Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
8 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 28, 1975)-v. 8, no. 40 (Dec. 17, 1982).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 2, 1976 called v.2, no. 22, but constitutes v.2, no. 1.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: July 28, 1978 called no. 14 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement; Aug. 25, 1978 called no. 16 in masthead and no. 17 in publisher's statement; Aug. 10, 1979 called no. 15 in masthead and no. 16 in publisher's statement; Oct. 22, 1982 called no. 31 in masthead and no. 32 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44607504
lccn - sn 00229550
ocm44607504
System ID:
AA00014311:00032

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
"Jewish Floridiao
of Palm Beach County
ComWnim "OUI YOKE" and "FEDIRATIOM IIPOtTII"
m conjunction with The Jewish Federation of Palm Bone* Cowrry
,g_ Number 33
Palm Beach, Florida Friday, October 29, 1982
Price 35 Cent*
Campaign Cabinet Steering Committee Conducts First
Meeting Of '83 Year
*>
*'j
of the Campaign Cabinet Steering
of the 1983 Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County-United Jewish Appeal met to
discuss plans for the upcoming campaign.
Myron J. Nickman, General
Campaign chairman of the 1983
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County-United Jewish Appeal
campaign, met with the Cabinet
Steering Committee on Oct. 4 to
develop plans for the 1983 cam-
paign.
Cabinet members discussed
the Special Emergency Fund for
Israel which will be an integral
part of this year's drive and serve
to meet the special social and
economic needs that have arisen
since June.
The group also discussed the
importance of leadership recruit-
ment, campaign solicitation
training, and major gifts events
for the year. The 1983 Federa-
tion-UJA campaign will be struc-
tured around key geographic
locations within the community,
as well as gift category levels.
Major gifts events are being
planned as well as several special
mission programs to Israel for
selected members of the local
Jewish community.
Working with Nickman as
associate chairman are Arnold
Lampert, H. Irwin Levy, Larry
Ochstein, Dr. Richard Shugar-
man and Women's Division
Campaign Chairman, Marva
Perrin.
>l Invites U.SL to View Soviet Weapons, Weinberger Says
HEW YORK (JTA) -
has invited the
States to inspect
weapons captured
the Lebanese fight-
according to an inter -
' with Secretary of De-
i Caspar Weinberger in
current issue of the
! Island Jewish World.
teinberger, in what is believed
(hethe first exclusive interview
i granted a Jewish news-
I also made these points:
) leader Yasir Arafat's meet-
i with world leaders do not
V much effect one way or the
a": the United States has an
"hakeable commitment" to
tain not only Israel's
wHy but also "its military
the Pentagon is "very
pleased" with the performance of totally false."
American equipment in Israeli
hands in the Lebanese operation.
"It is very important to
separate the Palestine problem
from the PLO and Arafat," and
while the PLO chieftain "is at-
tempting to act as spokesman for
that whole group, I don't know to
what extent he has a valid claim
to that," Weinberger said. He
was interviewed in the Pentagon
by Naomi Lippman, editor of the
Jewish World, and Stewart Ain,
contributing editor.
THE DEFENSE Secretary
also told his interviewers that it
was a "totally wrong perception"
that he is the Administration
leader least sympathetic to Is-
rael, adding: "Any perception
that I am opposed to Israel is
Community
tow of
Hank Bastvk
> of ^fwish community of Palm Beach County mourns the
*ish vO** .Hanlt" Bassuk, former campaign director of the
~reueration of Palm Beach County, who passed away on
?"?^ f the University of Missouri, Hank spent the last
his life in the fund raising field working for many
*ratin-0r^amzatlon8 "K* institutions, including UJA-
l!"" New York City, UJA National, Albert Einstein
Sarv u, ne> Bran onal r i: d Jewiah Congress, City of Hope and the
d lonl!.rence of Chri8tina and Jews. Those of ua who
iitvnil .urs with him in the quest for improving the
' Jewish hfe will miss his great wit and knowledge.
B8^f[ wd Board Directors of the Jewish Federation of
B*Zr County extend their heartfelt sympathy to Hank's
wwe. sons, Jim and Adam, and his sister Rose Samwick.
Weinberger was asked if he
had "been able to learn from the
Israelis all the information they
have learned about the Soviet
weapons" captured in Lebanon.
He replied: "We haven't in the
sense that we have in the Falk-
lands because that conflict is over
and we are getting a total ex-
change of information there. We
hope to have very much the same
thing."
He said Defense Minister Ariel
Sharon has indicated to me very,
very recently that we would be
welcome to send teams over and
examine some of the equipment
under terms to be worked out
over there. We think that would
be a useful thing to do and we
think it would be helpful to all of
us because after each of these
conflicts or battle tests of this
equipment, it is very important
how effective the tacts as well as
the weapons are and things like
that."
Asked about Jordanian King
Hussein's statement that he
would never negotiate with Is-
raeli Prime Minister Menachem
Police Detain Two Suspects
In Baptist Church Arson
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Two suspects have been
detained by police in con-
nection with the suspected
arson that completely de-
stroyed the Baptist Church
in downtown Jerusalem
leaving only a skeleton
frame of structure stand-
ing. No details of the two
suspects were provided.
Premier Menachem Begin, re-
acting to the reported arson, said
that "if it was arson, it was a
malicious crime that should be
condemned in the strongest
terms." Jerusalem Mayor Teddy
Kollek said he hoped the incident
was not arson.
Interior and Religious Affairs
Minister Yosef Burg visited the
church and told the .pastor that
"we are very unhappy about
what happened" and are "always
disturbed about such incidents in
Jerusalem, a city of peace."
According to reports, the blaze
in the church, which was built in
1933, began shortly after mid-
night. Police were reported to
have later discovered kerosene or
gasoline floating on the water left
by the fireman. An adjoining
building was saved from damage
or destruction. But damage to
the church was estimated at
$50,000.
The church is led by Rev.
Robert Lindsey, an old friend of
Israel who has resided here since
1939 after immigrating here from
Norman, Okla. The church has
frequently been the target of anti-
missionary harrassment,
although it has never engaged in
missionary activities.
Secretary Weinberger
Begin, Weinberger replied:
"I THINK that we have to
look at the final results rather
than statements. The Syrians
said they would never take in the
PLO, for example, yet there are a
very large number of them up
there now But there is a tre-
mendously strong feeling, even
among such basically moderate
people such as King Hussein,
that they have to express public-
ly their opposition."


Page 2
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

Friday, October Mi]
Home for Aged Selects Designs For Interior,
Landscaping and Sculpture
Nationally and locally prominent designers have been selected by the
Jewish Home for the Aged to create a functional and living en-
vironment for the elderly who will reside in the 120-bed, long-term
skilled nursing care facility now nearing completion. A presentation of
the concepts and models for the building's interior areas, resident
rooms, landscaping, and the entrance sculpture drew a most favorable
Architects Emily and Harold Obst and chairman of the construction
committee, Alec Engelstein (r), expressed satisfaction that the various
plans are in keeping with the design of the main structure.
Interior designer Bill Bagnall of Boston (r) explains to Robert S. Levy
the importance of color schemes in helping the elderly to identify
direction and location of areas within the building. His firm has
received national recognition for design and furnishing of hospitals,
homes for the aged, colleges, and commercial and governmental in-
stitutions.
Erwin H. Blonder, president of the Home, reviews the complete floor
plans of the 3-story structure and describes the decorative plans for
the lobby, synagogue, atrium, solariums, roof garden, dining rooms,
therapy and medical departments, lounges and administrative offices.
He further detailed the construction features of furniture and
equipment designed especially for the elderly.
Super Sunday '83
i
POSTER CONTEST
Open to children in area religious schools, youth groups and
students at the Jewish Community Day School.
COMPETITION RULES
1. The aim of the contest is to express in poster form the con-
cept of SUPER SUNDAY "83 ... a nationwide phonathon to
raise funds for the 1983 Jewish Federation United Jewish Ap-
peal campaign.
2. The contest is open to children (grades 4-12) in local temple
religious schools, youth groups and the Jewish Community Day
School.
3. All drawings can be submitted up to 28" x 40" and in any
medium.
4. All entries must be received no later than Friday, Dec. 10,
erev Chanukah.
5. Each child must write his name, age, address, name of reli-
gious school, parent's name and home phone number on back of
poster.
6. All entries should be sent to: Super Sunday Headquarters;
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County; 601 South Flagler
Drive, Suite No. 305; West Palm Beach, Florida 33401.
7. The winning poster will be selected by a special committee
of Super Sunday.
8. The winning design will be used around the community to
publicize Super Sunday '83.
9. The winner will be honored on Super Sunday and special
recognition will be given to the child's own school or organiza-
tion.
10. The theme for Super Sunday '83 is E.T. "Enjoy Tzed-
akah," Be there When we Phone your Home!
Entries should be sent to: Super Sunday Headquarters;
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County; 501 South Flagler
Drive. Suite No. 305; Weat Palm Beach, Florida 33401.__________
response from the Home's executive officers, architects, general
contractor, and construction committee. The designs incorporate
gerontological features that take into consideration the needs of an
elderly resident. Scheduled to open about June 1,1983, the new Jewish
Home for the Aged of Palm Beach County, Inc. is a beneficiary agency
of the Jewish Federation and will receive an annual operational grant
Landscape architect Herbert Wilkenfeld (2nd from r), interprets the
thematic design he has created for the boulevard entrance, driveways,
and the gardens that will enhance the Home's 15-acre grounds.
Famed sculptor, David Davis of Cleveland (standing center rear), is
shown preparing a slide presentation of die creative processes and
techniques that inspired his conception of the monumental sculpture
that will symbolize the spirit rff the Home, Mr. Davis' artistry graces
scores of college campuses, corporate buildings, parks, memoriak,
public buildings and museums.
The 20 ft. high Founders Sculpture, conceived by David Davis, u
topped with a multi-angled Star of David and derives its design from
the Torah quotation "How goodly are thy tenta, O Jacob, thy dwelling
places, O Israel!"
TV HIGHLIGHTS
Tune in to'MOSAIC
Sponsored by
The Jewish Federation
of Palm Beach County
Sunday morning over WPTV Channel 5, at 8 a.m.
with hosts Barbara Shulman and Steva Gordon


October 29. 1982
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 3
Know Your Candidate
lm*g'EE?2 Kl?SZl!aSl y. b* Co"mUnity Rd,li0M C~w oB,etal P"cy of th Community Relation. Council NOT to endorse individual Can-
like Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County to provide you with information, didatea.
!,,for office whose names do NOT appear did not return the questionnaire or
Mtd >t unsigned. Some of the Candidates offered their personal comments on
-inlar questions. Should you wish to examine the comments of a particular Can
K please contact the Community Relations Council at 832-2120, ext. 39 It is the
didatc
REFERENCE KEY
Y-Yee
N No
NR Candidate did NOT respond to the question
pc Candidate added personal comment! si
LjUflLSJATES HQUS AND SENATE
SENATE HOUSE DISTRICT #12 HOUSE DISTRICT 014
CHILES ID) CULVERHOUSE (D) L?2 MITCHELL (R)
J. With the Camp David Agreement as a basis for lasting peace, would uou support foreign aid to Israel: A) at present levels? Y,pc Y Y Y Y
B) at decreased levels? N.pc N N N
C) at increased levels? y.pc y Y N
2. Do 'jOu favor an Independent Palestinian State? N.DC N N Y N Y
IF YES, INDICATE ONE: ----j A) on the West Bank?
B) elsewhere? Y
C) only if Israel's territorial integrity is recognized by the Arabs? Y Y
3. Would you support advance weaponry sales to Arab countries in the future? N.pc pc N N N N
<. Should the United States dependence on foreign oil influence its support of Israel? N.PC N N N N N
5. will you work toward helping oppressed Soviet Jewry and other religious minorities in their struggle to emigrate from Russia? y.pc Y Y Y Y Y
i. Would you vote for the following Constitutional Amendments: A) prayer in the public schools? Y.pc Y Y.pc pc N.pc N
B) abortion? pc Y N pc N.pc N
C) balanced federal budget? Y.pc Y N Y N.pc N
D) equal rights regardloss of sex? Y.pc Y Y pc Y N
I Do you support tuition tax credits for non-public schools? N.pc Y N N N.pc N
I. Are you in favor of expanding border control against the entry of illegal aliens? Y.pc Y Y Y Y Y
J. In order to reduce the feieral budget, would you: A) cut defense spending? Y.pc Y Y Y Y.pc N.pc
B) cut social programs? Y.pc Y i N Y Y.pc N.pc
1T0RIAL STATF HOUSE AND SENATE
Senate
26
Senatt
H27
House
HBO
House IMouse
*81 083
House
*84
House
85

I
8
B Q
r
j a:

3

I
*>u2d you vote fox a Constitutional Amendment that favors:
~A) g^yer in the public schools?________________________________
N
PC
PC
N
N.pc
Y.PC
J) abort inn?
SLjlual rights regardless of sex?
Should the State fund abortions sought by,women on welfare?
-fi-
N
N
N
-BE.
Y.pc
JLc
NiP
-_
-E_
N
N
N
N.pc
PC
N
Mission
If funds from the State for block grant programs are inadequate,
0 you favor County support to keep human services programs in
_!tion?
Do
to
you
- -support a housing policy of requiring major developments
-p-iggiude low and moderate income housing? --------------------
0 yo" ravor locating the proposed land fill site at Dyer Avenue?
DISTRICT 94
Q
2
PC
PC
PC
s

