Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
8 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 28, 1975)-v. 8, no. 40 (Dec. 17, 1982).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 2, 1976 called v.2, no. 22, but constitutes v.2, no. 1.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: July 28, 1978 called no. 14 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement; Aug. 25, 1978 called no. 16 in masthead and no. 17 in publisher's statement; Aug. 10, 1979 called no. 15 in masthead and no. 16 in publisher's statement; Oct. 22, 1982 called no. 31 in masthead and no. 32 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44607504
lccn - sn 00229550
ocm44607504
System ID:
AA00014311:00027

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)


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Full Text
$1888
ROSH HA5HANAH sz^i

L GREET!INiGSj
dfewlslb Plox*idlao
of Palm Beach County
Combining "OUR YOKE" and "FEDERATION REPORTER"
in conjunction with The Jewish Federation of Pwm Beach Comity
i8- Number 28
Palm Beach, Florida Friday, September 17,1982
FndShochtt
Price 35 Centt
Filling in Background
mxxs&x^^
Israel Rejects Reagan's Initiative
By GIL SEDAN
[JERUSALEM (JTA)
Israel's Cabinet, sum-
Dned into special session
Premier Menachem
6gin, has rejected uncon-
itionally President Rea-
l's call for a "fresh
in the Middle East
ace process and defied
element of the Presi-
Dt's plan by announcing
at Israel would continue
i set up settlements in the
Ifest Bank and Gaza Strip.
I Begin interrupted a vacation in
|ihariya, in response to Presi-
Reagan's nationally-tele-
I speech on his "fresh start"
in. to convene the Cabinet for
i bristling rebuff to the Presi-
Dt. The Israeli press predicted
i imminent new low in Ameri-
i-Israeli relations.
! STATEMENT KsuerTir
[ the Cabinet meeting, read by
binet secretary Dan Meridor,
the Reagan plan a blue-
nt for suicide for Israel and
I it was inconceivable that Is-
(I could ever accept it.
!The President repeatedly
the United States com-
snt to Israel's security as he
for a halt to Israeli settle-
i in the occupied areas as an
ential element to the creation
trust by the Palestinian in-
bitants in Israel's commit-
in the Camp David ac-
tinians.
In an apparent effort for a
balanced position, Reagan said
the United States would not ac-
cept a Palestinian state in the
West Bank and Gaza and equally
would not accept Israeli annexa-
tion of the disputed areas.
Reagan proposed, as a possible
alternative, some kind of linkage
between the occupied areas and
Jordan, which has seized the
West Bank in Israel's 1948 War
of Independence, and lost it to
Israel in the Six-Day War.
THE CABINET statement
said the positions relayed to
Begin in Reagan's name, a
reference to a letter the President
sent to the Premier
much of which was leaked in Is-
rael ignored or contradicted the
Camp David accords. The con-
tent of that letter was spelled out
i to autonomy for the Pales-
The Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County will be
| closed for Yom Kippur Monday, Sept. 27.
by the President in his" televised
address.
The Cabinet statement said
that "since the positions of the
United States government devi-
ates to a serious extent from the
Camp David accords, contradict
the accords, and are liable to
cause a serious danger to Israel,
to its security and future, the
government of Israel decided
that, on the basis of these posi-
tions, it will not enter any nego-
tiations with any element." Rea-
gan reiterated that, for his
government, the Camp David ac-
cords were the only possible
framework for peace talks.
The Cabinet statement con-
tinued: "The government of Is-
rael is ready to resume without
any delay the autonomy talks
with the governments of the
United States and Egypt the
signatories to the Camp David
accords as well as with other
countries and elements which
were invited to participate in the
talks."
THE STATEMENT specified
the areas which, in the Cabinet's
view, contradicted the Camp
David Accords. These included
the status of Jerusalem which
the President said should remain
undivided, with its final status
subject to negotiations the
settlements freeze proposal, the
autonomy-Jordan proposed link-
age, and the handing of control of
security to the Arabs in the terri-
tories for the period of autonomy.
At the Cabinet session, Begin
reportedly said Reagan's plan
was worse than the plan U.S.
Continued on Page 12
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Each year at Rosh Hashanah we pause to examine the direc- :
:: tion of our lives and the value of our deeds to weigh promises 'v.
% kept and those still unfulfilled. It is a time to reflect on our 2
. kept _
:: responsibilities to one another, and to the heritage of hope and g
:: faith that unites us. 8
S The challenges facing us in the year 5743 intensify our need :
>: for guidance and renewal. The needs of our society's most vul- :-:j
j:j: nerable members the aging, the poor, the infirmed, the chil- ig
:: dren continue to grow. Yet the level of public funding for pro- j
>: grams of human compassion and social responsibility has been
S reduced.
V V.
;.: Abroad, the war in Lebanon has brought much bloodshed and %
$ loss of lives. The Covenant of the terrorist PLO is a document of 1
% hate which proclaims to the world that Israel does not exist and
:: cannot ever be accepted. The authors of this document have es-
I tablished increased credibility and acceptability by the world
community.
As we approach the New Year, with all its new challenges and
new responsibilities which confront us as a people and as indivi-
duals, we are mindful of the difficulties before us. We are proud
Americans, blessed with the privilege of the opportunity to live
in a free society and we contribute to make it one that will be
g
I
?: stronger and which will serve as an example for all who cherish x
liberty. We are proud Jews, sustained by a deep respect for our
noble and historic history -
On behalf of the officers and board of directors of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach County, I pray this year will be a year
of elevation, prosperity, health, and peace for Israel and Jews
around the world.
JEANNE LEVY, President
Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County
i

Home for Aged
Nearing Completion
With the main structure of the
( new Jewish Home for the Aged
"o* completed, plans are pro-
gjjung for the interior design,
Nnusnings, equipment and
Decorations under the direction of
"* firm of Bill Bagnall Associ-
te of Boston. Contracts are
to being let for landscaping of
we 15-acre site and for a design
a founders' sculpture at the
budding entrance that symbo-
E* and expresses the Judaic
2wni of concern for the eld-
*'y t i expected that these
Phases of the Home's construc-
"n will be nearly completed or
^Pleted by midwinter. Re-
cruitment and employment ol
professional administrative and
service staff are being scheduled
and timed in anticipation of
opening the Home on or about
June 1,1983.
According to Erwin H.
Blonder, president of the Jewish
Home for the Aged of Palm
Beach County, the admissions
committee will probably an-
nounce that the admission poli-
cies, procedures and information
necessary for admission to the
120-bed skilled nursing care
facility on the applications,
will be available shortly after the
first of the year.



The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
November3rd
4th Jewish Women's Assembly to Meet
Julie Cummings, Vice Presi-
dent of Education for The
Women's Division of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County announced the appoint-
ment of Maraa Shapiro and
Doris Singer as co-chairmen of
this year's Jewish Women's As-
sembly. The Assembly will be
held on Wednesday, Nov. 3rd at
the Hyatt Hotel in West Palm
Beach and will includes seminars
and workshops relating to the
1980s: A Decade of Concern.
In making the announcement
Julie Cummings stated "This
year the Jewish Women's As-
sembly promises to be exciting
and informative. Our topic is
Jewish Women and their con-
cerns and responsibilities in
community and in the world.
We are truly fortunate to have
such highly experienced and de-
dicated women as Marcia Shapiro
and Doris Singer organizing the
event. Under their able guidance
and leadership, this event will
truly be one that unites the Jew-
ish women in our community and
educates them as to the world
situation and their responsibility
to it."
Marcia Shapiro has been active
in the Jewish Federation in
Montreal, Canada and was the
National Treasurer of Canadian
Hadassah. She was awarded a
medal by Golda Meir and was ho-
nored by the Queen as an out-
standing Canadian.
Doris Singer is past president
of the National Council of Jewish
Women, Palm Beach Section,
and is active in Temple Beth El,
West Palm Beach She served on
the 1982 Super Sunday Commit-
tee of Jewish Federation and has
been involved in numerous Jew-
Women's Division Hosts
President's Coffee
Cynnie List, president of the
Women's Division of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County, has extended an invita-
tion to the presidents of Jewish
women's organizations in our
community, to attend the Presi-
dents' Coffee at the Hyatt Hotel.
Attendance to the coffee is by in-
vitation only.
The purpose of the meeting is
to present plans and programs by
the Women's Division for 1983 in
order to. provide a better net-
work of communication and
cooperation among all the orga-
nizations in this community.
Thousands of Jewish women will
be represented at this meeting.
Cynnie List stated, "It is im-
portant that Women's Division
and the Presidents of the organi-
zations come together in order to
be in touch with each other on
issues of mutual concern. I per-
sonally look forward to meeting
the top leadership of our volun-
Cynnie List
teer women's organizations at the
Presidents' Coffee on Monday
Sept. 20." '
Some Methods of Making
Charitable Contributions
Over the next few weeks this
column will focus on different
methods of making charitable
contributions which have special
tax benefits. In this article, two
of the more basic methods; gifts
of money and gifts of insurance
policies, will be discussed with
examples. The third method,
gifts of property that has in-
creased in value, will be used to
show the after tax cost of a par-
ticular charitable contribution of
appreciated property.
Gift of Mossy:
This type of gift gives a donor
a deduction for income tax pur-
poses for the amount of the gift
(within certain limits). The
higher the donor's tax bracket,
the lower the cost of making the
contribution. Because of the re-
duced tax rates are being phased
in for individuals over the next
serveral years, there is generally
an incentive to make contribu-
tions in 1982 and 1983 in order to
maiimize the tax benefit of the
contribution.
Gift of Insurance Policy:
Though gifts of insurance pol-
icies can be very technical and
confusing, generally speaking, a
deductible gift may be made by
irrevocably assigning it to a
charity a new or existing insur-
ance policy and by causing the
charitable donee to be irrevocably
named as the beneficiary. The
premiums thereafter paid are de-
ductible as charitable contribu-
tions and, to the extent that there
is a value to the policy at the time
of assignment, such value is also
deductible.
If a charity is designated as the
contingent beneficiary of a life in-
surance policy, the proceeds of
such policy actually received by
the charity are deductible from
the insured gross estate for es-
tate tax purposes.
Gift of Property that has
Increased in Value:
A double benefit is available to
a donor who makes a contribu-
Continued on Page 8
ish Federation matters.
Working with Marcia Shapiro
and Doris Singer on the Jewish
Women'8 Assembly, are the fol-
lowing committee chairmen:
Nancy Abrama, Renee Bussuk,
Deborah Brass, Sheryl Davidoff,
Laura Feuer, Millie Fier, Mollie
Fitterman, Fran Gordon, Karen
Hyman, Esther Kosowski,
Stacey Levy, Marjorie Schimel-
man. Adeie Simon, Esther
Szmuckler and Alice Zipkin.
If you are interested in work-
ing on the Jewish Women's As-
sembly committee, please contact Marcia Shapiro (1) and Doris Singer will serve as aw* s^.
Lynn Ehrlich. Women's Division Jewish Women's Assembly to be held Nov 3 tkun>oftl
Director, Jewish Federation, 832- West Palm Beach.
2120.
! Hyatt H,5|
FALL, 1982
REGISTRATIOM FORM:
PLEASE MAIL TO: MIDRASHA Judaica High School
Jewish Federation of Pain Beach County
501 S. Flagler Dr., Suite 305
West Pain Beach, FL 33401
Name
Hebrew Name
Date
Address
City
___zip_
Telephone
Name of Parent
Public School Crade_
Temple Affiliation
Name of School
I belong to the following Youth Croup'
Previous Jewish education (grades, city, temple)
T would_____would not_____like my name, address, plmnc lumber added to a general nailing
list for car pool purposes.
Students should choose one course for each period. If Hebrew is chosen for college credit,
students must register for two periods of Hebrew. Ona period of Hebrew is required for
every student.
I WISH TO ENROLL IN THE F0LL0W1NC COURSES: FALL TERM, 1SK2 SEPTEMBER 15 to DECEMBER 3,198
Period I 7:00 to 7:45 p.m. Period II 7:50 to 3:35 p.m.
_Hebrew for beginners
(grades 9 & 10)
_ Advanced Hebrew
"(grade* 9 & 10)
^American Jewish
Literature
__Jewiah Current Events/
Journalism -
Hebrew for Beginners
"(grades 11 & 12)
Advanced Hebrew
"(grades 1.1 t. 12)
_Llteraturc of the
Holocaust
Jewish Current Events/
Journalism
Period III 8:40 to 9:25 p.i.
Life Crises & Judalsa
"The Missionary at the
"Door"
Student's signature
____Jewish Drama Workehop
____Criminal Lav and Judalsi
Parent's signature
Registration and book fee ____is enclosed.
(Pees are $35 par tana or $75 for the year, including fall, winter and apring).
Make checks payable to: Jewiah Federation of Palm Beach County
During fall tera classes will meet at: Temple Israel, 1901 N. Flagler Dr., WTB 33407
Wednesday evenings 7: 00 to 9:25 p.m.
MMMMMHBAMAKgOBWmffl^^
Plan to Attend!
J08&&
WHY:
FOURTH ANNUAL JEWISH WOMEN'S ASSEMBLY
ALL MAJOR JEWISH WOMEN'S ORGANIZATIONS
IN THE PALM BEACHES
TO BE EDUCATED ABOUT THE 1980's: A
DECADE OK CONCERN. CHALLENGES FOR
JEWISH WOMEN

HYATT
PALM BEACHES
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3. 1982
8:45 A.M. 2:15 P.M.
*#M^^


J fr**fgg"^17*,WM
ai^iwaiaisiMittBriL_
. I -v^M
' ".....
ieu/isd ^fedeftation oj ?; V: *'..-..
NORMAN J. SCHIMELMAN
Executive Director
JEWISH
FEDERATION
OF PALM BEACH
COUNTY
DOUGLAS H. KLEINER
Assistant Executive Director

LYNNEHRLICH
Women's Division Director
JAY EPSTEIN
Assistant Campaign Director
RONNI EPSTEIN
Public Relations
And Leadership
Development Director
STANLEY HYMAN
Endowment Fund Director
SYLVIA LEWIS
Campaign Associate
ANN LYNN LIPTON
Jewish Education Coordinator
MARK MENDEL
Staff Associate
RABBI ALAN R SHERMAN
Chaplain and Director
Community Relations Council
CHARLES W. YOUNG
Comptroller
Seated (I*) Claire Jaffa. Jeanne Rachlea, AI
Rosoff, Nettie Berk, Amy Levy. Standing (1-r)
Hilda Kriegel. Sandra Proc, rtejrma c
Miriam Miraky, Gloria Belgard, Patty Kartell.
(Not pictured) Shirley Bernstein and Marilyn
Yacavone.


Page4-A
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Pri'tay. September 17
~Jewish Floridian
o Pam BMrti County c.m* <> t
ComMntng -Our Vote*" and "Fadaratlon RoiUi" s "* '"ocn" \
FRED K SHOCHET SUZANNE SMOCHE1 RONMITARTAKOW EPSTEIN
Editor and PuMMhar Eaacwtw* Editor New* Coorrjinatoi
PubNahad Waatdy Octobar through Mid-April. Bi Waakiy Daianea of yaaf.
Sacond Ctaaa Poataga Paid at Boca Raton, Fia USPS #089030
PALM BEACM BOCA RATON OFFICE
2200 H. Fadaral Hwy.. Surla 206. Boca Raton. Fla 13*32 Pnona 386-2001
Main Ottica Plant: 120 N E. Mh St., M.arm Fla 33101 Pnona 1 373-4805
Pa.lw.lfr Wn. tana Tt Jwfri FtorMUn. 0 01-2873. Mlarol, Fla 33101
nanrWHa. laair^nr Had Laaaar Pnona JtHIM
Comoinad Jawtah Appal Jamlan Fadaratlon ot Palm Beach County, inc.. Officaro Praaidant.
Jaanna Lary. Vloa PraaManta: Patar Cumrmnga. Alac Engalatain, Arnold J Hoffman. Amok)
Lamoart. Dr Richard Q Shugarman. Sacratary. Or EluabathS Frailich. Traaaurar. Ahrm WilenWy.
Exacutiva Dlractor. Norman J. ScrUmalman. Submit material lot publication to Ronni Tartakow
Epataln. Dlractor of Public Halations
Jawtah Floridian Ooaa not guarantee Kaahruth of Merchandise Advartiaad.
SUBSCRIPTION Rate* Local Area $4 Annual (2 Year Minimum 7 50), or by mambarahip Jewish
Fadaratlon of Palm Baach County. 501 S. Ftaglar Dr., Waal Palm Baach. Fla 33401 Phone
8322120. ^^
Friday. September 17,1982 29 ELUL 5742
Volumes Number 28
UJA Singles Mission Members Labor
As Galilee Kibbutz Volunteers
Amputation Operation
The Begin decision to move in the direction of
establishing more settlements in Judea and Samaria
is the only one possible in the wake of these
developments. It is a stern answer to an American
foreign policy determined to amputate Israel down to'
the sliver it was in 1948. There is to be no booty for
the victor in any of the Israeli wars since then but
no punishment for an Arab world determined to push
Israel into the sea yesterday, today, tomorrow,
whenever it will be able to.
The Begin decision also comes on the heels of
Labor Party chairman Shimon Peres' own "peace
initiative" in Washington the other week in his
meetings with President Reagan. Whatever Peres
said there, we doubt that the Labor Party or even
Mr. Peres himself will be as "giving" in new con-
cessions demands as the Reagan Administration
hopes or as obliging in relinquishing Jerusalem as
the Arabs insist upon in the world of Bechtel.
Still, the impression is that Peres will be that
obliging. And so comes the new torrent of
Nostradamus predictions in the general press. Mr.
Reagan wants to topple Mr. Begin.
Mr. Begin'8 settlements reply suggests that he will
be a tough bolder to sweep out of the way on
Washington's drive toward the Israeli amputation
operation.
KIBBUTZ SHAMIR, UPPER
GALILEE Travel broadens
the mind. Sometimes, it changes
it. Fred had planned to cancel his
participation in the third UJA
"Hatikvah" Mission because of
what the American media called
the "Israeli invasion of
Lebanon." He arrived convinced
that it was an unjust war.
"1 hadn't seen, I didn't know. I
was sympathetic to the press
reports that Israel had gone too
far. Now I'm here and I see
Lebanese children throwing
flowers and thanking Israel
soldiers. I see and feel the threat
that the Galilee residents have
lived under for years. I saw the
cache of PLO arms. When I go
home and explain what's really
going on, I can remind people
that it's a critic speaking."
With that, he turned around
and resumed working. Like the
others in the 450-member contin-
gent of American singles visiting
Israel on the Hatikvah Mission,
he had made a commitment to
join the kibbutzniks in their daily
labor a unique and concrete
means of showing their solidarity
with the people of the Northern
Galilee, at a time when kibbutzim
are suffering from a shortage of
manpower because of the number
of kibbutz members presently
serving in the army.
The volunteer farmers rolled
out of bed at 5 a.m. By 6 a.m.
Americans from New York to San
Diego lawyers, doctors, social
workers were clearing agri-
cultural land of boulders and
weeding the cotton fields.
Fred isn't the only person who
will have a great deal to say when
he gets home. Being in Israel has
given the mission participants an
opportunity to work through and
articulate their thoughts.
Howard, from Los Angeles,
pointed out, "When you're home,
vou're concerned about Israel but
you're also distracted daily life
and obligations. But here you're
not distracted. Being here brings
out what's really in your heart
and mind and clarifies it."
Others were still trying to
adjust to the reality of the situa-
tion. Marta, pausing from her
work, said, "With every soldiers
I see and hospital for the
wounded I visit, it gets more real,
more personal. As I'm here work-
ing, I know that the war is right
over there. Yet the mood of the
people is so strong and exuber-
ant. They're warm and friendly
as they continue with their lives
as best they can."
This Israeli spirit overwhelmed
the Americans whether thev had
been talking to city dwellers, kib-
butzniks, or children in Project
Renewal neighborhoods, who,
Israeli Diary
The Israeli View of the Palestinian PLO-Issue, PBS
Channel 42. Saturday, Sept. 18,8 p.m. Guests include Yit-
zak Rabin, Shimon Peres, Teddy Kollek, Chaim Herzog
and Moshe Arena.
HOMEBOUND?
If you are trying to keep things going, but are
experiencing difficulties, the Jewish Family &
Children's Service of Palm Beach County, Inc.,
would like to know. Consultations and home
evaluations are now available for the angency s
"Nurses Aides" program, through agency's
Quick Response Personnel.
For a confidential consultation, call J.F. & C.S.,
684-1991.
Jewish Family and Children's Service
of Palm Beach County, Inc.
2411 Okeechobce Boulevard
West Palm Beach. Fl 33409
The joy of sacees!-The cotton field is being cleared by UJA H.t!fc.L
Mission volunteers replacing kibbutzniks called uP (.T?
Peace lor Galilee. P Up*l*
in the States and you hetr'lwJ
was attacked you care bntii
c"\really feel it the w.r9
can after, being here. Now fk
whatitreaUyrneaiutobe^
ated on ; hostile borders I*
m the fields knowing y0 1
could be shattered any momat I
I U never listen to a news rt I
with the same ears again."
As the work day came to 11
close, the laboring guests scraped
mud from their shoes, wiped tit
dirt from their faces and sv-
veyed their efforts with satisfy I
tion. The residents were cietiij
moved by the concrete demo*
stration of support by the ym
Americans. Each of the visitors
was invited to a different kibbub
hum to be hosted by an Israeli
family. The total effect on minr
of the Americans was profound.
Perhaps Linda put it beat; 1
"Being here is making the pieces
of my Jewish identity really cone
together for the first time."
Participating in this missies I
from Palm Beach County wen
Dr. Hewitt Bruce, Dr. Roger j
Freilich and Robert Kirsch.
made a particularly special im-
pression on Marsha, a social
worker. "In the United States,
when you're in distressed neigh-
borhood, you feel it. Here, we've
gone to Project Renewal neigh-
borhoods and the children are
joyous and everyone's curious
and helpful. I 've never seen any-
thing like it before."
As Yoav, a kibbutz supervisor,
watched his industrious group
hauling 6-foot "weeds" out of the
cotton field, he said, "I'm really
surprised how hard they're work-
ing. They act as if they've been
doing it all their lives. And look
at how much fun they're having."
Despite the "fun" though, the
difficulty of the labor did not
leave the novices unimpressed.
Moving a boulder in the avocado
grove with his Israeli cohort,
Bruce groaned, "I never thought
it would be so hard it really
makes you understand why
people have fought so hard for
the land."
Leaning on a hoe and looking
up at the surrounding mountains
brought home to Howard just
how vulnerable to PLO attacks
these people in the northern
Galilee have been. "When vou're
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Lkvjgptanber 17,1962
- -

