Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
8 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 28, 1975)-v. 8, no. 40 (Dec. 17, 1982).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 2, 1976 called v.2, no. 22, but constitutes v.2, no. 1.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: July 28, 1978 called no. 14 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement; Aug. 25, 1978 called no. 16 in masthead and no. 17 in publisher's statement; Aug. 10, 1979 called no. 15 in masthead and no. 16 in publisher's statement; Oct. 22, 1982 called no. 31 in masthead and no. 32 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44607504
lccn - sn 00229550
ocm44607504
System ID:
AA00014311:00008

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
JJA/PB Dinner Demonstratt
[This dinner and the presence here tonight of Jews from all
toss America reflects the growth and maturity of our cam-
Ign in response to the urgent human needs of our people here
[| throughout the world". With these words Alan L.
[ulman, National Vice Chairman of the United Jewish Ap-
'al.opened the first national United Jewish Appeal/Palm
ach Dinner at the Breakers.
Addressing a capacity crowd of over 400 people. Mr.
[ulman spoke of the forces attacking the Jews of the world
; work on a global scale that seek to divide us... isolate us..
anipulate us and the most visible symbol of our sovereignty,
f Jewish Homeland, in pursuit of world domination".
ghulman went on to discuss what he called the "clearly ob-
kisive Crusade in the Halls of the United Nations not only to
credit the sovereign nation of Israel, but also to make all
irs the enemies of mankind". Shulman elaborated on the in-
Continued on Page 2
One people Indivisible

lw *
11 ?'
Former President Carter addresses UJA/Palm Beach Dinner.
iJewislb Flo^idiao
of Palm Beach County
Combining "OUR VOICE and "FEDERATION REPORTER"
in conjunction with The Jewish Federation of Polm Beach County
blume8 Number 9
Palm Beach, Florida Friday, February 26,1982
Fr*IShocht
Price 35 Cent-
Israel Remains America's Friend and Ally'
In a hand-written "Dear Menachem" letter to Prime
blister Begin, President Ronald Reagan attempted to
In Israeli fears about plans to sell Hawk missiles and
16 fighter planes to Jordan.
The President wrote: "Israel remains America's
end and ally." He vowed that Israel will keep its
litary advantage in the Middle East.
3egin earlier, on* the basis of overwhelming support
the Knesset in opposing the plan suggested by
Ifense Secretary Caspar Weinberger when he visited
|tiK Hussein in Jordan, wrote to the President saying
arms sale could pose "one of the gravest potential
Ingers we have faced ever since the renewal of our
ktehood."
Israeli Foreign Minister Yitzhak Shamir also warned
" "certain trends in the U.S. to supply sophisticated
Mitterrand's Men
weapons to some Arab countries." He said: "There is
no need for such new supplies of weapons. There
already is a massive concentration of U.S., Soviet and
French arms in our region."
. Shamir, digressing from the subject of arms, said
democratic countries should react to "the decline" of
the United Nations by forming a "new organization"
designed to protect democracy and freedom throughout
the world.
The U.S. Ambassador to the UN Jeane Kirkpatrick,
talking to the Anti-Defamation League meetings in
Palm Beach earlier this month, deplored recent actions
of the General Assembly, indicating that on almost
every issue, Israel is made the scapegoat. She also told
of hearing "whispers" of concern from other UN dele-
gations about a "Jewish influence" in the U.S. mission.
Kuropeans have been suggesting that the presence of
three Jews in the top six posts at the U.S. mission in-
fluences its policy in Israel's favor.
Begin's letter to Reagan was hand-delivered by Is-
rael's new ambassador to the United States, Moshe
Arens, who started his new duties Feb. 16 in Wash-
ington. Arens is scheduled to meet with State De-
partment officials concerning Weinberger's arms pro-
posal of Jordan.
Twenty Senators urged President Reagan to reject
the arms sale to Jordan. In a letter signed by those
Senators, Reagan was told the missiles and warplanes
'could dramatically change the balance of power in the
Middle Last, undermine the security of our ally Israel
and increase the overall instability of the region."
Many of His Key Advisers are Jewish
By BEN FRANK
[PARIS Quickly and
Ithout much fanfare, the
|w President of France
[tered the offices where
je civil marriage of one of
|b most trusted aides was
take place. It is not
Jeryone that has the Pres-
ent of the Republic attend
or her wedding cere-
pny. But that's what
ippens to Jacques Attali,
kcial consultant to Presi-
pt Francois Mitterrand,
with offices in the Elysee
Palace.
Due to a pressing schedule, the
President could not attend the
synagogue service, but many
high government officials did.
This was, of course, their tribute
to Attali a strong supporter of
Mitterrand, active in the Jewish
community, a vice president of
the Fonds Social Juif Unifie
(similar to the Council of Jewish
Federations in the United
States), and who at the age of 20
graduated at the head of the class
from the Ecole Polytechnique.
IT IS A truism in France,
which was the first European
country to grant Jews equality,
that Jews have risen to the
highest positions in government
and industry. Leon Blum, Rene
Mayar and Pierre Mendes-France
were all Presidents of France,
which today has a Jewish popu-
lation of more than 700,000 and is
the fourth largest Jewish com-
munity in the world.
Moreover, there are more Jew-
ish Cabinet members in the Mit-
terrand Administration than in
previous governments in recent
years; three of the four Jews in
the Cabinet have been very active
in the Jewish community for
many years.
Today, in the new Administra-
tion of Mitterrand, there are
those who were with him in the
old days when the Socialists
were in the political wilderness,
so to speak; who advised him on
policies, and who are now part of
the entourage which already has
decreed and set in motion much
economic and political change in
France.
BUT IN A country which has a
long tradition of secular govern-
ment, it should be remembered
that these men were picked not
because they were Jewish but be-
cause of their ability, and their
belief in the Socialist platform.
Indeed, the new French Ad-
ministration's policy towards
Israel has steered pretty much on
the same course as the previous
Administrations, although there
are nuances. The new govern-
! Continued on Page 3
French President Francois
Mitterrand will be visiting
Israel starting Mar. 3.
/Ill

qrJ
THE HOME' IS GOING UP. With the founda-
tion now completed, the outer structure of the
three story new Jewish Home for the Aged of
Palm Beach County takes shape as workmen be-
gin putting up the walls of the 120-bed skilled
nursing care facility. Construction is on schedule
for an anticipated opening of the Home around
June 1983.
mm


rage IU
Page 2
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County^
Friday, February
x=a
I f


Representative Dan Mica (IV. Fla. I recently addressed the Coalition of
Human Services at a meeting held February 11 at the Salvation
Army, on the future impact of funding reductions in Palm Beach
County.

The Coalition includes virtually all aspects of the
community services network in Palm Beach
County, and was initiated by the Common*3
lations Council of the Jewish Federation.
UJA/PB Dinner Demonstrates Overwhelming Support For Israel
Continued from Page 1
creasing waive of anti-semitic terrorism in countries around
the world as well as the affluent suburbs of New York. Boston
and Washington. DC. "We must respond to this threat", he
stated. "We must rally our people together to create an un-
derstanding of what is being challenged and why. and to
mount a response equal to the magnitude of the challenge we
face".
Shulman concluded his
remarks by stating. "By what we
do here tonight we must send a
clear and unequivocal message to
our friends and avversaries alike
that in a world gone mad with the
politics of convenience, we. the
Jewish people, defend our right to
secure our future...we will
stand with the Jews of the world
to ensure the quality of Jewish
life in the Jewish homeland.
throughout the diaspora, to that
"this unto the nations of the
world" should never be ex-
tinguished."
CARTER
ADDRESSES GATHERING
Former President Jimmy
Carter was the keynote speaker
lor the dinner. His speech focused
on foreign policy, the current
budget cuts and what he called
United States" human rights
failure in particular Soviet
Jewish emigration. He sited that
in 1977 when he took office the
number of Jews being allowed to
leave the Soviet Union was
estimated at 14.000. In 1979 the
number rose to 51.000. and that
today the number has
dramatically decreased.
Carter staled that "the most
time consuming, frustrating,
aggravating and gratifying
time." was his effort to work with
Israel and Egypt to bring about
peace in the Middle East. He
commended the United Jewish
Appeal and particularly those
gathered in the room by stating
"I am grateful to you for what
you mean to the United States of
America and the State of Israel,
and I am grateful that you will
continue to be generous with
your time and influence."
The results of the evening
demonstrated overwhelming
support for the programs and
services provided by the United
Jewish Appeal and Federations
around the country in their role
to raise the quality of life for
Jews everywhere.
The event was held |
operation with the New y
UJ A-Federation of Je
Philanthropies and the ,Ie
Federation of Palm B
County. Cecil N. Kudnickof,,
York City and Heinz Kppfej
Palm lleach were Ass
Chairmen for the dinner.
European Economic community unity: Bickering among EEC i
hits fishing industry. (*.-.,d, t.
HOLD THE DATE
SUNDAY, MARCH 21, GOO PJVL
WOMEN'S DIVISION
CAMPAIGN
Gala Victory
Cocktail Party
at
The Flagler Museum
Performance By
A VIVA MARKS, Israeli Actress
Capacity crowd ofover 400 people attend UJA/Palm Beach Dinner.
HOLD THE DATE
3rd NATIONAL
YOUNG LEADERSHIP
CONFERENCE
WASHINGTON. D.C.
MARCH 14-16,1982
A complete agenda of topical issues, brief-
ings by U.S. Government Officials and
Israeli Diplomats
MAKE THE CONNECTION
For Details, Please Call The Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County 832-2120


y, February 26,1982
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page3
T
resent at ive Tom Lantos (I)., Call.), left, was presented with a Pro-
bation declaring January 26 as Raoul Wallenberg Day in Palm
th County. The presentation was made by the Palm Beach County
limission. Joining Mr. Lantos is his wife, Annette (center), who is
Irman of the international committee on the plight of Raoul Wal-
erg. Mr. Dennis Willinger (right), who arranged the presentation,
live in our local community on behalf of Raoul Wallenberg.
Queens Man Booted Because
He Lied About His Nazi Past
|EW YORK (JTA) Mik-
Dercacz, a 73-year-old
ens resident, has had his
| Greek Rejects
EEC Plan
As Faulty
By DAVID KANTOR
JDNN (JTA) Prime
fister Andreas Papandreous
Ireece has told West German
jials that his country has re-
fd the Middle Hast policy of
European Economic Com-
|ity hecause it is not suf-
ntly supportive of the Arab
I a tone described by German
pals as "somewhat aggres-
I'apandreous, who held
|days of talks with the Ger-
also attacked the partici-
)n of Britain, Holland,
^ce and Italy in the multi-na-
1 peacekeeping force in Sinai
Israel withdraws from the
ccording to German sources,
aid Chancellor Helmut Sch-
that this step would legiti-
the current Mideast peace
ess based on the Camp David
rd'
TUNE INTO .
L'Chayim
' The Jewish Listener's Digest
An Exciting New Radio Magazine
Sundays, 10:30 am
WPBR-1340 AM
Sponsored by the Jewish Federation
of Palm Beach County
tliuayn~ February 28 Judaism: A Discussion With Allan
111 t1 'American Jewry's most outstanding rabbis, Allan
P"ier or the Reconstructionist Society for the Advancement of
ra*m discusses various aspects of contemporary Judaism,
piuding his unique approach to bar-bat mitzvah training and
i notion that Judaism is for adults not children.
Tune in to'MOSAIC
TV HIGHLIGHTS
Sponsored by
The Jewish Federation
of Palm Beach County
Sun "*hhoee Barbara Shufcnan and Slav* Gordon
Sunday February 28 Clarence Wagner,
executive Director of Bridges lor Peace
Jewish Education Committee
Sponsors Grass Roots Program
citizenship revoked by a federal
judge who ruled Dercacz had
concealed his role as a Ukrainian
policeman who had assisted the
Nazis in persecuting Jews when
he applied for admission to the
United States in 1949 and for
citizenship in 1954. According to
the Office of Special Investiga-
tions of the Department of Jus-
tice, Dercacz participated in
beatings and executions of un-
armed Jewish civilians in Lvov.
Brooklyn Federal Judge Ed-
ward Neaher ruled that Dercacz
had made "a willful misrepresen-
tation of his wartime service"
when he successfully applied for
immigration and citizenship. He
found that the defendant had told
federal officials in 1949 that he
had been a farmer in Poland
"from 1941 to 1944."
Dercacz admitted in a 1980 in-
terview that he had served in a
police unit in the town of Novy
Yarychev. Judge Neaher said in
his ruling that during the time of
Dercaczs service, the town's
2,000 Jews had been "rounded up
and killed by German forces."
Michael Piznak, Dercacz's attor-
ney, said he had not read the
judge's decision, issued in Feder-
al Court in Brooklyn, but he ex-
pected to appeal the ruling.
More parents are now com-
mitted to a stronger identi-
fication with the total Jewish
community and desire for their
children to gain an awareness of
their Jewishness. The religious
schools in our area are trying
hard to meet the goals and
aspirations of the young parents
and their children. The lack of
trained personnel a shortage
throughout our land, does not
allow for staffing all schools with
experienced and well-trained
teachers.
Mitterrand
Continued from Page 1
ment is emotionally closer to Is-
rael. An example of this is that
to visit the Jewish State.
' Attali, of course, is only one
1 Mitterrand will visit Israel in
March, the first French President
example of the galaxy of promin-
ent Jewish personalities who dot
the political map of France.
Among other examples, there is
Eric Beregovoy, who led Mitter-
rand's transition team and who is
now Secretary General of the
Elysee, a post comparable to Ed-
win Meese in the White House.
Active in the Jewish community,
Beregovoy worked with Mendes-
Franee for many years on social
issues.
ANOTHER JEW in the Cabi-
net is Charles Fiterman, a Com-
munist, who is Minister of Trans-
portation and who is one of the
five ministers who hold the rank
of "Minister of State." Although
he is known to speak fluent Yid-
dish, he has not shown "the
slightest interest in Jewish or Is-
rael affairs,"according to those
knowledgeable about Fiterman.
Not far from the Elysee Palace
is the Ministry of Justice, today
headed by another active Jewish
community person, Robert Bad-
inter, whose name is inseparably
linked with the fight to abolish
capital punishment.
The Jewish Education Com-
mittee and its Chairman, Dr.
Elizabeth S. Freilich. responded
positively to the request of the
Education Council, composed of
Kabbis and Education Directors
directing the religious schools, to
help fill the great need for our
community. The Education Com-
mittee and the Council suggested
a Crass Roots Program to be di-
rected by a professional co-
ordinator who would plan a pro-
gram to meet these needs. It was
agreed that we reach out to some
people with past experience in
public school teaching, who for
some reasons, be it retire-
ment, or other circumstances,
cannot at this time fill a full-time
job in the public schools.
Others who have a good curri-
culum background and possess
some intuitive quality for
teaching, as well as those who
have a good Judaic background
but luck the instruction know-
how, may apply for participation
in the Grass Roots program.
Kducation experts in Jewish
Kducation and erudite scholars
thoroughly versed in "Jewish
thought" will be part of the
laculty of the Grass Roots
Program.
Requirements: Regular at-
tendance in the prescribed
courses in Judaica and Hebraica,
instruction skills and methodo-
logy. Each candidate would be
required to deposit $100, which
will l>e refunded at the successful
completion of the entire course
(at the end of one year). There
will lie a $25 book fee and a $25
registration fee. It is hoped that
those who will demonstrate a
degree of competency will be
placed in our religious school sys-
tem, which may require any where
from two to twelve hours of
teuching per week.
A 40 week school year will be
divided into three trimesters. The
first trimester will begin
Tuesday, March 2 and every
Tuesduy thereafter, except on
given holidays (to be announced).
The total days of attendance for
the first trimester will be 12
Tuesdays from 9:;t() a.m. to 12
noon, or 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.
The hours of attendance will de-
pend on the choice of the
majority of applicants. Please
detach the form below and
complete same. You must in-
dicate by check mark the hours
moat convenient for you. Return
the completed form to the at-
tention of Max M. Purer, Jewish
Education Committee, 501 South
Flugler Drive, Suite 305, West
I'ulm Beach, FL 33401.
Please send an application form (or the Grass Roots Program
Name.
(please print)
Address.
Clty_
State.
-Zip
Telephone.
I prefer Tuesday, 9:30 am to 12 Noon ( )
Tuesday, 4:30 pm to 6:30 pm ( )
Please Check the hours most desired.
SAVE THE DATE:
MONDAY, MARCH22,1982
DR. IRVING'YITZ' GREENBERG
"IN SEARCH of ROOTS"
SPONSORED BY:
PALM BEACH JUNIOR COLLEGE
AUDITORIUM 8:00 P.M.
ADMISSION FREE
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
ORAL HISTORY COMMITTEE
In cooperation with the American Jewish Committee. Funded In pert by the Florida
Endowment for the Humanities with support from the National Endowment for the
Humanities.