N.pc
See Constitutional Amendments on November Ballot.. .Page 12
^


Page 4
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, October 29
.19
Shultz Muffs Opportunity
Secretary of State George Shultz, in an address
before the 37th UN General Assembly on Sept. 30,
declared: "I believe that the greatest advance in
human history was not the wheel, the use of elec-
tricity, or the internal combustion engine.
Indispensable to progress as these have been, our
most remarkable achievement was the slow, clumsy
but triumphant creation of language. It is words that
released our ancestors from the prison of the solitary.
Words gave us the means to transmit to our children
and the future the crowning jewel of human
existence: knowledge."
Bravo.
Speaking further on in his address about the war
in Lebanon, Shultz declared: "Today in Beirut, the
U.S. Marines together with our allies in Italy and
France are helping the Lebanese Government and
Armed Forces assure the safety of the peoples of that
tormented capital. Our Marines represent an ex-
tension of American power, not for war but to secure
the peace They are there to speed the moment
when all foreign forces depart from Lebanon."
Bull.
In using words, "the crowning jewel of human
existence," Shultz dissembled. By editing ex-
perience, he was making history tell lies. For how did
the United States come to Beirut? How did France
and Italy come to Beirut?
They came to Beirut because of the remarkable
achievement of Israel in Lebanon a fact which
Shultz refused to recognize and reward before the
General Assembly. Which, indeed, Lebanon's new
President, Amin Gemayel, refused to recognize and
reward on Monday before the very same body, when
like Shultz he called for the withdrawal of all forces
there, ignoring that Israel had also come to Lebanon
"not for war but to secure the peace."
The tragedy of the Shultz address on Sept. 30 is a
mirror image of this same tragedy since the
beginning of the Israeli operation in Lebanon as
reported in the equally dissembling media
newspapers and television which are also
presumably committed to knowledge as "the
crowning jewel of human existence," which also
trumpet the "triumphant creation of language." But
which in Lebanon distorted and recreated history by
doing violence to knowledge, language and words at
will.
For this reason, as seen in the media, Israel has
become the culprit rather than the victim lashing
back at tormentors. Israel has become the oppressor
rather than the liberator.
Is there any wonder that the Arabs in Nairobi
row seek to deligitimize Israel's facticity by plotting
to refuse its credentials as a member of the United
Nations General Assembly? Who gave the Arabs
the courage to do this in the first place?
It is the lying media. It is the NATO nations in
their churlish cowardice. Above all, it was George
Shultz in his address on Sept. 30.
This week Shultz found it necessary to pledge
America's withdrawal from the General Assembly
and from its membership in the International
Telecommunications Committee, a UN agency, if the
Arabs prevail in Nairobi. We could care less about
the media. We have as little regard and concern for
NATO.
But what about the U.S.? How would this drastic
plan as set forth by the State Department and
Secretary of State Shultz sit with the American
people, who have now been told that Israel is a pariah
nation? Who. have been told, not that without Israel,
Lebanon would still be hostage to the PLO and to
Syria, but that the shambles of Lebanon today is Is-
rael's fault.
Confusing, isn't it? And how needlessly violent
to the best interests of Israel, and therefore to
America itself. How unnecessarily violent, if only the
truth had been told about Israel all along!
"Jewish Floridian
0 Frad Shochl
ol Palm Beach County
Combining "Our Voice' and "Federation Reporter
FREOK SHOCHET SUZANNE SMOCHET 80NNITABTAKOW EPSTEIN
Editor and Publisher Executive Editor Newt Coordinator
Published Weekly October through M id April Biweekly balance of year.
Second Claaa Pottage Paid at Boca Raton, Fla. U6P6 #088030
PALM BEACH-BOCA RATON OFFICE
2200 N Federal Mwy Suite 206, Boca Raton, Fla 33432 Phone 366-2001
Main Office Plant. 120 NE 6th St, Miami, Fla 33101 Phone 1-373-4605
Poetmaiter datum form MTt to Jewtori Ftortdton. P.O. ecu 01 27J, Miami. Ha. 33101
AdwUatoe tiajiwHor Hart Leeaer Phene W-1662
IngSuae
iFeoa
Combined Jewish ApoealJewiah Federation of Palm Beach County. Inc .Offlcert President,
Jeanne Levy Vice Presidents Peter Cummings. Alec Engelsteln. Arnold J Hoffman. Arnold
Lamperl. Or Richard G. Shugarman, Secretary. Or Elizabeth S Freilich. Treasurer. Alvin WHensky.
Executive Director. Norman J. Schlmelman Submit material for publication to Ronni Tartakow
Epstein. Director of Public Relations
Jewish Floridian does not guarantee Kashruth of Merchandise Advertised
SUBSCRIPTION Rates: Local Area U Annual (2 Year Minimum $7 50), or by membership Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach County, 501 S Flagler Dr., West Palm Beach. Fla 33401 Phone
832 2120
12HESHVAN5743
Number 33
Dr. Goodfriend Discusses Health
Care At Chaplaincy Seminar
Friday, October 29. 1982
Volume 8
Do all nursing facilities accept
medicaid applicants? Can one re-
ceive medicare payments in a
skilled nursing facility? How
does the state and federal gov-
ernments supervise the care of
medicaid patients? What are the
obligations of nursing facilites to
medicaid residents? What is the
role of the ombudsman?
These are some of the
questions comprising the multi -
layered puzzle of bureaucratic
relationships pertaining to
hospital patients and nursing
center residents which were
answered by Dr. Joseph
Goodfriend, HRS Medicare -
Medicaid advisor, for more than
50 members and guests of the
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County Chaplain Aide Program,
Sept. 12, at their first seminar
workshop for 1982-83.
Dr. Goodfriend, in his present
capacity as physician consultant
State of Florida Nursing Home
Review Team and member of the
Palm Beach County Health De-
partment, with a background in
varied aspects of health services
in New York, reviewed the
strengths and weaknesses in the
Florida system of health care for
the elderly and disabled.
Stressing the importance of the
patient-doctor relationship for an
elderly person in a skilled nursing
facility. Dr. Goodfriend noted
that there is a marked difference
in this respect, between northern
cities and those in Florida. He
observed a reluctance on the part
of physicians in this area, to pay
professional visits to nursing
centers. He feels that the Florida
system should encourage more
physician visits to the un-
derprivileged in institutions.
Commenting on government
payments for medicaid residents,
Dr. Goodfriend stated that al-
though the quality of care varies
with the nursing facility, the
State at this time pays the same
monthly sums to all facilities for
each medicaid resident, the
amount varying with the extent
of care needed. However, the
State is considering instituting a
rating system which will affect
the levels of reimbursement.
There are three levels of care
Skilled, Intermediate I and In-
termediate II. The level for each
resident is determined by a gov-
ernment medical review team,
consisting of a physician, regist-
ered nurse and a social worker.
The social worker and nurse pro-
vide most of the personal contact
between the team, nursing
facility and resident. Although
the physician occasionally makes
personal visits, the team assess-
ment is generally based on in-
spection reports received. The
physician heads the team.
"There are means of redress for
inadequacies in the treatment of
a resident," said Dr. Goodfriend,
"but this requires a degree of res-
ident awareness and indepen-
dence or the vigilance of a bene-
factor such as a relative or
friend." He suggested that the
State Ombudsman be notified
when it is felt that the nursing
facility is failing in its duty to a
resident and added that chaplain
aides be alert to situations that
need corrections enjoining the
Chaplain Aides to go through
proper channels with a report to
Rabbi Alan R. Sherman, who di-
rects the Chaplaincy program for
Jewish Federation.
Dr. Goodfriend has been an
active, valued member of the
Chaplain Aide Program for over
three years. He is a native of
Ontario, Canada, but has spent
much of his medical career at
Jamaica Hospital in New York
City, as a senior staff member.
He organized and chaired
Jamaica Hospital Medical Asso-
ciates and Utilization Review
Committee.
Dr. Goodfriend and his wife,
Honee, live at Royal Palm Beach.
The1ir daughter, Mindy is a J
of the blind and their syonSeS
employed at South Beach HnJ
tal. New York, as pSl0*
social worker. W*nU
Shamir Exits Shultz Talks
Certain of Swift Withdrawal
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) Israeli Foreign
Minister Yitzhak Shamir
emerged from a four-hour
meeting with Secretary of
State George Shultz and
announced that Israel and
the U.S. would set up a
working group to discuss
their proposals for the early-
withdrawal of all foreign
troops from Lebanon.
Shamir, who presented Shultz
with proposals drafted by the Is-
raeli Cabinet, would not reveal
any details of the Cabinet's
positions. He declined to discuss
a reported two-tier security plan
for south Lebanon that the Cabi-
net was said to have suggested.
SHAMIR SAID his talk with
Shultz, which lasted two hours
longer than had been scheduled,
was held in a "spirit of friendly
consultation." He said they were
trying to find a common solution
to withdrawal and ensuring the
security of the Lebanese-Israeli
border. Asked if he still believed
that the withdrawal of Israeli,
Syrian and PLO forces from Leb-
anon could be accomplished by
the end of this year, Shamir re-
plied, "I hope its possible."
He said he and Shultz also dis-
cussed the problems of peace in
the Middle East in general but
gave no details. Shamir did not
mention President Reagan's
Middle East peace proposals.
Earlier, Shamir warned that
"any path other than the Camp
David accords" in approaching a
solution to the Mideast crisis "is
bound to provoke" a division be-
tween Israel and the United
States, as well as "impassioned
divisions" within Israel and
among the Jewish people.
IN AN address to the World
Affairs Council in Los Angeles,
Shamir reiterated his country's
opposition to Reagan's Mideast
peace proposals, contending that
the Camp David accords "con-
tribute the most realistic and
promising way to a peacehn
solution of the Mideast conflict!
Shamir declared: "We do b
accept the contention that th
Camp David accords are dead
For us they are alive, they an
viable, and they constitute th
only agreement signed togetht,
by Israel and an Arab state. Thei
should not be foresaken. Ne
proposals are bound to desu
the existing framework which L.
been so painstakingly devised."
Shamir told the Council thij
Reagan's proposals deviati
from the Camp David accon
because they tried to determin,
the fate of Judaea and SamtnJ
before the five-year autonomj
period agreed to by Egypt, Israel
and the U.S. The President's plai]
ignored this "bask tenet of th
Camp David accords," Shan
said.
HE CONTENDED that to
effort to reach an autonomy!
agreement must be resun
within the Camp David accords]
At this stage, success is pn
dicated upon the need to refrain
from dealing with the permanent]
status of Judaea, Samaria
Gaza."
Before coming to Los AngelesJ
the Foreign Minister met in Ne
York with 250 leaders of national!
Jewish student organizations and!
with the heads of youth move-|
ments. In addition to denouncng
Reagan's proposals, Shamirl
stated that the assassination oil
President Anwar Sadat of Egypt j
a year ago "was a big blow to the!
peace process in the Mideast. We[
miss Sadat."
*&&
w
%

Beware of The
Lure Of The Cults
Dear Parents:
On Sunday morning, Oct. 31,
Dr. Sandy Andron will present a
program at Temple Israel, 1901
North Flagler Drive, West Palm
Beach, entitled: BEWARE OF
THE LURE OF THE CULTS.
This program is sponsored by our
Palm Beach Board of Rabbi and
is being offered to you and to
your teen age children. It is spec
ifically geared to 9th graders and
up and is meant to sensitize them
to the methodology of the cults
and their deceptive and enticing
propaganda.
It is clear to us all that the
danger of the culta to our Jewish
youngsters is real. It is equally
clear that some cults understand
this and target our children spec-
ifically. This Sunday morning
program is a response to that
challenge. It is hoped that
through this kind of community
education we can effectively help
your children understand the
dangers and combat their eff*
tiveness.
Dr. Andron is eminently quali-
fied to present this prog^"8
is Youth Program direct*
Central Agency for Jewish tou;
cation in Miami. He is one ot w
leading specialists in ourxounW
on culta and has travelled BJ
country extensively working
individuals enmeshed ">""
and presenting this kind of pw
gram.
All the Rabbis of oiirammjj]
ity believe our children new
kind of exposure to *J
dangers that the cult mov-J*
represents. This joint prog*
for you and your child s bJJJJI
We urge you ta be there-^m
Morning, Oct. 31 10-12. w- |
E5 1901 North Flagler Dr* |
West Palm Beach.
RABBI |
HOWARD SHAPWJ |
cbehdfoftheP^


