Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
8 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 28, 1975)-v. 8, no. 40 (Dec. 17, 1982).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Jan. 2, 1976 called v.2, no. 22, but constitutes v.2, no. 1.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: July 28, 1978 called no. 14 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement; Aug. 25, 1978 called no. 16 in masthead and no. 17 in publisher's statement; Aug. 10, 1979 called no. 15 in masthead and no. 16 in publisher's statement; Oct. 22, 1982 called no. 31 in masthead and no. 32 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44607504
lccn - sn 00229550
ocm44607504
System ID:
AA00014311:00005

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)


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Full Text
T of Palm Beach County
Combining "OUR VOICF and "FEDERATION REPORTER"
in conjunction with The Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
ime 8 Number 6
Palm Reach, Florida Friday, February 5,1982
FnaShochel
Price 35 Centa
rilbert and Chepenick to Co-Chair Florida Federation Conference
iNDO, FL Bette Gil-
Palm Beach and Lois
of Jacksonville have
minted to chair the Asso-
[of Florida Federations
nee scheduled for April
ne Orlando Hilton Hotel
nee.
incement of the ap-
|nt was made by James
President of the South
federation and Chairman
1 Association of Florida
jns.
mference is designed to
ether Jewish communal
om throughout Florida
the numerous issues of
|to Jewish communities
Bette Gilbert
on the local, national and over-
seas scene.
Sponsored in cooperation with
the Council of Jewish Federa-
tions, the conference will include
a number of plenary sessions as
wi-11 ns small group workshops.
Hot to Gilbert, who was re-
cently inducted into the B'nai
B'rith Women's Hall of Fame,
was the first woman to hold the
post of President of the Palm
Ftooch County Federation. She
has served as Chairman of the
Federation Community Planning
Committee and helped develop
Federation-Agency guidelines.
Currently serving as President of
the Southeast Federation of
Temple Sisterhoods which en-
compasses five states, she has
also been a member of various
m
4>
%
Former President Carter to
Speak At National UJA
'aim Beach Dinner On Feb. 18
[ork,January 29) Former President Jimmy Carter will address hundreds of
I Jewish community leaders at the first United Jewish Appeal National Palm Beach
ebruary 18 at The Breakers Hotel in Palm Beach.
Ing the announcement, UJA National Vice Chairman, Alan L. Shulman, of Palm
used Carter's "intensive efforts in bringing about an end to the state of beligerency
kxisted between Israel and Egypt for more three decades. President Carter never
(n his belief", continued Shulman, "that despite all the risks, he could bring the two
[together so that future generations would no longer be ravaged and decimated by
N of war. We are delighted that the former President will be with us at this outstan-
It, and we look forward to an analysis of Middle Eastern events as seen from the
[?..*."e wno nas occupied our nation's highest office. In these difficult days," said
'it is important that Jews from the intire country who winter in the Palm Beach
ell as those who are year-round residents come togather to show a solid commitment
the people of Israel, Jews around the world and here at home"
it is being held in cooperation with the New York U J A/Federation of Jewish Philan-
|and the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County. Cecil N. Rudnick of New York
leinz Eppler of Palm Beach are associate chairmen for the dinner.
Statewide committees and has
chaired sessions at past General
Assemblies of the Council of
.Jewish Federations.
Lois Choponik. who will co-
chair the April 2-4 Statewide
conference, recently led a UJA
mission to Israel nnd is Chairman
of "Operation Breakthrough," a
big gifts development program
for the Jacksonville Jewish
Federation. She is currently a
Federation officer and past Cam-
paign Chairman of the Women's
Division and Past President of
Jacksonville OUT.
Persons interested in attending
the Association of Florida
Federations Conference are in-
vited to contact their local Jewish
Federation for additional
registration information.
Federation Completes
1981 Allocation to UJA
Jeanne 1-ovy. President of the
.Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County recently announced that
the Federation has completed
forwarding its 1981 commitment
of $'2,024,000 as payment in full
of its total allocation to the
United Jewish Appeal.