Page 4
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, February
26,
"Jewish Floridian
of Palm BMch County Frtd Snocnel
Combining "Our Voice and "Federation Reporter"
FREDK SHOCMET SUZANNE SHOCHET RONNI TARTAKOW
Editor and Publisher Executive Editor New* Coordinator
Published Weekly October through Mid May Bi Weekly balance ol year
Second Cuss Postage Paid at Boca Raton. Fla USPS1068030
PALM BEACH BOCA RATON OFFICE
2200 N Federal Hwy Suite 206. Boca Raton. Fla 33432 Phone 368-2001
Mam Office & Plant 120 N E 6th St. Miami. Fla 33101 Phone 1 3734605
ir. Send address change to Jawtti RortrJan. P.O Boa 01 an. Mart. Fta. JJ161
Advertising Supervisor Steel Lesser I
Combined Jewish Appeii Jewish Federation ol Paim Beach County. Inc Officers President. Jean
ne Levy. Vice Presidents Alec Engelstem, Arnold J Hoffman. Or Richard Shugarman. Barbara
Shuiman. Mortimer Weiss. Secretary, Barbara Tanen. Treasurer. Alvin Wilensky. Eiecutive Oirector
Norman J Schimeiman Submit material for publication to Ronm Tartakow. Director ol Public
Relit ons.
Jewish Floridian does not guarantee Kashruth of Merchandise Advertised
SUBSCRIPTION Rates Local Area t4 Annual |2 Vest Minimum $7 501. or by membership Jewisn
Federation ot Palm Beach County. 501 S Flagler Or. West Palm Beach, Fla 33401 Phone
632 2120
Is Jewish Culture Being Finally
Exterminated In Hie USSR?
Friday, February 26,1982
Volume 8
3 ADAR 5742
Number 9
ORT's Spring Campaign
The Southeastern Florida Region of Women's
American ORT will be holding its official ORT Day
1982 kickoff function on Mar. 3. Purpose is to launch
the organization's 1982 spring membership cam-
paign.
This is a program well worth noting. Today,
Women's American ORT (Organization for Re-
habilitation Through Training) has over 145,000
members in 1,250 chapters from coast-to-coast.
Founded in 1880, ORT has an annual student enroll-
ment of some 100,000 in over 800 schools worldwide.
Only last week, the job of providing industrial
retraining for many of Britain's three million un-
employed was given in nomination to a World ORT
administrative committee chairman. As head of the
British government's Manpower Services Com-
mission, David Young will be taking on a task that
Britons know full well his ORT experience qualifies
him for beyond the shadow of a doubt.
ORT's more than centurv of service in the cause
of helping people help themselves through vocational
training is the watchword of this organization. Its
spring membership campaign richly deserves an un-
qualified success.
Begin, Peres in War of Words
Over Soviet Jewish Problems
TEL AVIV (JTA) _
Premier Menachem Begin
and Labor Party Chairman
Shimon Peres are engaged
in a war of words over the
issue of Soviet Jewry and
Israel's handling of the
problem.
It started with a statement by
Peres last week that the Likud
government was "not Zionist"
because it paid insufficient at-
tention to the plight of Soviet
Jewry and that immigration to
Israel had dropped to an all-time
low. Instead, Peres said, the
government had pushed for a
pact with the U.S. to line Israel
up solidly against the Soviet
Union and thus reduced the
chances of the USSR allowing
further emigration.
Peres was referring to the
memorandum of understanding
on strategic cooperation that was
signed by Defense Minister Ariel
Sharon and U.S. Defense
Secretary Caspar Weinberger in
Washington last November.
BEGINS OFFICE responded
with a statement that Peres did
not know what he was talking
about, but adding that the true
facts were too secret to be pub-
lished. "The true information
cannot be divulged even to refute
a false accusation," the Premier'si
statement said.
The Labor Party responded by
describing Begin's reply as
"crude. This is a wild and
haughty style characteristic of
Begin. He applies to the country
at large the same objectionable
habits with which he runs
Herut."
The Herut leadership there-
upon denounced the Labor
Party's "abusive style," saying
that when it had nothing of
substance to say it resorted to
mud-slinging and personal abuse.
Seminar for Palestinians at UN
Will Emphasize People's Rights
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS (JTA) A North American
Seminar on the rights of the Palestinian people will be
held at the United Nations from Mar. 15 to 19. The semi-
nar was organized by the UN Secretariate at the request j
of the General Assembly in a resolution adopted last Dec.
10.
ACCORDING TO an announcement, seven panels
will discuss various aspects of the Palestinian question,
including the Palestinian issue and North American pub-
lic opinion, the fundamental rights of the Palestinians and
the nature of the Palestine Liberation Organization.
Invitations to attend the seminar have been sent to
all governments, the announcement said. In addition,
participants will be drawn from among academics and
others interested in the Palestine question. The seminar
at the UN will be one of a series of seminars on the Pales-
tine question to be held in various parts of the world dur-
UlK ^-
From
Soviet Jewry Task Force
Community Relations Council
On the morning of October 14,
1981. Moscow police broke into
and searched the apartment of
Pavel Abramovich. who has been
refused an emigration visa for the
past 10 years. Teaching aids,
more than 70 books, including
even a Russian edition of the
Bible, were confiscated. Three
other teachers of Hebrew were
similarly treated on the same day
The previous day, October 13,
KGB investigating officer
Filatov threatened Pavel Abra-
movich as well as Yuli Kosha-
rovsky (whose visa application
suffered a similar fate) with im-
prisonment for "paid agents" .
"we will incarcerate you here in
the USSR for another 25 years
for your misdemeanors"
promised Filatov .
In Odessa. Nepomiashchy,
Kofman and Semelman were
warned and threatened with
arrest and trial if they would per-
sist with their subversive Hebrew
teaching activities .
Criminal proceedings have
been started in Sverdlovsk
against Shefer and Yelchin for
"anti-Soviet activity" involving
the study of Hebrew, listening to
Hebrew language broadcasts and
reading the bi-weekly "Israel
Today" Brailovsky in Mos-
cow. Kislik in Keiv. Park sky in
Kharkov were selected as ex-
amples and put on trial and
punished because they were the
centers of Jewish cultural ac-
tivity in their respective towns.
Deputy head Zinchenko of the
Moscow office of OVIR, the visa
department of the Office of the
Interior, informed V. Magarikon
September 26 that exit permits
previously granted to him and
his daughter had been revoked.
Magarik is thought to have been
associated with Jewish sports ac-
tivities .
The students who study
Hebrew are picked up by plain-
clothes men separately and
closely interrogated. Typical
questions are: "Why are you
learning Hebrew?," "Are you a
Zionist agent?," "Do you know
that your teacher is a social para-
site and an anti-Soviet propa-
gandist?" Then, the students are
flatly warned that if they will not
cease their study of Hebrew they
will never leave the USSR (for
those who have applied to
emigrate), or they will find them-
selves dismissed from their work
(if they have not applied). .
What are the motives behind
the sudden new wave of cultural
persecution? Why is the Soviet
system hounding these people?
Their only crime is their desire to
acquaint themselves with their
culture, the language of their
forefathers which lies at the root
of Jewish culture, history and re-
ligion. Some of these people are
| preparing for the repatriation to
Israel, whereas others would be
content to preserve their subcul-
ture and identity while remaining
in the USSR.
The Soviet regime has been
fighting the Hebrew language
since 1917, never legitimizing it
or granting it recognition. Before
the 1917 October Revolution
"bourgeois" Russia accommo-
dated many Hebrew journals,
newspapers and books. Hebrew
was studied at many institutions
of higher learning, by both
Gentiles and Jews. The present-
day drive towards the sup-
pression of Hebrew studies is in
fact leading to the total ex-
termination of Jewish culture in
the USSR.
Nobody is deceived by the illu-
sion of the freedom of Jewish
culture nurtured by the Soviet
authorities in the so-called Jew-
ish autonomous region in Biro-
bidzhan, where the few thousand
Jews are in any case a minority
and have no cultural facility. The
very few publications in Yiddish
do not satisfy aspirations
towards a Jewish culture based
on Hebrew, the language of the
Bible and the lingua franca of
World Jewry today.
One cannot say that Hebrew is
absolutely forbidden in the
USSR. No, it is studied in uni-
versity and non-Jewish theo-
logical seminaries in Moscow,
Leningrad, Tbilisi, Zagorsk. But
Hebrew remains forbidden to
Jews whose native language it is!
For a cultural group to have to
argue for its right to study the
language of its choice seems a
ridiculous requirement in the free
world. The Jews of the Soviet
Union have been deprived of this
basic right. Yet, the present-day
persecution of Russian Jews by
the regime is all the more cynical
as it is in violation not only of
international conventions signed
by the USSR but also of the
internal laws of the Soviet Union.
On June 2, 1962, the USSR
ratified the Convention on the
Struggle Against Discrimination
in the Sphere of Education,
adopted by UNESCO, whose
Article 5 states, in particular:
1. The States consider that for
persons belonging to national
minorities the right to conduct
their own educational work, in-
cluding direction of schools and
. .use or teaching their own lan-
guage must be recognized.
Article 27 of the Covenant on
Civil and Political Rights,
adopted unanimously by the UN
in 1966 and ratified by the USSR
in October 1973, emphasized the
special significance of language:
"In those states in which
ethnic, religious or linguistic
minorities exits, persons
belonging to such minorities shall
not be denied the right in the
community with other members
of their group to enjoy their own
culture, to profess their own reli-
gion or to use their own lan-
guage."
This natural right is empha-
sized again in the documents of
the Helsinki Conference on
Security and Cooperation in
Europe and subsequent meetings
in Belgrade and Madrid.
In addition to the international
convention signed by the Soviet
Government, the right of Jews to
study Hebrew is a direct con:-
sequence of domestic legal pro-
visions. Article 36 of the 1977
Soviet Constitution guarantees
Soviet citizens of different na-
tionalities "the possibility to use
their native language and the
languages of other peoples of the
USSR." This argument is sup-
ported by Article 45 of this
Constitution, which gives "the
opportunity to attend a school
where teaching is in the native
language" and by the provision
of "facilities for self-education."
As is well known, Soviet news-
papers publish only those articles
which are approved by the Soviet
authorities. In this connection let
us mention two statements,
namely that "any citizen may
learn and teach whatever lan-
guage he prefers" (Pravda, 17-3-
72) and that "no-one in the Soviet
Union is forbidden to studv J
knguage including Hebr^l
Yiddish Uzvestia. 24-12-76|
These promise- seem clear-
unambiguous; however |3
Soviet authorities do notahy, '
practice hat they preach Ev
before the recent crackdown tkl
Soviets tried to prevent the 2
of Hebrew, impeded the dfi
bution and reception of tex'tn^
and teaching aids, chardT
Hebrew teachers with ^121
parasitism," entered their honil
while Hebrew lessons were ^
progress and took the names!!
students, and so on.
The situation, however, ha
become much more desperate nl
the last few months. On the on,
hand all indications point to J
concentrated Soviet effort J
stamp out Hebrew and Jewi,J
culture within the Soviet Union.
There is no doubt that the I
Soviets intend to carry throuri I
and succeed in this program Oi
the other hand, Jews hiv|
recently also had the channel o|
emigration for realizing their
cultural ambitions virtuaUy elj.
minated by the Soviet author. I
ities. Only about 100 families
were allowed to leave last month,
a mere ten percent of the number I
in previous years. Thus you can
neither leave the USSR not
remain there as a Jew!
On Monday, October 12. 19811
more than 100 Moscow Hebrew'
teachers and their students went
to the Supreme Soviet
(Parliament) to present a letter I
complaining about the sys-1
tematic persecution by the KGB,
and the police. They waited for
two hours in the reception hall
without receiving even an ac-1
knowledgement of their petition.
As previous experience hat I
shown, there is only one way the
voice of the persecuted shall be
heard. This is for all people ot I
good will to firmly voice their
protest against this ethnic and
cultural persecution. Cultural or-
ganizations, religious com-
munities, unions of educators,
professional bodies, scientific and j
educational institutions must ex-
press their unequivocal support |
for the struggle of Soviet Jews.
Perhaps the recent campaign can
be abated or even stopped <
altogether.
Lodge your vigorous protest
against the stifling of Jewish
culture in the USSK with pourj
makers in your own country, and1
in all your contacts with Soviet
colleagues, whether in scientific
business or commercial inter-
actions, on an individual or insti-
tuional basis.
Can you stand idly by white
people is threatened will |
spiritual extermination?
(The above was written by
Professor Moshe Git terrain.
member of Professors for Soviet
Jewry at Tel Aviv University, If |
reel.)
IF YOU ARE INTERESTED [
IN WORKING WITH THJ,
SOVIET JEWRY TASi
FORCE ON BEHALF 0
SOVIET JEWS, PLE
CALL RABBI ALAN ft SHE*
MAN AT THE JEWISH |
FEDERATION, 832 2120.
Egyptian Officer in Israel
TEL AVIV (JTA) Egyptian Chief of Staff Lt
Gen. Abed Rab El-Nabi Hafez arrived in Israel at the
head of a delegation of senior military officers for a five-
day official visit. He is returning the visit to Egypt by I*
raeli Chief of Staff Gen. Rafael Eitan last December.
The arrangements for the visit are similar to th*
made for Eitan in Egypt. The Egyptian army leader w*.
visit an Air Force base, tour the production line ofthe{*
rael-designed Merhava tank, and will visit training bas
and talk to senior Israeli officials. Before returning honfc
the Egyptian delegation will be received by Defense Mi|
ister Ariel Sharon.