Lto. Octobers 1982
The Jewish Flotidian of Palm Beach County
Page 5
Endowment Fund Planning
The Unlimited Marital
Deduction Under the 1961
Tax Act and Qualified
Terminable Interest!
County. Information contained
herein is not designed as legal or
tax advice. You should take up
such matters with your respec-
tive attorneys and accountants.
Should you want additional in-
formation about charitable
giving, and the various methods
which may be utilized through
the Federation's Endowment
Program, please contact Stanley
Hyman, Endowment Director of
the Jewish Federation at 832-
2120.
B, STANLEY HYMAN,
Endowment Director
. As of 1982, all property trans-
it between husband and wife
Lether made under a will or in
, inter vivo's trust, with minor
Inceptions, can be made free of
E transfer taxes (gift or estate
Li The exceptions involve
certain terminable interest
Lperty. A terminable interest is
i property interest which may
terminate or fail because of the
Laurence of an event or certain
contingency. If such a property
I interest terminates, the recipient
| of that property will no longer
,ve a right to the same control
sr its disposition. Under the
I law, as well as under the new
|i, this terminable interest
liroperty creates certain ramifica-
Idons regarding whether estate or
gift tax would be due on a partic-
ular transaction.
i Under the 1981 Economic Reco-
|my Tax Act an unlimited
[marital deduction was adopted.
[Formerly when transfers were
Inade between spouses under a
[nil and the decedent put certain
[iwrictions on the recipient
Mouse's interest, the property
[tnnsferred under the will to the
[surviving spouse would not
ilify for the marital deduction
, thus, the value of that pro-
[perty would be included in the
Liable estate of the decedent.
[Basically, if the surviving spouse
given the property interest
nthout any strings attached, the
nperty would have qualified for
I marital deduction.
Under the Economic Recovery
; Act of 1981 a special excep-
to this traditional rule Was
d. The rule now allows for a
rial type property called'
ified Terminable Interest
ty." Upon transfer of such
operty, if certain requirements
satisfied, such transfers will
*lify for the marital deduction
pass free of estate and gift
even if a terminable interest
i involved.
As indicated above, a termin-
t interest is a property in-
which may terminate or
i because of an occurence of an
J i e. the passage of time or a
ticular contingency. An
nple of such an interest
1 he where a person gives or
*qusaths property to his or her
'""! and specifies that the
use is entitled to all income of
* property for life. If the donor
*tes certain requirements such
% upon the death of that spouse,
the property should go to a par-
ticular individual or charity and
not to whomever the surviving
spouse may want the property to
go, that would be the transfer of a
terminable interest. That proper-
ty would not have qualified for
the marital deduction under the
old law. Under the new rules,
however, if a person gives or be-
queaths a qualified terminable
interest property to his or her
spouse, whereby the spouse is en-
titled to all of the income from
that property or all the income
from a portion of that property
for life, and that income interest
is payable at least annually to the
surviving spouse, than the un-
derlying property may be treated
as a "qualified terminable inter-
est property" and said property
would qualify for the marital de-
duction. This is a radical change
from the former rules, and it
should be noted that the qualified
status to such property does not
happen automatically. In the
above-cited example, the dece-
dent's personal representative
must elect to treat the qualified
terminable interest property as
such in order for it to qualify for
the marital deduction.
The above rule has very favor-
able implications in the field of
deferred charitable giving. For-
merly, if a spouse under a will
decided to create a charitable
remainder trust, (since such
trusts allows for income to a par-
ticular person; in this case we will
use the surviving spouse), and
then designates where the
principal of that trust should go
upon the death of that surviving
spouse, said trust principal would
not have qualified for the marital
deduction treament since the
property interest to the spouse
terminated at her death. Starting
in 1982, if an individual creates a
qualified charitable remainder
annuity trust or a charitable
remainder unitrust and, the only
non-charitable beneficiaries are
the donor and his spouse, the
rules which would have disal-
lowed a deduction because the
interest was terminable, would
not apply if the proper election
was made by the personal repre-
sentative- Therefore.the person
creating the charitable remainder
trust will receive a charitable
deduction for the amount of the
remainder interest and a marital
deduction for the value of the
annuity or unitrust interest. This
would mean that no transfer tax
would be imposed on the death of
the creator of the trust, if it were
a testamentary charitable re-
maider trust. In addition, on the
death of the surviving spouse, no
transfer tax would be imposed on
the trust corpus passing to the
charity, upon the death of the in-
come beneficiary (the spouse).
Since the marital deduction
and charitable deductions are
very important elements in estate
planning, one should carefully
note that there are transitional
rules which provide that the un-
limited marital deduction would
not apply to transfers resulting
from a will executed or a trust
created on or before September
12, 1981, which contained a
"maximum" marital deduction
clause. It was fairly common
practice to include a "maximum"
marital deduction clause in es-
tates which would likely be
taxable prior to 1981. The transi-
tional rule does not automatically
permit a will which had a "maxi-
mum" marital deduction clause
to be interpreted as containing an
"unlimited" marital deduction
clause. What this means is that,
if wills containing "maximum"
marital deduction clauses are not
amended before the death of the
decedent to refer specifically to
an unlimited marital deduction
and there is no state law which
would construe the formula
clause as referring to an "unlim-
ited" marital deduction, then the
maximum marital deduction
would apply as it would have
under the old law. If you hav a
will or trust executed prior to
September 12, 1981 and believe
that you would have a taxable
estate, it would be wise to contact
your attorney to discuss
amending the formula clause if
one is included m your will and to
consider whether the unlimited
marital deduction would be ad-
vantageous to your estate plan.
It would also be a good time to
consider including a charitable
bequest in your will as well.
NOTE: This column is written as
a service to provide general infor-
mation to the public about the
Endowment Program of the
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
Plena's
spirited
message is an
inspiration
to us all."
-TEDDY KOLLEK,
Mayor of Jerusalem
Beautifully reflective of
Rr\thu>K about Rena
"lumber*... Exudes a
ZES and strength of
nd BI"ur*,n* creativity,
^awUltoUvethatwill
MaO readers into her
<- anatomy of an ninem
HeadStron
cJui!ry ?f Conquest* and
DOCK*. Mnd eh* **'"*' "
Crown Puwtfwv Cm. Park Aw J* i
,001. P^mUV *>=^*r*9
cn0. NY .nclNJ mdMB.""
The Women's Division Business and Professional Women's Steering
Committee met to finalise program plans and discuss campaign plans
for the year. Present at the meeting were, (left to right) Lynne Ehrlich,
Women's Division director; Cynnie List, president of Women's
Division; Ellie Halperin, chairperson for the Business and
Professional Women's Group; and committee members, Ilene Silber
and Miriam Levinson.
Announcements
Announcement such as engagements, weddings and Bar-Bat
Mitzvahs are published as a free service by The Jewish
Floridian. Information should be sent to: 501 S. Flagler Drive,
Suite 305, W. Palm Beach, FL 33401. If desired, attach a clear
black and white photograph.
Riverside
Rivrr:.i<|i-Menu >ri.il Chapel.Inc. Mincr.ilDirer.lcir>
Miami Beach/ Miami/North Miami Beach
Dade County Phone No. 531-1151
Hollywood/Ft. Lauderdale (Tamarac)
Broward County Phone No. 523-5801
West Palm Beach: 683-8676
Carl Grossberg. President
Alfred Golden, Executive Vice Pr Leo Hack.V'.rV, Religious Advisor
' '" "''KeTt'h Kronish
SixinsiKinMlhrGuiirfliJinPlnnPrf' ^ri.mi. II ufiur.il
Tradition.
Ids what makes us Jews.
.
-liMililililililllililiMllllillMilllllilllilllllililiM^
I
m
*^&5SESg' EKHSEH3SE&E
waniiiniiiniwM
PRAYER IN PUBLIC SCHOOLS!
A JEWISH ISSUE?
Channel 12
Sunday, October 31st, 10KX) A.M.
ON
"Generation To Generation"
with hostess
BARBARA WEINSTEIN
Moderator BARBRA KAPLAN
Panel: BERNARD KIMMEL
RABBI ALAN SHERMAN
REV. JOHN MANGRUM
Plus:
ROBIN ALDEN, Chiropractor AL SEGEL, Jewish Baker |
1
------------ ___=
IIIIIIIIIHrllllllllMllrtrllllllllllliaiSIIIIIIIIIIII
,


Page 6
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, Oct
ober29
Organizations in the News
B'NAI B'RITH WOMEN
Menorah Chapter of B'nai
B'rith Women Coming
Events: Nov. 17 flea market at
Miller's Parking Lot, 80 North
Military Trail. Clean and usable
merchandise. Call Frieda or
Ruth. Nov. 18-21. Palm Beach
Spa. four days and three nights,
three meals daily, message daily
tax and gratuities included.
Nov. 21, Sunday, Charity Bazaar
Day at Cross County Mall.
Handmade or homemade items
only. The theme is Chanukah.
Call Bella Goldberg. Nov. 25-28.
Thanksgiving weekend, four
days, three nights, Deauville
Hotel, Miami Beach. Call Evelyn
Fischer.
B'nai B'rith Women's Masada
Chapter's program for our Nov. 9
meeting.
The topic is "Hypnotism."
Our speaker Nancy Ellis has an
impressive background with a
degree in Her 1th and Physical
Education and also has been
trained as a Physician's Assis-
tant, and has been on many radio
and television programs. She is
now in private practice as a
Clinical Hypnotist and teaches
with the Mental Health Associa-
tion.
Meeting is at 7:45 p.m. at the
American Savings Bank (en-
trance of the West Gate in Cen-
tury Village). refreshments
served. Lillian Stein, program,
vice president.
Our Special Events are as fol-
lows: On Nov. 6 (Saturday) at
the Rosarian Academy see and
enjoy the "Habimah Players."
Refreshments served. For
reservations and information call
Frances Chodosh. Lenore Eidus,
vice president of communications
- 696-5496.
The Palm Beach Kennel Club
is holding their first Annual Club
Exposition on Wednesday eve-
ning Nov. 10, which is Charity
Night. There will be continuous
entertainment including magi-
cians, strolling performers, pup-
peteers and animal acts, also fire-
works, lots of music, plus arts
crafts exhibits. Donation is $1.50.
Tickets are available by calling
Frances Chodosh. Please join us
in this venture for a delightful
evening.
B'nai B'rith Women, Masada
Chapter invites you to join us for
a four day New Years weekend,
which includes transportation,
taxes and gratuities. There will
be four breakfasts, three dinners
and show, one dinner at Cork &
Cleaver, New Year Eve Dinner
party Favors and drinks, four
day pass to Epcot Center, a
luxurious weekend to remember
$225 per person double occu-
pancy.
The next regular membership
meeting of B'nai B'rith Women,
Olam Chapter, Lake Worth, will
be held on Thursday, Nov. 4 at
12:30 p.m. in the Social Hall of
Challenger Country Club, Poin-
ciana Drive, Lake Worth. The
guest speaker will be Robert M.
Wilson, executive director of
Mid-County Medical Center, a
position which he has held since
March. Mr. Wilson's topic will be
"What Holistic Medicine Is All
About." From 1968-1982. Mr.
Wilson was associate director of
the Health Planning Council of
Palm Beach County.
Recently Olam Chapter do-
nated copies of the Anti-Defama-
tion League Date and Memo
Books to the Department heads
and Administrators in both Lake
Worth Junior and Senior High
Schools. Also, given in the name
of Olam Chapter, were issues of
Scientific American, spanning
two years, for students to use in
science as reference material.
These will be an integral part of
the science library at the senior
high school.
B'nai B'rith, Lucern Lakes
Lodge No. 3132 is sponsoring a
four day three night extravagan-
za at Harder Hall," Sebring
Florida, on Nov. 11, 12, 13, 14.
The price of $150 per person,
double occupancy, includes
gratuities, air conditioned room
with private bath, daily breakfast
and dinner from the regular
menu, a sumtuous cocktail party,
golf, no Green Fee (Cart 14). en-
tertainment and dancing nightly,
and unlimited court time for ten-
nis. For reservations call either
Al Sasso or Bennett Lee.
HADASSAH
Hadassah Volunteers will con-
duct a Telethon Campaign "Hello
Hadassah Sunday" on Nov. 7 for
the purpose of giving information
and enrolling new members. They
will re-enroll the present mem-
bers who have not paid their dues
up to the present time. They will
be available to pick up dues if re-
quested to do so.
Radio Station WPBR will
broadcast spot announcements
by Sylvia Mass, President of
Lake Worth Chapter in intervals
commencing on Saturday Oct. 16
and continuing throughout Octo-
ber and November leading to the
Campain on Sunday the 7th ad-
vising the pubilc of Hadassah
aims.
Just say "Yes" when you are
called!
Yovel Hadassah West Palm
Beach scheduled events: Nov. 4 -
Flea market at West Palm Beach
Auditorium 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Contributions appreciated of new
clothing, furniture. kitchen
items, etc. Call Reba Strauss
Norwich D 90 or Helen Kalick
Andover I 223. Nov. 11 Board
meeting, American Savings &
Loan 9:30 a.m. Nov. 12 Yovel
will participate in a Hadassah
Sabbath at Temple Anshei
Sholom 8 p.m. All welcome.
SanKO *~ s tuf SanKO
It's such great fun sharing the excitement ot your latest
trip with special friends There's nothing like treating
your guests to good times and a good cup of Sort
Brand Decaffeinated Coffee Why Santq3 Brand'
Purely and simply it's 100% real coffee with all the great
taste you want from your coftee. yet it s 97% caffem-free
So, you and your company can enpy all the Sortu*
Brand you want and you'll always get the satisfying
flavor that only 10X3% real coffee can give Sorto* Brand
100% real coffee and tastes IT! That s what manes it
sucn a welcome guest1
K CERTIFIEP
KOSHER
Pj\*5V Enjoy \bur Coffee
, registered trademarko" General Foods
and Enjoy Yourself.
c General Foods Corooralon 1H1
r1*
^.ihi... mM
Community Relations Council Speakers available
Topics Israel, Community Concerns, Soviet
Jewry, Energy, Holocaust
For information and bookings, contact
Rabbi Alan R. Sherman's office
at the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County, 832-2120
The West Boynton Chapter of
Hadassah will have a paid up
membership party on Monday,
Nov. 1, at 12:30 p.m. at the Royal
Palm Clubhouse at 22nd Ave. off
Federal Highway, in Boynton
Beach.
Rabbi Samuel M. Silver of the
Temple Sinai in Delray will be the
guest speaker, and the Lee Vassel
Choral Group of Lake Worth will
present a musical program. Ori-
ginal words to the music have
been written by Goldie Bernstein,
president of the Lake Worth
Chapter of Hadassah. Refresh-
ments will be provided by Fran
Traum.
The Pain, Beach Ch.pJ
Hadassah mil hold its JJi
board meeting on tH
Nov. 4. at the Sunrise nL
Military Trail and S^
Road, West Palm Beach at <3
8III.
...Thf ?ard meeting of d
Worth Chapter of H.duL B
been charged this month only
Wednesday, Nov. 3 at 7 n mi
the home of Goldye Bernstein
order to allow the member.'
participate in the Jewish Feda
Uon's Women's Assembly
NEW

