from Israel but he was
"concerned" by the undermin-
ing of America's moral support
for Israel and the "parallel tac-
tics" employed by the U.S. in
Southeast Asia.
Schlesinger's version of the
genesis of the American airlift
to Israel in October, 1973, cor-
responded with what he told the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency in
an exclusive interview two
years age.
He said the Nixon-Kissinger
policy when the war broke out
on Oct. 6 was that Israel could
receive whatever American
military equipment it was able
to pay cash for and to transport
in its own or chartered aircraft.
Subsequently, a decision was
made that the U.S. would trans-
port military equipment to the
Azores where it would be pick-
ed up by Israeli planes, but that
did not work out, Schlesinger
said.
HE SAID the idea then was
to transport the equipment in
unmarked American aircraft to
maintain a low profile for the
U.S. According to Schlesinger,
the decision to send Israel mili-
tary supplies directly by U.S.
Air Force transport planes was
not taken until 1 a.m., Satur-
day, Oct. 13.
Schlesinger's version has been
disputed by the State Depart-
ment which has implied that the
delay in sending military sup-
plies to Israel was due to foot-
dragging by the Pentagon.
Schlesinger declared that "This
should be out of contention."
However, he said. "We have
the latest authorized leaks" in
an article in Foreign Policy
magazine by Edward R. F. Shee-
han on Kissinger's diplomacy.
Schlesinger observed that this
was "a clever strategem to
neutralize Israel's supporters in
the United States."
HE SAID that Sheehan's ver-
sion of events is in conflict with
his known knowledge and
added, "I must allow others to
sort out the conflict."
Asked whether the U.S.
should be a "major" arms sup-
plier to Egypt and Saudi Arabia,
Schlesinger said that "some
modicum" of related arms is ap-
propriate for Egypt but that
was distinct from being a ma-
jor supplier.
He said that others could
supply Saudi Arabia along with
the U.S. "All arjns to the Mid-
dle East should be carefully
balanced on the basis of the
regional basis. The United
States should take a long-term
view rather than a short-term
one baseo on diplomatic views,"
he said. i]Tf|
TV
Highlight*
TUNE IN TO "Mosaic"
... a seasonal public-serv-
ice program in cooperation
with WPTV Channel 5,
every Sunday at 10 a.m.,
featuring films, interviews
and panel discussions on is-
sues and activities of inter-
est to the Jewish and gen-
eral community. Sponsored
by the Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County.
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In Support of Soviet Jews
Arrangements are being made
for a delegation from the Palm
Beaches to participate in a
rally for solidarity with Soviet
Jews, cosponsored by the South
Florida Conference on Soviet
Jewry and the Community Re-
lations Committee of the Great-
er Miami Jewish Federation.
The Sunday, May 23, rally,
will begin at 2:30 p.m. at the
Lincoln Road Mall and Wash-
ington Ave. in Miami Beach.
The Community Relations
Committee of the Jewish Fed-
eration of Palm Beach County
is requesting that all partici-
pants gather at the Federation
building, 2415 Okeechobee Blvd.,
at noon; car pools and possibly
a bus will be available for the
trip to Miami.
Solidarity Day with Soviet
Jews is part of American Jew-
ry's continuous effort to pub-
licize the plight of Russian Jews
and a demonstration of public
opinion against recent Soviet
actions in denying visas to
those seeking to emigrate to
Israel.
7 Injured in Private
Plane Crash on Road
TEL AVIV (JTA1 Seven persons were injured,
one seriously, when a small passenger plane crash land-
ed on a road north of Tiberias. There were eight persons
aboard the aircraft, operated by Arkia, Israel's domestic
airline. One apparently was unhurt, four sustained mod-
erate injuries, and two were discharged from the hospital
after treatment for minor bruises. The plane, an executive
type aircraft known as the "Chieftain," was on a flight
from Rosh Pina in Galilee to Tel Aviv when it developed
engine trouble. The pilot attempted to land on a road but
the plane struck an object which sheered off one wing and
part of one motor.
413 HIBISCUS STREET 4101 PARKER AVENUE
R. L. NEWMART.MBT. T'*- .fACH, PLORIOA ei.ADAMS. M*
W. R. ZERN. L.F.O.
Phona 8324121 Hw
MRVIMa THI JtWIIH COMMUNITY SINCE 1WT
C U A I A U PERSONALLY ESCORTED BY
JIIMLUm nut EDWARD TUMAROfF
ISRAEL 51199
FIR PERSON
DOUtU OCCUPANCY
JUIY 7 TO JUIY 21
whims. a trip mk titBiitBtUB, H M ft*
Traartara **mmi trip, betwen airaart aad batab la brad,
arrival mmi eaaarhtrt, aba aiiiifaaca M a'aaartaia tram Kiaaiay
Airport, N.T.
ACCOMMODATIONS IN S STAi NOTEU (with fall faciUtias hat**- aa
bsbeIi attaaaacY.)
Pall brasH Breakfast ia brasL
araaraai hi brad air caaarHaaaa1 basas, Eaf llaa
are bmmW far a recestiea at I'aal Irirh Hiaa'saarUrs la Ttl Avar;
vceatfce ef fa* braal tiairaanat Taarbt Offica, Jiraiabm
SELECT TOURS
6443 HfCAYNE BLVD., MIAMI PHONE 754-7202



Page 4
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, May 21
The Finger of Blame
With his speech before the policy conference of
the American-Israel Public Affairs Committee, former
Defense Secretary James R. Schlesinger has rekindled
the fire that blazed into an uncontrollable conflagra-
tion involving the U.S. role in the Yom Kippur War,
when in October, 1973, Israel's back was to the wall
and needed military resupply from us as quickly as
possible or suffer possible defeat.
In that conflagration, Secretary of State Henry Kis-
singer pointed the finger of blame at Schlesinger. In
turn, Schlesinger pointed the finger at Kissinger and,
by inference, President Nixon.
The passage of time seems to have borne Schle-
singer out: In effect, Kissinger and Nixon dragged
their feet until the last possible moment, when it be-
came apparent, not that an Israeli defeat was in the
offing, but that an Israeli defeat would mean a terrible
strategic blow to American prestige in the Middle East.
There is no need to relive the debate except within
Dr. Schlesinger's own frame of reference at the Public
Affairs Committee annual policy conference the other
day in Washington.
And that is once again to point the finger of blame:
this time squarely at the Ford-Kissinger pro-Arab
stance, which blames Israel for the failure to achieve
peace in the Middle East, but which says nothing about
Arab refusal to recognize the reality of Israeli exist-
ence.
So what else is new?
Make Your Gift NOW
Preparations for the 38th annual meeting and din-
ner of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation May 19
underscores the remarkable achievement of the Com-
bind Jewish Appeal Israel Emergency Fund campaign,
which two weeks ago announced that it topped its $12
million goal for this year, and is still going full steam
ahead.
We cannot overemphasize the need for every South
Floridian to contribute his fair share to the campaign.
Services here at home dedicated to the best edu-
cational, cultural, health and philanthropic needs of
the Jewish community are served by the campaign.
Needless to say, so too is Israel served by the cam-
paign.
It would be repetitive to recount these needs here
and now. It is no exaggeration merely to say that Is-
rael's very survival depends upon the success of the
CJA-IEF campaign and other such campaigns in Jew-
ish communities across the land.
If you have not yet made your gift, how do you
possibly explain it to yourself?
The answer to that question apart, make your gift
NOW.
Bicentennial Convocation
The Rabbinical Association has come up with a
unique format for its Bicentennial Convocation on
Sunday.
The convocation will recognize the pioneer Ortho-
dox, Conservative and Reform congregations in the
Greater Miami area.
We believe this is a splendid idea. At the same
time that the Rabbis will be paying homage to the his-
.ory of American Jewry on the occasion of the nation's
200th anniversary, they will also be paying homage to
synagogues and temples here that did yeoman spir-
itual service in filling the needs of the community
when the community was still fledgling and in need of
leadership.
Historian Max Dimont's scheduled presentation on
"American Judaism: Wasteland or Renaissance" will
certainly tie the two themes of the convocation to-
gether. The occasion should not only prove historical,
but educational, as well.
] Are Jeivs Politically Naive?
Jewish Floridian
OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
Combining "OUR VOICE" and "FEDERATION REPORTER"
In conjunction with Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County. Inc.
Combined Jewish Appeal
2415 Okeechobee Boulevard, West Palm Beach, Florida 3S408
OFFICE and PLANT 1K> N.E. 6th St.. Miami, Fla. 3S1S2 Phone 371-4806
ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 1-J78-4S05
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MORTON GILBERT AdverUsln Representative
The Jewish Floridian Does Not Guarantee The Kaahrvth
Of The Merchandise Advertised In Its Columns
All P.O. 357 returns are to be forwards/! to
The Jewish Floridian, P.O. Box 012S73. Miami. Fla. 31101
____________________C Frad K. Shochot May 21, 1t7
Published Bl-Weekly
__________________Second Class Postage Paid at Miami. Fla.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Arts) One year WOO. or by membership
to Jewish Federatlor, ,f P.lm Beach County. 2416 OkooVhob^rovlwrt. VVoit
Palm Beach, PJa. S340. phone M-6S00. (Out of Town upon Request )
-i55.*AI1^. 2rr,Clr!L "'*". Ollbart: vSi pVSdonti Stanley
Brenner, Rabbi Hyman Flshman, Charles Jacobaon, Jeanne Levy. Dr. Richard
Shugarman; Treasurer, Robert A. Wiener; Secretary, stsci Lssser- Acting
Executive Director. Robert Kessler. Submit matsrlal for publication to Ronnl
Tarf kow. Director of Pvbllo Relations. "'
Volume 2 Number 7l
Friday, May 21, 1976 21 IYAR 5736
ill 'ring the second Nixon
campaign for the presiden-
cy, writing for another news-
paper, 1 deplored the appear-
ance of a number of Jewish
leaders on William F. Buckley's
"Firing Line" in support of
Nixon's candidacy.
Their argument was that
Nixon had "changed." This was
a "new" Nixon we were dealing
with in 1972, whom we were
implored to regard as a bastion
of strength in behalf of Israel's
survival, a friend to Jewish
causes generally.
ONE OF the leaders, a ior-
mer Miamian, a loud-mouthed
bully with all the ethical prin-
Mindlin
ciples of a gutter street-fight-
er, addressed an ad hominem
attack on me to the paper from
New York, which promptly pub-
lished it with much Dr
and enthusiasm.
Taking their cue from Fa.
^eVw's *****
ginia Woolf?," in wl
drunken history pJJ*
ganizes a game called "&,
Guest 'the editors of,he^L
had long since organize?
game for me called "(S
Jew." m
Obviously, argued the
tors, if one of the "le
doubted the intelligence
criticism of their Nixon _
port, then I was wrong aixfi
credibility as a columnist
to question.
THE THEORY must
been that all Jews think
I am a Jew. I do not think I
other Jews do the pur
of the Buckley program
the leaders who appeared
was to give the impression
all Jews had swung into
Nixon camp. Ergo, I am eitl
wrong or incompetent, or
both.
I am reminded of this
dent because of an editorial I
the May issue of "Reform
daism," published by the
of American Hebrew Con
tions.
The editorial warns
against politicians who exp
Jewish emotions, panic
those emotions about
Soviet Jewry.
NIXON, declares the editoi
ial, "was not only a secretive)
duplicitous and fearful
but he had mixed feelings,
say the least, about Jews."
In obvious reference to
Woodward Bernstein "Fin
Days" study, the editorial
calls Nixon's ranting about
"Jewish cabal" and the
mand to his "underlings
steer his daughters away fn
museums because they are
mt Continued on Page 9
Wanted: Piety and Patriotism
Old-fashioned politics are out,
we're being told by the profes-
sional pundits. That that has been
true for the past 20 years or so,
as some few of us have writ-
ten, doesn't make any less inter-
esting the discovery and the
publication as if it were a new
American cultural phenomenon.
There were, of course, many
facets to old-fashioned politics.
One was what the hostile press
used to rant about during the
New Deal, Fair Deal Dem-
ocratic deals, as it were the
policy of spend, spend, tax and
tax. All of that toj?et the votes
of the poor and lower middle
class, who were most of us in
bygone days.
THE OFT-MALIGNED "boss-
es" of "machines" bought their
votes by passing out Christmas
baskets, welcoming newcomers
to the ward with a half-ton of
coal if needed, fixing traffic
tickets, helping to bring in im-
migrant families, giving out
janitor jobs at City Hall and on
the garbage trucks and doing
other people-oriented things
all for votes.
They also took money for fa-
vors and did other bad things.
So now we have a new kind
of politics and politicians. There
are also many facets to this but
what interests me at this point
in time is what, for want of a
better description, I shall label
"The Politics of Rottenness."
The people breaking new
ground, although the theory has
been with us for a long time,
are Gerald Ford and Ronald
Reagan. We have often seen
one candidate in a race take the
"Rotten" position but this is the
first time in my memory that
both are seeking to outdo the
other in their positions on mat-
ters of social concern which I.
EDWARD
COHEN
in my admitted bias, can label
only "Rotten."
WHERE THE old bosses used
to deliver food baskets to the
poor and near-poor, Jerry
Fcrd's policy on food stamps
will literally take the food out
of the mouths of young and old.
And it is as deliberate a pol-
itical act to counteract Reagan's
fraudulent attacks on welfare
fraud as was his recent decision
to spend additional billions on
unneeded ships in order to
counteract Reagan's charges
that we are militarily second to
the Soviet Union.
The WPA and loading the
payroll at City Hall with ward
heelers was a traditional way of
keeping the economy strong by
creating jobs. Public housing
not only moved the poor from
one shim to what ultimately be-
came another, but also provided
jobs for the construction indus-
try.
UNDER JERRY Ford, creat-
ing unemployment has been a
deliberate .policy, aimed to fight
inflation at the expense of mil-
lions least able to exist even on
minimal standard. Thus among
the many vetoes of the present
administration was that of a
bill designed to re-train unem-
ployed workers and to provide
jobs, rather than welfare.
Welfare, according to the code
of the rottenness politicians,
only for the military, for
arms industry. Jerry Ford's 1
est veto of the foreign minti
aid bill, made while Reagan w
breathing in his face, is a pr
example of what and who cou
most:
He objected to a $9 billw
ceiling on military sales, pit
ferring that this nation sen
up death at a great profit rath
than food at a lesser profit.
took issue with a proviso
we stop giving aid to countrie
which consistently violate n
ternationally recognized M
man rights."
THE VETO also had the
feet of cutting off $15 bilbo
in aid to Israel this year, "
I maintain that he is pavingi
dues to the oil bosses and mj
Jew-haters because he has wnr
ten off the possibility of gettir
a substantial Jewish vote I
survives the primary tests
ultimate selfishness with **
gan. And the bribery, graft, etc
are greater here than any
boss ever dreamed of-
There is more, much mo
on the sorry record of tm
two men. In all fairness, tn
reflect the attitudes of an ej
growing number of Amenc
if one can believe the polls;
what one hears on local
shows.
PIETY AND patriotism
be what Americans are lot
for in this year of our mc
tennial. For some strange,
well-documented, reason n
Americans do not relate P*
to the prophets or Jesus orp
riotism to Thomas Jefferson-
They stressed, if I may.
Politics of Hope, of compaw"
and a brotherly concern
for
people. The Politics of R"
ness is the. story of Cain
dated. And it is selling