The Jewish Floridian ofPabn Beach County
BBH
Fdwin tytan
'Pletzel' Before the Terrorist Attacks
PARIS The
Ipletzel, the Paris Jewish
Inuarter, was once an East
lEuropean ghetto where
llOO.OOO People apoke
[French with a Yiddish ac-
cent It covered a sizeable
Inart of the city stretching
Ifrom the Place de la Repub-
lliaue, where Zev Jabotin-
[sky used to speak in pre-
I World II days in the local
Ijewish "Palace," the Hotel
IModem, to the Rue Saint
IPaul, where poor Jews
[made a living hawking alte
hachen, alte shiech (old
Iclothes, old shoes).
Pge5-A
i
Today, it is a sentimental
emory to which people return to
y and remember how their par-
fnu or their grandparents once
Led when thev first arrived in
France from somewhere east
Poland, Rumania, Russia.
The PleUel is a maze of narrow
illeys and winding streets, far
[mm the glitter of the Champs
Elysees or the skyscrapers which
line the banks of the River Seine.
It is Filled with dark courtyards,
where the sun rarely shines, and
small, modest shops.
IN ITS center, La Rue des
[Rosiers, where terrorists struck,
killing six people and wounding
|22, there still are half a dozen
kosher outchers, a Hebrew book-
shop, two or three Jewish
restaurants and an old woman
who sells of Fridays the tradi-
tional chalot.
In between the remaining
Jews, live and work Paris' new
poor: immigrants from North
Africa and Spain. The shoemaker
who resoles the shoes and boots
of the neighborhoods's residents
is from Portugal; the locksmith is
from Auvergene, France's poor-
est province.
The Pletzel is a museum, and
Jo Goldenberg's restaurant, with
its hot pastrami and chicken
soup, is its main exhibit. The res-
taurant was also the scene of the
terrorist attack.
"People could not live if they
did not know their roots," says
anold Jew who has lived here
since before the war. "The rich
Jews, those who now live in the
posh sections, and have villas in
the country, spend their holidays
on the Cote d' Azur and drive big
Mercedes, they all have to come
back here from time to time,
where it all started, to remember
who they are."
THE OLD MAN, a regular
client at Goldenberg's, comes in
every day with his copy of the
local Yiddish paper, Unser Wort,
to drink a glass or two of vodka.
He has his own theory of why the
killers struck on the Rue des
Rosiers.
They did not come to kill
Jews. They could have found
more Jews and easier to hit in the
suburbs, hke Sarcelles or Plessy.
iney came to kill a dream. Yes
mons.eur a dream. They wanted
to erase the past. They want us to
be just like them, people with no
past and no future."
The Pletzel is filled with past
history. Jews first started set-
tling in what was then a suburb
of medieval Paris back in the
nth century, and after Philip
Augustus expelled the Jews from
"l 198 returned to the area
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
OF PALM BEACH
HIGH HOLY DAY SERVICES
AT
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
JN.EAU&PEACH
Rosh Hashanah Sept. 17,18,19
YomKippurSept.26,27
Services Conducted by:
Rabbi Joel Chazin
and
Cantor David Dardashti
[Temple Emanu-EI is a Conservative Synagogue and
invites the unaffiliated of the Palm Beaches to join it in
| membership and worship.
For Reservations and Tickets $75.00 each
Please
Phone: 832-0804 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Write: P.O. Box 764, Palm Beach, Fl. 33480
THE RUE des Rosiers was
named at the time "La Rue des
Juifs," the street of the Jews, and
on the site of the synagogue,
where President Francois Mitter-
rand came to attend services for
the victims two weeks ago, stood
a famous yeshiva where in the
early days of the 13th century,
Yudah Ben Isaac, known as Sir
Leon of Paris, used to teach.
The pletzel is Jewish history.
Every street, every corner, is
somehow linked with the past.
After the Jews were definitely
expelled from France in 1394, the
Pletzel emptied itself as if leprosy
had struck. The streets were
barely inhabitated till the early
part of the 18th century when the
rich Jewish businessmen from
Metz and Alsace started return-
ing.
By royal permission, they
could at first just spend the night
in the capital'"if necessary," and
the first Jewish inns opened. The
first Paris inn serving kosher
Continued on Page 13
The Staff of
Beth Israel
Memorial Chapel
wishes our Jewish
community a happy and
healthy New Year
BETH ISRAEL
Memorial Chapel
Delray Beach499-80000
Joseph Rubin. F.D.
Owner
u&tound the ^ou/n
fey Start 9!esseit
Around the Town" would like to hear from you. Send article*
typewritten and double-spaced to SUd Leaser, c / o The Jewish
Floridian, 601 South Flagler Drive, Suite 305, West Palm Beach,
Fl. 33401.
Mary Shupler is a special young woman. She teaches the
hearing impaired class students at Jefferson Davis Middle
School. Mary is well trained having received her Masters Degree
in Special Education at the University of North Florida. Mary is
a native of W.P.B. Her grandparents came to the area around
1914.
The Bella Were Ringing. Mazol Tov to Ronni and Jay
Epstein on their recent marriage and to Julie and Daniel Her-
shman on their recent marriage.
Happy Birthday to you, Happy Birthday dear Arnold
Lampert. Arnold recently celebrated his "50th." We know what
keeps Arnold so young wife, Marilyn, five children, and
dedicated involvement to our community.
A very special, special get well wish to a very special, special
young lady Nancy Dober. We expect to see you out on the
tennis courts real soon.
"Around the Town" would like to wish a most happy, healthy
and good 6743 to the entire community.
Let this be the time to reflect on our lives, both individually
and communally. May the looking glass of life show a reflection
of us all striving toward a goal. May that goal help us attain a
better world for us and all of our people everywhere. Shalom!
Riverside
Riverside Memorial Chapel,Inc. Funerai Directors
Miami Beach/Miami/North Miami Beach
Dade County Phone No. 531-1151
Hollywood/Ft. Lauderdale (Tamarac)
Broward County Phone No. 523-5801
West Palm Beach: 683-8676
Carl Grossberg, President
Alfred Golden, Executive Vice President
Leo Hack, V.P., Religious Advisor
Keith Kronish
Srjoniorlng the Guardian Plan Pre-ArranRnd Funeral
Tradition.
I A what makes us Jews.
Temple Judea
Reform Temple of the
Palm Beaches
High Holy Day
Rabbi Joel L. Levine
Cantor Rita Shore
Barbara Chane, president
Available
Join our growing family congregation for
Inspiring Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur worship.
* Sabbath Service
Friday at 8.-00 P.M.
FAMILIES WELCOME
JUNIOR ONEG
Religious School at
Jewish Community Center
Sisterhood
Brotherhood
Youth Groups
Social Action Platform
Social Groups
Chavurot
Services at St Catherine's Greek Orthodox Church Social Hall
4000 Washington Rd. at Southern Blvd.
7778 for Contemporary Jewish Living I
enorali
ardeng \m 'p ,
Chapels
and their staff
extend to you, our friends,
a healthy and happy
new year.
Mr. and Mrs. Mark Weissman
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Polinsky
Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Goldstein
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Salz
Mr. and Mrs. Albert Schatz
Dr. and Mrs. Myron "Mike" Klein
Mr. and Mrs. Gary Glass
Mr. and Mrs. Mark Ginsberg
Cantor and Mrs. Joseph Labovitz
Marion Dock
Jonathan Fuss
Scott Cuttler
Morris Funk
Michael Jacobson
Stuart Scblinsky


Pte6-A
l"l iiU,
IMrM ^toridnvip^P-fi^^wc^ gwnty
Friday-Sqptgnbtr.1
Organizations in the News
fT>rY**-.w*.< nI... D^l.i:^.-. ^ C*_____1___________1 1_ 1 _
HADASSAH
Shalom HadaueJi will spend
three days and two nights at the
Epcot Center beginning Oct. 11.
There will be a day at Calder on
Oct. 14. Contact Gene Fermag-
lich.
Reservations are being taken
for a three day and two night
New Year's weekend at Epcot,
highlighting a festive New Year's
Eve party and nightly entertain-
ment. Contact Fran Nudelman,
Flo Siegel or Lillian Schack for
details and reservations.
Chai Group of the Lake Worth
Chapter of Hadassah will hold
the first meeting for fiscal 1962-
1983 on Thursday, Sept. 23 at
12:30 p.m. in the Social Hall of
the Challenger Country Club at
Poinciana Place. Refreshments
will be served.
Fanny Schwartz will report on
the National Hadassah Conven-
tion held in Jerusalem in August.
An interesting program has
been planned by program co-
chairmen Florence Meyerson and
Sara Singer. Dr. William Poel
will be our guest speaker, and the
subject will be "How Does
Judaism Differ?"
The first meeting of the season
of the Henrietta Szold Group of
Hadaaaah will be held on Tues-
day, Sept. 21 at 1 p.m. in the Au-
ditorium of Lakeside Village, Lil-
lian Rd. West of Congress Ave.,
Palm Springs.
The program for the afternoon
will be a review of Isaac Bashevia
Singer, given by Minette Gross,
education vice president. Re-
freshments will be served.
The Henrietta Szold Group will
have a Chai Luncheon on Oct. 28
at Bernards. For reservations,
call Pearl Rubenzahl or Fritzie
Silverberg.
Community Relations Council Speakers available
Topics Israel, Community Concerns, Soviet
Jewry, Energy, Holocaust
For information and bookings, contact
Rabbi Alan R. Sherman's office
at the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County, 832-2120
Yovel Hadassah invites you tc
its first general meeting of the
season on Sept. 30 at Temple
Anshei Sholom at 12:30 p.m.
President Lee Goldberg will re-
port on Hadassah's Jerusalem
Convention this summer. Future
meetings will be held on the third
Thursday of each month. All are
welcome.
PIONEER WOMEN
Na'Amat
Golds Meir Club
Royal Palm Theatre, Sept. 23,
Tag Day
Tag Day and Child Rescue
Fund are synonymous to Pioneer
Women everywhere. This is the
way the group supports the
Youth Aliyah projects. Pioneer
Women were instrumental in op-
ening the doors of these institu-
tions in Israel: Ayanot, Kanot,
and Eron, so that children could
get valuable training in horticul-
ture.
Coeducational facilities are
presently being utilized for chan-
neling the disadvantaged youths
of Israel into constructive
citizenship which includes both
immigrants and Israelis, prepar-
ing them for a more creative and
productive life in Israel.
WOMEN'S AMERICAN
OBT
The Golden Lakes Chapter of
Women's american ORT will hold
its next meeting on Tuesday,
Sept. 28 at 1 p.m. in the Club-
house.
Carolyn Ring, region presi-
dent, will show slides and discuss
the new school of engineering in
Israels.
Tickets will be on sale for the
Burt Reynolds Dinner-Theatre
for Sunday, Oct. 31: Matinee,
Champagne Brunch show, and
appearaive of, Burt Reynolds in
person!
The next regular meeting of
Mid-Palm Chapter of Women's
American ORT will be held on
Sept. 20 at 1 p.m. at the Senior
Citizens Center, 201 North Dixie
Highway, Lake Worth. There will
be an interesting talk by Sophia
Jacobson on her recent trip to Is-
rael.
JEWISH WAR VETERANS
Ladies'Auxiliary
Post 408
The Ladies' Auxiliary of the
Jewish War Veterans No. 408 will
hold its regular meeting on Tues-
day, Sept. 21 at 12:30 p.m. at the
First Federal of Delray on Okee-
chobee Blvd., West Palm Beach,
at the West Gate of Century Vil-
lage.
Community
17
ROSH HASHANAH EVE
IS
ROSH HASHANAH
19
ROSH HASHANAH
20
Day School Extends Greetings and
Gratitude to the Jewish Community
An-nell
Hotel
Strictly
Kosher
3 Full Course Meals Dally
Mashgtach & Synagogue
on Premises
TV Live Show-Movies
Special Diets Served
Open All Year Services
MMf Ml good shopping
CM tor MM
700EUCLIDAVE/ CALL
MIAMI BEACH /1 -531 1191
The Benjamin S. Hornstein-
Jewish Community Day School
marks the year 5743 with its
historic move to the new campus
at 5801 Parker Avenue.
The leadership of the Day
School took the occassion of the
opening of the campus to extend
its greetings to the community
and to all of those who helped
make the dream a reality.
Shirley Dellerson, the presi-
dent of the school and Mordecai
Lvow, the headmaster, com-
bined their wishes for a "Shana
Tova" with expressions of grati-
tude to all of those who helped
provide a new home for the Day
School.
"Your dollars and pledges
made possible the new cai:\ous
which is the first Jewish c is-
munal structure in Palm Beach
County. It is a tribute to the
vision of the Jewish community
of Palm Beach County that this
'first' is devoted to Jewish educa-
tion."
FEDERATION WOMEN'S DIVISION PRESIDENTS' COFFEE
TIS luncheon and discussion group Jewish Fam'l m*
dren's Service board 7:30 p.m. Pioneer Wome' i^ ?**!
Herzl board 12 noon Women's American ORT M^d*?***
p.m. Temple Beth David Men's Club p m i L "'
Veterans No 408 board 7:30 p.m. JEWISH cc^T Wo'
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 7:30 p.m. JEWISH FEDERATION
hpiahrfl
Women's American ORT Boynton Beach 12:30 p.rn H i
sah Henrietta Szold I p.m. Congregation Anshei &2.
Sisterhood 1 p.m. Jewish War Veterans No 408 B'nai B'T
Women Chai 8 p.m. Temple Beth El Sisterhood 8 m .
Temple Beth David board 8 p.m. Temple Israel boa h b
p.m. Women's American ORT Wellington 8 p m nmu
FEDERATION COMMUNITY PLANNING MEETING 4:30 p m
Sqrterrter 22
Hadassah Lee Vassil 12:30 p.m. American Red Magen rw,
for Isrel 1 p.m. Temple Beth Sholom Sisterhood board ov\
a.m. JEWISH FEDERATION IN SERVICE TRAINING SESSION
JCC 4:30 p.m. JEWISH FEDERATION LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT
CABINET MEETING 8 p.m. WtNT
Hadassah Chai 12:30 p.m. Women's American ORT Boyn-
ton Beach Deli Lunch Card Party Jewish Community Center!
Executive Committee 8 p.m. Women's American ORT .
Haverhill board 12:30 p.m.
SeyfriiiB 26
YOM KIPPUR EVE B'noi B'rith Haifa 9:30a.m.
SjjlniiM 27
YOM KIPPUR Hadassah Chai Break the Fast Temple Beth El
Sisterhood Break the Fast
StptantW28
Pioneer Women Golda Meir board 9:30 a.m. Women's
American ORT Golden Lakes 1 p.m. Congregation Anthei
Sholom 1 p.m. Women's American ORT Boynton Beach -
board 1 p.m. Jewish Community Center Sukkot Building-5
p.m. B'nai B'rith Women Masada board 7:30 p.m. Tern-
pie Beth El Men's Club board 8 p.m. FEDERATION EDUCATION
COMMITTEE-8p.m.
JEWISH FEDERATION BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING 8 p.m.
National Council of Jewish Women Palm Beach 10 a.m.
Hadassah Tikvah 1 p.m. Hadassah Shalom Theatre Party
Sq*err*w30
Hadassah Bat Gurion Paid up Membership Luncheon -11 o.m.
Hadassah Yovel 12:45 p.m. Temple Beth Torah Sisterhood
- Ma| Jong Tournament 8 p.m.
Flaglet
National
Bank
Mfmtur FDIC
Your Locally Owned and Operated
IndependentBank
t G A IAMUNG CENTER
ComerolPG A BtaJ and Prosperity Farms Rd
OaMVMMOMCanER
Corner ot Atlantic Ave and M*Ury Trail
LAKE WORTH 1ANKMG CENTER
Comer ot Lake Worm Rd andJogRd
JUftTER IAJUUN6 CENTER
Corner ot indiantown Rd and MMrtaryTrari
caaaM-zm
FLA61ER CENTER DOWNTOWN Wft
SOtS Flag* Or WPB
FOREST H*LL lAMUM CEN H
Corner ot Forest rMBivd andFkHida mgoRd
PALM iEACH LAKES UNKING CENTER
Corner of Okeecnooee Blvd and
Palm Beach Lakes Blvd <-.
NORTMUMIE tANKMG CENTER
Northlake Btvd Across tromK -Man
It's time f or
happiness, good food
and Sorrento.
Rosh Hashanah is a time for celebration of a new beginning.
Families gathering to share the old and face the new it's all a part
of the tradition. And so is Sorrento. Serving Sorrento Ricotta at
your holiday table makes the New Year complete. Best wishes for
health and happiness in the coming year from the Sorrento
family to yours.
Have a joyous feast!
THE BEST
ITALIAN
CHEESE IN
AMERICA!"
SORRENTO
CHEESE CO.. INC
2375 SOUTH PARK AVE
BUFFALO, N.Y. 14220