The delicious, nutritious Noah's Ark
of pasta-shaped animals kids love!
Moms and kids go for Zooroni two by two! Kids think Zooroni
looks as great as it tastes And since Zooroni is vitamtn-
ennched pasta simmered in lots of yummy tomato sauce and
tangy cheese. Moms love to pair up with it, too1

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FEATURING BEAUTIFUL
ITEMS FROM ISRAEL
Original crafts and religious articles
imported from Israel are now
available in the Palm Beaches.
Jewelry, crystal, pottery and many
other fine articles by artists such as
Calderon. Fiat Ami, David Versano.
Yoeli and many others.
COME JOIN US AT THE
CROSS COUNTY MALL
Open:
Mon-Thurs. & Sat. 10AM to 8PM.
Fri. 10AM to 5PM,
Sun. 12 to 5PM.
BU
(
^4356 Okeechobee Blvd.. West Palm Beach.
the. _
FL (305) 47M274-


\m October 29.1982
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Pge7
E during the same day from
5a.m. to 2 p.m.
I isnil plans will be made for the
LLhon Hello Hadassah Sunday
|SionWPBRonNov.7iid
I St Chapter Education Day to be
ljddonNov.il.
Lvlh Chapter of Hadaa*h
livents:
luw 12_Hadassah Sabbath at
rretiM> Anahei Sholem.
Itoaker: Shirley Blumberg,
Umber of national service com-
I gttee of Hadassah.
I j,ov. 710 Lido Spa. Call
I Louis Lipkin for reservations.
Nov. H Flea Market at
Miller's Supermarket. Hold all
I aleible items (dishes, pots &
lans electrical items). For de-
|ljb call Martha Sheffrin or
[Florence Steckman.
Nov. 15 Paid up member-
Ijhip meeting and luncheon. For
nervation call Frances Rose or
lloseNovick.
I Thanksgiving weekend at the
I Sea Gull in Miami Beach. Call
[Emma Shipper or Ceil Berkowitz
[lor reservations.
WOMEN'S LEAGUE FOR
ISRAEL
The Women's League for Is-
Irtti. "Sabra Chapter." will hold a
Matinee performance of the
""Man from La Mancha" on Nov.
13, at the Stage Theatre.
AMERICAN
MIZRACHI WOMEN
American Mizrachi Women,
lliakoni Chapter, will hold its
regular meeting on Wednesday,
' v. 10, at 1 p.m. at the Ameri-
_) Savings Bank, Westgate,
K.V The well known personality,
|Norma Sirota will entertain us.
shments will be served. All
vited.
Remember! Our mini luncheon
ad card party on Sunday, Oct.
Hat 11 a.m. in the party room.
YIDDISH CULTURE
GROUP
On Nov. 2 The Yiddish Culture
of Century Village
nts The Century Village
dolin Ensemble under the
ttionof Morris Bell.
Carl Martin a professional
piager with a fine background of
ftcomplishments will entertain
^accompanied on piano by Mil-
wed Birnbaum.
Gabriel Rabenbach will read a
Bit poem by the famous yid-
TwhpoetAvromReisin.
The Nov. 9 program is spon-
I by The Chase Federal and
Bank. We will present The
I III Singers, a group that
normed for us before to great
MB.
[On Nov. 16th Yiddish Culture
^sents Fanny Ushkow and
nam Binder, two fine pianists
[tying four hands on the piano.
WjV Fleishman will read
rf"y .'or us in english and a
g.Wo wi consist of Mildred
P'moaum on piano, Beatrice
PoncaDo and vocalist Max
aDert. A real delightful group.
[The NoV. 23 program of Yid.
|h Culture will present Irving
P*. violmist. Mr. Kupfer is
^master for Century
.' symphony C jstra. He
* "aompanied on the piano
tfftmL Birnb- Mr.
fchhU 3 tjJen- in Partnership
C,fetGertrude'Play^e
t*" ouets for us.
C'ey^hmanwiUgiveus
fe^UtTheJeWi8hHome
?-Ruth Hyde Group will
LlV" ?"ginal contata en-
W* whoi will narrate the
th i ,soloi8t8 are Ann
rhHviaC ?uckerman and
nSnT8trau8,cal du^tor and
^CU 3 the beautiful
(SJJPSS Kay from Deer-
g^JU* andhebrewaccom-
htum. PWno b* Madred
^Sftfi Heln Bera-
00 B always a delight to
hear and is always received with
great enthusiasm, will play for
us.
WOMEN'S AMERICAN
ORT
When it comes to entertain-
ing you,ORT surely knows how.
On Oct. 30, ORT, Wellington
Chapter, is having an evening out
at the Hungry Genie, located at
6659 Lake Worth Road, Lake
Worth in the Discount Fashion
Pfaza.
We promise you fine, authentic
Mid-Eastern cuisine, and an in-
comparable atmosphere with a
close-up view of the featured
exotic belly dancer. There will
also be music for your listening
and dancing pleasure. The cost of
this evening is a mere $15 per
person contribution. This in-
cludes a full dinner, appetizer,
dessert and coffee. For the time
of your life call Paulette Weiss or
Nancy Miner. Please RSVP by
Oct. 19, if possible.
This function is open to the
general public as well as all ORT
members and their guests every-
where.
We appreciate you coming and
we know you'll have such a good
time one that will be remem-
bered all winter long.
BOYNTON BRANDEIS
WOMEN
The Brandeis University Na-
tional Women's Committee of
Boynton Beach will meet on
Monday, Nov. 15 at 12:30 p.m. at
the Royal Palm Clubhouse.
Watson Duncan III will review
the book "Helen Gahagan
Douglas.'' This should not be
missed. Refreshments will be
served.
A board meeting is scheduled
for Nov. 1 at 1 p.m. at the home
of Sylvia Rosenberg, Bldg. 2,
Apt. 113.
Nov. 4 at 1 p.m. is the date and
time for the Literature Study
Group, at the home of Sally
Friedman. Martha Sapir will re-
view "Season of Delight" by
Jeanne Greenberg.
The following dates should be
marked off:
Monday Dec. 20 Mini
Chanukah luncheon, with Judith
Temple in a one year woman
show as Elizabeth Barrett
Browning.
Saturday Jan. 8 Matinee
performance of "My Fair Lady"
at the Burt Reynolds Dinner
Theatre. For information and
reservations contact Thelma
Adlowitz, chairman, Janet
Asher, co-chairman or Martha
Sapir, Fund Raising chairman.
March 21-24 (Four days
three nights) at the Regency
Hotel Spa in Bal Harber. For in-
formation and reservations con-
tact Rhoda Collier, chairman
Sophie Beldner, co-chairman, or
Martha Sapir Fund Raising
chairman.
We are happy to report that
the Epcot trip is sold out and we
are looking forward to the next
trip.
FTnrrtnrtrrrsTrvTrrrrrrrr^^
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Economy I 25______ 76
7am-lpm
1pm-6pm
6pm-7am
EUROPE
Standard
Discount
Economy
237
178
142
1.33
1.00
80
7am-lpm
1pm-6pm
6pm-7am
PACIFIC
Standard
Discount
Economy
422
3.17
2.53
158
1 19
95
5pm-llpm
10am-5pm
llpm-rOam
CARIBBEAN/ATLANTIC
Standard
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Economy
168
126
1.01
1 13
85
68
SOUTH AMERICA
Standard
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Economy
277
208
166
1 18
89
71
NEAR EAST
CENTRAL AMERICA
Standard
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Economy
Standard
Discount
Economy
3.68
276
2.21
133
100
80
262
1.97
1.57
1.13
85
68
ArklCA
Standard
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Economy
289
217
1.73
INDIAN OCEAN
Standard
Discount
Economy
522
3.92
3.13
2.17
163
1.30
' For count,** that are no. dotoble. there's o 3 minute rmwnum ond -oles orejomewtoi higher
WkZ> -o- schedule, aopMo Canodo <^ M-a Ojk^ toco. op*o,
federal ecise tox ol 1% odded on oil coH> billed the United States
them, or almost anywhere else in the world,
at low one-minute rates. The 3-minute
minimum call is no longer
I in effect except in
. countries that are not
' dialable.
This chart gives you
| the new 1-minute dial
rates, the lower rates for
each additional minute,
and the new calling times:
' Standard, Discount, and
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| Bargain rates are
available 7 days a week,
day or nighteven to
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| No International
Dialing in your area? You
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"Hello World" costs
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Want to know more?
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4pm-!0pm
7am-4 pm
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FIRST MINUTH/t ADDITIONAL MINUTE
1


Page 8
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, October 29,1;
SjSW:*:*:*::-^^
I Jkkmud the 'tXoum
by Stac( Scsse/j
"Around the Town" would like to hear from you. Send articles
S typewritten and double-spaced to Stad Leaser, c-o The Jewish
g Floridian, 501 South Flagler Drive, Suite 305, West Palm Beach,
Fl. 33401.
Eighty-one years young, that is Al Ross. Al, honoree for the
S National Amputation Association, and presently golf pro at the
3 Palm Beach Spa, will be celebrating his 81st birthday this
month. Joining Al for his happy birthday will be wife Etta, on
g the board of the City of Hope, and daughter Sunny EUiot, Public
:::: Relations officer for First American Bank and Trust. Many
friends and relatives including Joseph P. Mandlebaum, winner
g of seven U JA awards and on the Board of the Jewish Theolo-
38 gical Seminary, and Edward Bronstien, who is on the Board of
: the Palm Beach Rotary Club, will be celebrating with Al. Happy
Birthday!
I
5
Snowbird Florence Kippel is looking forward to returning to
Leisureville after a long and busy summer. Florence's summer
consisted of a cruise, the Elder Hostel, and a visit to EPCOT.
Welcome home Florence.
Our heartfelt condolence to Phyllis Gerard on the recent
loss of her father, Nathan Soever. Phyllis is a member of the
Board of the Jewish Federation and co-chairman of the
Holocaust Commemoration Committee.
To life, to life, L' Chaim Mazol Tov to Ruth and Steve j
: Abramson on the recent birth of granddaughter Emily Anne,
g Emily's proud parents are Patti and Larry Abramson of New
g York.
Businessmen Negotiate
To Take Over El Al
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) The government has begun
secret negotiations with groups of Jewish businessmen in
Israel and abroad for their possible purchase of El Al, the
State-owned national air carrier, it was reported here.
A meeting of the El Al board of directors was to have
taken place here, reportedly to recommend to the
government and stockholders that the airline be placed in
voluntary receivership.
THE MEETING was postponed after several score
airline employees broke into the board room. El Al
management suspended operations last month and has
been chartering foreign aircraft to carry ticketholders.
The suspension was triggered by a wildcat strike of flight
attendants.
STATE OF
ISRAEL BONDS
BOUGHT AND SOLD
Invest in
Israel Securities
WE RE SPECIALISTS IN
ISRAEL SECURITIES.

TRANSAC IU )\s DAILY VIA TELEX
TO I^RM I STOCK EXCHANGE.
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Securities
NAS(>
Bank Liumi W-lsraei B M
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New York NY 10017
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Corporation Ton Free (soo) 221 -48i8
The Hidden Treasures of Pragu
By PHILIP FISHER.
Chairman,
Public Relations
Committee of The
Jewish Federation
of Palm Beach County
"So many of us live in a bubble
not realizing that many of our
Jewish bretheren live difficult
lives in Eastern Europe behind
the Iron Curtain."
As the sun set behind the In-
ternational terminal at Kennedy
Airport, I sat on the 747 along
with 40 fellow Jews repre-
senting the St. Louis, Detroit,
Birmingham, Houston, New
York and Palm Beach Jewish
Federations, and I found myself
caught between the anticipation
of my first mission to Czechoslo-
vakia and the anxiety of the con-
straints that would be placed
upon us, as was relayed by our
mission leader, Larry Jackier.
First, he advised us not to ex-
change our monies with black
market traders who would be ap-
proaching us on the street to
make this exchange at higher
rates than offered over the count-
er. We were also advised to be
aware that our most intimate
conversations could be moni-
tored, expecially those political in
nature. No pictures were to be
taken of the airport layout, any
military equipment, and certain
bridges in Prague. We were en-
couraged to take letters from the
Jews in Prague back to the
States and to spend more money
than the mandatory $13 a day
that the Czechoslovakian
government required.
The purpose of this historic
mission to Prague was to give us
an opportunity to view some of
the finest pieces of Judaica in
Eastern Europe. By allowing us,
a cross-section of western Jewry,
to view these treasures, this Iron
Curtain country would benefit
from the American dollars that
we would spend. (Next year this
collection will tour eleven mu-
seums in various American cities,
arriving at the Smithsonian In-
stitute in Washington, D.C. in
September 1983).
After landing some ten hours
later in the Czechoslovakian
capitol, our apprehension was
heightened as we left the last
semblance of western security.
We found the airport empty of
the normal crowd of travelers
rushing to their appointed gates.
Instead we found state employed
concessionaires, baggage han-
dlers, and military officers. After
clearing baggage and passport
control we were greeted by the
head of the Jewish community of
Prague and a representative of
the Czechoslovakian govern-
ment.
After we checked into the hotel
we gathered and took a walking
tour through Prague, a city of
over 1.2 million people. The
gothic, renaissance, baroque and
rococo styles of architecture
dominated the scenery. It seemed
unjust that this beautiful archi-
tecture could not be enjoyed by a
democratic society.
As we walked through the
Starometski Square the sullen
faces of the citizens echoed the
oppression of the state's de-
mands. From this square we had
our first glimpse of the Old-New
Synagogue. This 700 year-old
gothic styled synagogue is the
traditional base for the 1,500
registered Jews in Prague. The
mam synagogue was dominated
by a pulpit surrounded by an iron
ARABS NEED PEACE MORE
THAN THEY NEED WAR:
GAZIT
Speaking at the six annual
Negev Award Dinner, Shlomo
Oazit, president of the Ben
Ounon University of the Negev,
stated that "Arab nations today
have a greater need for peace
than to fight a war against
Israel. He continued," the ques-
tion today is not anymore can
there be peace, but what Arab
natns will next join the peace
process."
grill constructed in the 15th cen-
tury.
The next day we were intro-
duced to the collection of Judaica
at the State Jewish Museum. We
were fortunate that Mark Talis-
man, director of the Washington
Action Office of the Council of
Jewish Federations, was in
Prague at this time to serve as
our guide. Mark has been the
main force responsible for getting
these Judaic treasures out of
Prague and over to the United
States for exhibition. He showed
us thousands of artifacts, includ-
ing torah pointers (yads), breat-
plates, crowns, covers, etc., that
were seized and hidden by the
Nazis during World War II :nd
gathered in this one central loca-
tion. As I looked at these hidden
treasures, I began to realize that
the real hidden treasures of
Prague were those Jews who still
live in that city today and I
thought how unfair it w,,
some of these treasure?^
soon travel to freedom, wCy
the Jewish people themselves,
unable to do so.
to be continued .
An-nell
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j^t Congressman It JB
Dan Mica
Keep him working for you...
WE RECOMMEND...
DAN MICA
"Mica's 10 years ol experience as
administrative assistant to lormer
Congressman Paul Rogers prepared
him well tor public service
After first being elected to Congress
in 1978. Mica in his initial two years
became one of the most effective
freshmen congressmen in the nation.
In his second term, he has matured
and increased his value to the nation.
his state and the people of his district
His influence has grown with his
membership on the Foreign Affairs
and Veterans Affairs Committees and
the Select Committee on Aging
He has also been active in winning
approval of legislation designed to
help reduce illegal emigration from
Haiti to the U S. and In obtaining
funding for outpatient clinics and
other medical assistance programs to
veterans in his district