riday, February 26,1982
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 5
'amily Support Payments and Tax Savings
Through Charitable Reminder Trusts
By STANLEY HYMAN
Endowment Director
Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County
A recent article in this column
kiscussed diversion of income to
I family member in a low income
bracket as a technique for
aving income taxes. Generally
he family member is either a
hild or a parent in need of fi-
nancial assistance.
Many individual currently pn>
[ide financial assistance to par-
nts, who may have little income
|ue to extraordinary medical ex-
enses or poor planning. These
-eople providing this support are
Iften the same individuals who
hake regular and substantial
haritable contributions to or-
lanizations like the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
ounty. This article deals with
[iw those two current cash out-
lays (family support and charit-
Ible contributions) can be corn-
lined to result in a tax savings to
uch individuals.
An individual providing fi-
ancial assistance to a needy par-
nt generally provides that pay-
ent with after-tax dollars. If
his individual is in the 50 per-
ent marginal income tax bracket
vith a taxable income of about
42,500 dollars), he must earn
! dollars for every SI dollar of fi-
sncial assistance he wishes to
rovide. The low marginal in-
Dme tax bracket of the family
ember receiving the assistance
not utilized under that ar-
kngement.
A son providing $8,000 dollars
financial assistance to his
kther, must earn income of
II 6.000 dollars before taxes. If
Vome had been taxed directly to
he aged father, approximately
9,000 dollars of income would be
equired to provide the assistance
8,000 dollars. This is based
|P"ii an assumption that the
ther is in a very low bracket.
On the other side of the coin,
son providing the financial
fcssistance to his father, would
pve $1 dollar in income tax for
Very $2 dollars of qualified
charitable contributions he
makes.
A vehicle by which these two
cash outlays can be combined
(the assistance and the charitable
contribution) is the charitable re-
mainder trust. Charitable re-
mainder trusts were introduced
by the Tax Reform Act of 1969.
There are two types of charitable
remainder trusts; the charitable
remainder unitrust and the
charitable remainder annuity
trust. They have been previously
discussed in this column and will
be briefly desribed below.
A charitable remainder uni-
trust provides for the payment,
at least annually to the income
beneficiary, of a fixed percentage
of the net fair market value of the
trust assets. This fixed percent-
age must be at least five percent.
The amount payable each year is
determined by applying the fixed
percentage to the valuation of the
trust assets, which valuation is
determined on an annual basis.
Several alternative methods are
available in structuring the fixed
percentage payments. Each
income beneficiary must have
been alive at the creation of the
trust. The trust must be estab-
lished for a period not to exceed
20 years or for the life of the in-
come beneficiary or beneficiaries,
at the expiration of which the
trust terminates, with the accu-
mulated income and remaining
principal being paid to a desig-
nated charity or charities such as
the Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County. Additions to the
trust are permitted and the
federation can act as the trustee
if it has a beneficial interest in the
trust.
A charitable remainder an-
nuity trust is similar to the uni-
trust except that instead of a
fixed percentage, a sum certain is
provided which must be at least
five percent of the initial value of
the trust assets. With this type of
trust, there is no annual valua-
tion and no additions are per-
mitted. There are technicalities
which must be met for each type
trust with the annuity trust
being more complex in certain
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situations. Qualified attorneys
and accountants can make the
appropriate calculations, and
draw these instruments.
Use of either type of charitable
remainder trust usually entitles
the individual to a current charit-
able income tax deduction for the
remainder value of the trust. If
the individual establishing the
trust is not the income bene-
ficiary, gift tax and estate tax
consequences must be con-
sidered. The availability and
amount of the deduction is de-
pendent upon a number of
technical factors, including the
income payout schedule to the
non-charitable beneficiary; the
duration of the trust and the age
of the settlor, just to name a few.
As an example of the use of a
charitable remainder trust, let's
assume that the son providing
the support is age 45 and has
been providing $8,000 dollars per
year to his 65 year old father.
Also assume that the son is in the
50 percent marginal income tax
bracket. If the son establishes a
charitable remainder unitrust
with a contribution of $100,000
dollars under the terms of which
the father will receive nine per-
cent a year, based on an annual
valuation in monthly payments
for the remainder of his life, the
son will probably be entitled to a
current charitable contribution
deduction of about $38,000
dollars which will result in a
$19,000 dollars savings in federal
income taxes. By doing this, the
son has increased his disposable
after tax income by $3,500
dollars, because he now gives up
only $9,000 dollars per year
instead of $16,000 dollars,
resulting in a pretax savings of
$7,000 dollars and an after tax
savings of $3,500 dollars.
As the above example illus-
trates, a charitable remainder
trust is an effective vehicle by
which an individual can obtain a
current charitable contribution
tax deduction while at the same
time providing financial assist-
ance to a family member with
pre-tax dollars, and ultimately
benefiting his or her favorite
charity.
NOTE: This column is written as
a service to provide general in-
formation to the public about the
Endowment Program of the Jew-
ish Federation of Palm Beach
County. Information contained
herein is not designed as legal or
tax advice. You should take up
such matters with your respec-
tive attorneys and accountants.
Should you want additional in-
formation about charitable
giving, and the various methods
which may be utilized through
the Federation's Endowment
Program, please contact Stanley
I lyman, Endowment Director of
the Jewish Federation at 832-
2120.
FURNISHED COTTAGES
Catskill Mts., Sullivan Co., N.Y.
ADULT COMMUNITY
Pool, Rec. Hall, Near Golf
Rental and Co-op
(305) 962-5854
Attention
Israel Bond Holders
You do not help Israel by keeping your Israel
Bonds after maturity.
Israel must place the proceeds at the Chase
Manhattan Bank. Israel prefers you reinvest
your mature bonds into new bonds or file with
the Chase Manhattan Bank to collect your
principal plus interest.
For Information Call the
Israel Bonds Office
659-1445
The most respected name
in Jewish funeral service-
In the world
Not surprisingjt's River-
side, and there are many
reasons.
If you've ever worked with
any of our people on com-
munity projects ranging from
fund-raising drives for Israel
|to enhancing Jewish education,
you'd understand. If you've
iever experienced the compas-
sion and kindness of Riverside
counselors.you'd have an even
deeper appreciation of the
reasons for Riverside
leadership.
At Riverside, we have
the largest Jewish staff
available from any funeral
director in Florida. More
important, they are people who
understand Jewish tradition
and honor it.
They carry on a tradition
that for over three geherations
has been a priceless assurance
to Jewish families.
Our people. They make
(Riverside the most respected
name in Jewish funeral service
in the world.
The Largest Jewish Staff
In The World.
Carl Grossberg, President
Andrew Fier, Vice President,
New York and Past
President of the Jewish
Funeral Directors of
America.
Charles Salomon, Vice
President, New York.
In Florida:
Alfred Golden, Executive Vice
President.
Leo Hack, V.P., Religious
Advisor.
Sam Rosenthal
Kenneth Kay, V.P.
Keith Kronish, F.D.
Harvey Pincus, F.D.
Douglas Lazarus, F.D.
Carmen Serrano, F.D.
Robert Burstein
Arthur Zweigenthal
Isaac Nahmias
Samuel Gotland
Jules Fischbein
Elaine Gardner
Lena Rothfeld
Sonia Gale
Bernard Eilen
Charlie Blumkin
Ida Rosenberg
Barney Selby
Edward Dobin
Ralph Rubell
Guardian Plan Counselors:
Ira Goldberg, Manager
Steve Fischman
Joel Kay. i
Syd Kronish
Dick Sorkin
Joseph Bass
ADDRESSES:
MIAMI BEACH: 1920 Alton
Road (19th St.)/531-1151
NORMANDY ISLE: 1250
Normandy Drive/ 531-1151
MIAMI: 1717 S.W. 17th St.
(Douglas Rd.)/443-2221
NORTH MIAMI BEACH: 16480
N.E.19thAve./947-8691
HOLLYWOOD: 2230 Hollywood
Blvd./920-1010
FT. LAUDERDALE (Tamarac):
6701 West Commercial
Blvd. (E. of University Rd.)/
587-8400
WEST PALM BEACH: 4714
Okeechobee Blvd./
683-8676
Five chapels serving the New
York Metropolitan area.
RIVERSIDE
Memorial Chapal. Inc.; Furaral Dtractor*
Tradition. If s what makes us Jews.
Sponsoring tha Guardian Plan
_ Pre-ArranfedFunaral.


THgc-nr
I- -!- ~. r r>
Pag* 6
77ie Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, February
Judge Al Silverman and Mrs. Helen Schwartz discuss the "R" Game
which is a values clarification game created by Judges to develop mor-
al and legal reasoning activities. Members of the fifth grade at Jewish
Community Day School are part of a pilot project in values clarifica-
tion designed by a group of Judges. The creators of the program are
judges, social workers and educators. Judge Silverman, who served
for several decades on the Massachusetts' bench, is serving as a
volunteer facilitator of this program which will include, in addition to
classroom exercises, visits to the local courts.
Combining Health Education and Tzedakah. Almost 100 students of
the Hornstein-Jewish Community Day School participated in the
"Jump Rope for Heart" project of the American Heart Association.
The students raised several hundred dollars through pledges based on
their "Jumping for Heart." Currie Park, shown above, was jumping
with JCDS students at the Jump a thon held on Wednesday. Febru-
ary 10.1982.
Tu B'Shevat was observed at the Day School on February 8,1982 and
in a special program, shown above, at the Yiddish Culture Group at
Century Village. A highlight of the program was a Tu B'Shevat seder
which is a ceremony practiced in the Sephardic Jewish community
that has become popular in Israel. The seder program was coordinated
by Mrs. Rachel Stein and conducted by students in grades 7 and 8.
**&
#&

svc^-
UO*V'
*******
w$S

Former Mossad Chief Denies
Microphones Planted in U.S. Embassy
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Issa Harel, former head of
the Mossad and the Israeli
intelligence and security
services for the first 15
years of Israel's history,
has confirmed that it was
the Mossad which passed
on to U.S. intelligence the
details of Nikita Khrush
chev's famous 1956 speech
denouncing the previous
Stalin regime.
Israel has frequently been ru-
mored to have been the source
from which the Americans ob-
tained that important document,
but Harel's statement, in a week-
end interview in Maariv. was the
first official confirmation from
one of those involved.
The interview with Harel fol-
lowed reports last week in The
Washington Post of alleged de-
tails of Israeli intelligence activ-
ities against the U.S. and details
of the Israeli intelligence estab-
lishment.
HAREL SAID that during the
time he headed the Israel security
and intelligence establishment
(to 19651 there had been no plant-
ing of microphones in the U.S.
Kmbassv in Tel Aviv, and no at-
tempts had been made to "plant"
Israeli agents in the U.S. diplo-
matic mission or use female
agents to entrap American per-
sonnel and gain secrets from
them, as The Washington Post
had reported.
Harel said that since the CIA
had not disclaimed the document.
it must be presumed to be ant
cial CIA paper. But he
contained many inacci
The documents reference
Jewish "international networkl
could only be described as akinu
the notorious Protocols of the i
ders of Zion forgeries. Hard sail I
EXPERIENCE
A UN
PASSOVER
The DdCoronadO RMOrt, San DwgoCalrfornia
UoOti 01n Ko* suotrrmor, *X*x rov Upicrwo
T\s Passover enjoy a very special holiday at the injurious OH Coronaoo
I Hotel and Reson on the beach ^arauttrui San DmgaCattonvaQinAxtea
Seder servres Be name entertamnent Elegant Kosher gourmet maas
Detune hotel rooms and suites IWo netted pools. Acresofwtrte sandy oaacnei
Seven fully lighted terms courts Complete mm s and leoes spas Shopprtg
arcade CruUrens activities Full range of physical fitness ttctrtws for men anil
womer Close to Sin Oego major tourist attractms JaVW M ?
Av watf sports Cat js aoour out other 8 great ftlmd/td
Passovervacatcns Hesenanons (212) 9210291 Out nuMHimn
of NY too 2211000. m Los Angelas cat Haotn t*r 2"' r Srw
Butler(213)SSi906B Hem***. rr nox
Some kids would rather die
than bring home grades
like these. "^
In the next hour, 57 American
fads will try to fall themselves.
Many over problems that may
seem small to adults. But to
children, even little things
can be matters of life
and death.
Grades that weren't
quite high enough. A
broken date. A game
that wasn't won. One
more reason for feel-
ing they've failed to
measure up. To
others' expec-
tations. Or
their own.
Suicide is
the second
leading
cause of
death among
young people
But it's
preventable. If only
someone recognizes
the danger signals in time.
Sudden changes in eating
and sleeping habits Withdrawal from
fnends and activities. Becoming accident
prone. Talking about being "gone" or "better
off dead." The most dangerous sign of all is
making final arrangements giving away
favonte records, books or other treasured
possessions.
And don't think fads who talk about sui-
cide won't try it. They will.
As a parent, the most important thing
you can do is show you care
Ask your children about their feelings.
And listen to what they have to say Without
making judgments.
If you're concerned about self destruc-
tive behavior, call your local suicide
prevention, mental health or crisis center.
Professional counseling can help suiadal
children, and
their families, learn!
better ways of deal-
ing with problems.
One of the tragedies of youth suicide
is that children just don't always understand
That problems are temporary. And death
is permanent. They're not expenenced
enough to realize their options. So some d
them choose the way that should not be
an option at all. And some of them dont
live to regret it.
k
UBEBTTIM1TI0SAL
E INSURANCE OMPANY
BIRMINGHAM. ALABAMA
For a bee brochure on youth suiode and what you <* j
do to prevent it. write Liberty National. Advertising f
Dept RP. P.O Boa 261Z Birmingham. Alabama 3W* |