j, May 21,
1976
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 5
NOW, AT LAST, THERE IS TRULY
A CEMETERY EXCLUSIVELY FOR
THE JEWISH COMMUNITY!
Authentic Bible Gardens on consecrated and hallowed ground.
Historically significant design in the S,000-year-oM Jewish tradition!
All at SHALOM MEMORIAL PARK, the ONLY cemetery
totally dedicated for the Jewish community.
WEST PALM BEACH Since the
days of the Bible when Abraham
bought the cave of Machpela as a
family burial place for 20 shekels, Jews
throughout the work), with reverence
for our Jewish traditions, have pro-
vided hallowed grounds for the burial
and memorialization of their loved
ones.
Yet. in Palm Beach County with
over 35,000 Jews and eight active
synagogues bereaved Jewish families
have been forced to bury their dead in
a few isolated areas of non-Jewish
cemeteries, suffering the lonely, un-
comfortable feeling that somehow
the) did not belong there.
Other bereaved families, insisting on
all-Jewish burial grounds, subjected
themselves and their families to the
great emotional and financial burden
of transporting their deceased loved
ones back to the North.
DON'T BE MISLED!
Now, after years of research and
with the help of highly skilled and ex-
perienced cemetery management.arch-
itects, artists, and engineers all that has
ended. Now there is only one cemetery
in the Palm Beaches truly and totally
dedicated to the needs of the Jewish
Community Shalom Memorial Park,
Palm Beach County's first and only
all-Jewish burial place.
The response has been an over-
whelming barrage of mail and phone
calls from families who realize the wis-
dom of preparing in advance of need.
NO
AT SHALOM!
Shalom, like other memorial parks,
has no tombstones. Handsome bronze
memorials are used instead. They are
simple, yet tasteful and dignified, and
can never mar the beauty of the land-
scape. Incidentally, they will save you
hundreds of dollars.
And. you will have absolutely no
bills for planting, care, maintenance,
taxes, or assessments ever!
But, Shalom is not an ordinary
memorial park. It was planned as a
magnificent, landscaped private estate.
Everywhere you will look, you will
gaze upon spacious, meticulously man-
icured lawns, lovely flowers, beautiful
trees, shrubs, fountains, lakes, and
works of art and architecture.
The reason for this is simple. A gar-
den is more beautiful than a graveyard.
Visits here will be inspiring and com-
forting. Families will willingly come
often to Shalom to remember and
commune with those who meant so
much to them in life.
COMING TO SHALOM I
Most inspiring of all, Shalom's de-
sign has deeply religious and historical
significance, including plans, already
starled. for an authentic Bible Gardens
of Israel and glorious sculptures and
orks of art commemorating our Jew-
's" heritage. It win be not only a place
lo memorialize loved ones but a shrine
People. At Shalom you will soon see:
A Bronze Map-Portrait of the Holy
U|w. with scores of carvings illustra-
ting more than 30 exciting Bible epi-
sodes. (A replica of this magnificent
work of art was at the Museum of the
Jewish Theological Seminary in New
York City and was widely acclaimed
by art critics and Bible scholars.)
Boulders from the Wilderness of Zin,
the Red Sea, the Jordan Valley and
other authentic Bible sites. Authentic
Bible plants depicting the land of Milk
and Honey: fig. palm, walnut, olive,
wine grape.
The Miracle of Moses: Gushing Water
from Holy Land Rock.
A 12-ton Holy Land boulder with
sculpture of Moses receiving the Ten
Commandments.
Water-worn pebbles and rocks from
the shores of the Red Sea. whose
waters parted for the passing of the
Israelites under the leadership of Moses.
The Burning Bush and the bitter
herbs.
Authentic Biblical Olive Trees of
Peace.
Authentic Cedars of Lebanon
Shrine of the six million, an inspir-
ing monument memorializing "the six
million martyred Jews of Europe from
whose ashes Israel rose anew."
LYU MINUTES FROM
MUM BEACH AREAS!
Here are four other reasons why you
- like so many other Jewish families
in Palm Beach County will want to
make Shalom your family shrine.
1. Shalom is located in quiet country
surroundings, yet is easily reached on
uncongested roads within IS minutes
from any part of West Palm or Palm
Beach.
2. It offers a free 24-hour Family
Counseling Service with Counselors
constantly on call to help you in time
of need and assist in the many complex
problems caused by death.
3. Religious counseling service by
Shalom's staff Rabbi and spiritual
leader are freely offered.
4. Annual Yizkor memorial services
will be conducted by Rabbis of local
synagogues, assisted by cantor and
choir a beautiful, appropriate way
to pay tribute to loved ones.
YOUR OWN RABBI
KAtT OFFICIATE!
5. As your rabbi will tell you. choos-
ing your family burial place now is one
of the most loving things you can do.
For all too often, he has seen the
crushing emotional burden that the
family must bear when burial arrange-
ments are postponed until the inevit-
able happens.
ACT NOW!
Just one word of caution. If infla-
tion continues at its present rate, a* it
undoubtedly will, cemetery property
and interment could soon double,
triple or quadruple their present coat.
Shalom can now accommodate only
15,000 people. With over 35,000 Jews
in Palm Beach County and the popu-
lation expected to double in 5 years,
it's advisable to act without delay -
while you can select the choicest
location at the low construction prices.
Easy terms are available And you can
take years lo pay. For further informa-
tion, see instructions.
UNIQUE NEW JEWISH BURIAL GROUND The bronze sculpture of the
Holy Land portraying stories of the Bible, now being cast for the GARDEN
OF ISRAEL MAUSOLEUM AT SHALOM MEMORIAL PARK. The ONLY
EXCLUSIVELY JEWISH MAUSOLEUM in Palm Beach County, and the
first Jewish mausoleum north of Miami and south of Jacksonville.
Don't compromise with a non -sectarian cemetery,
when there Is only ONE cemetery In the Palm Beaches
truly and totally dedicated
to the needs off the Jewish community!
all-Jewish burial place in Palm Beach
County, the only one with a full-time
rabbi on staff and all-Jewish manage-
ment with a real knowledge of
Jewish traditions and true sensitivity
to Jewish emotional needs, to make
you feel truly at home. There is
nothing in this whole area remotely
comparable to Shalom!
Complete information about Shalom
and the free Family Counseling Service
may be obtained without obligation
of any kind whatsoever by simply
phoning any time, day or night, at
684-2277. Or. by mailing the coupon
below.
Because Shalom Memorial Gardens
is now developed, non-sectarian ceme-
teries that have not been able to make
Jews feel at home in the isolated small
sections they've provided, can no
longer serve the complete needs of the
Jewish community.
Shalom has excited great interest
here among Jews who dread burying
their dead in a lonely corner of a local
non-Jewish graveyard, where they feel
they don't belong, yet know a North-
em burial would cost far more and
make visits difficult and expensive.
Now there is no need to compro-
mise! Shalom is the first and only
YES, without obligation, please send me
complete information about Shalom Memorial
Part and your FREE Family Counseling
Service.
SHALOM NSCMQBTAL ftltt
Information Center
5932 Okeechobee Boulevard
West Palm Beach. Florida 33409
Name________________________
Address-------------------------------------
City----------
Zip------------
.State.
.Telephone.