Mrs. Levy commented,
"critical need for cash by the
Jewish Agency in Israel has
prompted this Federation to
accelerate the flow of much
needed cash from our local
<< nunupitv U> help the Agency
carry out its res|Kinsibilillu for
human services in Israel. My
heart felt praise to the memluTs of
this community who have
responded with cash payments
on pledges. Their generosity has
enabled this Federation to meet
its obligations earlier than ex-
ported."
Palm Meach County is one of
the few communities in the
country to complete payment on
their allocation by the end of this
calendar year.
Consul Charges PLO
Adopts Nazi Methods
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Naphtalie Lavie, Israel's Consul
General in New York, has
charged that the Palestine
Liberation Organization has
adopted the methods of the Nazis
in its aim to liquidate Israel.
"The PLO has learned well
from the methods and systems of
the modern and skillful Nazis,"
Lavie, a Holocaust survivor, told
more than 80 people who at-
tended an observance marking
the 40th anniversary of the Nazi
Wannsee Conference that set the
Holocaust into motion. The ob-
servance also served as a
memorial to the victims of the
Holocaust. It was sponsored by
the Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith and was held at the
ADL's headquarters here.
THE PLO, Lavie said, has
been taking steps to improve the
methods of the Nazis "by means
of the most sophisticated weap-
ons which are knowingly supplied
to them by the East and West
alike."
Lavie said that the date of
January 20, 1942, when the
Wannsee Conference was held,
during which the top Nazi Lead-
ership devised the "final
solution" to eliminate European
Jewry, "must remind all man-
kind of the inevitable conse-
quences when a passive majority
of the world watched silently the
atrocities perpetrated by a
minority of fanatics, obsessed by
the hypnotic force of a demagogic
tyranny."
Allan Ryan, Jr., director of the
Office of Special Investigations
of the U.S. Department of Jus-
tice, which has been prosecuting
Nazi war criminals living in the
US., said that the Department is
prosecuting at present 24 alleged
Nazis in the U .S. He noted that it
is a long legal process and that
"every dav that nasses reminds
us how little time we have" in
pursuing Nazi war criminals in
America, since many of them die
or deteriorate with age to a point
that they no longer are fit to
stand trial.
rVIK Confident
Religious Affairs Deputy Confident Israel Won't Withdraw on Apr. 25
By YITZHAK RABI
pesset member} Chain) Druck-
who is Deputy Minieter of
. :ious Affairs, said here that
| is confident that Israel's final
swal from Sinai will be
*ted. "As a member of the
esset from the government
ilition and a Deputy Minister,
an tell you that the withdrawal
ould and will be halted."
uckman, a rabbi and a member
[the National Religious Party,
declared at a press conference at
the Roosevelt Hotel.
The press conference was
sponsored by an organization
called Americans for a Sam Is-
rael. Druckman arrived here as
part of a six-member delegation
representing the movement in Is-
rael to halt the final withdrawal
from Sinai. The delegation will be
in the U.S. for three weeks to
present its view to the American
public that the withdrawal,
scheduled to be completed next
April 26, would endanger Israel's
security and survival.
DRUCKMAN TOLD THE
press conference that a petition
signed by one million Israelis was
completed recently, urging the
government to stop the with-
drawal from Sinai. Claiming that
when the peace treaty with
Egypt was signed in 1979 he did
not believe that the withdrawal
could be stopped, Druckman
declared:
"But thir s have changed. The
mood in Israel has changed.
There is now a groundswell of
public opinion in Israel which
realizes the danger to the State
and opposes further withdrawal
from Sinai."
Other participants in the press
conference were Ella Weizman, a
resident of northern Sinai who
heads the delegation, and Miriam
Levinger who is from Hebron.
Weizman also claimed that the
Continued on Page IS


Page 14
1 tie'Jewish, floridian at fa
Page 2
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, Februarys.1
Women's Plea for Soviet Jewry
Over 350 Palm Beach County
residents convened at the Hyatt
Palm Reaches on Wednesday.
Jan 6. to Rally for the "Women's
Pita for Soviet Jewry." making
this the most successful Soviet
Jewry Rally ever for this commu-
nity
11 was convened by the Na-
tional Council of Jewish Women.