[iday, February 26,1982
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

From
Community Relations
Council
U.S.-ISRAEL
RELATIONS
I The current tension between
\e U.S. and Israel was a major
enum concern. In one of the
kneral sessions, Republican
fcnator Orrin G. Hatch of Utah
as sharply critical of many as-
cts of American Mid-East
r'licy, especially the severe U.S.
action to Israel's extension of
i\\ law to the Golan Heights,
lich he termed "perfectly
|stifiable" on Israel's part.
atch assessed the Reagan Ad-
|imstration's policy as "incon-
ktent" because of the contradic-
fin between Reagan's "feelings
the State of Israel" on the one
Ind, and a policy of promoting
Iser ties to the Arab world on
1 other, which Hatch traced to
loldover" government advisers.
IForeign policy exDert and au-
r Professor Robert W. Tuck-
who also addressed the
enum, discredited the Reagan
time's attempts at forging a
Itrategic consensus" against
[i\ id expansion in the Middle
ast. Tucker termed the U.S.
Strategic consensus" attempts
be in reality "a one-pillar
klicy centered in Riyadh".
Summary of National Jewish Community Relations
Advisory Council Plenum
Page 7
to Oil to Israel,
Britain Vows
LONDON (JTA) The
|iiish Government has made it
Tar that despite its mounting oil
>lus it has not changed its
Iky of refusing to sell North
S oil to Israel. Hamish Gray,
puty Energy Minister, told
Hutment Tuesday that there
p no special restriction aimed
Israel. However, Britain would
I oil only to fellow members of
i European Economic Com-
ply., to members of the Inter-
zonal Knergy Agency and to
K'f existing customers. This
pmalically excludes Israel.
Rather than an "evenhanded"
policy of cementing ties to both
Israel and so-called "moderate"
Arab states, Tucker saw recent
U.S. posture as one of increasing
pressure on Israel to accept Arab
demands.
ISRAELDIASPORA
RELATIONS
Two nat>onal leaders from
Chicago discussed "Israel-
Diaspora Relations" in a general
session. Raymond Epstein,
present NJCRAC Treasurer and
past CJF President, emphasized
the necessity of projecting a
public image of the American
Jewish Community's consensus
of support for Israel. While
agreeing on the importance of
maintaining the overall support
consensus, Rabbi David Polish,
past CCAR President, em-
phasirnrl the need to find proper
avenues for expressing construc-
tive criticism of particular
policies. Epstein concurred, if
such channels are discreet.
ANTI-SEMITISM
IN THE U.S.
A general-session panel
assembled to discuss whether
anti-Semitism in the United
States is growing or declining,
reached a striking consensus
that, despite a number of serious
but relatively isolated incidents,
anti-Semitism in America con-
tinues its long-term declining
trend. But the panelists also ex-
pressed serious concern about the
prominent use of the spectre of
anti-Semitism by national polit-
ical figures during the recent
A WACS campaign.
The panel, moderated by Al-
bert Vorspan, Director of the
Commission on Social Action o!
the Union of American Hebrew
Congregations, included Phil
Baum, Associate Director of the
American Jewish Congress; Dr.
Milton Himmelfarb, Director of
Information and Research Serv-
ices of the American Jewish
Committee; Justin Finger, Civil
Rights Director of the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B rith; and Dr. Lawrence Rubin,
Executive Director of the Phila-
delphia Jewish Community
Relations Council. Frieda S.
Lewis, President of Hadassah,
chaired the session.
While citing the long-term
decline in anti-Semitism, the
panelists also agreed that indi-
viduals within the Jewish com-
munity tend to perceive a rising
danger and level of anti-
Semitism, despite contrary sta-
tistical studies; and that con-
tinuing vigilance is needed since
the seeds of social discord are fer-
tilized by current domestic
trends.
REAGAN'S
NEW FEDERALISM
A renewed emphasis on do-
mestic social and economic con-
cerns marked the Plenum, with
particular attention paid to stra-
tegies responding to the Reagan
Administration's domestic pro-
grams. Two different approaches
to the Reagan tax plan, budget
cuts, and New Federalism were
presented in a general session
featuring American Jewish Con-
gress Executive Director Henry
Siegman, and ADL's National
Executive Committee Chairman
Kenneth Bialkin. Siegman called
for a frontal assault on the
Reagan programs, calling them
Photography Contest
The JCC invites amateur
photographers to enter its 3rd
annual 1.8. Rapaport Memorial
Photography contest. This local
contest is being held from March
8-25.
All photographs must be
original and the subject matter
depict some form of Jewish lifp
Cash prizes will be awarded.
Entries will be judged separately
for the two separate divisions.
Division A for the 10 to 15 year
old and Division B for the 16 to
21 year old.
Pictures must have been taken
after March 31,1981.
No special camera or brand of
film is required.
Please call Sara Glenn at 689-
7700 for entry forms and all
information concerning this spe-
cial event.
Woman Fighter Pilot Runs for Office
,IFA ~~ Women in political
should be no novelty in a
intry where Golda Meir served
I Prime Minister. Every Knes-
has a handful of women
ong its 120 members, but hav-
said that, we have rendered
I' U ally a complete account of
Vale participation in politics.
I the local and municipal front,
Vy enough, there have been
V two women who have head-
Itown councils, Mrs. Violet
pury. mayor of the Arab town
[Kfar Yasif; and Rebbetzin
13' Lwho for a short while
med the council in the country
Bge of Yokneam.
low for the first time comes a
F>us, fighting contender for
[post of mayor of Haifa. She is
|i Horn, a dashing, charismatic
onality whose background is
1 with the kind of material
Cn makes ideal political as-
I- Her mothers family is fifth
eration Israeli, from Safed.
I has already attained fame as
els first woman pilot of a
. f ift?" Durin the Suez
_0,/956. ahewasatthcon-
1 of on* of the planes which
e many sorties and dropped
troopers into the Mitla Pass.
JFTEB HER military service,
l"w for tw0 years as.com-
M pUorwkh Arkia-airiinea.'
I earned a degree in political
Pee and history at the He
* University, married a pro-
fessor of aeronautics at the Tech-
nion and raised a family of three
children: Dalit, the oldest girl, a
sergeant who instructed soldiers
in the army; Avraham Yair, a
member of a Nahal kibbutz; and
the youngest, Vered, who at the
age of 17 has already completed
four semesters at the Technion as
a whiz kid in applied mathe-
matics.
Yael has always challenged the
concept that this is a man's
world, and not only in the cockpit
of a plane. While still at high
school, in Gadna pre-military ac-
tivity, she was company com-
mander of a group of boys, aged
16. She was all of 17. Once in uni-
form herself, she volunteered for
the Air Force, and against all
precedents earned her wings.
Politics have not been strange
to her, since her husband, Prof.
Yosef Rom, is one of the rising
stars of the Likud in the Knesset.
Professionally, she heads the
Unit for Advancement of Stu-
dents at the Technion, cutting
red tape and easing the path of
new immigrants, dteadvantaged
and disabled students.
IN A CITY where the Labor
political machine has always been
in control of City Hall. Yael's
challenge for the chief post in the
municipality has galvanized local
politics. The elections are due to
be held in November, but she was
her first hurdle in March: she
must win the nomination of her
own party, and that may not be
easy. The concept of a woman
mayor is difficult for some Is-
raelis to swallow, even for those
who know that Chicago and San
Francisco, among other cities,
have had no such prejudices.
Yael has blue eyes, short sandy
hair, and speaks with energy. She
is fluent in English. She has firm
ideas about the kind of adminis-
tration the city of Haifa needs.
Despite the fact that Haifa is the
country's center of heavy indus-
try, has the biggest port, and the
most beautiful location of all, it
has drifted into a passive accept-
ance of a role as a provincial
town, she says.
The city needs an aggressive,
spirited-leadership, one with vi-
sion and imagination, one which
will imbue its own citizens with
an espirit de corps and a pride in
their town. Technically, there is
talent and ability in the munici-
pal ranks, she adds; but direction
and inspiration have been lack-
ing.
WILL* SHE be a feminine
mayor, with the soft and tender
touch, or an aggressive fighting
administrator? \Ve asked her.
Sex characteristic* haye nothing
to do with iWfthilfeplfed. Ability
to function fs what counts1, and
both policies and methods should
be determined on the basis of
principles of administration.
simply "Reaction." He asked the
Jewish community to totally
reject the Reagan policies, ter-
ming "Reaganomics" a "betrayal
of the poor," and the Reagan
New Federalism "budget cutting
through block grants." Bialkin
voiced regret over the social serv-
ices cuts, especially those that
threaten programs the Jewish
community has been involved in.
But rather than an ideological
confrontation, Bialkin recom-
mended a pragmatic program-by-
program response by the Jewish
community which would empha-
size defense of specific priority
programs and needed services.
SOVIET JEWRY CRISIS
The present virtual shut-down
in Jewish emigration from the
Soviet Union, and the deep des-
pair among Soviet Jews, mark
the present "terrible times" for
the Soviet Jewry movement, the
Plenum was told by Theodore R.
Mann, immediate-past NJCRAC
Chairman, and present Chairman
of the National Conference on So-
viet Jewry. Mann's remarks were
made in a general session asses-
sing the role played by the
United States government on
behalf of Soviet Jewry. He
positively evaluated the role of
the Reagan regime, saying
"given the very poor relations
between the U.S. and U.S.S.R.,
this Administration is doing just
about everything it can do on be-
half of Soviet Jews" ... the
United States simply has no
leverage at this time," Mann as-
serted. But Mann went on to say
that "the real test of this Admin-
istration's willingness to act to
save Soviet Jews has not yet
come.
State Department spokesman
Dr. Richard E. Combs, Deputy
Director of the Department's Of-
fice of Soviet Union Affairs, also
spoke at the Plenum session on
Soviet Jewry, but his remarks
were off the record.
ASSAULT ON
THE BILL OF RIGHTS
American Bar Association
President David Brink joined us
in a general-session assessment
of the impact of 32 proposals now
before Congress that would strip
federal courts of jurisdiction, or
power to grant remedies, on
issues such as abortion, school
prayer, and desegregation
busing. Brink agreed that these
proposals were an "assault on the
Bill of Rights,'" posing a "Consti-
tutional crisis" and a "challenge
(to) our Constitution, our
separation of powers and our
very system of government."
David Saperstein, Co-Director
and Counsel of UAHC's Reli-
gious Action Center, shared the
platform, surveying some of the
specific proposals now before
Congress that were broadly
referred to by Brink. He called on
the Jewish community to resist
the court-limiting measures.
PLIGHT OF
ETHIOPIAN JEWRY
The difficut, delicate, and po-
tentially devisive topic of the
plight of Ethiopian Jewry was
chosen by Bennett Yanowitz as
the focus of his Chairman's ad-
dress. I le warned that the Falas-
has face "annihilation," and
called for continuing coordinated
and concerted efforts to save
them. "When it comes to saving
lives, we expect unity," Yanowitz
said, as he cited the NJCRAC
Committee on Ethiopian Jewry's
role in bringing together all
concerned with saving Ethiopian
Jews. Yanowitz read a telegram
to the Plenum from Israeli Prime
Minister Begin, which pledged
"utmost" and "devoted efforts"
to "bring home all our Falasha
brethren."
In the Plenum's closing ses-
sion, "How World Jewry Collec-
tively Meets Its Responsibility
to Vulnerable Jewish Communi-
ties.' session panelist Yehuda
Avner, Special Adviser to the
Prime Minister, detailed the Is-
raeli government's role on this
dangerous and difficult, highest-
priority issue. The panel, which
also included World Jewish Con-
gress' Executive Director Israel
Singer, and Canadian Jewish
Congress' Executive Vice Presi-
dent Alan Rose, described how
individual Jewish communities
across the world come together to
jointly assess issues of common
concern and determine appro-
priate response on an individual
level.
KOSHER
THE FULL LINES OF
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Empirel os!ier
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& Foods
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Miami Beach (305)672-5800
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Hialeah (305) 624-5750
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The delicious, nutritious Noah's Ark
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Moms and kids go for Zooroni two by two! Kids think Zooroni
looks as great as it tastes. And since Zooroni is vitamin-
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tangy cheese, Moms love to pair up with it, too!