L^Wfrihr".'^
The Jewish FtoridianofPdlm B*achounty
The Attitude of the Press is
Anti-Semitic, Blatant
*1*
By MEIR DAVID
| .Mike Oren is bitter. He
as with one of the first
lCk paratroop units
rhich went into Lebanon,
id he cannot reconcile the
tar he saw at such close
,ge with the war portray-
by the media.
"We were under strict orders
go into villages that we knew
-ere held by the PLO and the
lyrians and to wait until we were
red on before we started shoot-
Vg," he says. "Even then we had
identify the sources of fire
efore we could shoot back in
toe we injured civilians.
"I was in battles where I saw,
In more than three of four hund-
Ed yards away, terrorists and
lyrians running to take up their
ositions in houses. And yet we
ad to go in without firing.
nowing they were waiting for
Is.
I "DO YOU KNOW what that
Ming is? I lost friends,
pmrades, because of our concern
ir civilians. I saw what we did.
"At the time it was frustrating
and a lot of the guys were
ngry but in retrospect it was
onlv wav to be. The Israel
Defense Forre has to be different
worid"ny ther amy ta the
Mike Oren was with the first
S52*iJ? reach East Brut:
I he bells were ringing, people
were out in the streets in their
best clothes they were cheer-
ing, waving, throwing bags of
pita, nee, roses to us. We were
just sitting on our machines with
our mouths open in amazement,
home of the guys had tears in
their eyes. We couldn't believe
it.
Mike, 27, a New Yorker who
came on aliya four-and-a-half
years ago, returned from
Lebanon to his home in Jerusa-
lem to find that Israel was being
villified as the destroyer of inno-
cents.
" I CALLED my folks in New
York. The first thing they said
was, 'How could you have killed
so many civilians?' And they are
Zionists! But all they knew was
what they had read in the
newspapers and seen on televi-
sion.
"When I told my father what
we had done he was really sur-
prised. He was in the United
States Army in World War II
and took part in the invasion of
Europe. He said that when U.S.
troops were taking a town, they'd
flatten it completely if a single
sniper opened fire.
"I thought at first it might
have been different if foreign
journalists had been allowed to
come with us into battle and see
for themselves the way the IDF
behaved. They'd have seen that it
was just not true that the towns
were strewn with bodies.
"I WAS the first Israeli soldier
in Tyre and in two days I saw one
civilian casualty. I saw for myself
a hospital that turned out to be
full of terrorists and the Red
Cross wouldn't let us in because
it was sheltering them.
"But when I read reports in
Newsweek comparing Beirut
with the Warsaw Ghetto and the
rest of the press so violently anti-
Israel, I'm not so sure that hav-
ing reporters with us would have
helped. I've discussed it with my
friends and we've all come to the
same conclusion the attitude
of the press is anti-Semitic. Bla-
tant.
"I believe the press is out to
get this country. Frankly, I
wouldn't put anything passed
them. Before this war, I couldn't
understand why Israel was so
gun-shy about journalists. But
now I can see why we are forced
to adopt an armadillo stance.
Celebrate 5743
with a taste of tradiricm!
.....

Manischewilz
QUALITY JEWISH FOODS SINCE 5649
Produced under strict Rabbinical supervision 9
For Kashruth Certificate write:
Board of Rabbis. P.O. Box 214. Jersey City. NJ 07303
5
"WHAT DISTURBS me most
is that the press we get has a pro-
found affect on the way people
vote in Oklahoma and the way
people vote in Oklahoma deter-
mines how many bullets we get to
fire.
"When I was in Beirut with
people cheering and waving, I
was sorry that the press wasn't
there with us to see it. But now I
think they'd probably have writ-
ten that behind every cheering
Lebanese was an Israeli soldier
holding a gun to his head!"
Is rail Seen*
m
SUN!
i*r
Sunsweet Prune Juice.
It's not just good for my body
It just plain tastes good"
Everyone knows that Sunsweet Prune Juice has a variety ot
vitamins and minerals. So when people see me drinking it.
they usually figure that I drink it to stay healthy. Actually,
that'sonly half the reason. It also happenstotaste delicious.
And why not., it's a rich. 100" natural fruit juice, with
no sugar or preservatives added. I enjoy Sunsweet Prune
Juice often. After all, how often do you find something
that's good for you and that riikiria/rrT
tastes good, too? bUNbWtb I
To your health
Here's a good deal
on Sunsweet9 Prune Juice.
Good on any size of Sunsweet Prune Juice.
Mr. Groctr: This coupon it redeemable lor 10< (plus 7< handling)
when meiled lo Sunsweet Prune Juice, P.O. Box 1404. Clinton,
IA S2734. provided it his boon uiod for a purchase in accor-
dance with this offer. Any other use constitutes fraud Invoices
proving purchase of sufficient stock to cover coupons
presented for redemption must be shown upon request, void if
use is prohibited, taxed or otherwise restricted by taw. Cash
value 1/204 This of far expires October 31,1M3. Offer limited to
one coupon per purchase. SUNSWEET GROWERS. INC.
70M50 aoobai
CERTIFIED KOSHER WJ OFF
10:


i ho 7/>*ita*Al>
Page 8-A
The Jewish Floridian ofPalm Beech Gmmty
Friday, Sepumlm^
Some Methods of Making Charitable Contributions
Continued from Page 2
tion of appreciated long term
capital gain type property. Firat,
the donor is entitled: to a chari-
table deduction for the fair mar-
ket value of the property, rather
than its lower coat (basis); and,
second, the donor avoids the
capital gains tax he would have
paid if he had sold the property.
He will create a larger charitable
deduction with no greater cost
than if he had sold the property,
paid the capital gains tax and
then contributed the net pro-
ceeds. The charity will also re-
ceive a larger contribution.
Example: A married taxpayer
with $50,000 taxable income who
files a joint return wishes to dis-
pose of securities owned for more
than one year. The securities cost
him $2,200 and have a current
market value of $10,000. He also
wishes to make a contribution of
$8,000 to the Jewish Floridian of
Palm Beach County (JFPBC). As
shown below, he may give the
securities (having a $10,000 cur-
rent value) to the Jewish Federa-
tion of Palm Beach County with-
out any greater net cost to him
than if he first sold the securities
and then gave the JFPBC $8,000
in cash. Thus, in this example,
the taxpayer may give a substan-
tial additional benefit to the
JFPBC without any additional
cost to h mself.
Conversely, where a donor de-
sires to make a contribution of a
capital asset that he could sell at
a loss, he will benefit more by
selling the property (at a loss) to
a third party and contributing
the proceeds. He will recognize a
capital loss and use it to offset
capital gains (or up to $3,000 of
ordinary income per year, if he
has no other capital gains).
Normally the amount of the
charitable contribution is the fair
market value (less any encum-
brances) of the property but that
amount may be required to be re-
duced where the donated prop-
I he gives the
securities as a
contribution to
JFPBC
Taxable income before gift or sale
Less: Contribution (securities,
fair market value)
$50,000
10,000
$40,000
0
$9,196
Ihetajfthe
securities and
makes a
contribution
in cash
$50,000
Proceeds of sale of securities
Tax on ordinary income
Capital gains tax
$10,000
2,000 cost
$ 7.800 x rate (16 percent)-
Total tax 9,195
Net cash remaining
(securities disposed of) $40,805
All examples based on 1962 tax rates
8.
$42,000
10,000
$9,975
1,220
11,195
$40,805
fUMrraForTlM
High Holy Days
traditional services
BRING YOUR FAMILY
TO OUR HOUSE
FOR THE HOLIDAYS!
etm nnmp!! aa
Fallsuiiw
Non-cash item
erty is subject to the depreciation
"recapture" rules. A special pro-
vision may limit the deduction
for contributions of appreciated
property to 30 percent of the
donor's contribution base, unless
the donor elects to reduce the
amount of the contribution itself
by 40 percent of the inherent
long-term capital gain. A discus-
sion of these rules on "Limita-
tions on Charitable Deductions,"
will appear in subsequent artic-
les.
Note: This column is written as
a service to provide general infor-
mation to the public about the
Endowment Program of the Jew-
ish Federation of Palm Beach
County. Information contained
herein is not designed as legal or
tax advice. You should take up
such matters with your respec-
tive attorneys and accountants.
Should you want additional in-
formation about charitable
giving, and the various methods
which may be utilized through
the Federation's Endowment
Program, please contact Stanley
&t
Ot
taci
588-1652
A Costa Cruise
is easy to take.
Tkke the
Bahamas
Party Ship.
Amerikanis from Miami,
3- and 4-night cruises.
It's half price sail time on the fun-loving,
spacious Amerikanis sailing from
Miami, August 2 through ^^*--j
November 19.1982 ~^T att M i
I
I
That's when the sec-
ond person in your cabin cruises
for 50% less at a savings of $202.50 to
$332.50* Choose a 3-night cruise to Nassau
sailing every Friday or a 4-night cruise to Freeport
and Nassau sailing every Monday.
So have some fun at these easy-on-the-pocket
prices. Just call your travel agent. It's that easy.
Amerikanis of Greek registry.
Of*' apc*e to twin- tjedded cabns and mmWs *l uatejwy 5
and up This oft*> is capacity concouad and mbjact KJ
Mhdiawai witnout notice
.
0STA CRUISES
lake it easy, lake a Costa."
CALL COSTA TOLL FREE
In Florida (800) 432-9001 BVoward County 763-4990 In Miami 3587330
Hyman, Endowment Director of
the Jewish Federation at 832-
2120.
Indoor & Outdoor Tennis Indoor 4 Outdoor Pools
Robert Tront Jones Gtit Course Poolside Lunch
Health Club. Saunas Co-Ed Whirlpool Spa Jogging
Indoor Mini-Gerf a Gym Boating ft Fishing On Our Lake
Indoor Disco Roller Skating Entertainment A Nrte Club
Children s World A Pool. Day Camp A Toon Program
. HOTEL (914| S47-510* MYC (212) I47-442S. IN MONTREAL |5m 6111000
\ TOIL FREE CALLS III ALL STATES EICtPT NEW Y0P.K OIAL WO 4310152 /
KEREN ORR PRESCHOOL
of the
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
'YOUR CHILDREN AND HOW THEY GROW
THIS IS THE CONCERN WE SHARE"
CALL
689-7700
Is accepting REGISTRATION for
2Vt and 4 year olds
OUR PHILOSOPHY: le faster the social, .motional, physical and coani-
ttvs development of th. pra-tchool child. Call Today For Fall BrOCflUrO.
Listing New Mother/Toddler Classes and Activities for all ages.
While strolling the campus grounds at the University of Edinburgh, it
wouldn't be unusual to hear "Shalom aleichem" uttered in the same breath as
"Hoot, mon!" Because Hebrew was a language taught here as early as
the 1600's. As a matter of fact, the first Jews who came to Scotland
had been specially invited to Edinburgh just to teach Hebrew. Can
you imagine students in the land of King Charles celebrating gradua-
tion in the language of King David?
You don't have to be a Hebrew major from Edmburgh to
know that on such occasions a toast with fine scotch whisky is in
order. In America, the favorite is J&B Rare Scotch. Special blend-
ing has given J&.B a flavor in a class by itself. Which is why we say
it whispers. And which is why J&.B is the worthy spirit at any toast,
whether you say, "Cheers, Laddie!" or simply, "L'Chayim!"
J&B. It whispers.
6Proo

L September 17
1962
[ewish Gommunity Center Senior News
TheJtwiMkFtoridianofPalmBeachCounty pwH

Jewish Community Cen-
ICooprehenuive Senior Sarv-
Km receives funds from
^nt, Title III of tto
. Americsns Act, *
ulf,trenArmdeCouncU
a and the Fionda De-
*'of H.R-S. This enables
CC to provide transporta-
for the transit disadvan-
w doctors, hospiUls, nura-
bomes, shopping, etc. m a
ited area, as well rs a var-
f recreation and educational
JCC is continuing to de-
"other types of transporta-
r services as vehicles nave
awarded to them through
Jrban Mass Transportation
|m this time, only groups are
to call upon the JCC for
[Various local transportation
, both for day and evening
U. There will be a moderate
cover expenses. The JCC
[very strongly about provid-
Vpportunities to enable per-
to participate in enriching
ts and asks the community
ork with them to further ex-
I the program to better serve
I community. Call Rhonda
fn at 689-7700 for scheduling
[trip
Ongoing Programs
kund Table Talk for Men
My Topics for Thinking
ken These groups will
jointly every Tuesday
bt the second Tuesday of the
(that 1 p.m.
Stage A JCC drama
shop designed for persons
fested in all phases of drama
or Dick Sanders, group
Binator, Sylvia Skolnick, will
is for September and will
(every Tuesday in October at
i.m. The fall program will
enirate on one act plays.
Club Meets
ay at 10 a.m. Morris
president. All who are
ted in improving their
speaking talents are en-
ged to join this group.
pilth Insurance Assistant
Reiter, health insurance
rJinator, will assist persons
health insurance forms,
per questions, etc. the third
sday of the month at 2 p.m.
"I be at the Center Oct. 21'.
|Adult Education Classes
School Board of Palm
i County Adult Community
tion. Classes officially
the week of Oct. 11, but
classes are in session in
Nber. Everyone invited to
' No fee.
live Craft Circle-Toys 4
(Mondays, 9:30 a.m., begins
ve Life Attitudes
ays, lpm., begins Oct. 11.
* Your Car Wednes-
^10a.m., begins Oct. 13.
gin Your Chair-For Men
Women Wednesdays, 1
| begins Oct. 13.
I Hiding Wednesdays, 4
[ongoing.
to" Workshop Thurs-
ua.m.; begins Sept. 9;
a.m., begins Sept.
SL? W* No- l- North New Oriean. Sunday. Nov
^ l^Ch;fmaJ2 n0On to 4 M to Thunday, Nov. ITaS
p^nv Donation $6.25 Smorgas- cial senior gathering
m, 9:30
Event
Party _
Luncheon
Thursday,
"^ EnroUment
SL^Sistration required -
IS?,00 and Mk for Ro~
|orLibbyRobbins.
af Life Htatory -
p. I Pm., begins Oct. 16.
of the Month Dr.
,DJca" ~ Scenic water
and oils. Everyone is in-
! to visa the JCC Compre-
e ^nior Service Center to
8 'ovely exhibit.
Coming Events
?? lTd,V Ch> AcUvity
"" Rubin, president, an-
' t a variety of events
Planned by the Tuesday
Wonp Coun
'uons early.
up Council. Make your
bord, and transportation $1.
Total 17.25. Call Sam Rubin fo
reservations 689-7700.
Defensive Driving 56 and
Alive-Paul Oblas, instructor.
This program is offered two times
a year. It is designed for the
driving needs and problems of
the retirees of Palm Beach
County.
Wednesdays Sept. 29 and
Oct. 6,9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
$5 instructional fee 10 per-
cent discount of Colonial Penn
and Prudential Auto policies
after completion of seminar. Call
to register at 689-7700 and ask
for Rose Lord or Libby Robbins.
"Let's Explore Poetry Four
sessions of great poetry with
reading of original and master-
pieces. Enjoy a unique experience
with Ethel Novick, group leader,
on Tuesday mornings at 9:30'
a.m. through the month of Sep-
tember. All poetry lovers invited.
Trips
Lido Spa Oct. 31 to Nove. 3
Sunday to Wednesday. The
Jewish Community Center makes
its semi-annual trip to the Spa
a great time is always enjoyed by
all who attend. Fees listed in-
clude transportation.
Singles Occupancy: Members
$160; Non-Members $167.
Double occupancy per Person:
Members $145; Non-Members
$152.
Limited Reservation. Make
your plans early. Call Sam 689-
7700.
of the
Southern JCC Region. Visit a
great area, meet new friends. Call
Rhonda Cohen 689-7700 for all
the details.
Message from Jean Rabin, Direc-
torofCSSC. ..
As always our volunteers have
risen to the occasion. Our thanks
to all of you who have helped us
throughout the summer. Many of
you have been involved in pro-
gramming, the JCC Study, filling
in for our staff when they were on
vacation and mailings, especially
our Fall Brochure. We salute
you!!
The JCC-CSSC staff wishes ail
of you a very happy and healthy
New Year. We are looking for-
ward to a very exciting year
one filled with opportunities, fun
and expansion. Be sure you know
what is happening at the JCC.
LShanaTova. Je^R^
Orlando Southeast Senior
Happening A three day two-
night fantastic trip hosted by the
JCC of Orlando-this yearly event
is the 4th Southeast Senior get
together and will be a blending of
friendship, Disneyworld and life
in Orlando. Check in at the
Quality Inn, International Drive,
explore Epcot, shop at Lake
Buena Vista, enjoy a little bit of
Jewish theatre and meet new
friends. Also includes two break-
fasts, two luncheons. Call Sam
Rubin for information or return
registration form with your
deposit. Don't miss the JCC se-
nior trip of the year!
soutmuit stmoe mmnmc in ueuaoo
r. e
itcisrmioa nm
frit. lKlg*i ) *,.. I .li.a attlllllllltlaaa. ImIWImj UUM- txMUt. iklulH
(CKOr. Start tail ( ram). cue kfaaktaata, w> Uackaaaa, tM.tr. a.'ir. >> >rtil"
aae* tt.i.
mat r.Jl Haaa fUa*
r... J|t n
fit... CH.I iaaartae Will _________________
____Oaaala Occaamca..............rhak*r 1111.00
____Dauala Octaaaacj-.............. iMn 11*1.00
tlMl. Occaawcy..............M,i 1141.00
____SlaiU Occaawacjr..............Hin Maait 1)1.00
O..OHI suit ic(M.,r raaarvatlaa. 111.00 .r aaraa*aM Vatwraiatta alt.r Maviaajit Ut.
n..M cko.t. IgMki (At tttay'l) ______Ir.U.a risk ___ar.ll.. CMtk.a
TEMPLE SINAI
O' Palm Beach County
A REFORM HEBREW CONGREGRATION
member U A H C
HIGH HOLY DAY SERVICES
LIMITED TICKETS AVAILABLE
RABBI SAMUEL SILVER, D D officiating
Friday September 17 Rosh Haehanah evanlng 8PM
Saturday September 18 Roh Haahanah morning 10 AM
Sunday September 26 Yom Klppur evening a PM
Monday September 27 Yom Kippur 10 AM
Afternoon Menu,nal Service & Concluding Service 3PM
Religious School Now Being Organized
For Information coll 2766161
For Membership or Ticket Information call
s.o haic,
498 :C9e
.I'--- i'.IH'
49V iS6J
V A ', I t A '. Z *
7;: 3.99
firfLu.nc.hana Card Party
Enter the Mazel Tbv Sweepstakes
Win a$l,000 catered party from Maxwell Hous^Coffee!
Let Maxwell House put $1000 towards the cater-
ing of your next special occasion We'll make it a
glorious anniversary! A beautiful bar mitzvah! A
wondrous wedding! An affair with family and
friends you'll always remember! Maxwell House*
is the perfect coffee to help you share the warm
A living tradition in Jewish homes for over half a century
feelings of those special occasions because it's al-
ways 'Good to the Last Drop' So make 5743
even happierfill out the entry form
and enter the Mazel Tov Sweepstakes
from Maxwell House today!
1. Each entry must be accompanied by he in-
nerseal from a |ar of MAXWELL HOUSE' Instant
Code* or a 2" square from the plastic lid ol a can
of ground MAXWELL HOUSE* Coffee or MAX-
WELL HOUSE* A 0 C Coffee or the words
MAXWELL HOUSE* printed in block letters on a
3" x 5" card Entries must be on the Official Entry
Blank or a 3" x 5" card and mailed to: Mazel Tov
Sweepstakes. General Foods Corporation, PO
Box 3660. Grand Central Station. New York, New
York 10163.
2 HO PURCHASE REQUIRED TO ENTER
IWHPSTAKES.
3 Entries must be first-class man, one entry per
envelope, postmarked no later than January 4,
1983 and received by January 11,1983.
4 Winner will be selected in. random drawing
on January 18.1983. trom m entries received
prior to the deadline The drawing will be con-
ducted by Joseph Jacobs Organization. Inc.. an
independent organization whose decision it
OFFICIAL RULES "^
final In the event the winner declines the prize or
if' lor any reason the prize cannot be awarded
after the initial drawing, a supplemental draw-
ing!^) will be held to award the prize Winner will
be notified by mail Taxes on the prize are the sole
responsibility of the winner. The odds of winning
depend on the number of entries received
i. Prize consists of one Grand Prize: $1,000 to
cater your party. Prize will be awarded upon the
receipt of bill trom caterer
I. This sweepstakes is open to aH residents of the
United Stales who are 18 years of age or older,
except employees (and their families) of General
Foods Corporation, its advertising agencies,
subsidiaries or affiliates, or Joseph Jacobs
Organization, Inc Sweepstakes subject to a
Federal, State and local regulations void where
prohibited by law.
7. For the name of the winner, send a self-
addressed, postage-paid envelope to IMnner's
Name, PO Box 3990. Grand Central Station,
New York, New York 10163
MAZEL TOV SWEEPSTAKES
OFFICIAL ENTRY FORM
NAME
ADDRESS-
CITY-
STATE.
ZIP-
MAIL TO:
ttaiMkn
Ccwcral Foods Corpora
P.O. Box !t*0
GrMrtl Central ftafloa
New Yo.k, New Yort 10161
Enlnn unit ft* rrcnufii by January it r i