Palm Reach Section, the Worn-
in s Division and the Community
Rotations Council of the Jewish
Federation with sponsorship by
communit\-wide organizations
Sister Rose Thering. a most
dynamic speaker, was an inspira-
tion to the entire audience. She
spoke first-hand of the Jewish
and non-Jewish Refuseniks.
stressing that the Rally was on
behalf Of those Jewish Refuseniks
denied emigration
Cantor Ratty Robbins gave a
musical rendition of Kli-Eli. We
Wfanl To Re Free, and Oseh
Shalom.
\mong those attending were
County Commissioner Dennis P.
KoebJer: Hit-hard Marvin, Aeah
(ant to theCit) Manager: Father
Raymond Hubert, president.
Ministerial Fellowship of the
Palm Reaches, who gave the m
vocation: and Rabbi Joel Levine,
president of the Rabbinical
Council of the Palm Reaches, who
gave t he benediction
For further information on our
year round Soviet Jewry Task
Force please contact Shirlee
Rlonderat the Federation Office.
Sister Rose Thering, Catholic
Nun from Seton Hall University,
addresses audience.
(Standing) Richard Marvin. Assistant to the City
Manager, reads Proclamation on behalf of the
Mayor of West Palm Beach. Michael llyman.
Pictured with him (left tu right) are Florence
Wacks. President. NCJW, Palm Beach Sectioi;
Shirlee Blonder. Chairperson For the Rally; PuU
Ruth Kass. Director WD; Debbie Burger. Co-
Chairperson of the Day.
SMMBM
Cantor Betty Robbins provided
the music for the Rally.
Omitted
I* in. January 22nd issue of the Jewish Floridian the name
of Milton Cold was mistakenly omitted from the list of rep-
resentatives of Palm Beach County who serve on the Board of
Trustees of the United Israel Appeal. Mr. Gold sits on the Board
of I rust.ts as a representative of the Zionist Organization of
America
Shown above seated at dais for the Women's Plea
for Soviet Jewry (left to right): Cantor Betty
Robbins; Rabbi Joel Levine. President of the
Rabbinical Council of the Palm Beaches; Father
Raymond Hubert, President, Ministerial Fello*
ship of the Palm Beaches; Sister Rose Theriag,
Guest Speaker; Florence Wacks and Shirk*
Blonder.
Military Denies Syria Fired
Missile at Israeli Jet Fighter
TEL AVIV (JTA) A military spokesman has
denied that Syria had fired anti-aircraft missiles at Israeli
aircraft on a reconnaissance mission over Lebanon. The
spokesman confirmed that there had been "routine recon-
naissance flights." but the pilots reported no missiles
fired at them, he said. Reports from Damascus and Beirut
claimed that Syrian SAM-6 missiles in the Beka valley in
eastern Lebanon were fired at Israeli aircraft flying over
the area.
Both the Jewish and non-Jewish Community
turned out in anticipation of an exciting program
on the Women's Plea for Soviet Jewry.
Begin Letter
Assured Reagan on Military Restraint
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Premier Menachem Be-
gin has assured President
Reagan in a letter that Is-
-c rael will refrain from using
-force in south Lebanon as
> long as there is no provoca-
tion and political efforts
continue toward a solution
of the problems in that re-
gion.
He also reaffirmed Israel's
* commitment to be out of Skiai by
- next April but indicated that it
~ would make no further concee-
^akma with respect to autonomy
on the West Bank and Gaza
Strip.
BEGIN recalled that as far
back as tjgjCjnp
ngs in lyraTTsrael
Egyptian President
Sadat's proposal to grant the
Palestinians self-determination
and made it clear there has been
no change from that position. He
stressed that Israel was exercis-
ing restraint with respect to Syr-
ian anti-aircraft missiles deploy-
ed in Lebanon in order to give the
U.S. a chance to find a political
solution. He also emphasized the
great difficulties attending Is-
rael's final withdrawal from Si-
nai.
Begin has met with Sol Lino-
witz who was special U.S. Am-
bassador to the autonomy talks
in the Carter Administration.