* -ige iw
Page 6
Thf! JpUTi
The Jewish Floridian o/ Palm Beach County
Friday, May 21, xJ\
With the .. '
Organizations
Women's American ORT
The newly elected officers for
the Palm Beach County Region
will be installed at the planning
conference on Wednesday, June
9.
They are: Miriam Marks,
president; Judith Glatt, Harriet
Paul, Enid Kaufman, Anne Fein-
berg and Sylvia Bunis, vice
presidents; Esther Banish,
treasurer; Frances Hiltzik, fi-
nancial secretary; Blanche Sil-
verman, corresponding secre-
tary; and Betty Levi, parlia-
mentarian.
ft ft ft
Century Chapter will meet on
Wednesday, June 2, at 1:30 p.m.
at the Jewish Community Cen-
ter. Following the installation
of new officers, there will be
entertainment by "Nate the
Great," and refreshments will
be served.
ft it it
Palm Beach Evening Chapter
recently elected new officers:
Carole Klein, president; Ronni
Tartakow, Marci Scherer and
Barbara Perlman, vice presi-
dents; Parti Weisenneck, treas-
urer; Meryl Trontz, financial
secretary; Marilyn Chertoff,
corresponding secretary; and
Linda Cohen, recording secre-
tary.
ft it -tr
On Wednesday, June 2, at
12:30 p.m. at the Salvation
Army Citadel the West Palm
Chapter will install its new of-
ficers. Mildred Birnbaum and
the Musical Notes will enter-
tain, and refreshments will be
served.
ft ft ft
On April 27 the Delray Chap-
ter heard a talk by Ms. Adelaide
R. Snyder, director of univer-
sity relations at FAU, on the
changing role of women through
the years.
On June 2 the chapter will
hold its installation of new of-
ficers.
fr fr fr
Hundreds of petitions have
been mailed to President Ford
and Senators Richard Stone and
Lawton Chiles, from the 11 ORT
chapters in Palm Beach County,
stating grave concern over the
orojected sale of six C-130 mili-
tary transport planes to Egypt
and the extension of military
aid that would follow.
Independent Order of Odd Fellows
On May 19 the Palm Beach
Odd Fellow Lodge No. 88 wit-
nessed the initiatory third-
degree ritual bestowed upon 22
new members
The lodge is one of the many
groups of the international In-
dependent Order of Odd Fel-
lows whose membership in-
Temple
Beth Sholom
At the Men's Club meeting
on May 16 the guest speaker
was Alan Ciklin, a local attor-
ney, whose topic was "Condo-
minium Laws as of Now."
Friends of The
Jewish Community
Day School
The Friends of the Jewish
Community Day School of West
Palm Beach held the first in a
series of get-acquainted coffees
at the home of Mr. and Mrs.
Max Tochner on April 26. Nine
parents of prospective students
heard Dr. Sidney Selig, direc-
tor, discuss the school, and they
exchanged ideas and views with
Darents of children already en-
rolled in the school.
Coffees are scheduled
throughout the summer in the
Boca Raton and West Palm
Beach area. For information,
contact the Jewish Community
Day School, 832-8423.
I br k< far l. mo.mo
OLD A SILVIS QUOTli
*. af -l 1-Wk Mot 4.4 SaaJ 1VM
MS.........fUl
M--------------(Ml
------------1*
----------|l)4
11*1
ua*.UMi.
Vs^^^Miut;""
laaaaiararariii.lt. fcj iiSiiH
MPOMTOtY COR FOIA TK>N .
i w mmi ax. eludes retired and semiretired
business and professional execu-
tives residing in West Palm
Beach and adjacent areas.
Meetings are held on the first
and third Wednesdays of each
month at 7:30 in the Temple
Building on Datura St. Resi-
dents and visitors are invited
tn attend.
Wnai B'rith
Century Lodge No. 2939 re-
cently participated in the Israel
independence Day Carnival.
The proceeds from their booth
were donated to the Jewish
Community Center.
fr fr fr
Tel Aviv Lodge No. 3015 held
its general meeting on May 19.
The guest speaker was Robert
W. Downes, senior vice presi-
dent and trust officer of the
First Bank and Trust of Boyn- ,
ton Beach. His topic was "Es- '
take Planning, Wills and Fed-
eral Estate Taxes."
WHO.. WHAT.. WHERE?
COMMUNITY PROGRAMS
AND AGENCIES
JEWISH FEDERATION OF
PALM BEACH COUNTY
Camp Shalom Day Camp
Community Calendar
Community Pre-School
Friendly Visitors
Information-Referral Service
Jewish Community Day
School
Jewish Community Forum
Jewish Community
Relations Committee
Jewish Family & Children.
Service
Jewish Floridian of
Palm Beach County
Jewish Singles
Jewish Students Union-
Florida Atlantic University
Leadership Development
ram
B'nai B'rith
Women
Masada Chapter No. 1560 will
hold its first installation of of-
ficers and presentation of its
charter on May 25 at 8:15 p.m.,
at the Ramada Inn in West
Palm Beach.
The new officers are: Shirley
Bloom, president; Anita Gleim-
er, Gail Weinstein, Iris Block,
Frances Paskell and Marjorie
Orlowitz, vice presidents; Shim
Leeds, corresponding secretary;
Rica Robinson, recording secre-
tary; Helen McCauley, financial
secretary; and Sophie Dickson,
treasurer.
For information and reserva-
tions, call 689-6739.
. fr fr fr
The installation-luncheon of
the Boyn ton Beach Chapter No.
1523 was held on May 10. Mrs.
Rosalind Ornstein, member of
the executive committee of In-
ternational B'nai B'rith Women
and secretary of the South
Coastal Region, was the guest
speaker and installing officer.
The invocation was given by
Mrs. Bea Rauchwarger. Enter-
tainment was provided by Mrs.
Pearl Basseur accompanied on
the piano by Mrs. Norma
Plump. The cochairpersons of
the day were Mrs. Ethel Kap-
lan and Mrs. Gertrude Lubin.
fr fr ft
The South Coastal Regional
Conference of B'nai B'rith was
held in Daytona Beach on May
15-17. Members of the Boynton
Beach Chapter No. 1523 who
attended the conference were
Mrs. Sonny Groland, Mrs. Ethel
Kaplan and Mrs. Freda Bompey.
Temple
Beth David
On Saturday, May 22, at 730
Dm. at the North Palm Beach
Country dub the Sisterhood
and congregation will hold a
dinner and dance in honor of
their newly elected officers and
board members. Members and
friends are welcome. For infor-
mation and reservations, con-
tact Stuart Weidenfeld
"Mosaic" TV Program
Service to Institutions
Transient & Emergency
Relief
Newspaper
Deadline
All copy from organiza-
tions and individuals must
be submitted to the Federa-
tion Office no later than 12
days (Monday) prior to
publication (every other
Friday).
Articles ot current events
and activities should be 150
words or less, typewritten,
double-spaced with pictures
clearly and properly iden-
tified, together with the
name of the person submit-
ting the story, address,
phone number and name of
organization.
Photos should be 5 x 7",
black-and-white glossy, and
of good quality. Charges
will be made for photo-en-
gravings.
The papei reserves the
right to edit.
Editor
."ail material to:
Jewish Floridian
c/o Jewish Federation
^415 Okeechobee Blvd.
West Palm Beach, Fla
33409
American Jewish Commit/
CHAPTER
ELECTS PRESIDENT
At the recent annual meet-
ini? of the Palm Beach Chapter
of the American Jewish Com-
mittee J. Samuel Perlman was
elected to the presidency. Perl-
man has been a member of the
executive board of the local
organization since its inception.
The other officers are: Syl-
van Cole, honorary president;
Dr. Elliot Klorfein, Dr. Theo-
dore Rosov, Stanley Hollander
and Arthur B. Leibovit, past
presidents; Maurice Magid,
chairman; Dr. Shirley Chartock,
Sylvan Cole, Harry Elson, Stan-
lev Hollander and G. Newburg-
er. advisory board; Nathan Ap-
pleman, Jacob Goldfarb, Ben-
jamin Hornstein, Lester Men-
dell, Mrs. Samuel Paley, Mrs.
Samuel Rautbord, S. H. Scheuer
and Mrs. J. Regenstein, honor-
ary board; Dr. Shirley Char-
tock, Mrs. Alfred P. Haft, Ed-
ee
J. SAMUEL PERLMAN
win Herz, Maurice Magid, Stan-
ley Jenkins and C. Kaplan, vice
presidents; Donald S. Fried,
secretary; and Harry B. Den-
ner, treasurer.
Hadassah
The first annual installation
and luncheon meeting of the
Chal Group will be on Monday,
May 24, at 12:30 p.m. at the
Poinciana Place Clubhouse in
Lake Worth.
The new officers for 1976-77
will be installed by Mrs. Terry
Rapaport, past president of the
Palm Beach County Chapter of
Hadassah and a vice president
on the Florida Regional Board
of Hadassah.
Entertainment will be provid-
ed by the Goldaliers of Boynton
Beach.
fr fr -fr
Bat Gurion Group installed
officers on May 7: Erica Wald,
president; Lorraine Virshup,
Barbara Wunsch, Doris Singer,
Fran Gordon, Sheila Stark and
Sheryl Davidoft vice presi-
dents; Carol Hillman. corre-
sponding secretary; Judy May,
financial secretary; Sheila
Lewis, recording secretory; and
Judy Waltzer, treasurer,
fr fr fr
Gold* Meir Group met on
Mrs. Hilda Ruby officiated.
Mrs. Hilda officiated,
fr fr fr
Yovel Group is sponsoring a
trip to New Orleans, leaving on
Monday, June 7. and returning
Saturday, June 12. The trip U
open to all members and their
friends. For reservations, con-
tact Bess Klein, 689-3057.
Congregation
Anshei Sholom
There will be an executive
board meeting on Wednesday,
June 12, at 10 a.m. and a reg-
ular meeting at 1 p.m. on Tues-
day. June 25, at 1 p.m.
1975-76 Community Pre-School
Programs and Fees
5 Day Program
9 AM. 12 NOON MONDAY FRIDAY
3 and 4 year olds
bsikrDtc.il, ins
(Child
Kindergarten
(Child must b* 5 by Dec SI, 1975
Tuition: per month $47.50
filiation FMt ..$30.0t
JEWISH FAMILY ANO CHILDREN'S SERVICE
*v outstanding profusions! counseling agency serving the
Jewish community of Palm Beach County. Professional and
confidential help is available for
Problems of the aging
Adoption and child placement
Vocational counseling
Marital counseling
Parent-child conflict*
Personal problems
Private Offices
2415 Ofceechobee Soulevsrd
West Palm Beach, Ha. 33409
Telephone: 684-1991
"J""" '* chffM in family .no individual eout*lt w,"
*0 can t>.y (Faat M Dmu on Incomi nd famMy tlia)