Pa^elO-A
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
**^**b..
Former SS Commandant Remains in l

[ corps com- a threat to the safety of the com- "yuriffi,
munity and that there was a risk freedonTon bajf Whkh
pot a pointless set on^
because, under r,,
(L-Rl Brian Bernstein, Kenny Church, Jordan Tartakow, Jordan
Werner, Louis Shapiro, Andrew Koerner and Peter Tschannon who
were some of the children who enjoyed taking a special trip when they
attended the Jewish Community Center's Kaleidoscope program
which was held after the camp program.
Ladies who attended the Jewish Community Center are shown dis-
playing items they have made for the Center's Keren Orr Pre-School
while attending a newly formed group of the Center entitled "Toys 4
Us" (L-RI are Betty Weiss, Martha Kosish, Gene Gross, Anne
Ettelman, Laura Schwartz and Lee Blumenthal.
Something for Everybody
Call the Jewish Community
Center at 689-7700, if you have
not received its fall Brochure,
which lists activities for people
from birth to 90 plus.
Many new activities designed
for mothers and toddlers, chil-
dren starting with preschool as
well as after-school activities,
Singles, Single Parents, women,
families and seniors.
Special events for the Adults
are featured. 1962-83 calendar are
also included.
Many other items of interest
will also be found in this new
publication.
Call today and join the many
people who enjoy coming to the
Jewish Community Center.
A former
mandant, Albert Helmut
Rauca, remains in jail on
his own volition despite a
decision of a three-judge
Canadian Federal Court of
Appeal which rejected an
application for a reversal of
a lower court decision
which would have released
him on $150,000 bail for an
extradition hearing here
Sept. 20.
Officials said Rauca refused to
use the earlier decision, by Just-
ice Wilson Griffiths, which would
have allowed Rauca to go free on
bail, because he was afraid to
leave jail. Rauca was arrested
here June 17 for allegedly taking
part in the wartime slaughter of
10,500 Jews in the Kovno ghetto
in Lithuania. He was arrested at
the request of the West German
government, which wants him
extradited to be tried on the mass
murder charge.
ON JUNE 21, he was granted
bail, which his attorney, William
Parker, said he could afford, but
he chose to remain in jail, rather
than leave and stay with friends
until the extradition hearing. He
decided not to leave jail for fear of
endangering both them and him-
self. No information has been
made available as to why Rauca
is so fearful for his safety that he
prefers to remain in jail.
At the hearing sought by rep-
resentatives of the West German
government and the Canadian
he would jump bail and not ap-
pear at the extradition hearing.
Justices John Uris, Darrel
Heald and G. S. Cowan, in up-
holding Justice Griffiths' deci-
sion to allow Rauca to be free on
bail pending the deportation
hearing, ruled there was "no
evidence'' that Rauca "poses a
menace to the public" and that
"sufficient safeguards may be
built to ensure his appearance" at
the Sept. 20 hearing.
whenever he chose ffl
lheo yP*^* win
with Gnffiths' ruligw,
that the Canadian Bill of
recognizes specifically
to reasonable bail
videsthatnoonecharnJ
criminal offense shouU
pnved of the right to
tenm release without jmt
"thel
\.vnx:.
The
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PHILADELPHIA BRAND
CREAM CHEESE
SPREADS
HAPPINESS
AROUND
Wedding
BACHRACH HERSHMAN
Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Bachrach
announce the marriage of their
daughter, Julie Ann Bachrach to
Daniel Abraham Hershman, son
of Mr. and Mrs. Herman Her-
shman of Philadelphia on Sunday
Sept. 5. The marriage, performed
by Rabbi Howard Hirsch and as-
sisted by Cantor Elaine Shapiro,
took place in the Fread Sanctu-
ary of Temple Beth El, West
Palm Beach.
The bride is a graduate of
Florida Atlantic University with
a degree in accounting. Mrs.
Hershman also attended the Uni-
versity of South Florida in
Tampa and spent one year in
Israel prior to attending Univers-
ity in Florida. She was on a year's
work-study program sponsored
by Hadassah. Young Judea.
During that year, Julie studied at
the Jerusalem Institute. Mr.
Hershman is a graduate of Har-
vard Law School. Mr. and Mrs.
Hershman both work in the
Miami area and will reside in
Kendall for the immediate future.
PHILADELf
In some circles that's noRlralRStV3rperfection.
But then you have the devotees of bialys, pumpernickel,
onion rods, rye, whole wheat and matrons who
will positively insist that Kraft "invented* the famous
PHILADEL PHI A BRAND Cream Cheese flavor just for them!
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LT,ie Cream Cheese -PHILADELPHIA BRAND Cream Cheese


geptember.l7.1fl33>
Tte Jetilsh FloruHan of Palm BefohGowtiy
A ,l
%11-A
Leningrad Jews Appeal
j,wmg appeoi was sub-
.authorities by a group
ik activists in Leningrad
'seeking official recogni-
their Jewish cultural
Ministers of Interior,
justic and Procurator
Li the USSR:
L,t years, Jews in Lenin-
L become very interested
C history and culture.
to to know more about
-pie, about its historical
[d about its traditions and
tents is quite natural.
oately. possibilities for
information on these
, are extremely limited;
lablishers and the mass
ucation media devote
tie attention to Jewish
[and culture. Thus, the
8 of a few Leningrad en-
i, who have begun to
information on the
Indicated and to make it
| to anyone interested,
j) us to be very opportune
jgsary. Two years of quiet
invinced us of the great
Iof the Jews of Leningrad
I culture and of the com-
jality of our activity.
iver, certain employees of
e apparatus do not under-
[is. Recently, administra-
tsure on persons listening
i on Jewish history and
has increased sharply. II-
fempts are made to break
balks, the campaign to in-
f persons participating in
Jls does not cease. The
has even gone so far as
lpletely illegal intrusion of
I of police officers into one
partments with the aim of
gup our talk.
...nection with what we
ted above, we ask you to
I a written answer to the
following questions:
1. Is our interest in the history
and culture of our people legal?
2. Are the means which we
have chosen to satisfy this in-
terest legal? We gather in private
apartments where one of us, who
has carefully studied the availa-
ble sources on matters of Jewish
history or culture, tells about it
to persons invited by the owner
of the apartment. (We point out
the great discipline of the lis-
teners and the blameless manner
in which they maintain public or-
der.)
3. Do we have a right to count
upon the assistance of the USSR
Ministry of Culture in the future,
and can we count upon its sup-
port and aid?
A Group of Leningrad Jews
This statement was submitted
to the addresses in June, 1981.
More than half a year has Passed.
Until now there has been no re-
ply.
I "THE NEW IMAGE"
S Under The Supervision ^ f> fl f U T V
Of Rabbinical Council
Of The Palm Beaches
KDfflER^MIIET
Open*? |
MonThurt | '
9-5 Fit
8-4 Sun.
Closed Sat.
4774 OKEECHOBEE BLVD., WEST PALM BEACH
Between Military Trail & Haverhill In the Mini-Mall
rheMosI[Modem & Complete Kosher Supermarket
'MMimiimSmiMKSSHiti^
gTnnrrririi rwrnri iTTnTTl reirrBTBTBTrrBToTnri
rrrrB
A-AAboT ANSWERfoNE
A Division of
"ARING A DING" ANSWERING SERVICE
Computerized Switchboards Live Operators
WE ANSWER FAST'
439-0700
213 No. Dixie Highway, Lake Worth, FL 33460
'IHfliaQaBflQ8Pt8tt0B0fltt0fl00OO0OOOoo o b p o o l o e off ft
DOIT
FOR ISRAEL
BY DOING IT
IN ISRAEL
Have a swim in the cool Mediterranean.
Take a hike up breathtaking Masada
Or enjoy a delicious dinner
overlooking ancient Jerusalem.
This year, do it in Israel.
Because now more than ever,
when you do it in Israel, you'll be doing it for Israel, too.
You'll be having more than the best vacation ever.
You'll be showing Israel you love her
when she needs it most.
So this year,
take that special vacation in Israel.
For Israel. And for you.
ISRAEL. RIGHT NOW.
o* *'
*#,mcJ?.

4SWP>
*>?,
! -t
- -
RON BERGMAN
2725700
Happy New Year
Q-NTUffV
2311 S. Federal Hwy., Delray Bch., Fl. 33444 (305) 272-6700
A COMPLETE LINE OF RESIDENTIAL
AND COMMERCIAL FIXTURES
400 Spencer Dr.
W. Palm Beach
6890449
Wishes You and Yours A
Happy, Healthy New Year
Designer Shoes At Affordable Prices
Off P.B. Lake* Blvd.
AeroM Mantro't behind Miami Rug
RETAILER Tim coupon
,5 redeemable br lace
value and 7* handling
low! it is received on a
retail sale of the product
I spec 'f'ed beeem You fm
lo Sun-Diamond Growers
of California PO Bo 104
Clinton Iowa S2754 On re
quest you must
supply invoices
proving wfli'
cienl slock
purchases cov-
ering coupon!
iubmitted
lor redemption Othri
use (on!titirtr! fraud
Couptm rnay ntH he 2
assigned or nansferml Q I
CuMorm-r must pay -^ I
any sates tax Vend o "
where prohrlwled U
taxed iKenvrrtiurrccl^l
or reslnclrdliy U" t!
Cash value I Kf Good
only in U S A
Offer limited 10
one coupon per
purchase COO
PON EXPIRES
December )l
l1
RETAILER Thii coupon ii
redeemable tor lace value
and7 handling charges
providedaifollows mire
ceived on a retiil iale ol
the product specified here-
in You mail it to Sun-
Diamond Grower! ol Califo
nia PO 8o HO4- Clinton Iowa S,
On requeil
you must sup-
ply invoices
proving suffi-
dent stock pur-
chases cover-
ing coupons
7QM5Q 10Db2b
submitted lor redemp-
tion Other use consti-
tutes Iraud Coupon may
no* be assigned or trans
lerred Customer must pa>
any sales tax Void where
prohibited taxed license
required or restnc ted by mw
Cash value I XX Good only
in U S A Olle.
limited to one
coupon per pu'
chase COU-
PON EXPIRrS
December )'
1961
RETAILER This
coupon is redeei
able for lace vain
and 7 handling
charges provided as
follows it is received
on a reuil sale of either
product specified herein
You mail it to Sun-Diamond Growers ol Cali-
fornia. PO BoH04. Clinton. Iowa S27M
On request you
must supply 'n-
vorces proving
sufficient stocl
purchases cov-
ering coupons
itnctedbylaw
1)1113 1D5S20
tubmitted I6f re-
demption Other
ute constitute* fraud
Coupon may not be *-
a< grw?d or tram- -)
(erred Customer mus' i_
pay any sales tax Void
where prohtbrted. ta**d. Q
w license required or re-
Cash value '/A* Good only
mUSA Offer
limited 10 one
coupon per pur-
chaw COUPON
EXPIRES Oe
cember3t,1983
I
When your family wants a snack, treat
them to the natural sweetness and wholesome
goodness of Sun-Maid* Raisins;
Sunsweet* Prunes and Sun-Maid" or
.Blue Ribbon" Figs.
Enjoy. And save.
SUN-DIAMOND GROWERS
OF CALIFORNIA
*:*$;
riT <&
K CERTIFIED "COSHER
O Sun-Diamond Grower! oi California,. 1962
V