j Mica not only pays close
attention to his responsibilities
on the floor of the House,
where he has an almost perfect
voting record, but also it
known for first rate service to
constituents in solving
problems and cutting
Washington red tape. J}
He often dissents from more liberal
positions taken by his party Although
he calls himself a moderate Democrat
his most valuable quality is his refusal
to blindly follow partisan paths or
ideological currents instead, tie takes a
reasoned, practical, nondogrnalic
approach, addressing each issue on us
merits." ,,,.
Fort Lauderdtle News and Sun Senim
August 29. tw
MICA. A RECORD OF SERVICE
AND ACCOMPLISHMENT _
Congressman Dan Mica sponsored
important legislation to:
Increase Social Security
earning limitation
Establish a special Federal Crime
Co-ordinalor
Co-sponsored the Florida
Wilderness Act ._.mitM
. Introduced the Mica Amendment ic
the flow of illegal aliens into Soum
Florida (signed into public law oy
President Reagan)
RE-ELECT CONGRESSMAN DAN MKA.
VOTE IN THE GENERAL ELECTION
ON NOVEMBER 2nd
Paid lor by the CornmmM to (Meet Congressman 0" Mea Dav-iM;', },,v...j>;.$&$
te^^M^x*^ III""


r29.1982
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 9
si>
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Page 10
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, October;
TAD' Gift of Memorialize
Late Son of Irene Guffey
Irene Guffey, who has been the
office manager and secretary of
Temple Israel for the past fifteen
years, takes comfort in knowing
that her dead son's eyes are now
"seeing" for a 35-year-old woman
in Knoxville, Tennessee, who has
been blind since birth.
Irene's son, the late 36-year-old
John D. Houser, bought a
motorcycle on Wednesday
morning, Sept. 30, 1981; that
evening he was in an accident and
died on Oct. 1,1981.
That same night, as he had
previously ordered, his eyes were
on their way to "see" again.
In order to honor Irene and to
pay respect to the memory of her
son, on Sept. 10, the Congrega-
tion of Temple Israel, 1901 North
Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach,
dedicated a silver "YAD" which
had been donated by Irene's
many friends and was inscribed
in memory of her son. The
"YAD" is a pointer used in
Synagogues whfle reading the
Torah during Religious Services.
Irene's daughter, Susan Partain
and her granddaughter, Nikki
Partain, were present at this
service.
Irene comes from Tennessee
and during this interview she
said, "Throughout my 16 year
involvement with Temple Israel,
I was NEVER treated as an
outsider. I always felt as one of
the family!"
Community
Calendar
October 29 November 4
October 29
JEWISH FEDERATION LEADERSHIP RETREAT THRU Oct. 31
October 31
Temple Beth Torch Sisterhood Rummage & White Elephant
Sale.
November 1
.JEWISH FEDERATION EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MTG. 8 p.m. >
Temple Israel Sisterhood board 10 a.m. Congregation An-
shei Sholom Sisterhood board 9:45 a.m. Temple Beth El Sis-
terhood board 8 p.m. Women's American ORT Mid Palm -
board 1 p.m. Temple Israel Executive Board Hadassah Tik-
vah board 1 p.m. B'nai B'rith No 3046 board 3 p.m.
Brandeis University Women Boynton Beach board I p.m.
Temple Judea board 7:30 p.m. Jewish Community Day
School board 8 p.m. Hadassah West Boynton Beach noon
Pioneer Women Cypress Lakes Burt Reynolds Theatre
November 2
Temple Beth El board -8 p.m. Women's American ORT West
Palm Beach board 12:30 p.m. National Council of Jewish
Women Palm Beach board 10 a.m. B'nai B'rith Women -
Chai board 8 p.m. Jewish Community Center no school
holiday program Temple Israel Men's Club dinner meeting
Women's American ORT Wellington board 8 p.m.
Women's American ORT Golden Lakes board 10 a.m.
November 3
JEWISH FEDERATION WOMEN'S DIVISION WOMEN'S ASSEMBLY
DAY HYATT, WEST PALM BEACH 8:45 a.m. 2:15 p.m. JEW-
ISH FEDERATION WOMEN'S DIVISION BUSINESS & PROFRES-
SIONAL MTG. 6 p.m. Labor Zionist Alliance- 1 p.m. Temple
Beth Sholom Men's Club board Temple Beth Sholom Sister-
hood 1 p.m. Jewish Communtiy Center board 8 p.m.
Pioneer Women-Ezral 12:30 p.m.
November 4
JEWISH FEDERATION PUBLIC RELATIONS MEETING 7 p.m JEW-
ISH FEDERATION NORTH COUNTY CAMPAIGN MEETING B'nai
B'rith Women Olam 12:30 p.m. Jewish Home for the Aged
Board of Trustees 4:30 p.m. Hadassah Chai Board 10 a.m.
Hadassah Palm Beach County board 9:45 a.m. B'nai
B'rith Women Ohav 1 p.m. Congregation AitzChaim Sister-
hood board 10 a.m. Hadassah Bat Gurion board 9:30
a.m. Hadassah Yovel Flea Market West Palm Beach Audi-
torium 10 a.m. Hadassah Shalom Flea Market West Palm
Beach Auditorium 10 a.m. Pioneer Women Theodore Herzl-
1 p.m. Women's American ORT Palm Beach Evening
Women's American ORT Lake Worth-Covered Bridge 12:30
p.m.
B'NAI B'RITH Announces
The B'nai B'rith Insurance Program
JOIN NOW! WE ENROLL MEMBERS
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MEDICARE SUPPLEMENT (MOO-as-13077)
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Also Available:
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900 N. Federal Highway Suite 300
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Name
Date of Birth.
B'nai B'rith Member Yes.
.No_
Address
City_____
Jewish People and Places
By STANLEY SHOTZ
Vice President and ADL
Chairman, B'nai B'rith Lake
Worth Lodge No. 3016
My interest in southern living
began with my trying "kosher
style" grits back in the middle
'40s. Ever since then I have
picked up a few tidbits about
Jewish life in Florida. My
curiosity began in earnest when I
saw a license tag with the imprint
of LEVY, whereas my tag at the
time read DADE and still others
I saw read BROWARD, PALM
BEACH and MONROE. The
name Levy wasn't the first mark
that the Jews made in this state,
one of the first recorded Jews was
Alexander Salomon, a money
broker in Pensacola during the
1760's some relationsihp must
exist between him and the finan-
cier of Washington's Army,
Haym Salomon of Philadelphia
fame. Then too, there was David
Moses who was listed as a store
owner on the 1783 Spanish
census at St. Augustine.
When Florida was transferred
to the U.S. in 1821, the Jewish
heritage really began to move
along according to Pensacola and
St. Augustine records. There was
Moses Elias Levy, who had a son
David Levy, who changed his
name to David Levy Yulee.
Florida wanted to honor David
Lvy and named a county for
him, then he added a few mor-
honors to his credit. He not only
became the first U.S. Senator
from the state but he became the
first Jew to serve in the U.S.
-2IP-
____Telephone
Senate. Just as you go up 1-95
and are ready to leave Florida at
the Georgia state line, the last
town and the last road off of the
Interstate is identified by a sign
pointing to Yulee. Most likely, if
David had not altered his name
we would have had a town in
Florida called Levy as well as a
county just a bit west of Ocala.
After the Civil War, most
Jewish families were living in
Gainesville, DeLand, Palatka,
Tampa and Jacksonville. It was
Pensacola that documented the
first synagogue, Temple Beth-El
in 1874. The second in the state ,
was chartered in Jacksonville in
1882. The name on the records
was Temple Ahavath Chesed. A
survey made about that time
showed that the growth of Jews
in Florida had climbed to 772 of
which 130 made their homes in
Jacksonville. Then 20 years later,
about the turn of the century, the
Jewish population had reached
almost 3,000 and a number of
them had migrated to the most
southern counties of the state.
One man, Isidore Cohen, made
his way to Ft. Pierce, West Palm
Beach and finally Miami. Mr.
Cohen and 25 other Jews founded
a synagogue in newly
in-
corporated Miami and i
that city's first Rosh Ha,
The main development
Jewish community in
Miami dates from 1913,
residents founded Con
B'nai Zion which was kt,
Beth David. They were I
an area in the city can
Jewish burials. By theeim
1950's, only 45 years laterJ
Jews had grown to
residents. Now, in the 196
Jewish population living l
Broward and Pain
Counties rivals the poouli
Tel Aviv and the City
salem.
While Wall Street, Tin Pa,
and Broadway jaWl
producing the Strauss
wyns, Mayers, GershwiJ
Jolson, the Jews of Florid
developing a lifestyle th
made it a great place ta
Florida has become a veryl
segment of World Jewry f
in a short span of time (
create an enchanted land. I
of this nation is any k
charitable, concerned over|
problems or involved inth
of its people than the
communities of Florida.
:w:-S-S:-ffl::^
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LAKE WORTH IANKMG CENTER
Corner ot Lake Worth Rd and Jog Rd
JUflTERiAWI)6 CENTER
Cornet ol Indiantown Rd and MiMaryTrai:
CalltM-ZM*
FLAGLER CWTM DOWNTOWN Wfl
Sf" S fUgw. Oi WPb
FOREST ieUIAINDCBr
Corner ot Forest H* Blvd and Florida woo H"
PALM IIACH UMtll UMm CENTER
Corner ot Ofceecnobee Btvd and
Palm Beach Lakes Btvd
NORTHLAKE BANKING CENTER
Northiake Blvd Across trom K Man