May
21, 1976
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Pag
7
JH2
1hutt-a-^-<''
Support for Israel 'Prerequisite'
, have a question relating to a family problem?
I monthi the Jewish Family and Children's Service
J attempt to answer questions of general interest in
to column. Inquiries should be addressed to "Dear
Ltawy" Jewish Family and Children's Service, 2415
rflxechobee Blvd
EtM 684-1991.
West Palm Beach, Fla. 33409. Tele-
Readers,
tecejved a new brochure
iJFCS in my morning mail.
s so pleased to see its
available services that I
you to know about some
em.
. OFFER COUNSEL-
"ro the single par-
growing phenomenon in
society Young
jges torn by divorce or
i have special victims. Rais-
children alone, creating a
from an imbalance re-
i special help and support.
. OFFER MARRIAGE
SSEI.ING:
i those who are unhappy in
marriage, those about to
and those considering a
I marriage.
. OFFER INTAKE
FOR THE RIVER
I HEBREW HOME FOR
AGED:
en a family or an individ-
comes to the realization
I he can no longer live alone,
[experiences a variety of com-
; emotions. We provide both
nsultive service to these
iSes or individuals and a
tiling service for the River
en Hebrew Home for the
llSHjlN,
^
f the Palm Beacht
ft tr
^Cocktail Party
* home of
L&r Marvin Engle
1 Lakeside Dr.
1 Palm Beach
,: Jack Picota
d Bea Jones
' Beach Party
w I
I ^x lunch
grills available
, *
Jwish Singles Club
'** for single
i the Jewish Com-
jnembership informa-
!or 'o be placed on the
mailing list, contact
Ktemberg, president,
s- or the Federation
COST BASED ON ABILITY
TO PAY:
The sliding scale fee contri-
butes to the cost of the service
but does not cover the bulk of
it. JFCS receives the major part
of its financial support from the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County. THE INABILITY
TO PAY NEVER DISQUALIFIES
a person who needs help nor
does it alter the quality of the
service rendered.
Copies of the brochure are
available at the JFCS office.
Stop by and our staff will be
happy to give you one. The of-
fice is open Monday through
Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Phone
684-1991. Boca Raton residents
may call collect.
Jenny
-tr -tr &
Dear Jenny,
Just a note to tell yon how
thrilling It was to see so many
people and so much activity at
the Jewish Community Center
facility on Okeechobee Blvd. on
Israel Independence Day, Sun-
day, May 2, 1976. As a 20-year
resident of Palm Beach County
it is heartwarming to see so
much interest and cooperation
at this new greatly needed Cen-
ter.
Longtime Resident
Dear Longtime,
Thank you for those kind
words. I agree. It was a memor-
able day in West Palm Beach,
one of outstanding comrade-
ship. The JCC is planning many
exciting programs for aU age
groups. Raeders: call the office,
689-7700. and put yourself on
the mailing list to receive JCC's
newsletter. Don't miss out on
the fun.
Jenny
it's m &&***'**
Jewish Family ft Children's
Service offers professional
counseling, family life edu-
cation programs, and aids
in resettling refugees in our
community.
ESTHER FROELICH
President of P.I. County
Chapter of American Jewish
Congress is now
ACCEPTING RESERVATIONS
IN THIS AREA FOR AU
AJ.C. TOURS
CALL FOR YOUR
1976 TOUR GUIDE
689-4884
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Former UN Ambassador Arthur
J. Goldberg, contending that
American economic and mili-
tary support for Israel was a
"prerequisite" to Middle East
neace, has proposed here that
the U.S. "make it explicitly
clear" that its national interest
"will not permit Israel's se-
curity or integrity to be threat-
ened or jeopardized."
The goal of American policy
should be "a just peace here
and now," not in the indefinite
future, and attained in "the tra-
ditional way" of negotiations
between the parties in conflict,
Goldberg told the annual meet-
ing of B'nai B'rith's Commis-
sion on Community Volunteer
Services.
THE FORMER Supreme Court
justice and cabinet member was
honored by the B'nai B'rith
Commission with its annual
Chai Award, citing him for "dis-
tinguished volunteers activities
that have demonstrated a life-
time of commitment to the
community." The award was
presented by B'nai B'rith Presi-
dent David M. Blumberg.
Goldberg, a principal achitect
of Security Council Resolution
242 adopted fa 1967, said that
the resolution persists as the
THE
WHITE
r ^v FALLS KOSHER
QB \ POULTRY PRODUCTS
^JE^X available at your
^Qf LOCAL KOSHER BUTCHER
or contact
Arthur Horowitz
Poultry SatM Manager
Zion Corporation
1717 N.W. Savanth Avanue
Miami. Fla 33136
Tal 334-1855
NATURAL KOSHER CLEAN CHICKEN
basis for peace negotiations.
Efforts by the UN General
Assembly to circumvent 242
with conflicting resolutions are
"unconstitutional under the UN
charter" and "injurious to the
cause of peace," he declared.
GOLDBERG defended Israel
against charges of "inflexibi-
lity," saying "Israel cannot
make peace aloae. The key
question still unresolved
is whether the Arab nations are
read to conclude a consensual
agreement," he said.
Goldberg identified Unset
as a "long-standing Zionist,"
equating it as an expression of
loyalty to his Jewish heritage.
"Judaism and Zionism are
genetically the same," he said.
Who Needs That Kind
Of Arab-Jewish Tie?
TEL AVIV (JTA) Two
Jews and two Arabs joined
forces in a cooperative venture
and were arrested and sen-
tenced to jail terms of Rv. to
11 years for their effort.
The venture was doomed even
before it started. According to
police, the quartet two Arabs
from the village of Baqa el
Gharbiya and two Jews from Or
Akiva decided to rob an en-
tire village.
Pretending to be Israeli sol-
diers and wearing Israeli army
uniforms replete with stolen
badges and rank stripes, the
four entered the village of Nad-
lah-Sharika on the West Bank
and claimed to have instruc-
tions to carry out a house-to-
house search.
In the process, they looted
valuables and money.
South County Events!
m
CANMCIIGHTIMG TIME
21 IYAR 7:42
UJ
On Thursday, May 27, at
noon at the Barefoot Mailman,
Hillsboro, the Sisterhood of
Temple Beth El of Boca Raton
will hold their donor luncheon
For information, contact Gert-
rude Sherman, donor chairman.
to ? -to
Miles, son of Len and Louis
Baron, received new honors,
academic and athletic. A junior
at Boca Raton High School,
Miles was elected to the Nation-
al Honor Society. His athletic
honors include two firsts at the
Suncoast Conference swimming
meet, where he also broke a
Conference record.
54^500 Tons Of Fun!
The "Fun Ships" CARNIVALE and
MARDI GRAS, 27,250 gross tons each,
offer you more than any other 7-dy
Miami-based Caribbean cruise ship. We
have more swimming pools (even in-
door pools), more lounges, more ship-
board activities, more entertainment
(including two different shows each
night), more public deck space and the
largest staterooms. The reason we have
so much space is that each of the "fun
tea CARNIVALE, Departs
Every Saturday From Miami
For San Juan, St Maarten
And St Thomas
ships" are HALF-AGAIN LARGER
than any other 7-day cruise ship out of
Miami! We also offer the finest Inter-
national and American cuisine, full
gambling casinos, the most popular
ports-of-call, and we're the only 7-day
fleet that docks at every port.
When you think about going on a
cruise, think of "the Fun Ships". We
offer more bounce to the ounce. More
fun to the ton!
tss MARDI GRAS, Departs
Every Sunday From Miami
For Nassau, San Juan And
St Thomas
Far information or reservations bob your Travel Agent
Carnival Tdurs, 820 Biscayne Blvd., Miami, Florida 33132
H
Cruise "the Fun Ships"
.wCaiUhlife
M'Maiuj(;i!
aach 27,260 gross tons registered in Panama
$365-$565
per person double occupancy
rates are for base season sailing dates and
are higher for certain peak