Page8
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Fndy. February 26, i
Organizations hi The News
B'NAI B'RITH
WOMEN
B'nii B nth Women. Menorao
Chapter No. 1496 will meet Tues-
day. March 9 at the American
Savings Bank at Westgate. Bou-
tique hour 12:30 p.m. An inter-
esting program is planned.
Scheduled Trips:
Mar. 1-6: New Orleans. Chris
Owens Show, tour of city, Dixie-
land Jazz evening.
Mar. 21: Sunday. Flea Market at
Millers.
Mar. 24: Wednesday, Ever-
glades, dinner, airboat ride, bus.
Apr. 4: Sunday, "Side by Side"
at the Stage Theatre. Dinner-
Show.
Apr. 18: Orient trip, 23 days,
visiting Tokyo. Kyoto, Taipei,
Bangkok. Penang, Hong Kong,
Honolulu.
Apr. 26-29: Las Vegas. Royal
Poinciana Hotel.
May 8-10: Mother's Day Week-
end, Tampa and St. Petersburg.
May 19: Wednesday. Miami
Theatre. "Evita," transporta-
tion.
May 16-30: Italy, visiting Rome.
Florence. Venice, Milan, Siena,
Bay of Naples.
For information, call Ruth Ru-
bin or Lillian Cohen.
Installation of new officers will
be held at a meeting on Tuesday,
March 30. at the First Federal
Bank of Delray. Boutique hour
noon to 1 p.m. Refreshments ser-
ved.
HADASSAH
Tikvah Chapter of Hadassah
West Palm Beach events are as
follows:
Mar. 3: Burt Reynolds Dinner
Theatre snowing "Robber Bride-
groom." Price includes lunch and
transportation. Call Frances
Rose or Regina Parnes.
Mar. 15: Hadassah s 70th Birth-
day. Regular meeting at Anshei
Sholem 1 p.m. Boutique at noon.
Purim celebration and entertain-
ment by "Tikvah Players" who
will present "The Purim Shpiel-
ers" for your fun and enjoyment.
Mar. 25: Musical "Side By Side
By Sondheim" at the Stage Com-
pany Theatre (Clematis Street) 2
p.m. Call Frances Rose or Regina
Parnes.
Mar. 28: (Sunday) Hadassah
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Education Day at Anshei Sholem
1 p.m. Guest speaker will be Rose
Matzkin, past president National
Hadassah.
Mar. 30: Donor luncheon at The
Breakers Hotel. Entertainment
by Habima Players. You still
have an opportunity to attain the
lithograph donated by Edna Hi-
bel. world renowned artist, in
memory of Myra Ohrenstine's
husband. Joe. in support of Ha-
dassah Cancer Research. Call
Martha Fein or Pauline Flaxman.
Drawing at Donor luncheon on
March 30th.
Apr. 4: Hadassah Bond Function
at Temple Israel 2 p.m. to honor
all Hadassah Chapter presidents.
Speakers and entertainment.
Yovel Chapter of Hadassah
events are as follows:
Mar. 11: Yovel Board Meeting at
American Savings 9:30 a.m.
Mar. 18: Yovel Regular Meeting
at Anshei Shalom 12:30 p.m.
Jewish Music Month. Music by
Fannie Ushkow. Seventieth
Birthday of Hadassah.
Mar. 17: Royal Family luncheon
and show at Royal Palm Dinner
Theatre. Chairman. Essie Gold-
berg; co-chairman, Sylvia Dia-
mond. Leaving West Gate at
10:30 a.m.
Mar. 28: Education Day present-
ed by Hadassah Chapters at An-
shei Shalom 1 p.m.
Mar. 30: Donor luncheon at
Breakers Hotel. Speaker. Terry
Rapapport. Hibel drawing.
Note: Change of Dates
Apr. 1: Board meeting. Place to
be announced.
Apr. 4: Three Chapters of Ha-
dassah participating in Bond
Function at Temple Israel at 1
p.m. Speakers and refreshments.
Apr. 18-21: Lido Spa. An ex-
hilerating week-end with Yovel
ladies. Call Man. Rodd or
Dorothy Segelin.
Apr. 29: Regular Meeting at An-
shei Shalom 12:45 p.m.
Lake Worth Chapter will cele-
brate the 70th Anniversary of
Hadassah at the Sabbath Service
on Friday. March 5. 8 p.m. in
Temple Beth Sholom. 315 North
A St.. Lake Worth. The complete
service will be conducted by the
Board Members, the Cantorial
Service will be sung by Goldie
Bernstein and the Chapter Choir.
Terry Rap pa port. Florida Central
Region President will deliver the
sermon.
Sylvia Mass. Chapter Presi-
dent invites the entire commun-
ity to honor us at this most un-
usual celebration. The Oneg Sha-
bat (refreshments) will be spon-
sored by the Chapter. For further
information, please call.
LABOR ZIONIST
ALLIANCE
The Labor Zionist Alliance
Poale Zion annual Purim Pro-
gram for the Israel His tad rut will
be held Wednesday. March 3rd at
1 p.m. in the American Savings
Bank Building at the West Gate
of Century Village on Okeechobee
Blvd., West Palm Beach.
Homentashen and coffee will
be served. Seating is limited. Re-
servations are necessary. Contact
Mollie Falik or Abe Paster.
INTERXATIOtAL T0L RS
:
PIONEER WOMEN
Golda Meir Club
March 11th Rummage Sale.
Military Trail. Saleable items are
needed as well as volunteer sales-
ladies. Donor credit. Call Selma
Rind.
A regular meeting will be held
on Wednesday, March 17th.
Nomination of officers. For a fun
afternoon, please bring saleable
items only to be auctioned. Fund
raising.
Thursday. March 18th a lunch-
eon and card party will be held at
"Kristines." Call Selma Rind for
reservations. Donation $7.50.
Door prizes.
Regular meeting will be held
Wednesday, April 21. Election of
officers. Dr. Robert Alsofrom will
be the guest speaker.
Seats are still available for the
Burt Reynolds Theatre.
"Shenandoah," Wednesday,
June 2. Call Bea Cohen for reser-
vations.
YIDDISH CULTURE
GROUP
The Yiddish Culture Group of
Cresthaven will hold its annual
Purim luncheon on March 10 at
noon in the Dudley Auditorium
at Cresthaven. There will be a
book review by Helen Witt and
Herbert Ricci. orchestra leader,
will entertain at the piano. All
members are welcome.
The Yiddish Culture Group of
Century Village will hold a pro-
gram on March 2nd of Yiddish
Culture which will feature the
Yiddish Culture Chorus in a ser-
ies of songs in Yiddish, Hebrew
An-nell
HOTEL
Strictly Kosher
3 Full Course Meals Daily
Mashgiach and
Synagogue on PRemises
TV Live Show-Movies
Special Diets Served
Shopping
Washington Ave.
Passover/Seders Here
700 EUCLID AVE.
MIAMI BEACH
Community Relations Council Speakers available
Topics Israel, Community Concerns, Soviet
Jewry, Energy, Holocaust
For information and bookings, contact
Rabbi Alan R. Sherman's office
at the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County. 832-2120
and English. Seventy men and
women blending their voices in
harmony under the direction of
Mildred Birnbaum with Dorothy
Goldberg accompaning.
Concert pianist Helen Bern-
stein will be guest artist.
On March 9th Yiddish Culture
presents a Purim program. This
program features the lyric so-
prano voice of Lydia King who
has appeared in opera, on Broad-
way, on television and radio.
Miss King will sing songs from
around the world and will take up
the entire program. Her piano ac-
companist will be Rose Herman.
The March 16th program of
Yiddish Culture will celebrate our
12th anniversary of continuous
programs in Century Village. We
will present The Ruth Hyde
Group in an original contata
written by Lee Duchin entitled *A
Musical Tribute to Yiddish Cul-
ture." The group consists of Ann
March, vocalist, Jack Zucker-
man. baritone and Ruth Hyde
musical directress at the piano.
Lee Duchin will narrate the con-
tata.
Joseph Levy, whom we all en-
joy listening to will read briefly.
Morris Goldberg who has m
peared for us before to great t
claim will sing in Yiddish, EW
hsh and Hebrew, accompanied,
the piano by Dorothy GoldW
(no relation).
On March 23rd Yiddish Mi
ture presents Lou Young, viola.
ist and member of the Baron*
Group accompanied by jgZ
Feinberg on piano.
The ever popular Betty Steb> I
berg Tell, who is a delight to
hear, will read for us.
The fine singing group of Fa> \
nie Ushkow, who is director ni
accompanist will perform for
in conjunction with Sylvia FriaJ.
lander and her dancing group.
Please take note that M
March 30th program of The Yid-!
dish Culture Group will ufc
place in the party room at 1:30!
p.m. due to circumstances be-
yond our control this change bad
to be made. The program willfea-
ture The Lyric Trio, consistingol
Max Lubert, vocalist. Beatrix
Kahn. cellist and Mildred Bin>*
baum on piano.
Samuel Shutzer, our 93-year-
old elder statesman will read for
IT'S THE COFFEE THAT'LL
MAKE EVERYONE THINK YOU DID
WHEN YOU DIDNT!
The rich ground aroma and fresh perked taste
makes Maxim*the coffee any busy balbusta
would be proud to serve. Especially with the
strudel. Or, the Honey cake. Or the lox n
bagels. Or whenever friends and mishpocheh"
suddenly drop in. Maxim? the 100% freeze
dried coffee that'll make everyone think you
took the time to make fresh perked coffee
when you didn't!
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CERTIFIED
'KOSHER


Friday, February 26,1982
and David Altaian who plays
! concertina quite well will play
us accompanied by Ethel
fhilips on the piano.
WOMEN'S AMERICAN OUT
ORT Day is the beginning of
ie annual membership cam-
iign for Women's American Or-
anization for Rehabilitation
rough Training. "The gist of
.e problem which ORT had to
ce was always the same: What
, do with the young people who
tust be vocationally trained un-
abnormal conditions? What
do for men and women of 30,
), and even 50 years old, whodo
at want or cannot return to their
ome countries and to their old
jfessions? Will the right to live
denied to them? Will they
ave to accept charity until the
nd of their days?"
The ORT schools comprise a
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 9
giant international school system
which operates in some thirty
countries. One hundred thousand
students annually learning nine-
ty trades in over 800 training
units are more than mere statis-
tics. They represent people gain-
ing education and future careers
in computer technology, avionics,
hotel management and much
more. There are different courses
for different people with different
needs: pre-vocational, appren-
ticeship, physically handicapped
adult training, factory schools,
high schools, engineering insti-
tutes, etc., etc. ORT is educating
people for the year 2000.
Women's American ORT needs
the support of people who care as
we care, who want to know who
we are and what we do. Ours is
the highest form of charity, to
help people to help themselves.
ORT Day in the North Palm
Beach County Region of Wom-
en s American ORT will be cele-
brated at the Donor Luncheon, to
be held at the Hyatt of the Palm
Beaches, Wednesday, March 3 at
noon. Mrs. Frances Rubin, Dis-
trict Donor Chairperson, will be
the guest speaker. A musical pre-
sentation will entertain the
ladies, following the luncheon.
r
For Advertising
call Susan
at 734-3222

^ iV,
IS. Ambassador Samuel Lewis (center) views the America-
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Page 10
Page 12
The Jewish Fbridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, February
.
.
Jewish Community Center Senior News
The Jewish Community Cen-
ter, Comprehensive Senior Serv-
ice Center, receives funds from a
Federal Grant, Title 111 of the
Older Americans. Act, awarded
by Gulfstream Areawide Council
on Aging, and the Florida De-
partment of H.R.S. enabling us
to provide transportation for the
transit disadvantaged as well as
a variety of recreation and educa-
tional services.
Transportation is available to
the transit disadvantaged in our
designated area. Call 689-7700 for
information.
Programs For The Week
Round Table Talk for Men
Timely Topics for Thinking
Women Joe Greenberg and
Sylvia Skolnik, group leaders,
Tuesday 1 p.m.
Speakers Club Morris
Shuken, president, Thursday 10
a.m.
Adult Community Education
Classes School Board of Palm
Beach County
Winter program Adult Com-
munity F.ducation classes are
now in session. The following
classes are open:
Psychology for Everyday
Living Mondays 1-3 p.m.
Living With Your Ailments
Tuesdays 10-11:30 a.m.
Dancercise in The Chairs for
Men and Women Wednes-
days 1-3 p.m.
Lip Reading Wednesdays 4-
5:45 p.m.
We are sorry that Oil Painting
and Writers Workshop classes
are closed at this time.
There is no fee for any of the
Adult Community Education
classes. Everyone is invited to
attend.
Other Classes
Joy Through Movement An
extension class at Poinciana.
Lake Worth. Call Ceil Golden.
964-1455, instructor, for informa-
tion.
Tax Counseling It's that
time of the year again. Tax Coun-
seling for the elderly, a special
program that provides free tax
aid and advice in preparing your
Federal Income Tax Return, is
again available through the JCC.
Rosalyn Ram: Volunteer Tax
Counselor. Call Rhonda Cohen
for information.
Coming Events
Lido Spa Trip Mar. 28-31,
Sunday to Wednesday.
Cost Members Single
$140 Double $125; Non-mem-
bers Single $150 Double
$135; Transportation is $13
round trip.
Call Sam Rubin or Rhonda
Cohen 689-7700.
Defensive Driving "55 and
Alive" A licensed defensive
driving class, with instructor,
Paul Oblas, provided through
AARP, will be held on Mondays,
Mar. 15 and 22 from 9 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. Persons insured by
Colonial Penn or Prudential will
be granted a 10 percent discount
on their auto insurance premium
upon completion of the two ses-
sions. Pre-registration is required
plus a $5 fee for instructional
material check to be made out
to AARP. Call the JCC for
further information 689-7700.
Investing for Beginners A
three series class, Mar. 10,17,24,
10 a.m., instructor, Irving
Deutsch, registered investment
representative. Learn how to
evaluate which investments are
good for you.
Elderhostel Information Day
Mar. 8, 1:30 p.m. Listen to
former Elderhostel students and
leaders. Learn how you, too, can
participate in this dynamic and
fun experience and meet new
friends.
Sam and Rose Kanars, former
participants of the Elderhostel
program have been Line and
Dance instructors at Skidmore
College for the last two years and
have been asked to teach at
Ithaca College this summer,
well, will be speaking alone,
several other experieiJl
hostelers.
Purim, A Time for Fun and Games
The Jewish Community Center
invites the community to come
and enjoy its annual Purim
carnival, Sunday, Mar. 7, from 2
to 4 p.m.
There will be booths of games
and prizes for all the children to
enjoy. A very special magic show
and clown plus a variety marion-
ette show will be offered for addi-
tional enjoyment.
A costume parade will be held
and a prize for the best costume
of the day will be given.
Hot dogs, drinks and haman-
tashen, the traditional baked
treat associated with Purim, will
be available for purchase.
Come one come all for an^l
ternoon of fun and games. Cm
689-7700 for additional inforn|
don.
Saudi Urges U.S.
Pressure Withdrawal
GENEVA (JTA) P^i
Saud Al-Faisal, the Foreign Ms I
ister of Saudi Arabia, has urnj
Western European leaders A
contribute toward peace in tM
Middle East by helping to secunl
Israel's withdrawal from all t*n> I
tories it occupied in 1987 and by I
supporting Saudi Arabia's eight-1
i point plan."
JCC-CSSC
Theatre Event
"On Golden Pond," a play for
all ages that must be seen by
everyone. The CSSC invites you
to join the theatre goers on
Thursday, Mar. 11 to attend the
2 p.m. matinee at the Stage Com-
pany of the Palm Beaches. Con-
tribution including transporta-
tion is $9. Prepaid check con-
firms your reservation. Call Sam
Rubin or Rhonda Cohen at 689
7700.
1981-82
Jewish Federation/UJA
Campaign
Calendar of Events
JEWISH
FEDERATION
OF PALM BEACH
COUNTY
March 21
April 18
Women's Victory Gala
Women's Division Phone-A-Thon
^/JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
2415 Okeechobee Blvd. W. Palm Beach 689-7700
GENERATION TO GENERATION
'GENERATION TO GENERATION"
TV SHOW
FEATURING:
"JEWISH COMMUNITY YOUTH COUNCIL AS A DYNAMIC FORCE FOR TEENAGERS"
WITH HOSTESS BARBARA WEINSTEIN
AND
IDA MAY ALWEISS, DEMONSTRATING HAMANT0SHEN
AND
BARYL THE PUPPET CELEBRATING PURIM
Don't miss it! Saturday, Feb. 27
6:30 a.m. on Channel 12