October 29. 1982
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 11
jy, the South Florida Jewish Civil Service
ijm* were honored with the presentation of
I States Flag with an accompanying
i that said the flag was flown over the
States Capitol at the request of
man Daniel A. Mica. Presenting the flag
bert Polk, the district representative for
wnan Mica, who was in Washington.
I flag on the left is Robert Polk, Cong,
fi Dist. Rep. and Sid Levine, chapter
si. on right with the Certificate of Cer-
in his hand. The chapter's officers
standing in front of the flag (left to right! are:
Jack Zaslowsky, Fin. secy.; Michael Malbin, Cor.
secy.; Julius Conn, historian; Jeanette S. Levine,
secy.; Louis Vogel, 2nd v. pres.; Dr. George S.
Brookman, Legislative chairman; Sylvia C.
Burke. Soc. secy.; Carl Epstein, UJA chrm.;
Minna Malbin, Soc. and Hosp. chrm.; Eli
Rosenthal, trustee. Not shown: 1st V. Pres.,
Benjamin Klarreich; Treasurer Renee Klarreich;
auditor Theodore Frolow; representative to
National, Louis Koppelman, trustee Bernard
Simon and Daniel Levey; and Laternate rep to
National Charles Katz.
iemayel Pleads for Instant Withdrawal
By YITZHAK RABI
HITED NATIONS -
- President Amin
lyel of Lebanon de-
here Monday that
I Palestinians in his
should leave Leba-
|"in peace and freedom
I self-determination in
land, Palestine." At
Isame time, he called
[the immediate and un-
Itional withdrawal of
non-Lebanese forces
I Lebanon and stressed
(peace in Lebanon is a
odition to peace in the
He East.
relatively short speech to
FW Nations General As-
SUPER
FUND
RAISER!
KAFTANS
EASY SELL
ONE SEE
RTSALL
WVAWETY
PATTERNS*
FABRICS
LENGTHS
*^UW.TouBM..ApreM
^*. Sr.l. Novtiu^
UUFliAITS
WO Arch St
JJ1 pA 19107
I 15) 922-6638
"* For Catalog '
sembly, Gemayel, who arrived in
New York Monday and met
President Reagan in Washington
Tuesday, declared that Lebanon
is now on "the verge of a new
era." His speech was conspicuous
for its lack of reference to future
relations between Lebanon and
Israel.
HE MENTIONED Israel but
in a different context when he
said, "As we cherish our indepen-
dence, we also cherish the hope
that the Palestinians and Is-
raelis, with the support of the
world community, will reach a
settlement that will allow them
both to enjoy the fullness of
rights."
As for relations between Leba-
non and Syria, Gemayel declared,
"They have always been close in
the past. It is natural therefore
that Syria and Lebanon should
develop strong relations in the
future in the context of indepen-
dence, sovereignty and mutual
respect."
He added: "With this posi-
tion in mind, I call tor the imme-
diate and unconditional with-
drawal of all non-Lebanese forces
from Lebanon. I call upon the
world community to help Leba-
non regain its real independence
and rebuild its economy."
GEMAYEL SAID his country
will respect "the liberty and
sovereignty of others, fully con-
scious of the responsibilities that
this attitude entails." He said
Lebanon needs the support of the
international community to re-
build peace.
He declared: "We applaud all
positive steps taken by our
friends in the international com-
munity in behalf of a united and
sovereign Lebanon, steps such as
the U.S. initiative in Lebanon
which we shall explore to the full-
est. We look to our Arab brethen
for political and economic sup-
port in building a country which
can be a source of pride, peace
and progress for us and for
them."
Gemayel cautioned that while
he speaks optimistically about
the future of Lebanon, there and
all of the Middle East remains
"fragile." He said: "Only con-
certed efforts on your part will
strengthen the forces of peace in
our part of the world.
Kalnitsky to Chair Program
At National Meeting
The Association of Jewish .
Family and Children's Agencies
(AJFCA) will hold its quarterly
meeting in conjunction with the
General Assembly of the Council
of Jewish Federations in Los
Angeles. The Association meet-
ings will be held Friday, Nov. 12
through Sunday, Nov. 14 at the
Hyatt Regency Hotel.
In addition to working sessions
of the AJFCA committees and
the Board of Directors, this
quarterly will be expanded to in-
clude a study group pertaining to
"Services To Families Seeking A
Divorce: Problems Faced by
Families who Decide to Get a
Divorce," and services offered by
J.F. and C.S. and other Jewish
communal agencies. Special at-
tention will be given to Divorce
Meditation as a service to help
families cope with the problems
of separation. A workshop will
also take place dealing with the
subject of "Financing Agency
Services" and studying the shift
in the current sources of funds for
J.F. and C.S. agencies and op-
portunities for securing more
adequate funding.
Linda Budin Kalnitsky, a past
president and current vice presi-
dent of our local Jewish Family
and Children's Service of Palm
Beach County, Inc., will attend
Army Digs Ditch Along Border
With Egypt to Stymie Thieves
TEL AVIV (JTA) The army is said to be
digging a deep ditch all along the Israel-Egypt border in
Sinai. The trench is not a security measure, but rather a
frontier contraband anti-theft device. Army sources said
Egyptian vehicles have frequently been driven across the
Sinai border at unofficial and illegal crossing points. And
in the other direction, cars stolen in Israel have been
driven into Egypt where they are sold beyond the reach of
the Israeli police. The deep trench, it is hoped, will stop
traffic in either direction.
Linda Kalnitsky
this meeting as Program chair-
man for the national board of the
AJFCA. At that time Mrs.
Kalnitsky and her committee will
draft final plans for the eleventh
annual conference of the AJFCA
to be held after Passover in
Boston at the Copley Plaza
Hotel, from April 17-20, 1983.
The AJFCA was established in
1972 as the national service orga-
nization for Jewish Family and
Children's Agnecies in Canada
and the United States. It now has
110 members. representing
nearly all of the eligible Jewish
Family and Children's Agencies
on this continent.
The Home Of
(FREE PERSOBAL CHECKIMG!)
21 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS
MAIN OFFICE
401 Northlake Boulevard
North Palm Beach
Telephone. 848-0611
MEMBER FDIC
Wall.l Sty]* Only
V^ACflfrl
Total assets in excess ol $450 million
and Trust
TAPtS
CARTON*
h*NCtRJ
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BUSINESS FORMS
TA(* LABELS
BA(* BOXES
wipes
PALM BEACH
832-0211
HOWARD
Ai-un a
aCKAGINC
T201 N E45 STRflET
FORT LAUDERD/AlE
FDR THE FINEST IN
SECULAR AND JEWISH
EDUCATION ENROLL
YOUR CHILDREN NOW.
0URRRMRAM
The Homstein
School provides on
enriched program of
HcDomv and Judaic
Sfcjdtem conjunction
wWi a superior
Secufor jfudles
Program, Including
art, musk:, physical
education and
inwscnoKOTc
octrvtltes for
Pre-iundergorten
through grade sight.
This superior
curriculum Is fought In
on Innovative and
M- I I
'OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
5801 Parkw Avnue, Wi Palm Beach. Florida 33405 (305) 585-2227
learning environment.
TTwHomtfMn Jewish
Community Day
School odmm
students of every race,
color, mx. creed.
noRonol and ethnic
ortgm.
Wit NEW HOME
Tlw Porter Avenue
Compos, a seven ocre
ste wi provide the
neceseary
environment to give
ourchNdrena
well-rounded
education. The faculty
includes spoctous
cJossrooms. o Library
ood Media Center, on
Art and Music Cer far.
Science Laboratory,
Auditorium and
Chopel Building with
a kosher cafeteria
facility, amieftc fields,
basketball, tennis
courts, and
administrative offices.
A Biblical garden
enhances the natural
beauty ol the site and
promotes living
Judaism.
A BENEFICIARY AGENCY OF THE JEWISH FEDERATION OF PALM BEACH COUNTY



Page 12
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday. QctQi,
Jewish Community Center Senior News
Transportation is available to
persons who are transit disad-
vantaged through our Federal
Grant Title III OAA in a desig-
nated area. We take people to
doctor's appointments, hospi-
tals and nursing homes to visit
spouses, to social service offices
and food shopping. Please call
Helen or Beth in Senior transpor-
tation office for information
about our scheduling. Tuesday
morning is reserved for persons
who wish to go food shopping.
Transportation is also avail-
able to groups both day and eve-
ning for a moderate fee to cover
our expenses. Call Rhonda Cohen
about your group transportation
needs. If you are handicapped
and need the use of a lift, please
call for information about this
service.
Ongoing Programs
Round Table Talk for Men
Timely Topics for Thinking
Women
These groups will meet jointly
every Tuesday, except the second
Tuesday of the month, at 1 p.m.
On Stage Calling all thesp-
ians past and future. Persons
interested in all phases of drama
are invited to join this workshop
with fine director, Dick Sanders
on Tuesday morning at 10. The
Fall Program will concentrate on
delightful One Act Plays.
Speakers Club Meets
Thursday at 10 a.m. Morris
Shuken. president. All who are
interested in improving public
speaking are encouraged to join
this group.
Creative Crafts Circle Toys
4 Us
On Monday morning, seniors
meet to make toys for our pre-
school. The Second Tuesday
Council has taken on this activity
as a special program, and help to
gather material. Seniors have
made puppets, bean bags, pillows
and solf balls and presented them
to the pre-school last month, and
they are now being used and en-
joyed by the teachers and chil-
dren.
Thank you to Mr. and Mrs.
Komberg for donating the sew-
ing machine.
Adult Education Cli
It's school time again! Classes
with instructors from Palm
Beach County Adult Education.
There are no fees for these ses-
sions and everyone is invited to
attend any or all sessions.
First time offered
Positive Life Attitudes A
new psychology lecture Mon-
days at 1 p.m. Learn how to look
at the bright side of things. In-
structor, Nita Young.
Know Your Car A classic
course designed to increase the
driver's knowledge on the various
parts of your car Wednesdays
at 9:30 a.m. Instructor, Paul Ob-
las.
Yoga in Your Chair for Men
and Women Learn to relax by
breathing and exercise, while
sitting in your chair. This class is
on Wednesdays at 1 p.m. In-
structor, Bea Bunze.
Lip Reading This ongoing
course is especially designed for
those with hearing impairments.
Everyone is encouraged to attend
on Wednesdays at 4 p.m. In-
structor. Darlene Kohuth.
Writers Workshop A class
designed to learn the art of ex-
pressing yourself in literary form
is offered on Fridays at 9:30 a.m.
This class has developed many
budding writers and we welcome
anyone interested in learning how
to express himself in the various
phases of writing. Join one of the
classes: Thursday or Friday at
9:30 a.m.
Personal Life History An
opportunity to recall and record
the memorable times of your life.
This class is on Fridays at 1 p.m.
Instructor, Robert Hall.
Artist of the Month
Monthly exhibits by Senior
Artists take place in the CSSC.
Seniors are invited to call the
Center if they wish to exhibit
their art. Artists price their in-
dividual work, giving people an
opportunity to purchase
anything they wish. We cordially
invite Seniors who wish to
exhibit to call the Center for
further information.
Artist for month of October
Harry Kurt*. Stop in to view his
work in the CSSC Monday Fri-
day, 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Coming Events
Second Tuesday ActivRy
Nov. 16 at 1 p.m. (Note change of
time)
This month the Second Tues-
day Activity will be held on the
third Tuesday, Nov. 16 due to the
fact that many of our seniors will
be attending a meeting in Or-
lando with other Florida JCC se-
nior groups from Nov. 6 to Nov.
9. A kosher turkey drawing will
take place. Sam Rubin, president,
invites everyone to attend. A
special program is planned. Re-
freshments will be served.
Trip to Viacaya Museum
Miami Thursday, Dec. 16
Special all day tour (9:30-4).
Lunch on your own at Viscaya
Snack Bar. Members $8.50, non-
members $10. Call Sam Rubin
689-7700 for reservations and in-
formation for all events.
Needed:
Volunteers Pre-school
Aides. receptionists. Call
Rhonda Cohen 689-7700.
Toys 4 Us Items Old
stockings for stuffing pillows and
dolls: old socks for puppets;
foam rubber for pillows. Call
Sam Rubin 689-7700.
Thank you always for your
support and contributions.
Prime Time Singles
Rita Adler, president, invites
single persons over 55 to join in
the activities for November!
If you have any question*
please call Rita at 689-0247.
Nov. 3 Wednesday at 7 p.m.
at Mid-County Senior Citizen
Cmb of Lake Worth
"The Lyric Trio," a profession-
al erouD of musicians, featuring?
Mildred Birnbaum 2
Kahn, cellist, and M
vocalist. There wiU
and refreshments
cents.
Directions: 195 to Id
North: Go East. Rieht
"H" St. to the Clubh
North"H"St.,Lakel
Exciting Television Progi
Prayer in the public school will
be discussed Sunday, Oct. 31 at
10 a.m. on the Jewish Commu-
nity Center's monthly television
program "Generation to Gene-
ration '' on Channel 12.
Barbara Weinstein, hostess, is
pleased to present Barbra Kap-
lans' liaison between the Jewish
Community Relations Council
and the Public Schools of Palm
Beach County, as the moderator.
The panel will include Bernard
Kimmel, state representative,
Rabbi Alan Sherman, communi-
ty rabbi of Jewish Fen
Palm Beach County
erend John Mangrum,
vid s in the Pines.
A segment of Jewish i
and Jewish baking wil
presented. ^ H
Tune in for a stimui
exciting morning of a i
information Sunday, f
10 a.m. on Channel 12,
Write to Channel 12 |
Drive, West Palm Beacb!
for the recipe and your i
to the issues.
Martin Krieder and Heather
Greenhill members of the Keren-
Orr Pre-School of the Jewish
Community Center enjoy being
dressed as firemen during their
visit to the firehouse during Fire
Prevention Week.
Ms. Tomalka, assistant I
Jill Tomalka, certified jc
instructor who leads the
the ladies of the Jewi
munity Center on Tue
Thursday mornings it
Shalom from 11 a.m. to i
shown with a group enjoy
class.
<.
- "
Constitutional Amendments On November Ballot
This is what the proposed amendment is about.
FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE
REQUIRED BEFORE LOBBYING
BY FORMER LEGISLATORS AND
STATEWIDE ELECTED
OFFICIALS (short title)
'"urrently the Florida Constitution
prohibits legislators and officials elected
statewide from lobbying for pay with the
governmental body or agency of which that
person was a member or officer. This
restriction applies for two years after leaving
office. The proposed amendment would
eliminate the two-year waiting period if the
former elected official files a financial
disclosure when beginning paid lobbying.
PRE-TRIAL RELEASE
AND DETENTION (short title)
This proposal creates a Florida Constitu-
tional right to release without monetary bail
and provides for detention of persons await-
ing trial who pose a threat to the community.
Nonmonetary Bail. Nonmonetary bail
(including release on one's own recognizance
or on unsecured bond) is authorized by the
Florida Rules of Criminal Procedure but is
not a constitutional right. Approximately
two-thirds of Florida's jail population is now
made up of defendants who cannot afford
bail and who are not granted non-monetary
release pending trial.
Pretrial Detention. This amendment
would permit detention of accused persons in
order to: 1) protect the community from risk
of physical harm to persons when no con-
dition of release could reasonably do so; 2)
assure the presence of the accused at trial; or,
3) assure the integrity of the judicial process.
Integrity of the process refers to the threat
to or intimidation of victims, witnesses,
jurors or judicial officers. The state would
have the burden of showing the need for the
pretrial detention.
There is at present no alternative
covering these situations. Only those
accused of capital offenses (punishable by
death) or, in certain circumstances, life-
imprisonment offenses can be denied bail.
SEARCH AND SEIZURE (abort title)
This proposal would replace the present
Florida Constitutional protection against
unreasonable searches and seizures in one's
person, house, papers and effects with the
U.S. Constitutional provisions of the Fourth
Amendment as interpreted by the U.S.
Supreme Court.
The present Florida provisions are more
restrictive and among the most restrictive in
the nation. They expand the right of people
to be secure to include protection against
unreasonable interception of communication
(e.g., electronic surveillance, body bugs), and
are more restrictive than the federal rule in
requirements warrants. Any evidence col-
lected in violation of the rule is inadmissable.
The federal protections are based on
what is known as the exclusionary rule,
established by the U.S. Supreme Court in
1914 for federal courts and made applicable
to state judicial procedures in 1961, and
modified since. The present federal rule
allows some exceptions to search warrant
requirements, including good-faith
exceptions. This allows admission of
evidence seized in good faith by an officer
who believed he/she was acting lawfully. This
exception is based on the premise that the
exclusionary rule exists to deter willfully or
flagrantly wrong actions by officers, not
reasonable, good-faith ones.
If you tend to agree with these ar-
guments, you should VOTE YES.
The two-year waiting period is an unjust
infringement on the right to earn a living.
Staff members are not now prohibited from
lobbying for pay as soon as they leave the
government payroll so it is unfair to treat
elected officials differently.
Pretrial Release. The requirement to
post bail causes discrimination against the
poor. Non-monetary release is as effective, if
not more so, than financial methods of
assuring appearance in court. The dollar
savings from reduced jail populations
because of pretrial release alternatives more
than offset the costs incurred by these.
Pretrial Detention. Persons should be
detained on basis of their danger to the
community, not just to assure court
appearance. It is expected that pretrial
detention will be used carefully and in a small
number of cases.
Conformity of Florida law to federal law
adequately protects constitutional rights
while eliminating overly restrictive
standards for admissability of evidence,
which can serve to protect criminals rather
than law-abiding citizens. Police do not make
some arrests and searches because of fear of
violating Florida's complex procedural
requirements.
If you tend to agree with these i
guments, you should VOTE NO.
Conflict-of-interest possibilities wouk
rampant. A legislator or statewide-electr
officer might be offered a lucrative lobby
job after providing a vote crucial to the
prospective employer. Election to public
office is a public trust. Legislators should I
concerned with serving those who aW*
them, not building power and presage or
future employment. This proposal would i
weaken the Sunshine Amendment
overwhelmingly endorsed bv Florida vo
in 1976. _______
Pretrial Release. Allowing accused [
sons to more readily go free between am
and trial tends to increase the threat oi
crime. Administrative costs are unkM
Pretrial Detention. Preventive detenu
punishes those who are presumed innoe
until proven guilty under our sy'^VJl
detention, based on any system deveww
date, will result in detention of man>[
who would not be rearrested if *"* j
will cause an additional workload for
attorneys, courts and law enforcement
Florida citizens may want to p
irovid*
such"
themselves with more ProWctinivl,c<
against electronic intrusion **%
than afforded by the U.S. Co-J*Jg3
presently interpreted. Good f-tjjj^j
jective and difficult W disprove smc.
are no objective standards to &**
faith actions by law enforcement ofW
REPRINTED COURTESY OF THE LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS OF FLORIDA EDUCA TION FUND