-
Pagel2-A
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Israel Rejects Reagan's Initiative
, o f v,m., Fridav
Continued from Page 1
Secretary of State WUliam
Rogers posed in the early 1970s
which called for "insubstantial"
border changes in Israel's bor-
ders. Begin quoted former Pre-
mier Golda Meir who said at the
time that anybody who would ac-
cept the Rogers plan would be a
traitor. "The same policy should
apply to whoever adopts the
Reagan plan," Begin said.
The Cabinet said that if the
Reagan proposal had been imple-
mented, "nothing would have
prevented King Hussein (of Jor-
dan) from inviting his new friend,
Yasir Arafat," chairman of the
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion, "to come to Nablus and tell
him: rule. This would have be-
come the Palestinian state which
would have allied itself with the
Soviet Union, and arming itself
with all modem weaponry. The
PLO did that in Lebanon, creat-
ing a state within a state. Why
would there by anything to pre-
vent the PLO from doing the
same in Judaea and Samaria."
MERIDOR indicated that the
ministers were unanimous in re-
jecting the Reagan proposals.
Deputy Premier David Levy said
the eventual outcome of imple-
mentation of Reagan's "fresh
start" would be a Palestinian
state even if that was not the
Reagan Administration's inten-
tion.
He said the Reagan proposals
were a deviation from the Camp
David Accords and Israel would
not be a party to the "distortion"
of those accords. He charged that
the President's plan was "one-
sided and anti-Israel." He
stressed Israel was not seeking a
confrontation with the United
States but rather was trying to
avoid one.
Tourism Minister Avraham
Sharir expressed disappointment
that the Reagan Administration
did not consult with Israel prior
to the President's speech, es-
pecially since the Reagan Ad-
ministration did consult with
Jordan, which Sharir described
as "an ill-fated move."
The President said nothing
about an approach to Jordan in
the many talks with Arab diplo-
mats Secretary of State George
Shultz has had since taking of-
fice, particularly after it became
overwhelmingly clear that Israel
was determoned to drive the PLO
and its terrorist allies out of Bei-
rut.
YITZHAK BERMAN. the En
ergy Minister, called the Rea-
gan initiative an "error," not
necessarily because of its com-
ponents but because Reagan was
trying to determine now possible
solutions which should be dis-
cussed only after the interim five-
year period of autonomy.
The Camp David accords pro-
vided for creation of conditions
for free elections in the West
Bank and Gaza officials to exer-
cise governmental authority for
five years of self-rule, after which
negotiations would be held on the
final disposition of the territories.
Berman said Israel and Egypt
had the right to define the fate of
the territories after the five-year
autonomy period but that the
Reagan Administration, by try-
ing to do so now, was losing its
credibility as an "honest broker."
He did not clarify this remark but
it was seen as reference to the
fact that Reagan had moved from
being a mediator in the Mideast
peace process to being a partici-
pant in determining its course.
Ministers at the Cabinet ses-
sion criticized Shimon Peres, the
Labor party chairman, who
visited the United States last
month. The ministers charged
that in recent meetings with Rea-
gan Administration decision to
seek to link the occupied areas in
some form with Jordan.
THE LABOR PARTY
promptly issued a response say-
ing it would not be "tantalized"
by the attempts of Begins Likud
party to "smear" the Labor
Party's name. The Labor Party
statement said that it had
presented its own peace plan, ad-
vocating a settlement with Jor-
dan over the West Bank, at the
time it was in power and that i%
continued to stand for that piar
now when it was in the opposi
tion.
"The demagoguery attempts
of the Likud leaders indicate a
basic lack of understanding o!
substance of democracy and of
the fact that the Israeli society is
an open society," the Labor
Party declared.
Shevah Weiss, an Alignment
member of the Knesset, said the
Reagan plan indicated support
for the Allen plan, a reference to a
proposal by the late Labor For-
eign Minister Yigal Allon, under
which Israel would have with-
drawn from sections of the West
Bank heavily populated by Arabs
but maintaining an Israeli
security belt along the Jordan
River, plus pockets of Israeli
security forces near Israeli popu-
lation concentrations, meaning
the Jewish settlements.
VICTOR SHEMTOV and
Imrin Ron, leaders of Mapam.
said the Reagan plan had "posi-
tive elements" and should be ex-
amined seriously. Similar posi-
tive reactions came in from
smaller leftist parties.
Haim Druckman, a National
Religious Party Knesset deputy,
called on the Begin government
to prove through "action" that it
rejected the Reagan proposals,
specifically, by annexing the
Arab territories.
The Reagan plan was alsc
criticized by the Israeli ministers
because it was presented to Israel
without prior consultation, while
the Reagan Administration did
consult with Egypt, Jordan and
The first Arab reaction came
from a Egyptian official, Saad
Mortada, Egypt's Ambassador
to Israel. Speaking on the Voice
of Israel, Mortada said the Rea-
gan initiative indicated a positive
trend by the Administration
towards a solution of the Pales-
tinian problem.
autonomy ufcjjjj
"?astateof8USp
three years. As it,
3wtehJTS3l
total withdrawal^
A spokesman for th. u
Foreign Ministry ir'^
to react to the\Z"M
grounds that the
government was now
the plan. '
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
^ OF THE PALM BEACHES
2415 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach FL 33409
689-7700
GReenjfGS
FROM THE BOARD.
OFFICERS, & STAFF
THE JEWISH
COMMUNITY
5743
tow n?
ire recognized
the world.
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LwnbCT". 2
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
"T*S!
>letzer Before the Terrorist Attacks
BtinuedfromPge&
Pael3-A
^jUv opened in 1721 not
[where Goldenberg's eat-
stands. The first syna-
Foffically recognized as
Vened in 1788 as the
[Revolution was already
I FALLOWING year, af-
Efl of the Bastille, Paris'
lot more than 500 souls at
appealed to the revolu-
[parliament, the Consti-
Lembly, to be recognised
[French citizens and in-
^ of Paris- 0 January
Ttheir petition was grant-
| not far from the Rue des
on the Rue du Roi de
iere Meir's Inn stood at
_ the Jews gathered to
xhaim and to sing "La
i from the start of the
jitury that the Pletzel
|to grow as more and more
[emigrants arrived. Every
t~the night trains from
[Europe, Russia, Ruman-
the Slav Provinces of
used to stop at the
e 1 'Est" and a human
J poor, unshaven and un-
| Jews would disembark.
Pletzel was only a short
om the station. Many of
puled near the Place de la
ique which in popular
I became the Pletzel, the
where the rich Jews, or
n their way up the doc-
I lawyers, the prosperous
ers lived.
| DREYFUS affair in the
)'s was their first shock.
idespread anti-Semitism
by Edouard Adolphe
bt, the leading spokesman
ich anti-Semitism under
lird Republic, was their
Ishock. Neither, however,
the mass immigration
eached its peak between
| world wars.
in the 1930's, despite
at rising in Nazi Ger-
hat the Pletzel Jew felt at
|t. France was prosperous
Jewish community's
I of living improved fast,
6ter than that of the ma-
of France's inhabitants.
could fully live and ex-
eirJewishness.
Pletzel kiosks, half a
Yiddish dailies were on
hish pastry shops lined
is chic avenue, Boulevard
publique, and two Jewish
played for full nouses.
Kant and the rich used to
l tea at the Hotel Modern,
[political meetings were
DREAM was shattered
e outbreak of the war it
[into a nightmare on July
when the French police,
Ion the Nazis' orders,
their big roundup. Some
I People, including some
wldren, were arrested and
' to Maidanek. Moat of
fa were carried out in the
!. where the poor
|Wecl/i88 still lived.
there, where every
5 housed dozens of Jewish
ItuTl the P01"* came at
r* hunting ground, in
Thloncentration of Jews-
best. Slowly, as the war
'n, and more and more
we arrested and deport-
l^tzel started to empty
W the end of the war, only
*0"sand Jewish families
raany in hiding. The
l fini .u former homes,
ItoZ e,r, fonner bui-
I ^new their Uves. The
r broken, however. The
IhaSC" again
ft returned to normal and
" became reintegrated
Ihorn"??'' many teft 'heir
IJJM for richer or better
. IN THE EARLY 1950's and
1960's North African Jews start-
ed arriving, but again they opted
for other areas where their fami-
lies already lived: Belleville, in
the north of Paris; the Rue de
Faubourg Montmartre, where
many Israeli yordim also settled;
or the outlying suburbs where
modern state-subsidized housing
was available, with modern bath-
rooms and central heating.
It is only near the Place de la
Republique that many Jews still
live, but here, too, life has chang-
ed. The old kiosks with the Yid-
dish papers have disappeared.
The Jewish theaters have closed
down, and. even the Hotel
Modern has this year been con-
verted into Paris' new Holiday
Inn with air-conditioned rooms
and a hamburger cafeteria.
To the south of the formerly
Jewish area remains a typically
Jewish Business district: La Rue
du Sentier, the heart of the gar-
ment district. Thousands of Jew-
ish-owned shops and small fact-
ories, where the clothes which
have made Paris fashion famou.
all over the world are designed
and sewn, are located here.
BEHIND THE labels of fa-
mous couturiers and fashion
houses, are the men who once
lived and worked in the Pletzel.
From time to time they get into
their big black cars to drive
round the corner and get back to
the past.
Jo Goldenberg's restaurant
was such a jump into time a
jump into an era when the Pletzel
was filled and bursting with Jews
who thought they never had it so
good.
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Who says l
ias to weigh
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A kugel doesn't have to lie like lead in
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With Mueller's light-tasting egg noodles
you can create a perfect holiday kugel.
Light. Tender. Delicious.
And Mueller's quality egg noodles have
been a Jewish tradition for generations
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For a delicately delicious holiday kugel
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egg noodles.
P.S. Remember to try light Mueller's
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'
Noodle Kugel
1 package (Jounce*) cream
cheese, softened
Vi tup parve margarine.
softened
I% cups sugar
8 eggs, well beaten
4t* cups milk
2 teaspoons vanilla
I teaspoon lemon juice
Dash salt
8 ounces Mueller's egg
noodles
cup graham cracker
crumb"
teaspoon cinnamon
^pBf % cup parvc marg
softened
i
V
Beat togethercream cheese and rn.rg.nne; add sugar; m well
Blend mcEBs Stir in next four ingredient. Meanwh.le.cook
noodles M directed; drain, combine with chee mixture, pour
into |*"9-xr baking dish Mi graham cracker crumbs and
cinnamon; spr.nkle on top of noodle, Bake a. Wl**
hours o, until browned and crusty on top Allow to cool at least
JO minutes; cut in squares to serve 10 to 12 servings
rgarine.
V4 cup light brown sugar
8 slices canned pineapple.
* well drained
2 eggs
4 cup cooking oil or melted
parve margarine
<* cup sugar
V teaspoon salt
Upside-Down
Noodle Kugel
to teaspoon cinnamon
1 tablespoon lemon juice
to teaspoon grated
lemon hnd
S ounces Mueller's egg
'"noodles
to cup finely cut dried fruits
(apricots, prunes, dates)
to cup raisins
to cup chopped nuts
A.
Coat a9"squarepn with margarine: sprinkle with brown
sugar. Cut pineapple slices in half; place on sugar mixture. In
large bowl, beat eggs and oil with next five ingredients. Mean-
while, cook noodles as directed: drain; stir into egg mixture
Add remaining ingredients; loss well. Spoon into pan. Bake
40 to SO minutes at ISO* F. until set and golden brown. Let
stand 5 minutes; loosen with spatul.i and invert over serving
dish 8 servings..
*.



2&M
The
rnti ***
^A%^^^^
*W
^ Sabbtmcal ^mtt
RabMAlenR.
NIltN
fra Jawisn if* prt
^na
***.
"A tale is told of one who sat
and studied with Rabbi Mordecai
of Nadvoma (19th Century) who,
before Rosh Hashanah, came to
Rabbi Mordecai requesting per-
mission to be dismissed from his
studies. The Zaddik said to him,
'Why are you hurrying?' "
The student replied: 'I am a
Reader, and I must look into the
Prayer Book to put my prayers in
order.'
Said The Zaddik: The Prayer
Book is the same as it was last
Ear. It would be better for you to
>k into your deeds, and put
yourself in order.'"
This is the month of Elul (The
Hebrew month prior to Rosh
Hashanah). It is the time when
our people are called upon to pre-
pare for the High Holy Days. It
is the time when we are callec
upon to prepare ourselves so thai
we can enter the Rosh Hashanah
Yom Kippur season ready for its
message.
The message is that of the
Zaddik. ... It would be better
for you to look into your deeds,
and put yourself in order." The
message is that of a community
celebrating a New Year 5743
with all of its possibilities. Its
potential is immeasurable. The
future is ours humanity's to
shape and to mold.
In the Midrash on Deuteron-
omy, the Rabbis tell us that it if
the human court that sets the
date of Rosh Hashanah. Even the
ministering angels must inquire
of us for information. "When is
Rosh Hashanah?" the angels ask
of the Throne of G-d. "Why do
you ask me?," G-d replies. "You
and I, let us all go to the court on
earth and inquire of humanity.
There we can find the answer."
Our actions turn the pages of
the calendar. It is as if we are res-
ponsible for the passage of time
on this earth. It is that each New
Year is a challenge an oppor-
tunity for us as individuals to
decide: How will I use the year
now come into being? How will I
make the days of my life worthy
of celebration?
Rosh Hashanah calls to us.
'Why are You HiHTying?'
harmony? Rosh Hashanah is a
celebration; it rejoices in that
which yet could be for us as in-
dividuals for our people belea-
guered and tired of war for
humanity waiting still to be re-
deemed.
One Last Word. -
It is hard to think so universal-
ly with Israel at war, it is difficult
Rabbi Shapiro
Collectively it is an awesome res-
ponsibility and task. But it is one
we know belongs to us and no
other. The shape of tomorrow is
waiting; the form of the future is
anticipating. Will we this year
pick up the chisel and mold a
world filled with beauty? Will we
this year grasp the brush
and paint a year colored with
to be global when my people are
in pain. We enter Rosh Hashanah
with a summer filled with concern
and with worry behind us. Let us
pray it is ending this horrible
conflict with the Jewish people
center stage. Let us pray it is
ending this confusion of minds
where the good become villains.
and the terrorists become heroes.
Let us pray this is all ending
but even if not let us know we
are called to both Jerusalem and
Rome, (to both that whkh makes
us Jews and that which our being
Jewish represents).
May we all be blessed with a
year filled with Shalom peace,
wholeness and life.
Rabbi Howard Shapiro
Temple Israel
DENTURES
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ANDREW ADELSON. D.D.S.
689-0593
In Same Location Over 7 Years
1800 Upland Rd. West Palm Beach Fla.
JOIN THE
Golden Circle!
If you're over 62 years old, you're invited to join
Chuck & Harold's Golden Circle. This culinary club
entitles you to 25%' off your entire food bill. This
includes every delicious appetizer, entree and
dessert on the Chuck & Harold's menu. Offer is
good from 4:30 to 7 p.m. every day of the week!
The next time you dine with us, ask your server
for your Golden Circle Club Application and
official membership card.
'In lien of any other discount
fCHUCK. 8 HAROIP'S^
\______________A CAFE-________ J
207 Royal Poimiana Way Palm Beach 6591440
As always, the Golden Court Cafe serves dinner
Thursday, Friday and Saturday.
imrrlcmm fj+rru amd tttrr rmUl cmrt, tttptrd
We A Omck Hkt Ktutmrmu
Synagogues in fralA Beach
Con
Orthodox
Aits Chat. Congregatfe. Century VilW
Phone: 689-4675. Sabbathserv3.
18:15 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. "*89t.i
W. Palm Beach. Phone:
p.m. Daily servic
Congregation Anahei Ena,
551 Brittany L. Kings Point, Defray Beach 334*
7407 or 499-9229. Harry Silver. President DailVH^
and 5 p.m. Saturdays and Holidays 9a jn. y8ervicM
Reform
Temple Israel
1901 North Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach 33407
8421. Rabbi Howard Shapiro, Dr. Irving B. Coh.~"
Emeritus, Dr. Richard G. Shugarman, President C
man, Educator, Stephen J. Goldstein, Adrninistmor
services, Friday 8 p.m.
Temple Beth El of Boca Raton
333 S.W. Fourth Avenue. Boca Raton 33432. Phone mi
Rabbi Merle E. Singer, Cantor Martin Rosen. Sabbath!
Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9:15 a.m. Torah Study 1
Singer. Sabbath morning services 10:30 a.m.
Temple Sinai
at St. Paul's Episcopal Church, 188 S. Swinton Ave. 1
Mailing address 2005 N.W. 9 Street, Defray Beach, 33444 l.
Samuel Silver, President, Bernard Etish. Friday serving *J
p.m.
Temple Beth Torah
at St. David's in the Pines Episcopal Retreat. Forest Hi!
and Wellington Trace, West Palm Beach. Mailing addresg
Jack Pine St., West Palm Beach 33211. Cantor Nk
Fenakel. President Ronnie Kramer (793-2700).
Temple Jodea
Rabbi Joel L. Levine. Cantor Rita Shore, Barbara Chang I
dent. 1407 14th Lane, Lake Worth, Fl. 33463. Phone 966-71
Services Friday evenings at 8 p.m. Meeting at St. CatL
Greek Orthodox Church Social Hall 4000 Washington I
Southern B|vd.
Conservative-Liberal
Temple Eternal Light
at Boca West Community UMC, 8900 Boca WestGlaaal
(1 mile west of Boca Turnpike). The Free Synagogue, P.O.I
3, Boca Raton 33432. Phone: 368-1600, 391-1111. Rabbi I
jamin Rosayn. Sabbath services, Friday at 8:15 p.m.
Conservative
Golden Lakes Temple
1470 Golden Lakes Blvd., W. Palm Beach, Fl. 33411.1
Joseph Speiser. Phone 689-9430. President, Samuel Eis
Temple Beth El
2815 North Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach 33407. Phratl
0339. Rabbi Howard J. Hirsch, Cantor Elaine Shapiro, i
Evening Service at 8:15 p.m. in The Sanctuary. Saturday I
ing at 9:30 a.m. Daily Minyan at 8:15 a.m., Sunday and)
Holidays at 9 a.m.
Congregation Anahei Sholom
5348 Grove Street, West Palm Beach 33409. Phone 1
Office hours 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Rabbi Harry Z. Schectman.(
Mordecai Spektor. Services dairy 8:30 a.m. and
Friday, 8:30 a.m., 5 p.m., late services 8:15 p.m. fol
Oneg Shabbat. Saturday, 8:30 a.m.. 6 p.m. Mincha foil
Sholosh Seudos.
Congregation Beth Kodeah of Boyntoa Beats
at Congregational Church, 115 N. Federal Hay.,
Beach. Phone 737-4622. Rabbi Avrom L. Drazin.
services, Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.
Temple Beth Sholom
315 N. A' Street, Lake Worth 33460. Phone 685-5020J
Emanuel Eisenberg, Cantor Jacob Elman. Services MooayJ
Thursday at 8:15 a.m., Friday at 8:15 pjn., Saturdty
Temple Beth David
at Westminster Presbyterian Church, 10410 N. Military
Palm Beach Gardens. Office at 321 Northlake Blvd., Northi
Beach. Phone 845-1134. Rabbi William Marder, Cantor r
Rackoff. Sabbath services, Friday at 8 p.m.. Saturday H
Temple Beth Sholom
224 N.W. Avenue G\ Bella Glade 83430. Cantor J**
man. Sabbath services, Friday at 8:30 p.m.
Temple Baal Jacob
at Faith United Presbyterian Church, 275 AJernekU1 Drw.1
Spring 33461. Temple B'nai Jacob. President igj
Phone 964-0034. Sabbath services. Friday at 8 pro-, **"
9 a.m. Mondays and Thursdays at 9 am.
B'nai Torah Congregation
1401 N.W. 4 th Avenue, Boca Raton 33432F*ll
Rabbi Theodore Feldman Sabbath services, Friday
Saturday 9:30 a.m.
Temple Emeth
5780 West Atlantic Avenue, Defray Beach 3M*J*S
3536. Rabbi Bernard Silver. Cantor Seymour &
services, Friday at 5 p.m. and 8 p.m., Saturday and r
8:45 a.m. Daily Minyan at- 8:46 a.m. and 5 p.m.
Temple Emanu-El
190 North County Road, Palm Beach 33480. Phone J
Rabbi Joel Chazin. Cantor David Dardashti. Sabbath 1
Friday at 8:30 p.m., Saturday at 9 a.m.
Temple Beth Zioa
nM C,ub J Cmelia Dr.. Royal Palm Beach. Friday'
p and S^day 9 a.m. President. Eli Rendi*Uffl'
aS^' ^^ P^m B^ch. FL 33411, Phone 793-0643.
Albert Koslow.