jday, February 26,1982
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 13
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
[WASHINGTON
'A) Egyptian Presi-
|nt Hosni Mubarak
:lared that after Israel's
thdrawal from the Sinai
25, Egypt will in-
ase the normalization of
lations between the two
intries. "After Apr. 25,
will continue to build
jidges of understanding
(d friendship with the Is-
:'li people," he told a
icheon at the National
sss Club before leaving
lashington. "This policy
Irreversible."
fhe 53-year-old Egyptian
esident added that "in fact, the
ipletion of Israel's withdrawal
[m the Sinai will open the door
more interaction between
^ptians and Israelis. It signals
removal of another psycho-
{ical barrier on the road to full
ace."
[Ml HAH A K. in his speech, the
Tlv major address of his four-
visit here, called the
(iiestinian problem the "core" of
Middle East conflict and
lain urged the United States to
en a dialogue with the Pales-
lians.
I Mi' said that Egypt is com-
Itted to the Camp David peace
jocess and will continue to pro-
ote "a negotiated settlement
klween Israel and all its Arab
tinhliors" as well as seek an
(uonomy agreement for the
alestinians on the We-;t Bank
kd the (iaza Strip.
Hut Mubarak cautioned
jainst rushing to come out with
declaration of principles" on
|itonomy simply to say there is
i agreement. "A bad agreement
much worse than no
reement," he declared. He said
hat in order for an agreement to
ve "a chance of being im-
lemented" it must be accepted
the Palestinians.
Normalization to Increase After Apr. 25Mubarak
"WE ARE not suggesting that
we should seek their (the
Palestinians) prior approval
before we agree on a declaration,"
Mubarak explained. "We are
simple saying that all sides
should bear in mind throughout
the negotiations that their
purpose is to attract other Arab
parties to the peace process."
Mubarak's remarks at the
luncheon were similar to those he
made earlier to 25 American Jew-
ish leaders with whom he met for
an hour at Blair House. Both Ed-
gar Bronfman, president of the
World Jewish Congress, and
Howard Squadron, chairman of
the Conference of Presidents of
Major American Jewish
Organizations, said that
Mubarak stressed to the Jewish
group his "firm" commitment to
the Camp David process as the
only way to achieve autonomy
and a comprehensive peace
Gotham's Koch Takes
ON UNatlons Hypocrisy
UNITED NATIONS A
United Nations spokesman said
here that a statement made by a
UN official criticizing Mayor Ed-
ward Koch for his proposal to
alter the inscription on the Isaiah
Wall across from the UN, was
"unauthorized" and that discipli-
nary action will be taken against
him. The spokesman added, how-
ever, that Secretary General
Javier Perez de Cuellar has
decided to put off a luncheon ap-
pointment with the mayor in an
apparent expression of displea-
. sure over Koch's criticism of the
world organization.
Incensed over the anti-Israeli
resolution adopted by the Gener-
al Assembly, which called for the
total isolation of Israel for its an-
nexation of the Golan Heights,
Koch said that he has been
"reading the Bible," in search for
an acceptable phrase to be added
to the Isaiah Wall, that would
indicate the "hypocrisy, immor-
ality and cowardice" of the UN.
agreement. "There is no other
road," the Egyptian President
was quoted as saying.
Squadron said that Mubarak
maintained the same policy on
the Palestinians as did his late
predecessor. President Anwar
Sadat. Mubarak believes the
Palestinian problem should be
solved in conjunction with
Jordan through some kind of
confederation. Squadron said
that the one major confrontation
during the meeting was over
Jerusalem. He said that he
stressed that the American Jew-
ish community has strong
feelings that Jerusalem should
remain united under Israeli
sovereignty.
SQUADRON said they did not
argue the point because they
were not there to negotiate but
only to express their views on
various issues. He said the Jew-
ish leaders were "very favorably
impressed" by Mubarak.
In his discussion of the Pales-
tinians in his press club address,
Mubarak said that before the
Palestinian question appeared in
the 1940s, "there was no dispute
between Arabs and Jews"
because "Moslems and Chris-
tians of the Middle East never
had any problems coexisting with
their Jewish neighbors."
He said, therefore, the
Palestinian problem has to be
solved even though it can be done
in stages. "This is the philosophy
of the Camp David approach,
which remains the most valid
mechanism for a comprehensive
settlement."
"The starting point of such
phased solution should be mutual
acceptance and recognition.
When we talk about mutual
recognition, we have in mind the
recognition of the rights and not
institutions or organizations."
Community Calendar
February 26
Hadassah BatGurion 10 a.m.
February 28
Hadassah Chai 12:30 p.m. B'nai B'rith No. 2969- 10 a.m.
Jewish Community Day School Cocktail Party Flagler Museum
7 p.m. Temple Beth David Cocktail Party Tanglewood
Clubhouse.
March 1
Temple Emanu-EI Board 9:45 a.m. B'nai B'rith No. 3016 -
Board 3 p.m. Congregation Anshei Sholom Board 9:30
am Women's American ORT Lake Worth West Board 9:30
am Jewish Community Day School Board 8 p.m. Temple
Beth El S.sterhood Board 7:30 p.m. Temple Beth David Men's
Club 8 p.m. Temple Israel Sisterhood Board 10a.m.
March 2
Congregation Beth Kodesh Sisterhood Hadassah Tikvah -
Board 10 a.m. Hadassah Henrietta Szold Board 1 p.m.
Bna, B'rith No. 3132 7:30 p.m. American Jewish Congress -
if 30 p.m. B'nai B'rith Women Chai Board 8 p.m. B'nai
r,]h Women Medina Open Board Women's League of Is-
rael Noon Pioneer Women Cypress Lakes -Boord 10 a.m.
'emple Beth El Board 7:30 p.m. Temple Israel Men's Club -
winner Meeting B'nai B'rith No. 3041 Board 3 p. m.
March 3
Notional Council of Jewish Women Palm Beach Board 10
m Luncheon Breakers Noon Jewish Community Center -
T!\, 8 P m- Pioneer Women Ezrat 12:30 p.m. Temple
ootri Sholom Sisterhood 1 p.m. Temple Beth Sholom Men's
^od-Board -7:30 p.m. B'nai B'rith No. 3113 Board-8 p.m.
"omen s American ORT North Palm Beach County Region -
RlKiMcc.mm' 9:3 am FEDERATION WOMEN'S DIVISION -
usiNESS AND PROFESSIONAL DINNER MEETING 6 P.M.
March 4
adasson Chaj Board ,0 Q m Women<$ American ORT -
iPuroi" 8 P m Pionr Women Theodore Herzl 1 p.m. -
Had" h HadaMah Palm Beach County Board 10 a.m.
ORT^n Bal ^urion Board 10 a.m. Women's American
. N I h Palm Beach County Region Donor Luncheon Hyatt
o go01 Counc'l of Jewish Women Okeechobee Unit Board
B'r ik ui m Women'* American ORT Century Board B'nai
m om8n Ohav 1 p. m. Pioneer Women Golda Meir 1
lla i "an University Reception Evening Home of Lee
I. FFrl* Jew'*h Home for ,n A9d Board of Trustees 4:30 p.m.
I rtutRATIQN BUDGET AND AlinrATIONS COMMITTEE 7:30
|PM
Mubarak said. Much of the
second part of Mubarak's speech
was taken up with the need for
development of Egypt and other
Third World countries.
MUBARAK SPOKE of
Kygpt's hopes for increased
United States economic aid, an
issue that was a major focus of
his visit here, his first since being
elected President last October.
When a question was raised
about the high percentage of
United States foreign aid that
goes to Israel and Egypt,
Mubarak replied that Israel is
rich, while Egypt is a poor
country. He said that while he
was not calling for decreasing aid
to Israel, he hoped more aid
would be going to Egypt.
Mubarak revealed that Egypt
is sending arms and ammunition
to Iraq to help Iraq fight its war
with Iran, but he said he would
not send troops. He called for the
two countries to solve their diffi-
culties peacefully, declaring that
they should "come to the end of
the war," adding that they
should look to what war does to
the peoples of their countries.
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Page 10
,_-!.__ .* r
Page 14
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, February 26, lgg
Synagogue News
CONGREGATION
BETH KODESH
Of Boynton Beach
On Friday, February 5, Rabbi
Avrum L. Drazin, following ser-
vices, installed the 1982 Board of
Directors and the Congregation
Officers.
Board of Directors:
Nathan Allweiss. Miriam Ap-
pelbaum, Max Chuka, Murray
Chuven, Werner Hanstein, Jacob
Katz, Nicholas Lenovits, Philip
Leventhal, Jack Berliner, Joe
Linsenberg, George Lichtman,
Ben Pike, Louis Reiser, Abe Sil-
Massachusetts Senator Paul E.
Tsongas will be the guest speaker
at the State of Israel Bonds Na-
tional Dinner being held on
March 7 at the Breakers Hotel in
Palm Beach. The dinner is being
held in honor of Samuel Haus-
man, the New York Founder
Chairman of the Mediterranean-
Dead Sea Canal.
verglate, Sam Weiss, Isidore
Weissman, Jack Wiener and Ar-
chie Zacks.
Congregation Officers:
President, George Pasternack:
1st Vice-President, Irving I.
Koch; 2nd Vice-President. Harry
Haselkom; Secretary, Anne
Bein; Treasurer, Ben Katz; Fi-
nancial Secretary, Aaron Golden;
and Executive Director, Maurice
Klinger.
After Rabbi Drazin's delightful
commentary and blessings to the
installed officers, all congregants
partook of a festive Oneg Shabat.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID
On Friday evening, Feb. 26th,
Temple Beth David of Northern
Palm Beach County will hold its
regular Shabbat service at 8 p.m.
Guest speaker, Elsie Leviton, will
discuss "The Effects of the New
Federalism On the Jewish Com-
munity." Ms. I^eviton serves as
Chairperson of the Community
Relations Council, of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach Coun-
ty and is a member of the Nation-
al Executive of NJCRAC. She
has been studying the implica-
tions of budget cuts and other as-
pects of the "New Federalism"
for the Jewish community, both
locally and nationally. These im-
plications, and her predictions for
future directions, will form the
basis for discussion. The congre-
gation currently meets at the
Westminster Presbyterian
Church, Military Trail and Burns
Road, Palm Beach Gardens. All
are welcome.
TEMPLE ISRAEL
The Sisterhood of Temple Is-
rael will meet on Monday, March
15th at noon in Schwartzbere
JEWISH FAMtlY AND CHILDREN'S SERVICE
An outstanding professional and counseling agency serving the
Jewish community of Palm Beach County. Professional and con-
fidential help is available for
Problems of the aging
Consultation and evaluation services
Marital counseling
Parent-child conflicts
I Personal problems
Private Offices:
2411 bkeechobee Blvd.
West Palm Beach, Fla. 3340
Telephone: 684 1991
Moderate fees are charged in family and individual counseling to
Those who con pay (Fees are based on income and family size)
The Jewish Family and Children's Service is a beneficiary agency of
the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County.
Hall of the Temple at 1901 North "
Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach.
Lunch will be served.
While the Daily Press covers
events in the Middle East little
attention is given in regard to the
American-Jewish relations on
this score. Edith Grant, program
chairperson, will introduce Mr.
Ruby Lefkowitz, an outstanding
speaker. He is a graduate o'
Columbia University, involved in
Jewish Community life. He is
trying to win support of all im-
portant organizations Jew and
Non Jews regarding the Mid-
dle East, working with AIPAC"
the American Israeli Affairs
Committee, of which he is a
member, trying to bring a mes-
sage across to the American peo-
ple in regard to the American-Is-
raeli relations.
Prior to the luncheon, there
will be a study hour at 10:30 a.m.
chaired by Rabbi Howard Sha-
piro and Anne Blicher.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
The Sisterhood of Temple
Emanu-El extends an invitation
to a petite luncheon and meeting
on Monday, March 15 at 12:30
p.m. in the Temple, 190 North
County Road, in the Lona Wer-
shaw Social Hall to all members.
Mrs. Valerie Aspinwall, owner
and program director of Station
WPBR. 1340 A.M., will speak on
a variety of interesting topics.
ANSHEI SHOLOM
Sisterhood of Anshei Sholom
will hold a Board Meeting on
Monday, March 1st at 9:45 a.m..
and its Regular Meeting on Tues-
day. March 16th at 1 p.m. when
Rachel Potack will speak on
"Faith."
The Sisterhood of Congrega-
tion Anshei Sholom offers a
musical program ushering in
Purim on Sunday, March 7 at 8
p.m. A presentation of "We
Three" will take place, consisting
of Rosalie Williams, Dorothy Go-
lin and Tony Nicodema, accom-
panied by Pauline Cohen on the!
piano. Tickets are going fast. Call
Bessie Hoffman for further infor-
mation.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
The Sisterhood of Temple Beth
Sholom, Lake Worth, will hold its
regular meeting at 7 p.m.
At 8:30 p.m.. we will have the
pleasure of hearing Watson B.
Duncan, III, who will give a book
review on "Moving Pictures The
Memoirs of a Hollywood Prince,"
by Budd Schulberg. Refresh-
ments will be served.
On March 7th, the Sisterhood
of Temple Beth Sholom, Lake
Worth, will have a deli-dinner
and card party, commencing at 6
p.m., in the Social Hall. Donation
is $5. Come and win a door prize.
Reservations may be made by
calling Lee Bernstein.