*age 10
Page 8
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
_Fridy, May 21
3%
^abbtmtai flag

co-ofdinated by th*
Palm Beach County Rabbinical Council
co-editors
Rabbi Sheldon Harr
Rabbi William H. Shapiro
devoted to discussion of themes and issues relevant to Jewish life past and present
ISSUES AND ANSWERS
Mushroom Cloud Controversy
By RABBI SIMCHA FREEDMAN
No one who has seen it can
ever forget the billowing mush-
room cloud which rises fore-
bodingly following an A-bomb
explosion. Causing almost as
much of a spectacle is the fall-
out over the endless debate on
the legitimacy and value of
"mushroom" synagogues.
It is probably true that the
appellation "mushroom" was as-
signed to the phenomenon of
"instant" synagogue because of
the nature of the fungus, which
grows almost out of thin air and
then collapses and recedes even
as do the High Holiday disserv-
ices, which are equally ephem-
eral.
Despite this obvious analogy
it may be more appropriate to
compare the so-called syna-
gogues to the mushroom cloud
in recognition of the flighty
operation involved. In either
case, it is important to recog-
nize that the mushroom may be
poisonous.
THERE ARE those who claim
that the purpose of such serv-
ices is to avoid traveling on the
Holy Days. At first blush this
seems like a legitimate argu-
ment, even if inconsistent. Do
these same individuals travel to
shul on Shabbat and Yom Tov?
Are they Sabbath-observant? If
so, why do they reside in loca-
tions which are not within walk-
ing distance of a synagogue?
Nevertheless, if the reason for
conducting services on the pre-
mises of a condominium, for
example, is because of religi-
ous sensitivities, it merits sym-
pathetic understanding. What
happens to those who attend
such services on the other 362
days during the year?
The truth is that our congre-
gations still have plenty of room
for those who may wish to at-
tend daily services. There are
still many empty seats on any
given Shabbat. Adult education
courses are crying out for ad-
ditional students. Functions and
programs sponsored by our
temples are not oversubscribed.
Are the High Holy Day pray-
ers satisfying themselves with
the minimal effort such attend-
ance implies, to deny continu-
ous involvement and support of
those Jewish activities spon-
sored by our synagogues?
WE ARE living during a pe-
riod when it is increasingly
obvious that we cannot afford
to waste funds, talents or ener-
gies. The synagogues offer serv-
ices to the entire community
on a continuous basis. Issues
such as support of Israel, of
Soviet and Syrian Jewry need
constant contact which syna-
gogues provide. Petitions, dem-
onstrations, education, religious
fuffillment, social relations, etc.,
are the essence and core of our
synagogues. The rabbi stands
ready to counsel, console, visit
the sick, advise and, most im-
portant, educate. The school is
involved in providing instruc-
tion to our future generation.
The committees are involved in
a multitude of meaningful ac-
tivities.
Why should the synagogues,
which are desperately in need
of support, fall victim to the
poisonous mushroom?
Inside Judaica
By DR. FREDERICK LACHMAN
Q. What does the term
"rabbi" imply?
A. The title "rabbi," says
the Encyclopaedia Judaica, is
derived from the noun "rav,"
which in Biblical Hebrew means
"great"; in mishnaic Hebrew
Your Rabbi Sneaks
By Rabbi Max L. Forman, D.D.
Temple Emanu-El of Palm Beach
The Jewish teaching that man
is a partner with God in Crea-
tion is, of course, quite well
known. The Midrash comments
on Genesis 2:3 that man is a
Shutaf Im Hakadosh Baruch Hu
b'Ma'asei Bereshit. It should be
equally as well known that God
is a partner with man in his
creative acts.
It is clear that man's world
moves on its course through the
working together of two direct-
ing influences. From the hand
of the Creator come the basic
drives which stir in each crea-
ture. From Him, too, comes the
formulation of the goals of its
life, albeit sometimes but dimly
perceived.
But collaborating with and
directing these drives must be
the hand of man, who gropes
to be conscious of his goals and
then must mobilize the re-
sources of this environment, as
well as the energies of his own
heart and mind, in dedicated
and purposeful endeavor.
WE OFTEN lose sight of this
two-way partnership. Because
God is unseen, we assume that
He is absent and that man is
the sole master of his world.
On the other hand, we some-
times err in the opposite direc-
tion, and forget that man also
has a vital role in the shaping
of his destiny.
There are, for example, some
religious cults that forbid medi-
cine. Desperately! ill people
have sometimes lost their lives
because their religious beliefs
did not permit surgery or even
blood transfusions: they have
depended upon God alone to
heal them.
For many centuries, people
accepted with resignation child
mortality and plagues of all
kinds drought, famine and
persecution. In everything that
transpired they thought they
saw the will of God, and deem-
ed it necessary to submit to it,
sadly but unquestioningly.
The State of Israel, now cele-
brating its 28th birthday, was
born because at a certain point
in its history the Jewish people
assumed the responsibility to
share with God in the shaping
of its world. Afforestation, drain-
ing malarial swamps, reclama-
tion of the desert, desalination
of sea water, socially planned
medical facilities are some ex-
amples of human initiative
which are saving many people,
Jew and Arab alike, from the
dismal fate that resignation and
submission would write for
them.
WHAT AN example the State
of Israel is to a world which
is waging a losing war on pov-
erty! What a display of the most
revolutionary exercise of hu-
man initiative that can work
miracles in salvaging lives! Is-
rael has, indeed, demonstrated
that poverty and disease are not
a God-willed doom decreed for
man, but can be conquered if
our social and economic system
functions properly.
Much, very much, comes
from the hand of God, but God
demands that man act as His
partner and use his own hands
in the zone of responsibility that
is assigned for human initia-
tive.
We salute the State of Israel
on its 28th (Koach) birthday
and pledge that we shall give
her the sinews of strength
Koach that she needs to sur-
vive and to continue to show
the way to the rest of the world.
We shall be partners with her
in her partnership with God.
"rav" means a master as op-
posed to a slave.
In the generation after Hillel,
it was first employed as a title
for sages. "Rabbi" literally
means "my master," and "teach-
er" as popularly misunderstood.
Since the title was accorded
only to those who had been pro-
perly ordained, and such ordi-
nation was not granted in Tal-
mudic times outside Israel, it
was not borne by the Babylon-
ian sages, the Amoraim, who
adopted, or were granted, the
alternative title of "rav."
The rabbi of the Talmud was
completely different from the
present-day holder of the title.
The Talmudic rabbi was an in-
terpreter and expounder of the
Bible and the Oral Law, and
usually had an occupation for
his livelihood. It was only in
the Middle Ages that the rabbi
became the teacher, preacher,
and spiritual head of the Jew-
ish congregation or community,
says the EJ.
From the 14th century on-
ward there emerged the concept
of one rabbi for one locality, the
"mara de-atra," "the master of
the locality." In today's huge
concentrations of Jews in mod-
ern cities, the concept of "mara
de-atra" is vanishing. The rabbi
here is mainly the rabbi of a
synagogue congregation. In the
Reform movement the very con-
cept of rabbi has changed: he
becomes to a large degree a
priest, ordering the prayer serv-
ice and leading it.
The function of the modern
rabbi varies somewhat from
country to country, though
there are lines of similarity.
Preaching occupies a place of
prime importance. The rabbi is
expected to devote much of his
time to pastoral work, establish-
ing a personal bond between
himself and his congregation,
visiting the sick, officiating at
Bar Mitzvoth, marriages, fun-
erals, and in times of mourning.
He takes part in all social, edu-
cational and philanthropic ac-
tivities of the congregation.
Above all, he is looked to as the
spokesman of the Jewish com-
munity to the larger commu-
nity.
SYNOPSIS OF THE WEEKLY TORAH PORTION
Behukkotai \
"But if ye will not hearken unto lie ... Jaffl
bring the land into desolation And you will I
scatter among the nations" (Lev. 20.14 32-33)
BEHUKKOTAI "If ye walk in My statutes^ an
keep My commandments, and do them; then I will' mel
you rains in their season, and the land shall yield hetl
produce, and the trees of the field shall yield theirl
fruit. ... Ye shall eat your bread until ye have enough,!
and dwell in your land safely. And I will have re-1
spect unto you, and make you fruitful, and multiply!
you; and will establish My covenant with you. ... But!
if ... ye shall reject My statutes, and if your soul
abhor Mine ordinances, so that ye shall not do all My
commandments, but break My covenant I will
chastise you seven times more for your sins. Audi
you will I scatter among the nations, and I will drawl
out the sword after you; and your land shall be a deso-
lation. When they are in the land of their enemieJ
I will not reject them ... to break My covenant whol
them; for I am the Lord their God. These are the]
statutes and ordinances and laws, which the Lord
made between Him and the children of Israel in Mount]
Sinai by the hand of Moses" (Leviticus 26.3-46).
Synagogues in
Palm Beach County
REFORM
TEMPLE ISRAEL
1901 North Flagier Drive
Weit Palm Be.ch, Florida 33407
833-8421
Rabbi Irving B. Cohen
Atoc. Rabbi Sheldon J. Harr
Sabbath service., Friday at 8:15 PM.
TEMPLE BETH EL OF
BOCA RATON
P.O. Box 568
Boca Raton, Florida 33432
3914901
Rabbi Norman T. Mend*I
Sabbath MrvkM, Friday at 8:15 PM.
Moravian Church, 12th Ave. ana)
Palmetto Park Rd., Boca Raton
CONSERVATIVE-LIBERAL
TEMPLE ETERNAL LIGHT
P.O. Box 3
Boca Raton. Florida 3343k
426-1600
Rabbi Benjamin Roiayn
Sabbath tervicei. Friday at 8:15 p.m.
Services held at Unitaiian-
Univertali.t Fellowship Building
162 W. Palmetto Park Rd.
*-oca Raton
CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION
ANSHEI SHOLOM
5348 Grove Street
Wett Palm Beach. Florida 33409
684-3212
Rabbi Henry Jerech
Daily service., 8:30 a.m., 7 p.m.
Friday service., 8:30 a.m., 6 p.m.,
830 p.m.
Saturday service., 8:30 am., 7 p.m.
TEMPLE BiTH EL
2815 North flagier Drive
We.t Palm Beech, Florida 33407
833-0339
Rabbi Hymen Rahman
Sabbath lervicea, Friday at 6t 75 PM.
Saturday at 9:30 AJKL
Dairy Minyan at 8:15 a.m.
Sunday at 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
315 North "A" Street
Uke Worth, Florida 334*0
585-5030
Rabbi Emenuel Baenborg
Service* Monday* I Thuradey*
' 8.30 AJ*
Friday at 8:15 P.M.
Saturday at 9:30 AM
TEMPLE BETH DAVID
Sabbath service., Friday at 1:00 pjn
Service* held at Weatmineter
Presbyterian Cnurch
10410 N. Military Trail. Palm
Gerdene. P.O. Box 9924
Riviera Beech. Fla. 33404
Cantor Nicholas Fenekal
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB
375 Alemeda Drive
Palm Springs, Florida 33460
Sabbath aervket, Friday at 8:00 pJ
Saturday at 9:00 ajn.
Monday* & Thursday* MO
Service* held at Faith United
Prebyterlan Church. Palm Spring!
B'NAI TORAH
CONGREGATION
P.O. Box 2306
Boca Raton, Florida 33432
Rabbi Nathan Zelinr
Sabbath Mrvicet, Friday at 8:15 f*
2nd It 4th Saturday* at 9:30 AM.
Service* held at:
Boca Federal Saving. & Loan *
3901 Federal Highway, "oca l*o
DELRAY HEBREW
CONGREGATION
(Meot* at Method*** row*Np Ha
342 N. Swinton Av*., Detrey
Philip Bialer. Lay Reader
For information call
Mr.. CaH MJller-7t-1*S
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
N.W. Avenue "O"
Belle Glade. Florida 33430
lack Stetemen. Lay Leedar
Sabbath service*. Friday at MO F*
TEMPLE EMANl>a
190 North County Road
Palm Beach. Florida 334BC
8320004
Rabbi Max L. Forman
Cantor fmett Scbreiber
Setbeth aaorlcae, Friday at 8:30 a*
Saturday at 9 a**