!* "**
/\
9^g^^Mi^ack
r-5Sft-.*tf^V?f,V*'-TF
Z,oca/ Synagogue News
Countii
Pagel^
[lIPLE ISRAEL
__i Community
Icflcul Action Committee
SJstion of T-,U *"
M North Flagler Drive,
pgini Beach, are partid-
fiii a food collection pro-
|of nonperiahable item*
\ October. Temple Israel
[fast Synagogue in the
intry" program designed
jst those individuals and
*ho have been processed
h health and rehabilitative
is a need based on an
basis while they are
evaluated for their long
ds. We will be supplying
ntry for the months of
rand May.
ntire community is urged
I us for Sukkot Service on
) p.m. Food offerings are
\ needed and will be warm-
i Howard Shapiro of
Israel, will present a
[ling of Biblical Poetry" on
y, Sept. 20, from 10:30 to
Lin. for Sisterhood mem-
guests, in the Temple
[Room. This stimulating
_ will be followed by a
fcn in Schwartzberg Hall.
tii Alan Sherman, Chaplain
ctor of the Community
us Council of the Jewish
of Palm Beach
\, will address the Sister-
I guests on "Community
i in the Palm Beaches."
informative programs
duled for the third Mon-
very month same time
urther information, phone
nple office.
groups. In some cases, the group
holds meetings in school, after
school hours not unlike other
extra-curricular activities.
"On the college level, they will
approach your children at a time
when they are exceptionally vul-
nerable the first week on cam- '
pus, when your children may be I
lonely and needing friendship; I
during final weeks, before and ,
after vacations, when the student!
is facing a personal social crisis; I
when the student needs at- '
tention."
Schuval warns students to
"beware of groups that recruit
you by guilt invitations to week-
end workshops. Don't go away
for weekends or longer with a
stranger or strange group unless
you know the name of the spon-
soring organization, its ideas and
beliefs, what's going to happen at
the workshop, if you will be free
and able to leave at any time."
Schuval has been effective in
mobilizing parents and students
in Broward County to protest
Youth for Christ activities. Schu-
val is quick to remind parents
and students that although the
names Campus Life and The Club
do not mention religion they
are an integral part of the multi-
million dollar national Youth for
Christ movement.
Campus Life and The Club are
actively present in major junior
and senior high schools through-
out the United States. Rabbi Joel
Levine of Temple Judea believes
that Schuval is most qualified to
explain to parents and students
the total picture behind Campus
Life and Club activities. This
program is part of the social ac-
tion program known as the Tem-
ple Judea Platform. Nancy
tffcfc
m
eM. Schuval
EMPLE JUDEA
Club, Campus Life,
or Christ" will be discus-
day, Sept. 24 at Temple
M. Schuval will be
_ the seminar during
Modes Sabbath Services
h Services are conducted
pocial hall of St. Cather-
>k Orthodox Church, at
P of Southern Blvd. and
I Drive. Junior high, high
college students and their
1 invited to attend and
pons at the Oneg Shab-
bwing Services.
N is director of commu-
tions and social planning
? Jewish Federation of
[Fort Lauderdale. He has
ned himself as a na-
specialist on confront-
jMsue of Campus Life. In a
| """sage to parents,
1 stated that "m local
I"" high schools, Youth
w, also known as Campus
The Club, are holding
P Programs which never
VJ* group as a Christian
~y organization. The
' m these assemblies is to
r* nwmbership of their
Christian youth
"ANTED TO BUY*
^Painting,. pohsn.
rntianan.Austrian .
RAr"Mt Living Todav
!*' Collector
55-321
Mighdoll is chairperson of the so-
cial action committee.
For more information, call the
Temple office.
Roah Hashanah
Service Schedule
Temple Judea, Palm Beach
County's newest Reform congre-
gation will usher in Rosh Has-
hanah on Friday evening, Sept.
17 at 8 p.m. in the social hall of
St. Catherine's Greek Orthodox
Church at the corner of Southern
Blvd. and Flagler Drive. Rabbi
Joel Levine will speak on "5742:
Year in Review;" Cantor Rita
Shore wul chant the music Rosh
Hashanah morning worship wul
begin at 10 a.m., Sept. 18. Rabbi
Levine will speak on "Repen-
tance, Prayer and Charity." Jeff
Marcus will blow the Shofar.
Youth programs will be an in-
tegral part of both evening and
morning services. Children will
participate in part of the adult I
services and then assemble in the
reception room for special activ-
ities, stories, and creative wor-
ship, j
In the spirit of Temple Judea's
philosophy as an intergenera-
tional, family oriented congrega-
tion, a festive reception will
follow the evening worship and a
kiddush will follow morning wor-
ship. Thus, the warmth of the
holy day season will be enhanced
by family participation and
snared experiences.
For more information about
tickets and membership, call the
Temple office or Helaine and
Mike Kahn during the evening
hours. Admission to all High
Holy Day Services is by ticket
only.
Tuneinto'MOSAIC
TV HIGHLIGHTS
Sponsored by
The Jewish Federation
of Palm Beach County
Sunday momtnqonerWPTV Channel 5,at830 am
wNh hosts Berbers Shubnen and Sieve Gordon
Sunday, September 19 Mark Talisman
Sunday, September 26 Jay Neugorboren
Religious School Registration
i in II if >
Theatre Performance
Workshops for Children
Children attending grades
three through five, and children
in grades six through eight will
have the opportunity to enjoy
their own Theatre Performance
Workshop led by Betty Lee
Gray.
The workshop will be held at
the Jewish Community Center,
2416 Okeechobee Blvd. on Tues-
day evenings 6:30 to 8:00 p.m.
for the younger group and Thurs-
day evenings 6:30 to 8 p.m. for
the older children.
The group will be introduced to
basic voice exercises with empha-
sis on breath control, enun-
ciation, correct pronunciation
and expression. Some improvisa-
tions! techniques will also be
used.
All efforts of the workshops
will be directed towards conclud-
ing with a major production.
CUB 689-7700 today to enroll in
this new and exciting workshop.
Our School is in session. Our classes have begun! Our
children will be celebrating the Holidays with their
families at home and in Temple, trained by a caring
faculty, emphasizing Jewish values and way of life, the
Hebrew of the Prayer Book and more. Should your child
be enrolled with us? For information and registration,
please call 832-0804.
'Small classes, Wednesdays and Sundays
'Close involvement of parents and Rabbi
'Dedicatedprofessional teachers
'Confirmation Program
'A warm, caring environment designed to strengthen
your children's Jewish Identity and commitment.
190 North County Road
Palm Beach, FL 33480
I \ Alan H. Cummings Rabbi Joel Chazin
President Educational Director
Richard E. Kowalsky, M.D., P.A.
Takes Pleasure In Announcing
The Association Of
Gary K. Schneider, M.D.
For The Practice Of
Obstetrics, Gynecology
Infertility
299 W. Camino Gardens Boulevard
Boca Raton, Florida 33432
(305) 392-4477
With Offices At
5258 Linton Boulevard
Delray Beach, Florida 33445
(305)495-0558
Harbeke Plumbing Co
2807 South Military Trail
Lake Worth965-2184
dCa/i/ip JVeua 8b*t &o

Page 16-A
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
J^Sep^
9ma."W. 0.7 ng. meow* w. pef cigarette by I


September 17,1982
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page IB
Reagan Demands Settlements Freeze
By GIL SEDAN
I JERUSALEM (JTA)
, New tensions in the rela-
m between Israel and
, United States have de-
doped as President Reag-
ina letter to Premier
Cnachem Begin, de-
_nded a freeze on Jewish
ttlements on the West
pnk and Gaza Strip, a halt
[the expansion of existing
[ttlements, and full link-
e between Jordan and the
festBank.
aeli leaders, caught by sur-
K at this development, ex-
ssed anger not only at the de-
ads but also at the timing,
rt as the last group of PLO and
pian forces left west Beirut and
(Begin was scheduled to meet
h US. Defense Secretary
ipar Weinberger later that
Iryday-
IlSRAELI OFFICIALS viewed
agan's messagt as constitut-
5 a new American policy
rard the autonomy negotia-
and the Palestinian
oblem, and as challenging the
laic principles of Israeli policy
those issues. Israeli officials
i viewed the timing of Reag-
l's letter in the context of the
looming summit conference of
mb nations, noting that the
|.S. seemed to want to make it
ar that it does not intend to
isle any time to solve the Pal-
nian issue which was pushed
the top of the international
ndaby the war in Lebanon.
| The understanding of senior
jlitical sources in Jerusalem
that Keagan issued his de-
nds as a precondition for the
sumption of the autonomy
klks. If true, the sources said,
pel would not agree to resume
: autonomy talks on the basis
Reagan's demands. The
purees also pointed out that Is-
would have to seriously
udy Reagan's letter to deter-
bine if the message constitutes a
leviation from the Camp David
cords.
It was recalled that U.S. Secre-
ery of State George Shultz told a
Revision interviewer a week be-
bre that the Camp David process
pn be interpreted in many ways
nd that the Palestinian should
ve a role in determining the
ondiiions under which they live.
was seen as a reference to
ome form of Palestinian par-
gcipation in the peace negotia-
ng process.
SHULTZ, at a press confer-
nce in Washington last month,
llso stated that the Camp David
words had a "lot of room for
deas" and that the Reagan Ad-
punistration was forming its own
ews. He said the Administra-
on expected to be moving on the
toue of Palestinian rights, but
lid not elaborate at the time.
Begin told a Cabinet meeting a
k ago, in response to Egyp-
official8 who were saying
at Israel was maintaining a
[arrow and restricted interpreta-
n of the provisions of th*>
pamp David agreements, that
prael would not feel bound to ad-
e to the accords if Egypt tried j
i change its dimensions.
However, at least one Israeli
Official was quoted as saying:
[As far as we are concerned, we
Jtk, and we shall stick to the,
Lamp David accords." According
"> this concept, only the autono-
~ issue should be discussed at
1 stage. Any other ideas, such
i Jordanian linkage to the West
Bank, should be discussed only
' r the mechanisms for autono-
bave been settled and au-
my is in effect for five years,
anting to the Israeli view.
,A KEY question at this stage
' whether Reagan's points are
*demic or operational. If the
*8n Administration insists
the demands raised by
Reagan be implemented, Israel
will undoubtedly reject them, and
a-confrontation will be unavoid-
able, Israeli political sources said.
The issue of Reagan's letter
figured prominently in the talks '
Begin held last week with Wein-
berger.
According to political analysts,
the outcome of the session was a
foregone conclusion: it decided to
expand existing settlements ana
establish new ones. In fact, the
new town of Maale Adumim,
located on the road linking Jeru-
salem with the Jordan valley
town of Jericho, was dedicated
immediately in a festive cere-
mony.
Deputy Prime Minister David
Levy, addressing a crowd of
several thousand people at the
dedication of Maale Adumim,
sharply criticized any attempt to
halt Israeli settlements activities,
saying Israel will not allow the
establishment of a Palestinian
state on the West Bank.
HE SAID not even a message
from Reagan would deter Israel
from building the Land of Israel.
This issue is not negotiable be-
cause it is a problem of survival
on which Israel's future and that
of its children and their children
depend.
. Addressing himself to Reagan,
from afar, Levy said: "From time
to time we hear things which con-
tradict this (the demands in
Reagan's letter), and we would
prefer to work in concert with
you. But if you do not want coop-
eration and wish to act freely,
you cannot impose your will on
us if it involves our security and
survival." Levy added that there
would be "settlements in all parts
of the Land of Israel because it is
essential for our security."
Beyond reactions attributed to
political sources, there were reac-
tion from political parties. Yuval
Neeman, leader of the Tehiya
Party and Minister of Science
and Development, whose party
recently joined the government
coalition, said his party would
demand that the government
make the settlements in the
occupied territories a priority
issue in response to Reagan's
demands.
LIKUD KNESSET member
Ehud Olmert said Israel would
not tolerate any "deviation" from
the Camp David accords. He
added, however, that he was not
certain the U.S. has yet shaped
an overall comprehensive Middle
East policy. "In the past there
were messages, cables, letter
from the President, and even-
tually the practical policy was
not identical to some of the
demands and threats," Olmert
said-
Labor Alignment dove Yossi
Sarid welcomed Reagan's mes-
sage as positive. He said the
American initiative could rescue
the Mideast from a dangerous
situation and felt that the Labor
Party would not object to a
strong Jordan-West Bank
linkage. Party chairman Shimon
Peres had no immediate com-
ment. A party spokesman said
Peres was seeking "more precise"
information about Reagan's mes-
sage before issuing a statement.
Israel's Ambassador to Wash-
ington, Moshe Arens, who was in
Israel to participate in the talks
Weinberger had with Israeli
leaders, said he knew nothing of
the Reagan message before it was
sent.
He told the Knesset Security
and Foreign Affair Committee
that he was not surprised by the
message because he had been
under the impression for some
time that the U.S. would now
focus its Mideast policy on
promoting the prompt resum-
ption of the autonomy talks
which have made no significant
progress since they began in
1979.
Happy
5743
From The
Airline That
Began In
5688.
fcs'r.^J
J&n AmAbu Can't Beat the Experience:


Page 2-B
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Fhy. Sepumh.,
17.
State Dep't. Says Exodus
Of PLO Finally Over
WASHINGTON State Department spokesman
Alan Romberg has announced that with the departure of
nearly 700 PLO terrorists by ship to Tart us, Syria, on
Sept. 1, the evacuation of the terrorists, which began Aug.
21 has ended.
He said that during this 12-day period, ap-
proximately 8,300 PLO members left Beirut. This in-
cluded 3,850 who went to Syria, 1,100 to South Yemen,
1,000 to Tunisia, 850 to North Yemen, 600 to Algeria, 500
to the Sedan, 260 to Jordan and 130 to Iraq.
The PLO terrorists were transported aboard eight
Greek and Cypriot merchant ships which made a total of
15 trips from Beirut, Romberg said. In addition to the
8300 listed, the International Red Cross took ap-
proximately 175 sick and wounded terrorists to Cyprus
and Greece aboard the hospital ship Flora. Also, 2,600
members of the Palestine Liberation Army and 3,600
Syrian troops left Beirut for Syria by land.
MAURICE R. PERESS, M.D.
Mamber American Fertility Society
Announces The Opening Of His Office
For The Practice Of
GYNECOLOGY, INFERTILITY,
MICROSCOPIC TUBAL SURGERY, and
REPRODUCTIVE ENDOCRINOLOGY
At
CAMINO REAL CENTRE
Suite 200
7100 West Camino Real
Boca Raton, Florida 33433
TELEPHONE: (305) 368-5500
OFFICE HOURS: BY APPOINTMENT
For Ads Call Staci
588-1652
New Year
from
Delta
Air Lines.
Delta Air Lines extends best wishes to our Jewish friends for
the holiday season and for the year to come. May the new year
bring peace, health, happiness and prosperity for everyone.
May

the year
you with
health and
happiness.

AMERICAN m
SAVINGS fc
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF FIOHIDA ^B^
Shapard Broad
Chairman
Morris N. Broad
President
SERVING SOUTH FLORIDA SINCE 5711




Sept*berl7,1982
.
________The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page3-B
itcher of Lyons' Manages to Avoid Extradition
L PAUL HOFFMAN
1PAZ. Bolivia (JTA)
dlor Augustin Saavedra
lowed a West German ex-
ton request for the notor-
[xta war criminal Klaus
L known as "The butcher of
F'" to pass to the juriadic-
7 the civilian judiciary, thus
t surely guaranteeing a ser-
J legal maneuvers by Bar-
Lwyers which will enable
inner gestapo commander to
being prosecuted for his
me activities.
I declining to intervene at a
ministerial level, Saavedra has
virtually assured the same fate
for Germany's extradition re-
quest as that encountered by a
French claim 10 years ago. In
1972, France pressed for the ex-
tradition of Barbie, whom it twice
condemned to death in absentia
for war crimes committed against
French Jews and resistance
members, through normal Boli-
vian judicial channels.
IN A DRAWN out series of
legal maneuvers instituted by
Barbie s lawyers, France had to
first prove that he was the same
person as Klaus Altman, the as-
sumed name by which the former
Nazi was known and under which
he had illegally acquired Bolivian
citizenship.
Once this hurdle was cleared
the case moved slowly through
the lower courts until it finally
reached the Bolivian Supreme
Court in 1974. The Supreme
Court denied the request, due to
the lack of an extradition treaty
between the two nations. Subse-
quent French appeals to then
acting-President. Gen. Hugo
Banzer to reverse the ruling were
turned down by the military
strongman.
Germany has based its request
for extradition on a detention or-
der against Barbie by a criminal
tribunal in the city of Augsburg
that claims he was responsible for
the death in 1944 of a French citi-
zen named Kemmler.
THE FRENCH Armed Forces
Tribunal, a military war crimes
judicial commission set up after
World War II to prosecute Nazi
war criminals, has determined
that Barbie commanded aGesta-
po unit based in Lyons that mur-
dered 14,000 members of the un-
derground resistance movement
and that he sent 10,000 French
Jews to their deaths at Ausch-
witz.
Informed diplomatic sources
here who have requested anony-
mity, maintain that the denial of
the French request by the gov-
ernment, was directly linked to
Barbie's close ties with highly
placed Bolivian military figures.
It is widely known in Bolivia that
one of the most feared "advisors"
in torture and interrogation tech-
nique attached to the Bolivian
' Ministry of the Interior, the in-
ternal security bureau during the
1950's and 1960's, was a German
immigrant and ex-soldier named
Klaus Altman.
Wishing A Healthy and Happy
New Year To All Our Friends
toward, Detra, Monica &
Jared Kay
A Happy and Healthy New Year
from
[Ronni and Jay Epstein
and
Greg and Jordan
ALAN and THAILA COHEN
DON and RON
^
Best Wishes For A Happy New Yew
Marshall, Debby, Dana &
Justin Brass
WISH ALL THEIR FRIENDS
A
UPPY& HEALTHY NEW YEAR
Wishing You Health and Happiness
Throughout The New Year
iuellen, Robert, Stephen
and Ian Schiff
Harriet and Sy Fine
WISH ALL A HAPPY
AND HEALTHY NEW YEAR
Alan and Marcy Marcus
and Michael
WISH ALL OUR FRIENDS
A HAPPY NEW YEAR
New Years Greeting
West German Auto Center
365 North Military Trail
West Palm Beach 1-684-0808
Happy New Year
A Happy and Prosperous
New Year To All
Dr. and Mrs. Thomas Davidoff
Jonathan, Jill and Jamie
Eileen and Myron Nickman
IAli and Paul Summers
and Family
Wish the Community
A Healthy and Happy New Year
Best Wishes For A Healthy And
Happy New Year
*>mdne, Arthur, Tamara
am >eth Virshuo
We Wish All Our Friends
A Happy and Healthy New Year
Abe, Esther, David
and Rebecca Szmukler
Richard, Esther
Sosha & Max
Zaretzky
ROSH HASHANAH
HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL
7)3121 oi>* JIJM
Health and Happiness For The
New YEar
Candice, Lee, Adam,
Rachel, Jason and Rebecca
Fischer
Rhona & Dick Shugarman
Keith, Marcy and Todd
A Year of Health, Happiness
and Shalom
Best Wishes For A Healthy
And Happy New Year
Mr. & Mrs. Michael Small
Lisa, Brad, Jodi and J.D.
Wishing You Health and Happiness
Throughout The new Year
Dr. & Mrs. M Sheridan
IIXPPV .
Best Wishes For A Healthy And
Happy New Year
Joel, Carole, Brett
and Adam Koeppel
:-
Wishing All Our Friends
Health and Happiness For the
Coming New Year
Diane, Ken, Jessica
and Adam Mitchell
The Bach, aci i Family
A Joyous and Fruitful New Year