Synagogues in
Palm Beach County
Orthodox
Aitz Chaim Congregation Century Village
W. Palm Beach Phone: 689-4675 Sabbath services 9 a.m. and 5
p.m. Daily services 8:15 a.m. and 8:30 p.m.
Congregation Anshei Emuna
551 Brittany L, Kings Point, Delray Beach 33446 Phone 499-7407 or
499-9229 Harry Silver. President Daily services 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.
Saturdays and Holidays 9am
Reform
Temple Israel
1901 North Flagler Drive. West Palm Beach 33407 Phone 833-
8421 Rabbi Howard Shapiro Dr. Irving B. Cohen, Rabbi
Emeritus Dr. Richard G. Shugarman, President Stephen J. Gold-
stein, Administrator .Sabbath Services, Friday 8 p.m.
temple Beth El of Boca Raton
333 S.W Fourth Avenue, Boca Raton 33432 Phone 391-
8900 Rabbi Merle E. Singer Cantor Martin Rosen Sabbath ser-
vices Friday 8:15 p.m. Saturday 9:15 a.m. Torah Study with Rabbi
Singer Sabbath morning services 10:30 a.m.
Temple Sinai
at St. Paul's Episcopal Cnurch, 188 S. Swinton Ave., Delray*
Mailing address 2005 N.W. 9 Street, Delray Beach, 33444 Rabbi
Samuel Silver President, Bernard Etish Friday services at 8:15
pm Temple Beth Torah
at St. Davkfs In the Pines Episcopal Retreat Forest Hill Blvd. and
Wellington Trace, West Palm Beach. Mailing addrees:1125 Jack Pine St,
West Palm Beach 33211. Rabbi Edward Conn, Cantor Nicholas FenaM,
President Ronnie Kramer (793-2700). Sabbath service, Friday at 8:15p.m.
Temple Judea
Rabbi Joel L. Levine Cantor Rita Shore Barbara Chane.
President 1407 14th Lane, Lake Worth, Fl. 33463 Phone 985-
7778 Services Friday evenings at 8 p.m. Meeting at St.
Catherine's Greek Orthodox Church Social Hall 4000 Washington
Rd. at Southern Blvd. .___________________________
BENJAMIN S. HORNSTEIN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL OF
THE JEWISH COMMUNITY DAY SCHOOL OF
PALM BEACH COUNTY
a limited number of applications are being accepted
for the
1981/82 School Year
PRE-SCHOOL THROUGH GRADE 8
Accredited by the Florida Council of Independent Schools
Mordecai Levow
Director
Dr. Howard B. Kay
President
2815 N. Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach, Florida
Telephone 832-8423/4
NEW CAMPUS: 5801 Parker Avenue, Watt Palm Beach, Florida
A beneficiary agency of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
Conservative Liberal
Temple Eternal Light
at Boca West Community UMC, 8900 Boca West Glades Road (1 mile
west of Boca Turnpike) The Free Synagogue. P.O. Box 3, Boca
Raton 33432* Phone: 368-1600, 391-1111 Rabbi Benjamin Rosayn
Sabbath services, Friday at 8:15 p.m.
Conservative
Golden Lakes Temple
1470 Golden Lakes Blvd.. W. Palm Beach. Fl. 33411 Rabbi Joseph
Speiser Phone 689-9430 President, Samuel Eisenfeld.
TemDle Beth El
2815 North Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach 33407. Phone 833 0339.
Rabbi Howard J. Hirsch. Cantor Elaine Shapiro.
Shabbath Evening Service at 8:15 p.m. in
The Sanctuary. Saturday murmng at 9:30 a.m. Daily Minyan at 8:15
a.m., Sunday and Legal Holidays at 9:00a.m.
Congregation Anshei Sholom
5348 Grove Street. West Palm Beach 33409 Phone 684-3212 Office
hours 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Rabbi Harry Z. Schectman Cantor Mordecai
bpektor Services daily 8:30 a.m. and 5.30p.m. Friday. 8:30 a.m.. 5
p.m. late services 8:15 p.m. followed by oneg Shabbat Saturday. 8:30
a.m., 5p.m. Mincha followed by Sholnsh Seudos.
Congregation Beth Kodesh of Boynton Beach
at Congregational Church, 115, N. Federal Hwy., Boynton Beach'
Phone 737-4622 Rabbi Avrom L. Drazin Sabbath services, Friday
8:15 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m.
Temple Beth Sholom
315 N. -A" Street, Lake Worth 33460 Phone 585-5020 Rabbi
Emanuel Eisenberg Cantor Jacob Elman Services Mondays and
Thursday at 8:15 a.m., Friday at 8:15 p.m. Saturday at 9 a.m.
Temple Beth David
at Westminister Presbyterian Church. 10410 N. Military Trail, Palm
Beach Gardens. Office at 321 Northlake Blvd.. North Pl>"
RuhPeT:M5"1134,Rabbi WiUiM1 Marder Cantor Earl J.
nackort Sabbath services. Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m.
>. u... Temple Beth Sholom
224 N.W. Avenue G\ Belle Glade 33430 Cantor Jack Stateman
Sabbath services, Friday at 8:30 p.m.
Temple B'nai Jacob
at Faith United Presbyterian Church, 275 Alemeida Drive, Palm
Springs 33461 Temple B'nai Jacob. President Jacob Frant Phone:
964-0034 Sabbath services, Friday at 8 p.m. Saturday at 9 a.m. Mon-
days and Thursdays at 9 a.m.
urn..,,.,, B'nai Torah Congregation
1401 n.w. 4th Avenue, Boca Raton 33432 Phone: 932-8566 Rabbi
Nathan Zellzer Sabbath services, Friday 8:15 p.m. Saturday 9:30 a.m.
wJ&flEm,th of ,ry Hebrew Congregation
bTk o At,anllc Avnue. Delray Beach 33446 Phone: 498-3536
Maooi Bernard Silver Cantor Benjamin Adler Sabbath services,
r-naay at 8 p.m., Saturday at 9 a.m. Daily Mlnyans at 8:48 a.m. and 5
ion whk o Temple Emanu-El
Rabhi f,L^Knt)' Rotd- Palm Beach 33480. Phone: 832-0804
F^dav.V?L a2'2,C*n,0f **Ui Dardashtl Sabbath services,
rnoaj at 8,30 p.m. Saturday at 9 a.m.
Temple Beth Zion
S52r9e2 C*m*"t r" ***' P"m B#aeh-Friday nl9W 8 P'm *
BMBW