Lktowitz arrived here from Egypt
on what he said was a private trip
to the Middle East. He ruled out
any possibility that be might
ooce again undertake a mission in
connection with the autonomy
na.________.
hetokiraporters, "I have
Anwar always thought an agreement
was possible. I continue to be-
lieve it. There are no insoluable
problems and if the parties will
sit down together and work con-
scientiously, I am sure an agree-
ment can be reached." However,
he did not think it would be
reached by next April.
Linowitz had a meeting with
President Hosni Mubarak of
Egypt in Cairo and met with For-
eign Minister Yitzhak Shamir
here. He said he would give Begin
a message from Mubarak which
"covered substantive issues."
LINOWITZ said he found Mu-
barak to be "unequivocal in his
assurance that he remained firm-
ly committed to the Camp David
process, his hops to move for-
ward in the autonomy negotia-
tions and the promise of ulti-
mately reaching an agreement."
the importance of accelerating
the pace of the negotiations.
HOLD THE DATE
3rd NATIONAL
YOUNG LEADERSHIP
CONFERENCE
WASHINGTON. O.C.
MARCH 14-16,1982
A complete agenda of topical issues, brief-
ings by U.S. Government Officials and
Israeli Diplomats
MAKE THE CONNECTION
For Details, Please Call The Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County 832-2120


Friday, Februaiy 5,1982
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 3
1500 Young Jewish Leader to
Meet In Washington For National
Conference March 14-16
Klein to Chair Lucerne Lakes
NEW YORK, N.Y. The
third national Young Leadership
Conference sponsored by the
United Jewish Appeal Young
Leadership Cabinets will be held
in Washington, D.C. from March
14-16, 1982. The three-day con-
ference, which is expected to at-
tract some 1,500 men and women
from around the country, will fo-
cus on the critical issues and
problems that will affect the
course of world Jewry in this de-
cade.
Conference participants will
attend a full program of plenary
and workshop sessions to learn
how national Issues affect them
on a local level, how they can be
effective in working for change,
and how they can create and im-
plement programs of substantive
importance in their local com-
munities. They will also have the
opportunity to examine issues
and share opinions with collea-
jues from their own region as
well as from other regions of the
ountry.
In a joint statement, Edward
Robin of Los Angeles, Chairman
of the Young Men's Leadership
Cabinet, and Vicki Agron of Den-
ver, Colorado, Chairperson of the
Young Women's Cabinet, de-
scribed the thematic thrust of the
conference.
"We are extremely pleased
with the initial plans for this
year's conference. The subject
matter is very relevant for today
and will promote genuine dia-
logue and interchange of views.
Sessions that are being organized
currently deal with anti-Semitism
and human rights, economics and
energy, terrorism, world Jewry,
the role of the media in Jewish af-
fairs, and the United States and
the Middle East. Conference
speakers will include experts and
policy planners from every disci-
pline including government, aca-
demia, business, religion and re-
search, to name several.
The Young Leadership Cabi-
nets of the United Jewish Appeal
are made up of men and women
between the ages of 25 and 40,
business and professional leaders
from Jewish communities all over
the United States, who play a vi-
tal fundraisng and policy making
role within their respective com-
munities. These individuals will
assume significant leadership
positions locally, nationally and
internationally in the years to
come.
Registration and hotel space
are limited and interested parties
are encouraged to contact their
local federation and-or the Na-
tional Young Leadership office at
United Jewish Appeal, (212) 757-
1500, ext. 387.
Conference Co-Chairmen are
Karen Adler of Washington, D.C.
and Steven Greenberg of Metro-
politan New Jersey.
PL0 Leader Urges Arab
Talks to Join 'Peace Camp'
PARIS (JTA) Palestine Liberation Organization
representative Issam Sartawi has called on the PLO lead-
ership to approve the continuation of talks with members
lot what he termed the "Israel peace camp." Sartawi, gen-
erally based in Vienna, held secret talks with Sheli leaders
IMeir Payil and Arye Eliav in autumn, 1976 in Paris.