Pae4-B
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Anti-Semitism in Switzerland
ByTAMARLEVY
GENEVA -(JXA)- A
specter is beginning to
haunt Switzerland, the
specter of anti-Semitism.
Its current expression
takes the form of blistering
attacks against Israel's
government and its policies
in the Middle East, partic-
ularly its "Peaces for
Galilee" operation.
These attacks, couched in
political terms, invariably spill
over into attacks against Jews.
For many Swiss, Israel ahd Jews
are one entity, two sides of the
same coin, and an attack against
one is simultaneously an attack
on the other; a critism of Israel is
also used as an excuse to criticize
Jews in this country for any
domestic problems.
IRONICALLY, the Swiss were
never known to be particularly
anti-Jewish. One of the reasons is
that the Swiss Jewish com-
munity is small, and Swiss Jews
maintain a very low profile. There
are some 20,000 Jews in Switzer-
land of a total population of some
6.3 million. The largest Jewish
communities are in Geneva and
iu Zurich.
Bui the war in Lebanon
brought whatever unconscious
anti-iemitism there was to the
fore r nd made implicit anti-Simi-
tisru explicit. This development
is across the board, from left to
right, from politicians to the
average citizen. Examples
abound.
The largest agricultural co-
operative in the country. Migros.
none of whose directors is Jewish,
was recently under attack by
some farmers for selling tomatoes
at too low a price, thereby engag-
ing in unfair competition with
private farmers. At the same
time, a soda water bottling fac-
tory which is owned by Migros
was burned down under suspi-
cious circumstances. How did
this translate into anti-Jewish
feelings?
A GROUP OF Swiss men dis-
cussing the war in Lebanon were
overheard saying, "Look at what
Jews are doing in Lebanon.
They're doing the same in this
country. Create trouble wherever
they are. After all, Migros is in
Jewish hands, and look at the
problems there."
They continued to mention
that all the large department
stores in Geneva the Grand
Passage, Pharmvca Principal and
Placette
J^yJ^Pfcmbtfn,
~ are ownedbT,
Best Wishes To All Our Friends
For A Happy and Healthy New Year
ELLEN and MICHAEL RAY
PETER, BRIAN and ERIC
Warm Wishes For A Healthy
and Happy New Year
ELIZABETH STERENBERG FREILICH
Barbara and Nate Tanen
and Family
A Happy and Healthy New Year
Best Wishes For A Healthy and
Happy New Year
Jane, Larry, Janine and
Harrison Katzen
Best Wishes For A Healthy And
Happy New Year
The Koffs
Sonia, Ben.Steven and Laurie
Barbara &Sherwin
Isaacson
Wish Everyone A Happy &
Healthy New Year

Ranch's Drug Store
Wishes All Their Friends
A Happy New Year
3800 S.Dixie-W.P.B. 833-6451
Wishing You Health, Happiness
and Peace Throughout
The New Year
Deborah, Howard, Nancy
and Joshua Subarra
L'ShanaTova
Fred and Nettie Berk
Francis & Joel Gordon
Michael and Lisa
Wish Their Family and Friends
A Happy New Year ff -
Best Wishes For A Healthy
And Happy New Year
FLORYN and HAROLD
BARRI and JULIE NEEDLE
DR. and MRS. EMANUEL NEWMARK
and FAMILY
Wish All Their Friends and Family A
Happy & Healthy New Year
Wishing You Health and Happiness
Throughout The New Year
Dr. and Mrs Thomas H. Ross
David, Bruce and Julie
Wishing You Health and Happiness
For The New Year
Health and Happiness For
The New Year
Diane, Richard, Sylvia
and Michael Kaufman
Dr. & Mrs. Hyman Roberts
and Family
Holiday Greetings
(which is t
they concluded that e^
control the major enSj1
the country and thereby^
the Christians. *
The Socialist Party in r
joined forces with the fW S
Party to collect signatu^S
petition requesting EbJ
Swim government i^SJ
deal to buy arms from hS,*1
with the Jewish State In
hVhe C*t p4.
ushed an article attaS
president of the Su?5T
Bonds and the Untied il
Appeal, saying that he wu.
Continued on Pagt ]
Sheila & Alec EngelsteST
and Family
A Healthy and Happy
New Year Tn All
Best Wishes For A Healthy And
Happy New Year
The Bernsteins
Alan, Barbara, Matthew,
Genny and Jodi
Wishing All Our Friends
Health, Happiness and Peace
Dr. & Mrs. Philip Paston
Shona and Karli
WrnUAy \e< fir*)
Paul and Carole Klein
Rachel, Rebecca & Laura
Shep and Stacci Lesser
Tami and Gary
m
Wish All A Happy, Healthy &
Good Year
L'Shana
Toua
Judge And Mrs. Edward
Andy and Jimmy
Best Wishes For A Happy and
Healthy New Year
Marjie, Shelly and Derek
____ Konigsberg
Best Wishes For A Healthy
And Happy New Year
From
The Sulzer Family
We Wish Our Friends
a Healthy and Happy New Year
Samuel W.& Fay B. Smith!
Wishing All Our Friends
A Happy and Healthy New Year
Phyllis, Jeffrey
Scott and Jason Penner
Best Wishes For A Healthy and
Happy New Year
Ceil and Bob Levy
Jay, Sander and Mitchd
Best Wishes For A Very
Happy, Healthy and Prosperous New Year
Dr. & Mrs. Richard Kachel|
Tami and Jason
Lesser,
Daniels
and
Shalloway, P.A.
Best Wishes for a
Happy New Year
%
ShepardLeH
Bruce J. Dame18
C. Michael Shallop


|Friday^ept^rn^2_
The Jewish Florida of Palm Beach County
Christian Describes View of New' Lebanon's Future
All Divisions Must Go
rS/Jth Going of 'Invaders'
By ROGER EDDE
London Chronicle Syndicate
It is time I to move boldly
Lnd quickly towards radical
solutions in the Middle
East which provides secur-
iY for all Sates in the re-
ln. The unity and sover-
eignty of Lebanon can only
|be achieved if Lebanon be-
Icomes a permanently
I neutral and disarmed State
|_ that is, neutrality
[guaranteed by the super
I powers and assured by the
I presence on Lebnese soil of
| a multinational force. .
Disarmed neutrality for Leba-
non is a solution of last resort.
-Neutral Lebanon is compatible
with Lebanon's history, its geo-
Igraphical location and its politi-
Ical tradition. Alignment abroad
I has brought disintegration at
I home.
ONLY A DISARMED and
Ineutral Lebanon can permanent-
Ih; end the cycle of violence which
has claimed the lives of so many
innocent victims. A permanently
Idisarmed and neutral Lebanon
|would require:
Total departure of all foreign
forces presently occupying Leba-
Inon;
Complete disarmament of
Lebanon within its international-
lly recognized boundaries, the
[Lebanese Army transformed to
fill the vacuum left by the disin-
tegration of its internal security
|forces;
International guarantee of
[Lebanon's permanent neutrality;
K'stabllshfrrftit bf a rritiiti-na-- '
Itional force acceptable to all con-.
Icerned parties in Lebanon to as-
[sure neutrality, including U.S.
[forces in the 25-mile area north of
I Israel's border. The predominant
[role in other parts of Lebanon
I could be played by French
| troops;
The enforcement of demo-
Icratic procedures which would
permit the free election of a cred-
|ible Lebanese leadership.
ANY FURTHER progress in
Ithe Middle East peace process is
|irreversibly tied to a stable and
I lasting solution for Lebanon.
I This depends on the reestablish-
Iment of Lebanon's territorial in-
[legrity and sovereignty.
Lebanon, at the geographic
I heart of a region in a state of war
[since 1948, signed an armistice
I agreement with Israel that form-
lUy recognized the existing
I boundaries between Lebanon and
1 Israel.
The neutrality of Lebanon
I means peace and security for Is-
|rae without risking the exclusion
lof Lebanon from the Arab com-
Imunity until negotiations pro-
Iduce a comprehensive settlement
|of the Arab-Israeli conflict.
For Israel, Lebanese neutrality
luk a "8tate of Peace." No
Iwoanese leader, not even a
[Maronite President, could carry
I he burden of being isolated by
|we Arab world. We just could
I t handle it, especially given the
[economic burden of reconstruc-
Itton.
Neutrality would amount to a
|a facto peace with Israel without
I e need to negotiate and sign a
I* u treaty Such fanuta
l*ould probably be acceptable to
I most of the Arab States, since it
| *ouid have pacified Lebanon.
IUnTPAY, Lebanon is basically
uruud. The danger we face is that
P* may be asked to pay the price
I pleasing President Assad of
lu^i'or Prime Minister Begin of
|**L. or the Christian militias,
no may b, encu^-jj to ^
l^e that they could establish
their rule and dominate Lebanon
with the help of the Israeli mili-
tary machine.
It is worth remembering that
the Maronites are no more than
20 percent of the Lebanese and
the Phalangists, at best, 6 per-
cent. In a parliament of 99 mem-
bers, the Phalangists have no
more than seven members.
In the past, the Moslems of
Lebanon asked: How can we be
neutral between Israel and the
Arab world? Today, if they ask
that, we tell them that neutrality
is essential to maintain the unity
of Lebanon, but also to preserve
Lebanon from further occupa-
tion, to have every Moslem and
every Palestinian left here pro-
tected against revenge and mas-
sacre.
THERE HAS been a real shift
among Moslem Lebanese. The
first priority now, as it was not
always in the past, is to conserve
Lebanon. They used to hesitate
between their Lebanese identity
and their Arab identity.
What we tell them today is:
"We are Lebanese, and we are
Arab, but we have to be Lebanese
first. You Moslems of Lebanon
have been let down by the Arabs
when you were smashed, first by
the Palestinians, second by the
Syrians, and third by the Israelis.
You have no other priority except
your partnership with the Chris-
tians of Lebanon."
As for the Palestinians in
Lebanon, it is unrealistic to ex-
pect that, tomorrow, they will be
given the chance of going home.
We would like to see that, and we
will do whatever we can, diplo-
matically and politically, to pro-
mote this because we think that
reconciliation between the Pales-
tinians and the Israelis is the key
factor in the acceptance of Israel
in the Arab world.
Israel could impose peace on
every Arab country, maybe, by
force but not acceptance and,
insofar as the Israelis do not have
acceptance, they have nothing.
THOSE PALESTINIANS
who came into Lebanon after
1970 and who have Jordanian
and other passports, or whose
families live in Syria or other
Arab countries, should go and
join their families. Perhaps 50
percent of the Palestinians in
Lebanon today have family con-
nections outside Lebanon.
This is a matter for negotia-
tion. What we would not do is to
throw them into the sea. What we
do need to do is to give those Pa-
lestinians who remain in Lebanon
the chance to live a dignified life.
We will never accept that they
go back into the camps, that is
certain. We do not want time
bombs around our cities ever
again. We would like them to be-
come a real, productive economic
force in Lebanon. And they could
be.
We need a labor force in Leba-
non. Before the war, we imported
250,000 to 300,000 workers week-
ly from Syria and this work force
used to go home every weekend,
taking their money back into
Syria. This was an economic bur-
den, because there was a perma-
nent bleeding of hard currency
out of Lebanon into Syria.
THE PALESTINIANS could
fill this gap. It will require tech-
nical education and adaptation,
perhaps an Arab "Marshall
Plan" to help the needy among
the Palestinians, the Shia Leban-
ese and others in the south who
have had their homes destroyed
and lost everything.
I am not talking about aid but
the opportunity, through private
investment, to work and to give
those who will invest this money
Roger Edde is moderate
Christian political and
scion of one of
Lebanon's most influ-
ential families. In this
article, he outlines his
plans for a neutral, dis-
armed Lebanon.
a chance to have it back with in-
terest.
They should start to invest
some money in productive econo-
mic fields. There has been enough
investment in arms, in subver-
sion and in speculative foreign
markets.
It is time for Arab money to be
invested where the Arab destiny
lies, in the future of the genera-
tions in Lebanon, among the Pa-
lestinians and the Lebanese who
are today enraged with the failure
of the Arab world to halt their
bleeding.
In only two places in the whole
Middle East were there demon-
strations in support of Lebanon
a small one in Cairo and a
massive one in Tel Aviv.
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i *'


Page6-B
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, September i
Current Efforts to Inject Religion Into Public Schools 7&Jf^*m
NEW YORK Current
efforts to inject religion in-
to the public schools pose a
serious danger to freedom
of religion, the entire Bill of
Rights, and the balance of
powers between the three
branches of Government,
warns a report just issued
by the American Jewish
Committee.
Moreover, declares the report,
titled "The Fourth R": Religion
in the Public Schools," these ef-
forts "fueled partly, but not
exclusively, by the religious 'New
Right' constitute a "major
campaign" to "erode the wall of
separation between church and
state erected by the framers
of the Constitution."
WRITTEN by Samuel Rabi-
nove, director of the Discrimina-
tion Division of AJC's Domestic
Affairs Department, "The
Fourth' R' "is part of an ongoing
series of "Pertinent Papers" on
current social issues being pub-
lished by the department.
National director of the de-
partment is Seymour Samet, and
national chairperson of the
Domestic Affairs Commission is
Richard L. Weiss
Pointing to President Reagan's
proposed constitutional amend-
ment to permit voluntary organ-
ized prayer in public schools,
Rabinove asserts that this pro-
posal like other recent attempts
to legalize prayer in the schools,
violates the principle of separa-
tion of church and state because
public schools, being tax-
supnorted, "are clearly state in-
stitutions."
FURTHERMORE, continues
Rabinove, prayer in public
schools can never be really volun-
tary.
" 'What eight-year-old,' "says
the paper, quoting from a recent
column in the Washington Post,
is going to raise his hand
and (say he has a) constitutional
right to be excused?' "
" 'It is pure sham,' continues
the booklet, in a quotation from
another Washington Poet
column, 'to contend that in
such circumstances 'prayer and
meditation' can be made 'volun-
tary'. "
Because the Supreme Court
has repeatedly ruled against ef-
forts to introduce prayer and reli-
gious instruction into the public
schools, continues Rabinove,
"the religious New Right' has
launched a drive to accomplish
its goal in another way by
Best Wishes for the Holidays
Representative
Bernard Kimmel, M.D.

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Linda Weiss, President
842-4343
Holiday Greeting To All
From The
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Information for joining contact:
Sid Levine, Pres.
964-2837
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Marilyn & Arnold Lampert
and Children
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Barry, Eva, Mark & Adam
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Linda Budin, Eugene and
Herm Kalnitsky

From the directors,
officers and staff
of
Flagler
National
Bank
Telephone
659-2265
Thomas E. Rossin
President
Member F D I.C.'
POweroflheT^^*
nrieonachool-prayercSLI
nating in the states," ^^ W*I
THESE PROPOSED U- v
declares, "threaten to iimIm
delicate balance of JE
tween the executive, L-TL .
and judicial branchesofSl
ment set forth in the Const fat
- a balance that has bn,
cornerstone of this countrvV
litical system almost from i,!
gmnings as a nation."
Furthermore, he emphasij
these measures could lead tol
stringent enforcement of I
tutional protections: "Spon.
of these laws obviously feel ,
good reason, that many
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Though the task be difficult, and the tim* *** JJ
not ours to complete the task, but neither or* u*i
to desist from it" clti&i
, Ethics of a*'*"
Shana Tova ._-
AMERICAN JEWISH COMMITTM-
Pabn Beach CowUy Chapter UoMgttJ ft*
Arnold Hoffnun. Praa. Sylraa Cole. H-*w
William A Gralakk. Soatheeet Region^I*\
Bette Gilbert. Are. Director. Palm B<* ^-