Friday. February 26,19g2
The Page 15
lave you made plans yet for this Saturday Night? Why not indulge
ourself in disco dancing, desserts, liqueurs, and a chance to win a trip
Israel the tax deductible contribution to the Banjamin S. Horn-
lein Klementary Day School of the Jewish Community Day School
till benefit our children. Bruce Sutka is staging the affair at the Flag-
Ir at 8:30 p.m. For information, call 832-8423, or tickets may be pur-
hased at the door.
PAN AM 2 for 1
Coupons
Spouse or Child Flies Free
to
Call 13 Countries
1588-1652 540.00
FULL PASSOVER SEDER
6:30 P.M., Wed., April 7,1982
Officiating Rabbis:
Rosaynoble and Cantor and Instruments
Boca Raton Sheraton Hotel Ballrooms
I-95 at Glades Road
Until April 1,1982: $25.00 per person
RESERVE EARLY PLEASE.
For Information:
498-4995 421-1111
391-1111368-1600
^necks to: Temple Eternal Light (The Free Synagogue)
PO Box 3, Boca Raton, Fla. 33432
Most Arabs Support Us
Can't Say So, Mubarak Tells Leaders
NEW YORK
Egyptian President Hosni
Mubarak told Jewish
leaders that most Arab
states "support the Camp
David accords but can't say
so," the World Jewish Con-
gress reports.
Mubarak's disclosure came
during the course of a lengthy
private meeting in Washington
on the final day of his official vis-
it to the United States. Blair
House was the site of the meeting
between Mubarak and the dele-
gation of national Jewish leader-
ship comprised of members of the
World Jewish Congress
Executive and the Conference of
Presidents of Major American
Jewish Organizations.
Edgar M. Bronfman, WJC
president, opened the meeting
with introductory words of
welcome for the Egyptian presi-
dent: "The Jews of the world are
one in their support of Camp
pavid," Bronfman told
Mubarak.
HOWARD Squadron, chair-
man of the Presidents' Confer-
ence noted that American Jews
were united on three matters:
Camp David had provided a long
period of peace and its continua-
tion was expected regardless of
| progress in the Palestinian
autonomy talks; there was con-
cern that there should be no mis-
understanding between Israel
and Egypt over the autonomy
talks: and the commitment of
American Jews to a unified Jeru-
salem under Israeli sovereignty
was unshakeable.
In response, Mubarak reaf-
lirmed unwavering support for
(amp David, noting that 'the
treaty was between two states
and not two persons." He added
that both Israel and Egypt were
respecting their commitments
under the treaty but asked for
patience from those who would
"hurry things along." Continu-
ing, he asked that Apr. 25, the
date of final Israeli withdrawal
Irani Sinai, not be made a "big
issue," stressing that the com-
mitment of Egypt to the peace
process would be the same "after
as before."
Mubarak said the the Pahd
Plan was "good" but dismissed it
as only a "draft."
"Who's going to fulfill it?" he
asked. He repeatedly emphasized
that the only document to which
both Israel and Egypt were
committed was the Camp David
treaty.
HIS PRIOR experience of
negotiations with Prime Minister
Begin over the Sinai had led
Mubarak to believe that nego-
tiations concerning the Pales-
tinians would be arduous but
ultimately successful. th'
Temple Judea
Reform Temple of the Palm Beaches
Presents
U
A Song & A Dance"
A Song
A Popular music concert
by our own
Cantor Rita Shore
A Dance
You'11 dance to
the music of the
BUI Wink Trio
March 6 at 8 P.M.
Rosarian Academy
$10 Donation per person
Ticket Information
966-7778
Egyptian leader said. He ex- not to provide internal Egyptian
plained the necessity of insuring opposition anv ammunition for
that all Sinai territory abultin, criticism: "One meter can make
the Gaza Strip be returned, so as (treat tougles.' he observed.
Israel Bonds to Hold
Prime Ministers Reception
Gerald lusher, General Chair-
man for the Palm Beach Israel
Bond Society, has announced
that he and his wife Leimomilani
will host a Prime Ministers Re-
ception on Peb. 27 in their home.
LcsIht also announced Dan
I'attir, Press Secretary to Israel's
Prime Minister Menachem Be-
gin, will attend the reception.
Pattir was a member of the
first Israel delegation to the
Cairo Conference in December
1977. He accompanied Begin to
meetings in Egypt and Washing-
ton DC. leading up to the
signing of the Camp David peace
treaty.
Pattir was named to the post of
Counselor for Media and Public
Affairs by former Prime Minister
Yitzhak Rabin in 1975 and was
reassigned to the post by Begin
in 1977.
Dan Pattir, Press Secretary to
Israeli Prime Minister Menachem
Begin.
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Page 16
7%e Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
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Full Text
riday, February 26,1982
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
amily Support Payments and Tax Savings
Through Charitable Reminder Trusts
Page 5
By STANLEY HYMAN
Endowment Director
Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County
A recent article in this column
liscussed diversion of income to
i family member in a low income
bracket as a technique for
aving income taxes. Generally
|he family member is either a
hild or a parent in need of fi-
nancial assistance.
Many individual currently pro-
ride financial assistance to par-
jits, who may have little income
|ue to extraordinary medical ex-
enses or poor planning. These
ople providing this support are
tften the same individuals who
nake regular and substantial
haritable contributions to or-
ganizations like the Jewish
federation of Palm Beach
pounty. This article deals with
nw those two current cash out-
ays (family support and charit-
able contributions) can be com-
bined to result in a tax savings to
luch individuals.
An individual providing fi-
jncial assistance to a needy par-
Int generally provides that pay-
ent with after-tax dollars. If
|his individual is in the 50 per-
ent marginal income tax bracket
vith a taxable income of about
|42,500 dollars), he must earn
! dollars for every $1 dollar of fi-
lancial assistance he wishes to
rovide. The low marginal in-
ome tax bracket of the family
ember receiving the assistance
not utilized under that ar-
angement.
A son providing $8,000 dollars
If financial assistance to his
Bther, must earn income of
116,000 dollars before taxes. If
come had been taxed directly to
aged father, approximately
|9.000 dollars of income would be
equired to provide the assistance
If $8,000 dollars. This is based
Ipon an assumption that the
Bther is in a very low bracket.
On the other side of the coin,
son providing the financial
Issistance to his father, would
ave $1 dollar in income tax for
very $2 dollars of Qualified
charitable contributions he
makes.
A vehicle by which these two
cash outlays can be combined
(the assistance and the charitable
contribution) is the charitable re-
mainder trust. Charitable re-
mainder trusts were introduced
by the Tax Reform Act of 1969.
There are two types of charitable
remainder trusts; the charitable
remainder unitrust and the
charitable remainder annuity
trust. They have been previously
discussed in this column and will
be briefly desribed below.
A charitable remainder uni-
trust provides for the payment,
at least annually to the income
beneficiary, of a fixed percentage
of the net fair market value of the
trust assets. This fixed percent-
age must be at least five percent.
The amount payable each year is
determined by applying the fixed
percentage to the valuation of the
trust assets, which valuation is
determined on an annual basis.
Several alternative methods are
available in structuring the fixed
percentage payments. Each
income beneficiary must have
been alive at the creation of the
trust. The trust must be estab-
lished for a period not to exceed
20 years or for the life of the in-
come beneficiary or beneficiaries,
at the expiration of which the
trust terminates, with the accu-
mulated income and remaining
principal being paid to a desig-
nated charity or charities such as
the Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County. Additions to the
trust are permitted and the
federation can act as the trustee
if it has a beneficial interest in the
trust.
A charitable remainder an-
nuity trust is similar to the uni-
trust except that instead of a
fixed percentage, a sum certain is
provided which must be at least
five percent of the initial value of
the trust assets. With this type of
trust, there is no annual valua-
tion and no additions are per-
mitted. There are technicalities
which must be met for each type
trust with the annuity trust
being more complex in certain
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situations. Qualified attorneys
and accountants can make the
appropriate calculations, and
draw these instruments.
Use of either type of charitable
remainder trust usually entitles
the individual to a current charit-
able income tax deduction for the
remainder value of the trust. If
the individual establishing the
trust is not the income bene-
ficiary, gift tax and estate tax
consequences must be con-
sidered. The availability and
amount of the deduction is de-
pendent upon a number of
technical factors, including the
income payout schedule to the
non-charitable beneficiary; the
duration of the trust and the age
of the settlor, just to name a few.
As an example of the use of a
charitable remainder trust, let's
assume that the son providing
the support is age 45 and has
been providing $8,000 dollars per
year to his 65 year old father.
Also assume that the son is in the
50 percent marginal income tax
bracket. If the son establishes a
charitable remainder unitrust
with a contribution of $100,000
dollars under the terms of which
the father will receive nine per-
cent a year, based on an annual
valuation in monthly payments
for the remainder of his life, the
son will probably be entitled to a
current charitable contribution
deduction of about $38,000
dollars which will result in a
$19,000 dollars savings in federal
income taxes. By doing this, the
son has increased his disposable
after tax income by $3,500
dollars, because he now gives up
only $9,000 dollars per year
instead of $16,000 dollars,
resulting in a pretax savings of
$7,000 dollars and an after tax
savings of $3,500 dollars.
As the above example illus-
trates, a charitable remainder
trust is an effective vehicle by
which an individual can obtain a
current charitable contribution
tax deduction while at the same
time providing financial assist-
ance to a family member with
pre-tax dollars, and ultimately
benefiting his or her favorite
charity.
NOTE: This column is written as
a service to provide general in-
formation to the public about the
Endowment Program of the Jew-
ish Federation of Palm Beach
County. Information contained
herein is not designed as legal or
tax advice. You should take up
such matters with your respec-
tive attorneys and accountants.
Should you want additional in-
formation about charitable
giving, and the various methods
which may be utilized through
the Federation's Endowment
Program, please contact Stanley
llyman, Endowment Director of
the Jewish Federation at 832-
2120.
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ageiU
Page 4
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, February 26. iJ
Jewish Floridian
FrwJS'TOClWI
of Palm Baach Coonty
Combining Out Vorea ana FaoatH>n RapOflai
FREDK SMOCHET SUZANNE SMOCMET RONNI TARTAKOW
Ediloc and PutXianat Eiocutrea Editor News Coordinator
Pubhsnad Wtity Octobaf mtougn MM May Bi Weakly oalanca ol yaai
Second Claaa Postaoa Paid at Boca Raton. Fia USPS1068030
PALM BEACH BOCA RATON OFFICE
2200 N Federal Mwy Suite 208. Boca Raton. Fia 33*32 Phone 358-2001
Mainpttice & Plant 120 N E filti St Miami Fia 33101 Phone 1 373-*805
l address change to Mat Mfet PO. Boa oi asn. Mam. Ra JJioi
Advertlalnfl Superrtaor Stacl Lmm< I
Combined Jewish Appeal-Jewish Fedeiation ol Palm Beach County Inc O'ticers President Jean
ne Levy, Vice Presidents Alec Engelstem. Arnold J Mottman. Or Richard Shuoarman Barbara
Shulman. Mortimer Weiss. Secretary. Barbara Tanen. Treasurer. Aim Wiiensky. Executive Director
Nor-r-jn J Schimeimen Submit material lor publication to Ronni Tartaow Director ol Public
Reiat ona
Jewish Floridian does not guarantee Kashruth o' Merchandise Advertised
SUBSCRIPTION Rates Local Area 14 Annual |2 Year Minimum V X\. or Dy membership Jewish
Federation ot Palm Beach County. 501 S Flagier Dr. Wesl Palm Beach Fia 33401 Phone
8322120
Is Jewish Culture Being Finally
Exterminated In The USSR?
Union is forbidden to
Friday. February 26.1982
Volume 8
3 ADAR 5742
Number 9
ORT's Spring Campaign
The Southeastern Florida Region of Women's
American ORT will be holding its official ORT Day
1982 kickoff function on Mar. 3. Purpose is to launch
the organization's 1982 spring membership cam-
paign.
This is a program well worth noting. Today,
Women's American ORT (Organization for Re-
habilitation Through Training) has over 145.000
members in 1,250 chapters from coast-to-coast.
Founded in 1880, ORT has an annual student enroll-
ment of some 100,000 in over 800 schools worldwide.
Only last week, the job of providing industrial
retraining for many of Britain's three million un-
employed was given in nomination to a World ORT
administrative committee chairman. As head of the
British government's Manpower Services Com-
mission, David Young will be taking on a task that
Britons know full well his ORT experience qualifies
him for beyond the shadow of a doubt.
ORT's more than centurv of service in the cause
of helping people help themselves through vocational
training is the watchword of this organization. Its
spring membership campaign richly deserves an un-
qualified success.
Begin, Peres in War of Words
Over Soviet Jewish Problems
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Premier Menachem Begin
and Labor Party Chairman
Shimon Peres are engaged
in a war of words over the
issue of Soviet Jewry and
Israel's handling of the
problem.
It started with a statement by
Peres last week that the Likud
government was "not Zionist"
because it paid insufficient at-
tention to the plight of Soviet
Jewry and that immigration to
Israel had dropped to an all-time
low. Instead. Peres said, the
government had pushed for a
pact with the U.S. to line Israel
up solidly against the Soviet
Union and thus reduced the
chances of the USSR allowing
further emigration.
Peres was referring to the
memorandum of understanding
on strategic cooperation that was
signed by Defense Minister Ariel
Sharon and U.S. Defense
Secretary Caspar Weinberger in
Washington last November.
BEGINS OFFICE responded
with a statement that Peres did
not know what he was talking
about, but adding that the true
facts were too secret to be pub-
lished. "The true information
cannot be divulged even to refute
a false accusation," the Premier's;
statement said.
The Labor Party responded by
describing Begins reply as
"crude. This is a wild and
haughty style characteristic of
Begin. He applies to the country
at large the same objectionable
habits with which he runs
Herat."
The Herat leadership there-
upon denounced the Labor
Party's "abusive style." saying
that when it had nothing of
substance to say it resorted to
mud-slinging and personal abuse.
Seminar for Palestinians at UN
Will Emphasize People's Rights
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS (JTA) A North American
Seminar on the rights of the Palestinian people will be
held at the United Nations from Mar. 15 to 19. The semi-
nar was organized by the UN Secretariate at the request
of the General Assembly in a resolution adopted last Dec.
10.
ACCORDING TO an announcement, seven panels
will discuss various aspects of the Palestinian question,
including the Palestinian issue and North American pub-
lic opinion, the fundamental rights of the Palestinians and
the nature of the Palestine Liberation Organization.
Invitations to attend the seminar have been sent to
all governments, the announcement said. In addition,
participants will be drawn from among academics and
others interested in the Palestine question. The seminar
at the UN will be one of a series of seminars on the Pales-
tine question to be held in various parts of the work! dur-
ing 1982-83.
From
Soviet Jewry Task Force _
Community Relations Council
On the morning of October 14,
1981. Moscow police broke into
and searched the apartment of
Pavel Abramovich, who has been
refused an emigration visa for the
past 10 years. Teaching aids,
more than 70 books, including
even a Russian edition of the
Bible, were confiscated. Three
other teachers of Hebrew were
similarly treated on the same day
The previous day. October 13,
KGB investigating officer
Filatov threatened Pavel Abra-
movich as well as Yuli Kosha-
rovsky (whose visa application
suffered a similar fate) with im-
prisonment for "paid agents" .
"we will incarcerate you here in
the USSR for another 25 years
for your misdemeanors"
promised Filatov .
In Odessa. Nepomiashchy,
Kofman and Semelman were
warned and threatened with
arrest and trial if they would per-
sist with their subversive Hebrew
teaching activities .
Criminal proceedings have
been started in Sverdlovsk
against Shefer and Yelchin for
"anti-Soviet activity'' involving
the study of Hebrew, listening to
Hebrew language broadcasts and
reading the bi-weekly "Israel
Today" Brailovsky in Mos-
cow. Kislik in Keiv. Paritsky in
Kharkov were selected as ex-
amples and put on trial and
punished because they were the
centers of Jewish cultural ac-
tivity in their respective towns.
Deputy head Zinchenko of the
Moscow office of OVIR. the visa
department of the Office of the
Interior, informed V. Magarik on
September 26 that exit permits
previously granted to him and
his daughter had been revoked.
Magarik is thought to have been
associated with Jewish sports ac-
tivities .
The students who study
Hebrew are picked up by plain-
clothes men separately and
closely interrogated. Typical
questions are: "Why are you
learning Hebrew?," "Are you a
Zionist agent?," "Do you know
that your teacher is a social para-
site and an anti-Soviet propa-
gandist?" Then, the students are
flatly warned that if they will not
cease their study of Hebrew they
will never leave the USSR (for
those who have applied to
emigrate), or they will find them-
selves dismissed from their work
(if they have not applied). .
What are the motives behind
the sudden new wave of cultural
persecution? Why is the Soviet
system hounding these people?
Their only crime is their desire to
acquaint themselves with their
culture, the language of their
forefathers which lies at the root
of Jewish culture, history and re-
ligion. Some of these people are
1 preparing for the repatriation to
Israel, whereas others would be
content to preserve their subcul-
ture and identity while remaining
in the USSR.
The Soviet regime has been
fighting the Hebrew language
since 1917, never legitimizing it
or granting it recognition. Before
the 1917 October Revolution
"bourgeois" Russia accommo-
dated many Hebrew journals,
newspapers and books. Hebrew
was studied at many institutions
of higher learning, by both
Gentiles and Jews. The present-
day drive towards the sup-
pression of Hebrew studies is in
fact leading to the total ex-
termination of Jewish culture in
the USSR.
Nobody is deceived by the illu-
sion of the freedom of Jewish
culture nurtured by the Soviet
authorities in the so-called Jew-
ish autonomous region in Biro-
bidzhan, where the few thousand
Jews are in any case a minority
and have no cultural facilitv. The
very few publications in Yiddish
do not satisfy aspirations
towards a Jewish culture based
on Hebrew, the language of the
Bible and the lingua franca of
World Jewry today.
One cannot say that Hebrew is
absolutely forbidden in the
USSR. No, it is studied in uni-
versity and non-Jewish theo-
logical seminaries in Moscow,
I-eningrad. Tbilisi. Zagorsk. But
Hebrew remains forbidden to
Jews whose native language it is!
For a cultural group to have to
argue for its right to study the
language of its choice seems a
ridiculous requirement in the free
world. The Jews of the Soviet
Union have been deprived of this
basic right. Yet, the present-day
persecution of Russian Jews by
the regime is all the more cynical
as it is in violation not only of
international conventions signed
by the USSR but also of the
internal laws of the Soviet Union.
On June 2, 1962, the USSR
ratified the Convention on the
Straggle Against Discrimination
in the Sphere of Education,
adopted by UNESCO, whose
Article 5 states, in particular:
1. The States consider that for
persons belonging to national
minorities the right to conduct
their own educational work, in-
cluding direction of schools and
. .use or teaching their own lan-
guage must be recognized.
Article 27 of the Covenant on
Civil and Political Rights,
adopted unanimously by the UN
in 1966 and ratified by the USSR
in October 1973, emphasized the
special significance of language:
"In those states in which
ethnic, religious or linguistic
minorities exits, persons
belonging to such minorities shall
not be denied the right in the
community with other members
of their group to enjoy their own
culture, to profess their own reli-
gion or to use their own lan-
guage. "
This natural right is empha-
sized again in the documents of
the Helsinki Conference on
Security and Cooperation in
Europe and subsequent meetings
in Belgrade and Madrid.
In addition to the international
convention signed by the Soviet
Government, the right of Jews to
study Hebrew is a direct con:"
sequence of domestic legal pro-
visions. Article 36 of the 1977
Soviet Constitution guarantees
Soviet citizens of different na-
tionalities "the possibility to use
their native language and the
languages of other peoples of the
USSR." This argument is sup-
ported by Article 45 of this
Constitution, which gives "the
opportunity to attend a school
where teaching is in the native
language" and by the provision
of "facilities for self-education."
As is well known, Soviet news-
papers publish only those articles
which are approved by the Soviet
authorities. In this connection let
us mention two statements,
namely that "any citizen may
learn and teach whatever lan-
guage he prefers" iPravda, 17-3-
72) and that "no-one in the Soviet
""'
language including HebreV!
Yiddish' (/i>esfia. 24-12-76) t
These promise seem clear
unambiguous; however
Soviet authorities do not ah,,-
practice hat they preach Eva
before the recent crackdown Z\
Soviets tried to prevent the stud,
of Hebrew, impeded the oW
but ion and reception of textooob
and teaching aids, charged it-
Hebrew teachers with "so^S
parasitism." entered their hon*
while Hebrew lessons were
progress and took the names d I
students, and so on.
The situation, however, h*j|
become much more desperate a I
the last few months. On the one
hand all indications point to (
concentrated Soviet effort to!
stamp out Hebrew and Jewish!
culture within the Soviet Union. I
There is no doubt that the I
Soviets intend to carry through
and succeed in this program. Oi
the other hand, Jews hawj
recently also had the channel d f
emigration for realizing their |
cultural ambitions virtually eli-
minated by the Soviet author-
ities. Only about 100 families
were allowed to leave last month,
a mere ten percent of the number
in previous years. Thus you can
neither leave the USSR nor
remain there as a Jew!
On Monday, October 12, 1961 |
more than 100 Moscow Hebrew
teachers and their students went
to the Supreme Soviet j
(Parliament) to present a letter
complaining about the sys-
tematic persecution by the KGB j
and the police. They waited for
two hours in the reception hall
without receiving even an ac-
knowledgement of their petition.
As previous experience his I
shown, there is only one way the
voice of the persecuted shall be
heard. This is for all people of
good will to firmly voice their
protest against this ethnic and
cultural persecution. Cultural or-
ganizations, religious com-
munities, unions of educators,
professional bodies, scientific and
educational institutions must ex-
press their unequivocal support
for the straggle of Soviet Jew-
Perhaps the recent campaign can j
be abated or even stopped
altogether.
Lodge your vigorous protest
against the stifling of Jewish
culture in the USSK with policy
makers in your own country, and'
in all your contacts with Soviet
colleagues, whether in scientific
business or commercial inter-
actions, on an individual or insti-
tuional basis.
Can you stand idly by whflei
people is threatened n
spiritual extermination?
(The above was writtea by
Professor Moshe Gittennan,
member of Professors for Soviet
Jewry at Tel Aviv University. I*
rael.)
IF YOU ARE INTERESTS
IN WORKING WITH THJ,
SOVIET JEWRY JA
FORCE ON BEHALF' W
SOVIET JEWS. PLE**
CALL RABBI ALAN R SRW
MAN AT THE JEWISB
FEDERATION, 832 2120.
Egyptian Officer in Israel
TEL AVIV (JTA) Egyptian Chief of Staff 1*1
Gen. Abed Rab El-Nabi Hafez arrived in Israel at the
head of a delegation of senior military officers for a five-1
day official visit. He is returning the visit to Egypt by I* <
raeli Chief of Staff Gen. Rafael Eitan last December.
The arrangements for the visit are similar tojtWj
made for Eitan in Egypt. The Egyptian army leade/p'j
visit an Air Force base, tour the production ^.*t!L
rael-designed Merhava tank, and will visit training b**"
and talk to senior Israeli officials. Before returning bon*
the Egyptian delegation will be received by Defense M"r
ister Ariel Sharon.


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