May
21, 1976
The Jewish Ploridian of Palm Beach County
Page 9
1WNDUN
Are Jews So Politically Naive?
Cootin0ed from PW 4
4*01 by "Jews and left-
thrust of the UAHC. edi-
:i obviously not to dwell
Lout, but to avoid the
fS5 of submitting to
headers" and other can-
, who "can turn a Jewish
fee into salivating, pavlo-
foters."
or ONE thing, it may be a
"cherished fiction that there
no such thing as a "Jewish
but it ought to be made
ientlv clear to those who
tthat vote that Jews are
"single-issue voters.
the editorial points out,
are centrally concerned
,ut economic issues, gun
itrol crime, civil rights, the
of the CIA and FBI in the
.asion of individual liberties
d 5^ abortion no less than
r are about Israel or Soviet
To deny this is to give sup-
to the growing military-
pustrial, pro-Arab propagan-
about a singular, unique,
by in America in alleged con-
trol of Congress as if the
Arabs do not have a far more
singular, unique, powerful, ex-
clusive lobby; as if the petro-
billionaires do not, or the ener-
gy moguls, or the jetcraft and
military industrialists in cahoots
with the Pentagon, or the just
plain good old American Med-
ical Association.
AS JEWS, once and for all
we must let those wh6 want our
votes understand that we are
singular, unique, powerful and
exclusive as individual Amer-
ican voters, who will not fall for
the pablum of any candidate
be it a Nixon or Gerald Ford.
Gerald Ford, incidentally, is
an excellent case in point. In
a memo from the White House
dated Apr. 19, Ford acknowl-
edges the significance of "Sol-
idarity Sunday for Soviet Jew-
ry to reaffirm this commitment
to human dignity and funda-
mental rights."
Declares Ford in a ringing
non sequitur: "Our nation was
founded on the principle that
certain rights are inalienable
ate, therefore, that in this Bi-
centennial year, Americans ev-
erywhere rededicate themselv-
es to the principles of human
rights on which the nation was
founded."
WHAT THIS has to do, ex-
cept by the wildest stretch of a
politician's imagination, with
the agony of Soviet Jewry, I
hardly know.
But, in his memo, Ford con-
tinues bravely: "As I said four
and a half years ago in New
York at a similar meeting: Let
our American values demon-
strate to the peoples of the
world that we Americans have
net changed in our devotion to
the freedom and brotherhood
of man under the fatherhood of
God."
Non sequitur again except
perhaps to prove Ford's "con-
tinuing concern" for the plight
of Soviet Jewry. The truth is
that he was offering non sequi-
turs on the subject four and a
half years ago, and he is offer-
ing them again today.
FOR FORD it is who bottled
up trade agreements abroad,
erful, exclusive Jewish lob- ... It is particularly appropri-
,^*rft.
'M5
KtfUr
A pilot project luncheon at the home of Mrs. Carl Ablon
was a first for UJA fund-raising from apartment dwell-
ers, sponsored by the coordinated national UJA Wom-
en's Division and the Women's Division of the Jewish
federation of Palm Beach County. The luncheon was
or%anized by cochairpersons Jen Konigsberg and Grace
Mendelsohn (seated) and committee members (stand-
H, from left) Gerda Loewengart, Ruth Reyner, Flo
Stuart and Adie Ehrenfeld.
* t

/
Jte Golda Meir Club of Pioneer Women recently hon-
Ted City Commissioner Carol Roberts (left) as Woman
or h v-""""tsstoner Carol Rooerts iiejv as ww'
'the Year for her outstanding community service. With
UTS Roberts are Mrs. Roe Hornstein, president, and
s Phyllis Sutker, national organization chairman of
^r Women.
and especially the Most Favor-
ed Nation trade agreement with
the Soviet Union, because of
his opposition to the Jackson-
Vanik Amendment that would
deny MFN status to the So-
viets unless they promised a
liberalized emigration policy for
Jews and other minorities wish-
ing to leave the country.
Ford it is who, mimicking the
Muscovites in this regard, de-
clared the Jackson Vanick
Amendment to be an intolerable
interference into the internal
affairs of the Soviet Union and
a flagrant tampering with U.S.
foreign policy to the detriment
of detente.
This is the very same Ford
who wrote all those pretty sen-
timents about Solidarity Sun-
day in his Apr. 27 memo. It is
the very same Ford who wound
up his Apr. 27 memo with one
final, thunderous non sequitur:
"THE AMERICAN people
have long sought to promote
respect for fundamental h'iman
rights, including the right of
emigration. 1 assure you today
that the United States Govern-
ment will continue to promo'te
the principles contained in the
Universal Declaration of Hu-
man Rights."
How? By attacks on the Jack-
son-Vanik amendment? Is this
how to "promote the princi-
ples" of human rights? Is this
the way to show solidarity with
the Soviet Jewish agony?
Or was the Apr. 27 memo
just an exercise in ethnic po-
liticking for the ethnically in-
trepid who hear and under-
stand only what they want to
hear and understand?
THIS IS also the very same
Ford who last week vetoed the
$4 billion foreign military aid
bill, which was tantamount to
slashing $1.5 billion in aid to
beleaguered Israel.
Even if we WERE a one-issue
people, isn't it eminently clear
that politicians consider that
Jewish emotions are so incan-
descent that we fail to see their
inconsistencies, the rank op-
portunism of their words, their
fakery, the frankness of their
deceptions? ,
The Union of American He-
brew Congregations editorial
may make us feel uncomforta-
ble because it underscores our
political naivete. But we would
be even more naive not to pay
heed to it.
Pre-'67 Borders a Certainty
Continued from Page 1
tinian state federated with Jor-
dan or an independent state
and whether there should be
an economic confederation with
Israel or with both Israel and
Jordan.
There are Arabs who will ac-
cept such a settlement guaran-
teed by both the U.S. and Rus-
sia, Goldmann said.
THE WJC leader said that no
progress has been made toward
solving the problem of Jews in
the Soviet Union. He said the
Soviet attitude has become
tougher because the Soviet bloc
is constantly being strengthen-
ed while the Western bloc has
become correspondingly weak-
er.
The result is that the num-
ber of Jews seeking to emigrate
from the USSR has declined,
Goldmann said. He said he had
information that a number of
the visa offices that were open-
ed in the Soviet Union to deal
with exit permits for Jews have
been closed down because of a
lack of applicants.
Goldmann confirmed a re-
British Airways Gets Protest
On Lists' Omission of Israel
By MAURICE SAMUELSON
LONDON (JTA) British
Airways on May 5 disclosed
some of the steps it takes
to avoid offending the Arab
world by omitting Israel from
much of its publicity. A press
officer for the state-owned avia-
tion company told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency that it
prints two editions of its 24-
page worldwide timetable.
One of them, which includes
the services to Israel, is for
general distribution. The other,
omitting Israel, goes to British
Airways offices in the Arab
world. The spokesman also dis-
closed that BA draws up special
lists of its offices which omit
mention of its three offices in
Israel.
THIS HAS come to light be-
cause one of these lists was in-
advertently sent to a company
m Israel in connection with an
international conference on fire,
security and safety held in Lon-
don last week. British Airways
had supplied the list to the or-
ganizers of the conference who
distributed it exactly as it was
received.
These admissions were made
following protests to BA over
the absence of Israel from an
otherwise comprehensive list of
nationality marks on civil air-
craft published in the com-
pany's 1976 diary.
Previously, BA has claimed
that this was "an unfortunate
oversight," pointing out that
the diary does give the ad-
dresses of its offices in Israel.
BUT PAUL Maurice, one of
the BA's press officers, told the
JTA that whoever drew up the
list "must have dropped the
Israeli marking for obvious pol-
itical reasons." Had Israel been
included, it would have appear-
ed between the names of Ye-
men and Libya.
Meanwhile, the matter has
been taken up with BA by the
newly-formed Anti-Boycott Com-
mittee. It is understood, too,
that the British government has
been made aware of Israeli
views about it.
MORT GILBERT
IS AN
Advertising Representative
OP THE
JEWISH FIORIDIAN
OP PALM BEACH COUNTY.
His Telephone Number it
683-1193
port, referred to yesterday by
Yosef Almogi, chairman of the
World Zionist Organization and
Jewish Agency Executives, that
60 percent of the Jews who left
the USSR last month did not
continue to Israel after reach-
ing Vienna. Goldmann also said
that the Soviet authorities were
issuing exit visas to many non-
Jews to go to Israel because
they were dissenters unwanted
in Soviet society.
GOLDMANN referred to an-
other recent phenomenon
Arab efforts to demonstrate
friendship toward Jews as sep-
arate from Zionists. He noted
that the King of Morocco an-
nounced he would welcome the
return of Moroccan Jews who
emigrated, even if they held Is-
raeli passports.
In Lebanon, both sides in the
civil war tried to protect the
Jewish community in Beirut,
Goldmann said. He also reveal-
ed that "quite amazingly, a pro-
minent Jew from the 500-strong
Jewish community in Egypt
asked if his community would
be accepted in the WJC."
Summing up his views, Gold-
mann predicted a very difficult
year for Israel in 1977 when
vital decisions will have to be
made.
BEN ROTHENBERG
Counselor and
Sales Representative
SHALOM
MEMORIAL PARK
"Palm Beach County's
First Cemetery Dedicated
Exclusively to the Needs
of the Jewish Community"
OfHeo 684-2277
L*
VITT
MOffTNWAM
ISMS W. Mate Rwf.
AaWllaW. '
f4-431S
MMirwooe war Mia maoi
It* Fiafcrifce ML MS U. OWv* *.
Saaay UvHl, U. PW% WehsteH f M.
911.71M 3*4413