r 17,1982 .
,gptanbe
Iwilh less vigor and rffec-
' than their Federal
rts-
I U S Supreme Court aa
[ '. Federal lower courts
.traditionally been more
te w claims of Constitu-
Irights than have state
BS also more effective m
Cog these rights .
Uges (are) less free from
pressure and far
-ulnerable to the public
[ban are Federal judges)."
,SING THAT the First
sent, which mandates the
on of church and state, is
_nd foremost a safeguard
[minority against the ty-
The Jewish Ploridian of Palm Beach County
Page7B
t
ranny of the majority," Mr.
Rabinove states:
"If Congress were to enact a
law barring the Supreme Court or
other Federal courts from review-
ing cases involving school prayer,
no provision in the Bill of Rights
would ever be truly secure again.
For any time that a decision of
the Supreme Court or a lower
Federal court seriously offended
a majority of both Houses, the
jurisdiction of the Federal courts
to hear the issue would be elimi-
nated."
Another effort to involve the
public schools in the teaching of
religious doctrine, continues Mr.
Rabinove, is 'the powerful drive
to discredit the theory of evolu-
tion in the public schools and to
compel the schools to teach
scientific creationism' the
Biblical account of creation."
"Despite the effort to cloak
'scientific creationism' in scienti-
fic garb," argues Rabinove,
"there can be no serious question
that it is a religious doctrine."
RABINOVE contends that
public schools should teach
"common core values that are
broadly shared by religious be-
lievers of all denominations and
secular humanists as well," but
adds, "for reasons of law and na-
tional harmony, those lessons, in
the public school classrooms,
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Bernstein, Narkier, Sharif,
Monchick and Karp
may not be couched in religious
terms .
"The men who framed the
Constitution were painfully
ware of what happened to here-
tics' and 'dissenters' in the many
lands where church and state
were joined and the historic
documents that helped shape the
First Amendment warned that
tax-supported religion would cre-
ate enmity and endanger free-
dom.
"Religious teaching belongs in
-he home, the church, the syna-
gogue and the parochial school,
out not in the public schools of
this country."
Fashion-Buyers
In Tel Aviv
TEL AVIV (JTA) Over
150 fashion buyers from coun-
tries throughout the world, but
mainly from Britain and contin-
ental Europe, have gathered at
the Tel Aviv Hilton Hotel for Is-
rael's fashion week. On display
are a variety of fashions for the
summer season of 1983. Fashion
Week organizers report that
"satisfactory" sales were effected
on opening day, Monday.
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Pae8-B
The Jewish Floridion of Palm Beach County
Frida
y.
Streisand's Dream, 'Yentel,'
Finds Her More Approachable
By DAVID NATHAN
London Chronicle Syndicate
' Yentl" is an Isaac
Bashevis Singer story
about a girl who disguises
herself as a boy in order to
be allowed to study the
Holy scriptures. For some
15 years, Barbra Steisand
has had a burning desire to
play this erudite transves-
tite in a film. She is now a
substantial part of the way
through the movie which is
being made in England and
Czechoslovakia.
This is rather odd because in
Czechoslovakia no Jewish child
of either sex can study the Holy
scriptures, as the authorities do
not allow the teaching of Hebrew. .
Streisand is striving to re-
create Polish stetl life as ac-
curately as possible. She could
not make the film in Poland be-
cause of "difficulties." So, somt
60 miles from Prague, they have
built the village of Yanev" from
the farm and three houses that
made up a place called Rozytly.
THE REMNANTS of the
once-flourishing, thousand-year-
old Czech Jewish community
have been happily working as ex-
tras, playing minor roles in what
was once their way of life, ex-
tending warm hospitality to the
visiting actors and renewing their
acquaintance with Miss Strei-
sand who was there on a recon-
naissance four years ago.
On her first night in Prague, a
Saturday, British actress Miriam
Margolyes went to the Alt-
neuschul with a friend, a psycho-
logist she had known at univer-
sity who was attending a con-
ference in Prague. A non- Jew.
"There were very few people
there." said Miriam, "barely a
minyan. They were very welcom-
ing and after the service they in-
vited us into a back room for a
meal of boiled eggs, tomatoes and
bread. They sang wonderful old
Yiddish songs, beating the table
with their fists in rhythm. No
women, just six or seven men.
Some of the tunes I recognized
from shut, but mostly they were
strange to me. They wanted me
to sing something, and I felt so
ashamed because I had nothing
to offer them."
A SENSE of oppression
weighed on the Western actors
and a sense of shame too when
they were told that the Czech
authorities had insisted that the
extras and Czech technicians and
crew must not share the location
food flown out from England.
"It was an unedifying sight,"
said Miriam, "us eating and them
watching us. They were shocked
by the amount of food we had and
by what we wasted. We were in a
luxury hotel, handsomely paid
with big expenses. All around us
was oppression and drabness.
I'm a socialist and I feel shaken
by it."
Equally shaken was Jack
Lynn, a big, bearded English
actor who, though technically a
Jew through his mother, hat
never considered himself to be
one as he was baptized as a child
and received no Jewish education
of any kind. All the same, he has
played a couple of Jewish roles on
television as a rabbi in Jack
Rosenthal s play, "Bar Mitzvah
Boy" and in "The Dybbuk."
LIKE MANY of the others, he
visited the Terezin (Theresien
stadt) concentration camp, near
Prague. "I broke down," he said.
"Thank God some of the younger
members of the cast got me out.
For the first time in my life,
though I still can't feel some-
thing I was not brought up to
feel, I wanted to shout out loud,
tall everybody, that I was a Jew.
"Some of the extras had con-
concentration camp numbers tat-
tooed on their arms. I said to one
of them, Well, at least it isn't as
bad as the Germans.' He said,
There are more ways than one of
getting rid of us. Hitler did it
openly. We can't teach our chil-
dren, so in a couple of generations
there'll be no Jews left here.'
"I'm very glad I went but I
never want to go back."
Streisand could not face going
to Terezin but asked some of the
others what it was like. Nor could
the Jewish wife of the unit's still
photographer; her grandparents
had been killed there.
Yiddish actress Anna Tzel-
niker was able to communicate
more easily with the local people
than anybody else. "The fact is,"
she said, "that there are hardly
any young Jewish people to teach
Hebrew to. Some were allowed to
emigrate and went to Australia,
Canada and America. Parents are
allowed to visit them and they
come back. There are some
youngish people here and they
are in the professions. There are
Jewish doctors and lawyers, but
they don't particularly think of
themselves as Jewish. The elder-
ly daven in the Altneuschul, but
I found that only the very, very
old spoke Yiddish. The others
spoke German though. Some are
quite happy with their lives there
and some would just say freig- ^
nisht don't ask."
IT IS NO secret that, in the
past, Streisand has been ac-
counted a very difficult lady to
j work with. Indeed, books have
.been written about it. Well-at-.
tested stories include the one)
about the cast and crew of a I
Hollywood film she worked on
organizing a parting present a
one-way ticket to New York.
It was all either a pack of lies,
or there has been a radical
change. No one has a bad word
for her; indeed, the good words
pour out in torrents. Her opening
speech to her cast was; "Thank
you for being part of my dream"
(to make "Yentl"). After which
they were all her devoted ser-
vants.
She has treated even small-
time, unknown actors as if they
were human beings and has
aroused passionately protective
feelings in every breast. On one
very hot day, playing a scene
with an actor, an acolyte rushed
up during a break to hand Strei-
sand a glass of cold water. She
shared it with the actor. This
probably says less about Miss
Streisand
other film stars, L?
impressed the actor,.
"She may have bw,,
My mother films,
star and acted as ,
AnnaTzelniker,^'
she is the produce tu
writer (with Jack B*
star, and she's stic
neck out. She has soffill
tf things don't go
ever it is, I ^'l
enough, both as an artS
colleague."
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September 17,1982
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page9-B
>eres Says He Doesn't See Mitterrand
As French Anti-Semite
ARIS (JTA) Is-
Lposition Labor Party
7 Shimon Peres said
. after meeting with
Ijdent Francois Mitter-
|that he did not believe
Lee was a center of ram-
lanti-Semitism.
Lyself believe that there
1 anti-Semites in France,
j,ce herself is not anti-
:, neither by culture,
r"by philosophy, nor by
Ion," Peres saia aiteT a ^'
. meeting with the Preei-
1 arrived here at the invi-
[of Mitterrand in an effort
Ue the strains developing
en Paris and Jerusalem in
Lake of several terrorist
[s against Israeli and
E-owned installations, cul-
w in the terrorist attack
Idenberg s restaurant in the
(of Paris' traditional Jewish
ISRAEL HAS blamed France
for having "created an anti-
Semitic climate" because of its
support for the PLO in the Leba-
non fighting. Premier Menachem
Begin issued a sharply worded
attack on the French government
last week.
Peres said he was confident
that the strain in relations be-
tween Israel and France has been
eased by his visit "because what
was necessary was a clarification
and not just an exchange." He
added: "I think when polemics
are overtaking politics we are all
in trouble."
Peres said that Mitterrand
provided a detail-ed account of
the government's efforts to
combat the surge of terrorism in
France. Mitterrand later made a
television address to announce
new anti-terrorism measures and
clafify French policy in the Mid-
dle East.
Peres, who is an old friend of
Mitterrand from the Socialist In-
ternational, said France and Is-
rael have similar views in the
Middle East except for the issue
of a Palestinian state and the role
of the PLO in the region.
DURING THEIR meeting,
which was described as "ex-
tremely friendly," Mitterrand re-
affirmed France's willingness to
contribute to a peaceful evacua-
tion of the PLO forces from
Beirut but emphasized that all
foreign armies the Israelis,
Syrians and the PLO must
withdraw from Lebanon.
As for the long-range political
solution of the Palestinian prob-
lem, Mitterrand called for, the
"participation" of the PLO in the
negotiating process as "one ele-
ment, among others."
There was no insistence on his
part for recognizing the PLO as
the "sole representative" of the
Palestinian people, nor did he re-
peat the traditional French call
for a Palestinian state.
-AntisemHism Is aFrench internal affair
dti rora r\wh
>nd they dhall heat their
Awordd into plowshare** and their bpearb
into pruninc/hookt; nation ohall not li\t up
oword against nation, neither Ahall they
learn war any more."
J^aiah 2, IV
Through the new year, may your family
share the blessings of peace, joy and love.
AHappyRoshHashanah
toyour whole family from
the people at Publix.


PagelO-B
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday.sePu!0>befl7
Anti-Semitism in Switzerland
Continued from Page 4
letting money for Premier
Menachem Begin and his govern-
ment and therefore was acting
against the beat interests of
Switzerland.
Bern, said that during the fight-
ing in Lebanon thetmbassy re-
ceived letters every day denounc
ing Israel- Some were anony-
mous, while others were signed
with epithets.
Some letters stated. "What a
shame Hitler did not finish off all
the Jews." Others said, "It's a
pity that only five Jews were
killed in Rue des Rosiers in
Paris." This was a reference to
the terrorist attack on Jo
Goldenberg's restaurant in Paris'
Jewish quarter earlier last month
where six people were killed and
22 wounded. None of the dead
was Jewish. In Geneva, graffiti
include hate messages such as
Begin-Hitler," "Dirty Jews,"
and "Jews-Murderers."
MRS. RAELI said that ant
Israeli editorials in the nation's
press and photographs claiming
to show that the devastation in
Lebanon was caused by Israel has
provided legitimacy for anti-Is-
raeli and anti-Semites to come
out of the closet and express their
feelings publicly.
One example of what might be
termed media incitement to
hatred was a recent talk show on
Swiss radio where the host of the
program was reading from Hit-
ler's Mein Kampf. Each time he
read a passage which contained
the word "Jew" he substituted
that with the word "Palestinian.'^
and for the original word "Jews"
V
v\ 6>
'vv \.

IJii
r ummTvH a******* ^T"
he said Palestinian nation."
The Jewish weekly. Israeli-
tische Wochenblatt, has de-
manded a public explanation of
his from the director of the radio
station and is planning legal ac-
tion.
THE WAR in Lebanon has
also taken its toll among those
who supported Israel. A woman
phoned the Israeli delegation to
the United Nations in Geneva
and asked to speak to an Israeli
official. She reportedly told the
official: "I have always been a
fervent supporter of Israel and
have visited vour country several
times. But now I am totally op-
posed to Israel's conduct in Leba-
non, and my feelings have turned
against Israel. I am not the only
one who feels that way. Many of
my friends feel exactly as I do.
We no longer support Israel and
will not again visit Israel."
The harshest critics of Israel
are Swiss youth between the ages
of 15 and 20. Their criticism of
Israel spills over into attacks
against Jews. Not infrequently,
Swiss youth can be overheard
saying: "Maybe Hitler was right
after all to want to exterminate
the Jews when we see what they
are doing in Lebanon."
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INDIAN OCEAN Stondofd Discount Economy 522 392 313 217 163 130 6pm-lom )am-l!am Ham- 6pm
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FIKST UNUTH/tADPiriONAl MIM Tf


The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
ggan Presses for Jordanian W. Bank
____ wider nartir.inat.inn in thaao ltk security Ha J uk tK I
Page 1 IB
it
bny
kVID FRIEDMAN
JHINGTON
.. President Reagan
id an "American
initiative" for the
East in which he
dear that the
States defines
for the Pales-
on the West Bank
jaza Strip as,"self-
jent" and believes
best be achieved in
ition with Jordan."
, the firm view of the
States that self-govern-
the Palestinians on the
jc and Gaza, in associa-
, Jordan, offers the best
for a durable, just and
peace," the President
, a nationally-televised
from California where he
itioning.
IAN ALSO stressed that
will not support an "in-
it Palestinian state" or
annexation or perman-
ol" over the West Bank
i. He urged the Palestin-
, the Arab states to re-
the State of Israel, and
J that "Jerusalem must
undivided" with its final
upon through neg-
itn also called for an im-
kfreeze by Israel of Jewish
fcnts on the West Bank.
1 the immediate adoption
ttlemenl freeze by Israel,
lan any other action could
he confidence needed for
wider participation in these (the
autonomy) talks," he said.
"Further settlement activities is
in no way necessary for the
security of Israel and only dimi-
nishes the confidence of the
Arabs that the final outcome can
be freely and fairly negotiated."
The President's speech, which
he said marked the completion of
the evacuation by the Palestine
Liberation Organization from
Beirut, was his first outline of a
Mideast policy since taking
office. He said that full details of
his proposal which followed two
weeks of discussion here and
abroad, were presented this week
by the U.S. Ambassadors to
Israel, Egypt, Jordan and Saudi
Arabia.
THE DETAILS presented in a
letter by Premier Menachem
Begin Tuesday sparked a furor in
Israel and caused Begin to sche-
dule a special Cabinet meeting. It
was believed here that Reagan's
hastily scheduled television ap-
pearance was an attempt by the i
President to make his proposals
public before the Israeli govern-
ment acted.
Reagan stressed that the U.S.
approach is based "squarely on
the principal that the Arab-Israel
conflict should be resolved
through negotiations involving
exchange of territory for peace.
This exchange is enshrined in
United Nation Security Council
Resolution 242 which in turn is
incorporated in all its parts in the
Camp David agreements."
Throughout his address,
Reagan stressed the U.S. contin-
uing commitment to Israel's
security. He said when the final
border is negotiated between
Israel and Jordan, "Our view on
the extent to which Israel should
be asked to give up territory will
be heavily affected by the extent
of true peace and normalization
and the security arrangements
offered in return."
He seemed to imply that
Israel's withdrawal would not be
to the pre-1967 borders which he
noted had left Israel only 10 miles
wide and with most of its popula-
r Friends:
|cebra;e our TWENTY FIFTH ANNIVERSARY It t only natural for us to
I those whose friendship and patronage hat mad* possible the growth of
l we express our sincere thanks tor your confidence. We fchall continue to
p the h-ghesi standards of quality and service Your confidence in us is
V appreciated and we shall do all in our power to merit its continuance.
Sincerely,
Sy Wolf (Pros.)
Imness is caring about your feet This can add years of comfort to your
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SAT. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m
tion in artillery range from its
enemies. "I am not about to aak
Israel to live' through that
again," he said.
REAGAN SAID, "The United
States will oppose any proposal
from any party and at any point
in the negotiating process that
threatens the security of Israel is
ironclad. And I might add, so is
mine."
At the start of his talk, Reagan
said that Americans should be
"proud" of the outcome in
Lebanon since the "peaceful" de-
parture of the PLO "could never
have been taken without the rood
offices of the United States and
especially the truly heroic work of
, Philip Habib.
"The Lebanon war, tragic as it
was, has left us with new opport-
unity for the Middle East,"
Reagan said. "We must seize it
now and bring peace to this
troubled area so vital to world
stability while there is still time."
HE SAID the first step is to
rebuild Lebanon because "a
stable and revived Lebanon is es-
sential for all our hopes in the
region," but *-vost of his talk was
concentrated on the autonomy
negotiations.
[Mrs of Technical Advances and Traditional Expertise has
1 toot discomfort due to many conditions:
Wive Feel Diabetic ulcers e HYPA Sensitive Feet
,3* Heel Spurs Amputations
<*0M or Ankle e Dropped Metatarsats e Hansens Disease
rT<* Malformations a Muscular Dystrophy
e Polio Etc.. Etc
' To* e Parkinsons
Jwentltlv* feet we use the Slipper-Sock. Foot-
PJtat from Dr. Paul Brand of U.S. Public Health
H* Hospital at Carvllle, La."
[yourself|avor. visait our factory and showroom MOW
BETTER-MOLD SHOE CO.
|m "t hut ifta, (is, int. $t. i m. tt. .*)fc -* i* w
PHONE 895-6942
Call or write for FMS brochure
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The flavor of Jarlsberg" Brand Cheese is as natural as the Norwegians who
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Alsoenjoy Ski Queen' Brand (.jeJiist cheese. Nokkclost
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The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Frida
if I
NORTON
SINCE 1924
TIRE CO.

SAFETY
SERVICE
CENTER
.->/:
Coach Howard Schnellenbergei
SO. FLORIDIANS
lIFGoodrichj
LIFESAVERXLM^ RADIAL
SIZE
P155/80R13
V
VI
7
P165/80R13
c
P175/80R13
PRICE F.E.T.
49.19
51.18
53.05
P185/80R13
K tel
r r r
P195/70R13
P205/70R13
P205/70R14
54.45
55.50
1.53
1.69
1.78
1.92
1.98
SIZE
P195/75R14
P205/75R14
P215/75R14
P225/75R14
P195/75R15
57.15
62.17
A Vl
P175/75R14
P185/75R14

51.88
57.15 *
2.14
2.23
1.83
P205/75R15
PRICE
62.17
64.85
Ei.II
2.18
2.34
66.01 :2-<8
70.58 H
65.20 2-33
P215/75R15
P225/75R15
P235/75R15
67.42 in
69.99
72.56
77.83
^f Goodrich
BELTED CLM
P-METRIC POLYESTER CORD. GLASS BELTS
SIZE
P155/80B12
P155/80B13
P165/80B13
EXPERIENCE ft INTEGRITY
THAT SAVE YOU MONEY
Since 1924 Norton Tire Co. has offered quality
brands, competitive pricing, fast & efficient service,
T/A high tech specialist store managers, certified
mechanics, personal integrity plus guaranteed
satisfaction. You pay no extra for our service and
experience.
P175/80B13
P185/80B13
P175/75B14
P185/75B14
P195/75B14
P205/75B14
P215/75B14
P225/75B14
P155/80B15
P165/80B15
P205/75B15
P215/75B15
P225/75B15
PRICE
31.49
31.97
33.81
35.75
37.93
38.79
39.88
41.82
42.92
44.25
46.57
35.75
37.44
44.14
45.60
47.78
F.E.T.
1.49
1.44
1.50
1.63
1.69
1.70
1.79
1.95
2.07
2.20
2.35
1.68
1.83
2.15
2.34
2.46
50.10
2.59
2.78
3.01
FLORIDA
HEADQUARTERS
FORALLBFG
iTj m H
::. i :
HIGH TECH'
RADIALS
50,60 & 70 SERIES WIDE
and the new T/A COMP
RADIALS
| FOR FOREIGN & MOST DOMESTIC
SMALL & INTERMEDIATE CARS
SIZE
155SR12
155SR13
165SR13
175SR13
165SR14
175SR14
185SR14
155SR15
M65SR15
PRICE
29.98
32.55
35.62
37.36
38.25
39-S4
F.E.T.
1.53
1.61
1.80
2.02
1.85
2.04
, 7 1 _50-10 I 2.65 .~~.~^
il'41 i [\U [4 M CERTIFIED MECHANICS
ASK ABOUT OUR FREE 8 POINT SAFETY CHECK-UP
DISC BRAKE
SPECIAL
Install new disc pads
Resurface rotors Install
new seals Repack bearings
Check calipers Check system Inspect
master cylinder Add fluid as required
Adjust and bleed as required Check and
adjust rear brakes Road test
- Most of our me-
chanics have been TESTED and CERTIFIED by
the National Institute for Service Excellence. They
are available at any of our stores listed below with
a star (*).
42.86
36.04
39.46
2.28
1.82
FOR MOST
AMERICAN*
FOREIGN CARS
1.98
74
GET OUR
PRICE OH
MUM BRAKES
30,000 MILE GUARANTEE
OIL CHANGE, FILTER
AND LUBE
UP TO 5 QTS. OF PREMIUM
OIL NEW OIL FILTER COM-
PLETE LUBE
*12
95
WE SERVICE NATIONAL ACCOUNTS
FOR
MOST
U.S.PM-
wmn
CARS.
UftMT
TRUCKS
ENGINEERED FOR SMALLER CARS"
BULK
! honor MASTER CARD VISA
AMERICAN EXPRESS
0INERSCLUB
* CORAL GABLES
d & Dougla* Road 446-8101
NORTH MIAMI
1330O N.W. 7th Ave 661-8541
* N. MIAMI BEACH
1700 N.E. 163rd St 945-7454
+ MIAMI BEACH
1454 Alton Road 672-5353
* SOUTH DAOC
9001 S Dlxl* Hwy. 667-7575
CUTLER RIDGE
20390 S Dixie Hwy. 233-5241
* HIALEAH/PALM SPRINGS MILE
1275 49th St. 822-2500
t MIAMI AIRPORT
N.W. 25 St. & MMam Dairy Rd 593-1191
DAOC: ExponVVVhoMMMU*
1666 N.W. 82 Av*. 593-7040
T FT. LAUOERDALE
1740 E. Sunn** Blvd. 463-7588
PLANTATION
381 N. Stat* Rd. 7 567-2186
* LAKE PARK/N. PALMBEAC
532 N.Lak* Blvd. 848-2544
t OBBRPIBLO BBACH
- --------- ~.n. ,w o. ao/-zioo 2266WHW*t>oroBrvd;427-
* WEST MIAMI TAMARAC t Ft PIBRCB _
**mm2Stt2LSS!L 'WCorwn-JBMl 735-2772 2604 South4th St. 464-8020
* KENDALL DR./HIQATE SQUARE t TAU1UT t VCRO BBACH
13672 S)(W88B1 St 387-0128 N Ur**ny Or. TM^rSoT.d 72V4700 755 21sS*H_S^74
497 *. S.. Ra 7 967-0450 bZZZ 63^4
t DAV1E St Rd 64 )u*t wt of Urev*flty Dr. 473-4700
iozisiairvvi -
? DAVTONA BBACH
907 VohMla Av*. 255-7"
t MAPLES
2065 E. Tamiam. Tr 774-4443


Full Text
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