[October
29,1982
,
Meeting With Shultz
. ,.
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

Page 13
ithdrawal Talks Will 'Accelerate'
n
[daVID FRIEDMAN
UNGTON
_ The State
nt indicated that
to get foreign
"to withdraw from
will "accelerate"
the talks the
Administration
tge with Israeli
Minister Yitzhak
and Lebanese
utAminGemayel.
Former Lebanese President
Camille Chamoun said in in-
terviews that while he opposed a
peace treaty with Israel now, he
supported an agreement with
Israel in which Israel would
pledge "respect for the
sovereignty and integrity of
Lebanon," and Lebanon would
"undertake a pledge of not
allowing any political or military
organization on its soil which
could be a threat to Israeli
security."
army was retrained and
reequipped. He said this could
take up to two years.
But Hughes reiterated
Reagan's position that the
marines are in Lebanon for a
"limited period." He said the
President believes that the
departure of the Israeli, Syrian
and PLO forces should not take a
long and noted that Shamir has
predicted that it could occur by
the end of the year. Reagan has
said that the marines are in
Lebanon until the Lebanese
government feels it can handle its
own security. Reagan has said he
could not give a timetable for this
although he had maintained that
it would not be of long duration.
,_nt spokesman John
iaid that following the
os," the U.S. will
own "thoughts and
Ion the withdrawal and
the Administration's
litiied concern" for the
arrangements sought by
liouthem Lebanon.
OR MET with Secretary
: George Shultz at the
Department, Vice
George Bush and
Secretary Caspar
Gemayel held talks
sklent Reagan at the
iHouse
stressed that these
11 continuation of the
conducted in the
East by special envoy
" bib and Morris Draper,
Assistant Secretary of
' Near East and South
Affairs.
reiterated that the
opposes a Lebaneae-
| peace treaty as long as
i are in Lebanon. But
IthattheU.S. favors
iy arrangement, as Israel
[demanding, although he
1 discuss any details for
ngeraent.
jJ peace treaty, Hughes
J the U.S. position that it
N)' be negotiated after
kwnese government "has
rt of its population."
pat such a treaty must
stated freely, thought
"d be "something
I last and not some type
("jporary document
to to meet a temporary
F.?,Ru the security
nt, Hughes noted that
w states has made it
JJX dear that this is
7 "jat has to be
t m Israel has to be
that south Lebanon
11 8?d as "Punching
hMK?" aU18t IWMl.
*d he could not discuss
'What the security
JU should be or how
JJ worked out or
KGRESSIONAL
DLUTION
|the In,"0U8e resolution
Pthe &tional Com-
P SLOT Societies to
%nL7 Mranch of the
' the Magen David
lotion H.Res. 580
i ID in i ReD' Frank
rttenrtii-'c."88 identical
fcud^LSenate version
f wpted unanimously.
P5SJ thBat **.*****
Sy and ?xLc'u8ion is
Sbfnn 'thUt me"t-
"Pous bias" to account
But the 82-year-old Christian
leader, who was President when
U.S. marines were first sent into
Lebanon in 1958, said the
Lebanese army could not at
present maintain security for the
whole country. He said the
Christian militia should be
allowed to operate until the
Syrian and Palestine Liberation
Organization forces withdraw.
HE ALSO urged that the
multinational force, made up of
U.S. marines and Italian and
French troops, should be
enlarged to about 20,000 men and
remain there until the Lebanese
The Palm Beach County State of Israel Bond
Women's Division held its annual kickoff lun-
cheon on Sunday, October 17, at the home of Mrs.
Henry (Evelyn) Blum, chairman of the 1982-83
Women's Division campaign, in Palm Beach. The
luncheon was the inaugural planning session for
the upcoming Ninth Annual Israel Bond
Women's Division International Fashion Show
and Luncheon. The Fashion Show is scheduled for
Tuesday, December 14, 12 noon, at the Breakers
Hotel in Palm Beach. The luncheon will be in
honor of Mrs. Elinor Belfer and will feature Mrs.
Yehuda Blum, the wife of the Israeli Ambassador
to the United Nation* More than 55 women
turned out for the luncheon at Mrs. Blum's in-
cluding: (I to r) Etta Klein, Fritzi Columbus,
Irene Kabinoff, and Laura Shur. (Far left) Evelyn
Blum.
On November 2
Vote for
*DOROTHY
WILKEN
M

Palm Beach County
District 4
During her years as mayor and council member in Boca Raton, Dorothy Wilken built
a solid reputation as a no-nonsense, concerned representative of the people .
a careful listener ... a frank spokesman ... a strong advocate for environmental
safeguards who can get things done. As a working mother of four daughters.
Dorothy knows how to meet critical needs within a limited'budget. Her Master
of Public Administration degree, experience and leadership ability combine to give
Dorothy the unique qualifications we need in our County Commission today!
Mayor of Boca Raton
Council member, Boca Raton
Chairman. Ethical Conduct Board. Boca Raton
President. Citizens Crime Watch of Boca Raton
Palm Beach County Area Planning Board
Chairman. Joint City/County Reserve Area Planning Committee
County's Charter Advisory Board. Subcommittee on Finance & Taxation
Boca Raton Charter Revision Boards
Dorothy has served as a member or in various offices of the following groups:
Academy of Political Science
American Association of University Women
American Society for Public Administration
Boca Raton Center for the Arts
Common Cause
League of Women Voters
Royal Palm Audubon Society
Sierra Club
The Nature Conservancy
Wells College. George Washington University & Florida Atlantic University
Alumnae Associations
Campaign to Elect Dorothy Wilken
Palm Beach County District 4 Commissioner Democrat
Bill Feldman, Campaign Mgr. Dorothy Wilken...
6561 Spring Bottom Way will bring Leadership and
Boca Raton 33433 Fresh Ideas to the County
392-6360 Commission...
For a breath of fresh life in our outlook and in the very air we breathe, vote for: DOROTHY WILKEN.
M. fo! A*r.