- .ige iw
Page 10
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
^day, May
'The Challenge of Leadership" was the Leadership Cabinet, the group discussed
topic at a recent leadership development
meeting at the home of Dr. and Mrs. Peter
Wunsh. Led by Ralph Stern (left), of Mor-
ristown, N.J., a member of the UJA Young
the roles and responsibilities of being a
committed young leader within the J iwish
community.
ARABS JUST HAVEN'T RESPONDED
'No Initiative' Charge Flayed
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Simcha Dinitz, Israel's Ambas-
sador to the U.S., declared here
that "there is no greater lie
than that Israel is sitting by
without creating initiatives" for
a peace settlement in the Mid-
dle East.
Addressing 400 American
Jewish leaders at a luncheon
during the 17th annual confer-
ence of the American-Israel
Public Affairs Committee
(AIPAC), the Israeli envoy said
that "all is now in the Arab
court."
He asserted that Israel has
advanced two initiatives but the
Arabs have not responded to
either so far.
ISRAEL'S first proposal, Di-
nitz said, was to reconvene the
Geneva conference on the basis
of its initial terms agreed to by
the United States, the Soviet
Union and the Secretary Gen-
eral of the United Nations.
But now, he said, "some
PRINCIPAL NEEDED
POSITION OPEN as religious school supervisor for local syna-
gogue. Excellent remuneration for part-time work. Reply in
writing, stating age, qualifications and experience, to:
Box 18
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach Co.
2415 Okeechobee Blvd.
West Palm Beach, Ha. 33409
JCC Presents...
May 28: Fly Away to Paradise. A Memorial Day Week-
end adventure to the Bahamas has been planned for you by
the JCC. A four-day three-night stay at the Holiday Inn on
Paradise Island includes two meals daily, three hours of free
tennis, two cocktail parties, gambling in the casinos, com-
plimentary snorkeling, free towels and chaise tongues, and a
glass-bottom-boat trip. Children under 12 can stay with par-
ents at no cost with only a $12 daily charge for food.
PLANE FARE PER PERSON
Members ...................................... $175
Non-Members .............................. $200
Children .................................... $ 66
Reservations are limited to 50 people. Call 689-7700.
May 3: Holiday Teen Dance. Celebrate the end of the
school year with a gala dance on Sunday evening for all high
ichool teens.
JCC T-Shirti: Orders are being taken for the classiest
JCC T-shirts ever offered. The bargain price is $7.50 each.
Call the Center for details.
Birthday Parties: Children can have their birthday parties
at the Jewish Community Center facilities. A nominal fee per
child includes a birthday cake, candy, drinks and a unique
program of songs, games and films expertly put together by
the social group staff of JCC. The enthusiastic Jewish Youth
Council led by Ruth Lifshitz will participate with the children.
A grand time will be had by all
Sunday-Fnndays for Children, Grades K-4, for the next
four Sundays, from 12:30 to 3:30 p.m. at the JCC building,
2415 Okeechobee Blvd. Every Funday program includes a
kosher lunch of barbecued hot dogs or hamburgers, games,
dancing, and arts and crafts. Programs are led by one of
the JCCs professional social work staff. The fee is $6 for
members and $12 for non-members for the program. Mail
your check immediately to the JCC
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
of the palm beaches, inc.
2415 Okeechobee Boulevard, West Palm Beach, Florida 3340*
Telephone 689-7700
want" the Palestine Liberation
Organization invited, an ap-
parent allusion to the Soviet
Royernment's statement last
week calling for resumption of
the Geneva parley with PLO
participation at both its in-
formal and formal stages.
Dinitz stressed that Israel's
refusal to permit the PLO to
attend the Geneva conference
is not a matter of protocol, but
arises from the PLO's charter
which calls for the destruction
of the State of Israel. "No pow-
er in the world can counsel us
to do this," Dinitz said, adding
that the U.S. was not trying to
change Israel's position on the
PLO.
HE SAID the second initia-
tive was to end the state of war
in the Middle East and wait and
see if normalization and lack of
suspicion could materialize in
time and lead to a "full and
positive peace." Dinitz pointed
out "a basic difference" be-
tween "peace and movement."
The Middle East, he said,
needs progress toward peace,
not "movement for the sake of
movement" because "that
creates conditions where a
country can consider itself pres-
sured to make movement and
not to make peace."
He said that movement should
not be made "a matter of public
relations." Israel won't move
just to "have favorable editor-
ials" in the New York Times
and Washington Post, Dinitz
declared.
THE TASK in the Middle
East, he said, is "more com-
plicated, sophisticated and more
difficult than in the past." Di-
nitz said the Arab states would
recognize Israel only when they
recognized that it was indes-
tructible. "The State of Israel
and Israel's greatest friend
the U.S. must coordinate
strategic aims if not tactical
aims," he said.
Dinitz called on Americans
to translate Israel's vital needs
into basic strategic terms, "not
by this or that administration
but bv the majority of the
American people as the people
have done up to this day."
In that connection he noted
that in the three years since
the Yom Kippur War, the U.S.
has given Israel one-and-a-half
times more aid than in the 25
preceding years. "Keeping Is-
rael strong is vital to American
interests in the region of the
Middle East and for the cause
of democracy everywhere," Di-
nitz said.
community

May
21
22
24
25
26
27
Hadassah Yovel Study Group
Hadassah Bat Gurion Group Installation Luncheon
Temple Beth David Congregation and Sisterhood DinnP I
ORT North Palm Beach Regular Meeting
Hadassah Chai Group
CRC Committee Meeting
B'nai B'rith Women No. 1523 Board
Temple Beth David Sisterhood
Yiddish Culture Group
Congregation Anshei Sholom
Hadassah Yovel Group
B'nai B'rith Women No. 174
Pioneer Women Golda Meir Club Board
ORT West Palm Beach
ORT Palm Beach Regional Executive
FEDERATION ANNUAL MEETING
American Jewish Congress
Hadassah Palm Beach County Installation
Temple Beth El Men's Club Board
June
Yiddish Culture Group
Temple Emanu-El Sisterhood Board
Temple Beth David Sisterhood
Temple Israel Men's Club
Temple Beth El Board
ORT Palm Beach Regional Board
National Council of Jewish Women
Jewish War Veterans Auxiliary Board
ORT Palm Beach County Regional Board
Temple Beth Sholom Sisterhood
Jewish Community Center Board
American Jewish Congress Board
ORT Evening
CRC Plenum 7:45 p.m.
Temple Beth David Confirmation
For Boy* & Girls 6-16
A CAMPING PARADISE IN THE HEART
OP THE POLLEN FREE, COOL HILLS
LAKES OF OCALA NATIONAL FOREST j
LAKE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Ail Lane' and Water Sports Wstmkiins and Ridinfl Daily
Pro Golf and Tennis Arts aad Crafts Mhft Scnln
Trips by C n Horsskack Ridiea SpscW Tsm Proem
Ruding sad Math Clinics -Traditional Friday & Sssbiti
Service* Bar Mhzvah Lenoss -All Dietary Livw Otatrvd
M.D. 2 R.N.'s Staff our Modern Infirmary at ALL'
Accredited Member American Camping Associattna
Your Camp Directors:
COACH J. I. MONTGOMERY
MORRIS SHEILA WALDMAN
e
Miami Beach Phono: 1-532-3152 or**"
P.O. Box 402688, Miami Beach, Florida 33140
WON UP NOW
A FEW OPENINGS ARE STILL AVAII
REGISTRATION
CAMP SHALOM 1976
RETURN AT ONCE TO CAMP OFFICE
Jewish Federation of Palm Batch County
2415 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach, Florid.
Please enroll my child (children) in the summer day i
Parent's Name ..................................... Phone
Address ............................................... Bus. Phone
City................................ state.................................. flP "
1. Child's Name ..................................................................
? Male Q Female Birth Date....................
Name of School ............................. Grade in Sept. 76
2. Child's Name ................................................................
? Male ? Female Birth Date
Name of School .............................. Grade in Sept. 76
I wish to enroll my child (children) for:
Eight weeks June 21 Aug. 13
1st Period June 21 July 16
2nd Period July 19 Aug. 13 -
I hereby apply for admission of my child(ren) to the aay
program of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach conn -|
Parent Signature .............................................. 25CI
Note: Each child's application must be accompaniedjrj
ment of Registration and Activity fee. Check payao*
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County.
CAMP FEES
Pre-school, Elementary Division: M
8 weeks$210 & $40 Registration and Activity r
4 weeks8110 ft $20 Registration and Activity l
For each additional child from same family:
8 weeka-8190 & $40 Registration and Activity JJ
4 weeks$100 A $20 Registration and Activity '^