Page 14
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday. October;
-V'
*
* Sabbtmod **,
ejevoted *o eucsikm of tbHMi mi istt
Coordinated by
Rabbi Alan R. Sherman
The Blessings of Living As A Jew
By RABBI
JOEL CHAZIN
Temple Emanu-El
We know how we are touched
and sanctified by the memories of
martyrs and fighters who
through the ages have given their
lives for the sake of our people.
Yet we hold a high regard for
the many who made an equally
heroic decision: to go on living as
Jews. Surely we would not be
here if not for the millions of
lesser known heroes and heroines
. our forebearers, who found
in their faith and culture a vital
reason to live.
Asher Barash tells the story of
a Jew who escapes the inquisitors
and returns to his native town,
Toledo. There, not a familiar soul
survives. But he resolves to stay
on. "The Last Jew In Toledo":
his triumph lies not in doing
anything to his enemies, but in
his quiet decision to go on living.
His motto: "Lo Amut Ki Echyer;
I shall Live And Not Die, And
Proclaim The Works Of The
Lord." (Psalms 118:17)
Thanks to hundreds of genera-
tions like these, our identity rests
3n a bedrock of perserverance
and hope.
Jewish living today has be-
ome infinitely richer because of
the State of Israel. It is also far
more complex. For the first time
in millennia, the Jewish people
are at the center of the world's
stage, accupying a fulcrum of
power, and drawing like a magnet
the most intensive heat and
criticism.
The Western World doubts
itself, is numb and paralyzed to
deal with the cost of Arab oil and
the encroachments of Commun-
ism. Accused by its own lack of
self-respect, the world accuses
Israel.
After all, the nation of Israel is
potent. By acting to destroy the
threat to its Northern borders, it
humbled the Soviet Union and its
clients. Syria and the PLO.
A perceptive writer in Wash-
ington noted: "Those Americans
who have denounced Israel's
invasion of Lebanon may forgive
Israel for defending itself, out
they may never forgive Israel for
illuminating our own confusion
and cowardice."
True, we tend to feel that Israel
might have used less firepower or
should "have known when to
stop." The Israelis themselves
can draw the same conclusions.
But we do know the alterna-
tive: no power at all. In 1939 the
Jewish communities of Eastern
and Central Europe were models
of civility and humanity,
religious and scholarly absorp-
tion. Yet six million were des-
troyed without the faintest
protest or sign of anger from the
world's leadership or the world's
press.
We learned then that impo-
tence is an invitation to murder.
This is the bottom line for Israel
and Jews everywhere. Power is
the price of our safety, survival
and our self-respect. It is also the
assurance of the survival of the
values Jews have cherished for
generations, and still seed to
; share with others in the building
of a better world. Israel will act
and the world may react. But ad-
versity will help us to grow.
These are among the added di-
'mensions and blessings of living
as a Jew.
Rabbi Chazin
Chaos at Airport
As Personnel Strike
TEL AVIV (JTA) Chaos
reigned at Ben Gurion Airport
when El Al personnel jumped the
gun on a sympathy strike called
by the Histadrut among airport
workers and prevented the de-
parture of over 1,000 passengers
before the strike officially began.
All the other airlines serving
Israel had either cancelled or ad-
vanced their flights, to ensure
that their planes and passengers
would be clear of Israel by the
morning.
El Al, which has not been
flying its own planes for the past
month but chartering others to
handle passengers holding El Al
tickets, had arranged for nearly a
dozen planes to leave in the early
morning hours. But the El Al
workers committee called special
"informational and educational"
meetings of the ground crews and
flight attendants. Passengers
could not approach the ticket
counters.
After some hours, the airline
management bussed the angry
passengers back to hotels in Tel
Aviv to wait until the airport
strike ended.
Bar Mitzvah
' Alan Dies, son of Ronald and
Marilyn Dies of Palm Beach
Gardens, will be Bar Mitzvah
Friday evening, Oct. 29 and
Saturday morning, Oct. 30. at
Temple Beth David, Northern
Palm Beach County. Rabbi Wil-
liam Marder and Cantor Earl
flackoff will officiate.
In addition to the airport, the
Histadrut called for sympathy
strikes at the country's seaports,
the government owned Electric
Corp., the Mekrot water supply
company, the Dead Sea potash
works and the Tel Aviv and Jeru-
salem municipalities. The electric
and water companies were closed
to the public but power and water
supplies were not affected.
Many of the strikers inter-
viewed by Israel Radio said they
stopped work at Histadrut orders
because they were opposed to the
manner in which the government
handled the El Al dispute. But
most had little sympathy with
the El Al workers who are among
the highest paid in the country.
They were blamed for disrupting
normal airline operations and
bringing the company to the
brink of foreclosure.
NEW SETTLEMENTS IN
ISRAEL REACHES
NEW HIGH
In a report by Matityahu
Drobless, co-chairman of the
World Zionist Organization s
WZO) settlement department
h* nnnnnr*d that a total of 205
new settlements have been estab-
lished during the past five years,
about half of them on the West
Bank, Gaza Strip, and Golan
Heights.
Drobless predicted that
between the next WZO Congress,
scheduled for Jerusalem, Dec. 7-
14 and the one after that, approx-
imately 10,000 families will be
living in the settlements. He
added that more settlement
efforts should be made in the
Galilee.
Richard E. Kowalsky, M.D., P.A.
Takes Pleasure In Announcing
The Association Of
Gary K. Schneider, M.D.
For The Practice Of
Obstetrics, Gynecology
Infertility
With Offices At
29C| W. Camino Gardens Boulevard
B I Haton, Florida 33432
(3 1477
5258 Linton Boulevard
Uelray Beach, Florida 33445
(305)49o-J558
Synagogues in Palm Beach Cm
Orthodox
Aitz Chain. Congregation Century Villa-.
W. Palm Beach. Phone: 689-4675. Sabbath services q
p.m. Daily services 8:15 a.m. and 6:30p.m.
Congregation Anshei Emuna
551 Brittany L. Kings Point, Delray Beach 3344fi dw
7407 or 499-9229. Harry Silver, President Dailt 2L hone<
and 5 p.m. Saturdays and Holidays 9 a.m n"ces 8
Reform
Temple Israel
1901 North Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach 33407 piv.
8421. Rabbi Howard Shapiro, Dr. Irving B Cobe V
Emeritus, Dr. Richard G. Shugarman, President Ceceil'
man. Educator, Stephen J. Goldstein, Administrator Sato,
services, Friday 8 p.m.
Temple Beth El of Boca Raton
333 S.W. Fourth Avenue, Boca Raton 33432 Phot*, iqi
Rabbi Merle E. Singer, Cantor Martin Rosen. Sabbath se 5
Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9:15 a.m. Torah Study with'Sul
Singer. Sabbath morning services 10:30 a.m.
Temple Sinai
Cason-United Methodist Church, Corner of Lake Ida Rd
Swinton Ave., Delray. Phone 276-6161. Mailing address
N W 9 Street, Delray Beach. 33444. Rabbi Samuel Silver I
dent, Bernard Etish. Friday services at 8:15 p.m.
Temple Beth Torah
at St. David's in the Pines Episcopal Retreat. Forest Hill BW
and Wellington Trace, West Palm Beach. Mailing address
Jack Pine St., West Palm Beach 33211. Cantor Nic
Fenakel. President Ronnie Kramer (793-2700).
Temple Judea
Rabbi Joel L. Levine. Cantor Rita Shore, Barbara Chanel
dent. 1407 14th Lane, Lake Worth, Fl. 33463. Phone965',
Services Friday evenings at 8 p.m. Meeting at St. Cather
Greek Orthodox Church Social Hall 4000 Washington
Southern Blvd.
Conservative-Liberal
Temple Eternal Light
at Boca West Community UMC, 8900 Boca West Glades 1,
(1 mile west of Boca Turnpike). The Free Synagogue, P.O. I
3, Boca Raton 33432. Phone: 368-1600, 3911111. Rabbi I
jamin Rosayn. Sabbath services, Friday at 8:15 p.m.
Conservative
Golden Lakes Temple
1470 Golden Lakes Blvd., W. Palm Beach, Fl. 33411. Ribl
Joseph Speiser. Phone 689-9430. President, Samuel Eisenfeld.
Temple Beth El
2815 North Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach 33407. Phone i
0339. Rabbi Howard J. Hirsch, Cantor Elaine Shapiro, I
Evening Service at 8:15 p.m. in The Sanctuary. Saturday i
ing at 9:30 a.m. Daily Minyan at 8:16 a.m., Sunday and I
Holidays at 9 a.m.
Congregation Anshei Sholom
5348 Grove Street, West Palm Beach 33409. Phone _
Office hours 9 ajn. to 1 p.m. Rabbi Harry Z. Schectman.l
Mordecai Spektor. Services daily 8:30 cm. and 6:30 pj
Friday, 8:30 a.m., 5 p.m., late services 8:15 p.m. followed I
Oneg Shabbat. Saturday, 8:30 a.m., 6 p.m. Mincha followdl
SholoshSeudos.
Congregstioa Bath Kodeah el Boyntoa Beach
at Congregational Church, 115 N. Federal Hwy.,
Beach. Phone 737-4622. Rabbi Avrom L. Drtzin. Sib
services, Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.
Temple Beth Sholom
316 N. *A' Street, Lake Worth 33480. Phone 685*120. -
Emanuel Eisenberg, Cantor Jacob Elman. Services Monday i
Thursday at 8:15 a.m., Friday at 8:15 p.m., Saturday at 9 a.m.
Temple Beth David
at Westminster Presbyterian Church, 10410 N. Military'
Palm Beach Gardens. Office at 321 Northlake Blvd., North 1
Beach. Phone 845-1134. Rabbi William Marder, Cantor Ei
Rackoff. Sabbath services, Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday 10 a.nv
Temple Beth Sholom
224 N.W. Avenue G', Belle Glade 33430. Cantor Jack:
man. Sabbath services, Friday at 8:30 p.m.
Temple B'nal Jacob
at Faith United Presbyterian Church, 275 Alemeida Driver-
Spring 33461. Temple B'nai Jacob. President Jacob >"
Phone 964-0034. Sabbath services, Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday"
9 a.m. Mondays and Thursdays at 9 a jn.
B'nai Torah Congregation
1401 N.W. 4 th Avenue, Boca Raton 33432. Phone iW*H
Rabbi Theodore Feldman Sabbath services, Friday 8:'6P*|
Saturday 9:30 a.m.
Temple Emeth
5780 West Atlantic Avenue, Delray Beach 33446. Ph^JJI
3536. Rabbi Bernard Silver. Cantor Seymour Zisook-SM*JI
services, Friday at 5 p.m. and 8 p.m., Saturday and HolWI
8:45 a.m. Daily Minyan at 8:45 a.m. and 5 p.m.
Temple Emanu-El
190 North County Road, Palm Beach 33480. Phone 832-08M.
Rabbi Joel Chazin. Cantor David Dardashti. Sabbath sen"**
Friday at8:30 p.m., Saturday at 9a.m.
Temple Beth Zion
Lions Club 700 Camelia Dr., Royal Calm Beach, Friday
pm laiurdav 9 a.m. President. Eli RoeenthaUw
Parkwa i toyal Palm Beach, FL 33411, Phone 793-0643. tr
Albert i\nslow.


L October 29,1982
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

Page 15
Robert Schachter
Selichot, Sept. 11, six new
Mezuzot were istalled at Temple
Israel, 1901 North Flagler Drive.
These were donated to our
temple by Shirley and Dan
Forstein, in honor of the birth of
their grandson, Brian Harris
Solow.
This is a beautiful way to begin
the New Year of 5743 in which
the temple will celebrate its 60th
anniversary.
A mezuzah (plural Mezuzot)
contains a hand-scribed "Shma"
and is nailed to the right hand
side of the doorpost of a Jewish
residence and responds to the
order in Deuteronomy "in-
scribe them on the doorposts of
your house and on your gates."
The large Mezuzah on the main
entrance of the Sanctuary is a
unique one because the par-
chment with the Shma inscribed
on it, is on the front and in full
view for anyone to read.
Many people date the Mezuzah
back to the time when we were
slaves in Egypt. It is a form of
Jewish identification and is
believed to be a "guardian of the
daws' of Israel."
TEMPLE BETH TORAH
Temple Beth Torah Sisterhood
will hold a rummage sale on
Sunday, Oct. 31, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
at 825 Lantern Tree Lane (off
Guilford Way), Wellington.
Dorothy Rautbord
Local Synagogue News
fSCHACHTERTOBE
JJf TEMPLE JUDEA
Jon sabbath
Judea will honor
pon Friday evening. Oct.
Rjd Services will be held
V social hall of St.
L5 Greek Orthodox
tit the comer of Southern
d Flagler Drive.
_kv Rautbord, prominent
[grtch philanthropist, is
L serving as president of
Unst region of the
n Society for Technion.
usknown as the "M.I.T.
ne|." The American
, Society, a 42 year old
group, which was
. organized by engineers
jessmen in technology -
IWustries, fosters teaching
(research programs at
Li Based in buildings in
[Technion is Israel's only
It of higher education
i primarily to technology
ied science. Technion
. approximately 1,000
j each year. Its alumni
it more than 75 percent of
|i engineers.
t Schachter, regional
;, will join Mrs. Rautbord
e pulpit of Temple Judea.
i tell the story of the
I project of the American
n Society: the
ent of an Industrial
Center which will
p"smart "robots.
(community is invited to
more about Technion.
Rita Shore will sing
(music composed in Israel.
dreception will follow.
of Anshei Sholom
bid its board meeting on
y, November 1, at 9:45
m its regular meeting on
y. November 16, at 1 p.m.,
Esther Samuels wiH 'e\h''
g us with a book review of
pnes" by Joseph Viertel.
NEW MEZUZOT
DEDICATED AT
| TEMPLE ISRAEL
Saturday evening of
Egypt Favors Jordan
Palestinian Federation
Mrs. Wally Sherman delivers a
Challah to the home of Carl and
Linda Millman and their son
Brad. Temple Israel's Tikvah
Chapter of Sisterhood has un-
dertaken "Project Welcome" by
having Sisterhood members
deliver a Challah to everyone of
the Temple's 103 new members.
The Sisterhood chose a Challah
because it symbolizes the warmth
of a Jewish Heme and the unity
of the Jewish people As Rabbi
Howard Shapiro, spiritual leader
of Temple Israel said, "as the
Challah is braided so all of Israel
is joined together."
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) -
Egypt has come out in
favor of an association be-
tween Jordan and a future
Palestinian entity. Egyp-
tian Minister of State for
Foreign Affairs Boutros
Ghali said in Paris that
"Egypt fully supports the
idea of associating the
West Bank and the Gaza
Strip to the Jordanian
Kingdom."
The Egyptian declaration,
which confirms earlier support in
favor of President Reagan's Mid-
east peace plan, took added sig-
nificance in view of PLO leader
Yasir Arafat's recent meeting
with King Hussein of Jordan.
Diplomatic sources said at the
time that Arafat had given some
sort of agreement to Hussein's
offer to open negotiations on this
subject with the United States,
that Cheysson turned down Ara-
fat's request for an official invita-
tion to France.
ARAFAT, who conferred for
over two hours with French For-
eign Minister Claude Cheysson,
also told the French that he is
prepared to be "far more flexible"
in future and said his organiza-
tion would henceforth play "the
political card."
They Cheysson-Arafat meeting
has come under condiserable
criticism in France, where a num-
ber of Jewish organizations pro
tested what they called "award-
ing a prize to the terrorists." A
storm of protests also greeted
Cheysson s comment in which he
said that he "deplores that Israel
shows no sign of looking for a
political solution" to the Middle
East crisis.
After the two-hour meeting,
Cheysson told reporters in Tunis:
"The PLO now seeks a political
solution, but all concerned
parties must do the same. The
strongest of these, Israel, shows
no sign as yet of seeking such a
way." The Minister said that
should this situation continue
"there is a risk that certain
(Palestinian) elements, disap-
pointed and frustrated, might
once again revert to force and
violence."
THE FRANCO-ISRAELI Al-
liance issued a communique des-
cribing as "ignominous"
Cheysson's declaration as tanta-
mount to "having Israel shoulder
the responsibility for future ter-
rorist attacks." The Alliance also
"wondered who is conducing
French foreign policy: the Presi-
dent or his Foreign Minister."
The pro-Israeli organization
was obviously referring to the
contradiction in the generally
pro-Israeli stand taken by Presi-
dent Mitterrand and the militant
pro-Palestinian tone adopted by
Cheysson. French sources said
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r*tan f*emw/ry Qt Pa/m B9ach county. Professional and con-
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Page 16
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, rw
;-x-x.x-:*ra.:.:w.y.:.:.x."v
E8T FOR
NDEPENDENTS
IS*
m
EMOCRATS
THE ISSUES.
The Airport:
The Environment:
Growth Planning:
Budget Planning:
Management:
Policy Development:
THE EXPERIENCE TO DEAL WITH THEM EFFECTIVELY !
Pilot over 20 years experience. Former Assistant Manager of
largest airfield on East coast.
Member, now Chairman of the statewide Environmental Quality
Committee of the Florida League of Cities
Experienced as a long range planner
20 years experience in formulating large scale budgets -
over $900,000,000.00
Masters in Business with many years experience as responsible
manager of organizations numbering in hundreds
Former management consultant
Policy maker for thousands of employees throughout the country
Malcolm Bird has been in elective office and there by observed by the press for over 3 years, a fact which makes
their editorial comment with regard to his performance particularly meaningful.
The Miami Herald says:
"South County needs an aggressive and effective
spokesman. He (Malcolm Bird) is just what the
commission needs: aggressive, decisive, able to make
the hard decisions. The Herald recommends Malcolm
Bird." 9-5-82
The Sun Sentinel says:
"As a city official, the 44-year-old Bird has
demonstrated an ability to spot problems and propose
solutions. He was in the forefront of efforts to deal with
the city's management problems." 9-3 -82
The Evening Times says:
"His government experience and businesslike
approach make Bird an outstanding choice '
8-24-82
The Post says:
his (Bird's) voting record shows that the people
can tell where he stands. 8-20-82
The Wellington Town-Crier says:
"The good old days are gone forever, and the county
commission needs clear thinking, well educated leaders
like Malcolm Bird to solve our present and future
problems." 8-28-82
Mod...
November 2nd
County Commission District 4 Republican
Maurice Schacher
Madelyn Salman
Mort Yarny
Myra Yarny
' Leonard Friedman
Claire Friedman
Stephen Meicer
Linda Meicer
Esther Omansky
Ethel Kretsky
Milton Kretsky
Oscar Adelman
Dora Adelman
Sol Nagorsky
Charlotte Nagorsky
Sam Rosenbaum
Mary Rosenbaum
Louis Levine
Sylvia Levine
George Con ley
Catherine Conley
pM t by m*K> <* *#"*1


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