May
21, 1976
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 11
letimes it Seems That Wall to Wall Cabinet is Needed in Israel
Haifa
-vflAY WE shall have a short lesson in the real-
I I rie, of Israel's internal political organization.
The leadership of the country and the vital deci-
SL which such leadership makes are directly af-
| fected by that organization.
J won a majority in the Kneet. Hence it
< always been necessary to form a coalition
Ikiiw partnership which would assure parUamen-
SfSwng of at least 61 of the 120 vote, in the
Knesset.
TWICE IN its history Israel felt called upon, in
*, face of national emergency, to create a wall-to-
Lall coalition of all or almost all parties and thus
mm a national united front. The first time was
1948 when independence was proclaimed. The
Second time was in June, 1968, on the outbreak of
Six-Day War. _______
darl
*4L
'pert
Today's Government, headed by Prime Minister
Yitzhak Rabin, comprises a coalition which gives it
the support of 67 members of the Knesset. That
means that a large minority of S3 is completely left
out of the decision making at Government and Cabi-
net level. Chief bloc in the opposition is Gahal. with
39 Knesset members.
AGAIN AND again voices are heard warning us
that Israel faces a new crisis. Who can deny that
we are experiencing a series of political and diplo-
matic setbacks which are seriously eroding our posi-
tion on the international scene? Our righteous in-
dignation against the steamroller tactics at the
United Nations is not going to alter the bitter facts.
Is this not a time to draw into the Government
all the talents available, irrespective of party, and
create a National Unity Cabinet?
Minister of Defense Shimon Peres has openely
idvocated it. Every public poll has endorsed it.
AT A TIME when Jerusalem calls upon world
Jewry to unite in support of Israel, cannot this
:ountry itself set an example of unity?
To be sure, there are legitimate doubts with
respect to the move. One objection is that it will
introduce widely divergent opinions into the Cabi-
net, with the result that it will be difficult, or per-
haps even impossible, to arrive at decisions.
Inmates'
Families
Given Help
MORE THAN 1,000 Jewish men and women inmates of eight
prisons in New York State sought and received help from
Jewish Family Service counselors in the period between 1970
and 1975, according to a report by the agency.
The agency's social rehabilitation division provides help to
the Jewish criminal, to the ex-criminal and to his family during
both his incarceration and post-prison adjustment. A spokes-
I man said the vast majority of Jewish criminals are men.
THE SPOKESMAN reported that the number of Jews in
prison has been declining steadily. One explanation offered is
that the criminal justice system is now more concerned with
hwbreakers involved in highly visible and dangerous street
crimes than with "white collar" criminals those whose of-
fenses include writing of bad checks, embezzlement of funds
and similar crimes.
The spokesman said Jewish offenders usually are in the
litter category and frequently are not sent to jail. But in re-
cent years, the spokesman said, there has been a slight in-
i crease in the number of Jews imprisoned for drug abuse.
PRISON LIFE for Jewish inmates, as for inmates general-
ly, is a grim affair but with a particular harassment. As mem-
bers of a minority group, the spokesman said, Jewish inmates
are often forced into the role of scapegoats. Because they are
often judged as a group, rather than as individuals, Jewish
prisoners react by tending to stick together.
The spokesman said that one way this group feeling mani-
fests itself is in attendance at religious services in prison, a
regularity of attendance which for many of them was a prac-
tice rarely or never maintained "on the outside."
ONE RESULT is that the Jewish inmates often establish a
relationship with the prison rabbi who may help the prisoner
handle problems in prison But if the inmate has concerns
>out this family, he is referred to a JFS counselor.
JFS counseling is provided to inmates in six prisons in the
New York netropolitan area and to ten correctional facilities
in npsl York. Help is provided in fact-to-face meetings
d via the mall. JFS counselors maintain an extensive and
continuing correspondence with the prisoner and his family.
*mch concerns not only current problems but also the need
Retting a job after release.
THF. PROGRAM at the prisons consists of provision of
counseling services by a specially assigned JFS worker who
Wi Sing smu prison once each month and other nearby in-
stitutions, such as Walkill, Greenhaven and Westfield women's
reformatory and prison, several times a year.
aWkM expcrts sa'd few experiences are more disruptive to
or hu ,han the arre8t and imprisonment of a spouse, parent
with The family is left wi1"01" breadwinner, the child
can k!? a parent- the wife without a husband. The situation
J* as bitter for the family on the outside as it is for the
fan% member in prison.
sfihifNFTIALLY' muv wive* "* devastated by what eon-
. es an ""tant crisis. They feel betrayed and angry but often
feelin 0Verwhe,med they are unable to express their rages and
inu oh fear and I****!. Through individual JFS counsel-
to hri w particiPaton in a women's group, the agency tries
p ,hese women to express those feelings.
comm>tnyuappear unab,e t0 'unction or regress to a level of
*e surf elp,es8neM Separation for these wives can bring to
The Wi 8Ce deepseed feelings of inadequacy and dependency.
tions of wmay r,nd tney wnnot cope with the negative reac-
even h 2?" fami,y members and with an unsympathetic and
heln,,, f'e con"nunity. The goal of the JFS program is to
We sin m,Hes as thV k* to deal with a radically changed
**, the 8poke8yman Mjd
Hh? PR0BLEMS do not, of course, magically disappear
prison;!, reiurn 0* the prisoner to his or her family. Former
Win. 7i. 8uWer difficulties in readjusting to and reinte-
"* themselve, back into normal life.
S
usan
r*ff
Rebuttal to Bellow's
Distasteful Performance
CYNTHIA OZICK, Bloodshed and Three Novel-
las. N.Y.: Alfred A. Knopf, S6.9S. 178 pp.
(' YNTHIA OZICK wrote a commentary in The
New York Times Book Review (March 21,
1976) on Saul Bellow's recent distasteful inter-
views and lectures. Everyone in Miami was
suitably shocked and disgusted with Bellow.
Miss Ozick successfully and very skillfully
chastised him.
After reading the above essay entitled
"Hanging the Ghetto Dog," I looked forward
to her new book, "Bloodshed," with great anti-
cipation. 1 have not been disappointed. I am a
little annoyed with her Preface to the book.
THE POMPOSITY of her writing is over-
whelming. She constantly refers to her editor
and other authors who disapprove of Prefaces
and make a convincing case; yet she writes
twelve pages' worth.
The Preface did not make sense until I com-
pleted the book and reread it. It should be an
Afterword, and as such is important to the
understanding of all of the works in this col-
lection.
I STRUGGLED through the first two stories.
She saved the best for last. "An Education"
and "Usurpation (Other People's Stories)" are
beautifully written.
In "An Education," Ozick tells the story of
a brilliant, hopelessly romantic young female
scholar, who becomes manipulated by a young
glamorous couple which she perceives as per-
fect. Ozick has us too believing in their per-
fection at first.
Then she adeptly and cleverly reveals their
intolerable selfishness and immaturity to the
reader while our young scholar muddles about
confused, and afraid to believe the truth.
I HAVE never read a story like "Usurpa-
tion." The narrator depicts for us the horror
of attending the lecture of a famous writer
who begins to read his new story. She dis-
covers that his story is her story.
That is, he has written the story first.
Characters proceed to compete with each other
in creating stories until the storytellers find
themselves actually living one another's stories.
Miss Ozick has a tremendous background
in the classics, humanities and Jewish litera-
ture.
SHE DEMANDS that her reader meet this
knowledge to taste the full measure of her
writing. Her writing is lyrical, intelligent and
intense.
Each one of those stories or novellas, con-
tains a Jewish theme, none of which is de-
rogatory toward Jews.
It is obvious that they are written by a
committed Jew a Jew who has a right to
criticize Saul Bellow's denials and fears. Cyn-
thia Ozick is truly a first quality Jewish writer.
England, France and Italy
Due for Mexican Treatment
KM.-
ENGLAND, France and Italy voted against
Israel at the recent Security Council ses-
sion. That is to say they voted for the PLO.
Shouldn't these countries be given the
"Mexico treatment"? Remember, Mexico voted
against Israel and in revulsion thousands of
tourists cancelled their reservations. Why
should we visit countries which vote against a
democratic nation?
THAT VOTE, which was vetoed by the
U.S., meant, in effect, that these three so-called
civilized nations participated in maligning the
State of Israel.
Israel does not oppress the Arabs. The
only well-off Arabs in the world are in the
Jewish country.
The recent uprising of the Arabs in Israel
was fomented by Communists and by PLO-
oiks. It is, alas, the condition of a democratic
country to expect people to stage protests, as
this country has experienced protests for
years.
But you won't find protests in Saudi Ara-
bia, Egypt, Iraq, Syria (in spite of Mike Wal-
lace's libels), Libya.
THEY'D BE forcefully squelched in those
despotic lands.
And that selfsame Security Council did not
exhibit any shock over the slaughter going on
in Lebanon. So why should Jews (or any de-
cent people) tour England, France, and Italy?
Let those countries get oodles of cancelled
reservations, as Mexico did before that nation
reversed its position.
If you must travel, see the U.S. during
this milestone year. Or visit that other splen-
did democracy, the State of Israel,
ft ft ft
NOW THAT the ex-Nazi who wanted to
be head of the Rotarians has withdrawn, may
I have a word in the matter?
I rejoice that the outcry against the man,
whose name I don't care to remember, result-
ed in the end of his candidacy.
It is a repulsive thing that a Hitlerite
should have risen so high in the echelons of a
fine service agency like Rotary.
IT IS good to note that revulsion against
him resulted in his being unhorsed.
But there was a missing ingredient in the
lamentable contretemps.
What was missing was any sign of re-
morse on the part of the former Nazi.
PERSONALLY, I am ready to forgive a
man who has done wrong. The Jewish faith
revolves around the belief that an individual
may atone for his faults, if he repairs his char-
acter after admitting his sin.
But in all the tararam around the man
who was about to head up Rotary there was
not a single indication that he regretted be-
ing linked with murderers.


* .ige iw
Page 12
Thf! .Ifvriih Ftarf/Ks... .< n- ~.....
The Jewish Floridian oj Palm Beach County
Friday, May 21
,

MGHHUT HS4
1-067001U13103S 05/10/7*.
ICS MGHNCSA CHNY
00038 MLTK V*
uiestem union
Mailgrarrf f^
Golda
Will
Be
Here
**#***
MR. STANLEY BRENNER, GENERAL CHAIRMAN
1976 COMBINED JEWISH APPEAL ISRAEL EMERGENCY FUND
JEWISH FEDERATION OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
2415 OKEECHOBEE BOULEVARD
WEST PALM BEACH, FLORIDA 33409
THE FIRST LADY OF THE JEWISH PEOPLE, MRS. GOLDA MEIR, WILL BE GUEST OF HONOR
AT A 1976 NATIONAL CAMPAIGN REPORT LUNCHEON JUNE SECOND HOTEL PIERRE NYC
IN ORDER HELP CLOSE OUR CAMPAIGNS AND REACH ONE HUNDRED MILLION DOLLAR
CASH GOAL. I AM PRIVILEGED INVITE YOU TO JOIN LEADERSHIP OF AMERICAN JEWISH
COMMUNITY IN REPORTING TO GOLDA BY YOUR PRESENCE OR BY TELEPHONE ON JUNE
SECOND YOUR COMMUNITY'S FUND RAISING AND CASH RESULTS. PLEASE CONFIRM IF
YOU WILL ATTEND.
REGARDS.
FRANK R. LAUTENBERG
GENERAL CHAIRMAN
22:56 EST
MGMMIAT
HSA
You have always responded generously when
Israel has been in trouble. Today is again a time
of grave concern for Israel and Jewry. It is this
urgency that prompts Golda Meir to come again
to the United States, seeking our help.
If you have not yet made your pledge to the
United Jewish Appeal please do so immediately
by mailing the pledge card below or by calling
SHOW
HER
YOU
CARE
the Federation office, 689-5900, so that your
contribution will be included when our cam*
paign chairman Stanley Brenner personally re-
ports to Golda Meir.
You can express your appreciation to Golda
Meir for her years of labor on behalf of Jewry
and Israel by a most generous response.
o
JEWISH-FEDERATION OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
Combined Jewish Appeal Israel Emergency Fund
nircrer
ClfT
1973
1974
1975
3
2415 OKEECHOBEE BLVD
WEST PALM BEACH. FLA. 33409
IN CONSIOEIA1ION Of IMI GlfIS Of OTHERS AND IN RECOGNITION IMA! FUNDS HAVE HEN AUOCAIfD iNn
DISIURSED FOR OUR RENEFICIARY AGENCIES ANO SERVICES AS SEI FORTH ON IME REVERSE SIDE HEIEOf IN If
UANCE UfON THIS HEDGE I WE flOMISE IO PAY IO IME JEWISH FEDERATION Of tAIM BEACH COUNTY FOR
1976
ACCOUNT NUMBER
CNV
SIGNATURE X_
(ilU)
.DATE.
CJA $
IEF $ Glf I SECUREO Y
roR omcf use oniy
IOIl CHI 1 3 T
|. A
B
PAID HEREWITH
WORKER NO APPROVED
s
DCHECK QCASH OR Sill AS FOllOWS Dmonthiy ? quarterly D PAYROU DEDUCTIOf FO (C,


? START SIIUNG (ATCH NO DATE
We Are One
Give to the
COMBINED JEWISH APPEAL-ISRAEL EMERGENCY FUND
of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
2415 Okeechobee Boulevard, West Palm Beach, Florida 33409 Telephone: 68900
-?


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