I He told Le Monde that he held these meetings at the re-
quest of the PLO leadership and interrupted them after he
was disowned by his organization. He called on the PLO
[to renew these contacts which, he said, can spell the
[future of the Middle East. Sartawi was last year awarded
[the Austrian "Kreisky Peace Prize."
TUNE INTO
L'Chayim
' The Jewish Listener's Digest
An Exciting New Radio Magazine
Sundays, 10:30 am
WPBR-1340AM
Sponsored by the Jewish Federation
of Palm Beach County
Sunday February 7 Chain Potok. Author Chaim Potok
discusses his latest novel, "Book of Lights'' which reflect* his
own inner conflict that resulted from his contact with Oriental
culture when he served as a chaplain fa Korea. Potok also dis-
U j"f.", 8 fee,in8 "bout the atomic bombs dropped oa Japan to
?V* 71- War II; nd ** crhidms the "Talmndlc" men
'ity that has no patience for mysticism, Kabbalah, and flights
of fancy fa the Midrash (rabbinic commentary).
Tune In to "MOSAIC
TV HIGHLIGHTS
Spon8ondby
The Jewish Federation
of Palm Beach County
WrrVC*anwal5.!fc30aj.
Joseph Klein. Chairman of the
annual 19g2 Federation-United
Jew.sh Appeal Campaign at Lu-
cerne Lakes for the fourth
with the broadened campaign or-
ganization and events in keeping
with the steady growth fathe
area.
Joe Klein has long been active
m Jewish community organiza-
tional life. A past president of the
Century Lodge of B'nai B'rith.
active in the HiUel and Anti-
Jeiamntion League programs of
H nai B nth. he was instrumental
in helping to organize the new
Lucerne Lakes Ix>dge.
At a Rreakfast on January 6
for the Lucerne Lakes volunteers
hosted by Etta and Joe Klein at
their home. David Herman. Di-
rector of Research and Planning
for the American Joint Distri-
bution Committee in Jerusalem
was the guest speaker. He spoke
:>n the miracle of Israel which has
l>ecn relatively successful in ab-
sorbing a population five times
%.lrS of its "Kinal population
of 650.000 Jews in 1948. He spoke
<> the many difficulties involved
in absorption, and also stated
I hat the cost today of one
Phantom Jet equals the cost of
schooling for all ninth graders in
Israel for one year.
Viola and Harold Salant were
hosts at a well-attended Rreak-
fast at their home on February 1.
On February 7, Edith and
( harles Carasik will host a sec-
ond Rreakfast for the residents in
the area.
Guest speaker at both events is
Paula Ruth Kass, a member of
the International Newwork of
Children of Holocaust Survivors.
In addition to Charles Carasik
and Harold Salant, the other
members of the largest Campaign
(Left to right) Harold Salant, Charles Carasik. Joseph Klein
Committee in the history of
Lucerne Lakas are:
I lerbert Bacher. Rernard
Merger, lk>njamin Chait. George
Columbus. Morton Fuchs,
Hurokl Goldberg. Irving Gold-
farb, Murray Gnldner. David
Green. Joseph Gross. Mel
llirschman. Max Kessel. Sidney
Klein. Edward Kurtz. Bennett
Iav. Irving Mandril. Seymour
Mark. Samuel Mania. Hy
Mendelson. Milton Sachs, Alvin
Sasso, Max Schuckman, Michael
Siegel. Al Steinberg. and
Leonard Turk.
Mitterrand Inaugurates Exhibit
PARIS (JTA) President Francois Mitterrand
inaugurated an exhibition of drawings and etchings illus-
trating the late Moshe Dayan's book on the battle of
Masada, which has been posthumously published in
France.
It is the first time in recent years that a French Presi-
dent personally inaugurated such an event. French offi-
cials say it is in keeping with Mitterrand's commitment to
Israel and his former personal relations with Israel's mil-
itary hero. The etchings are by modern artist Raymond
Moretti, and the 300 copies of the book will be sold for
prices up to $28,000 per copy.
On January 11, Jake Orenstefa and Irv Siegel, co-
chairmen of the 1982 Federation-United Jewish
Appeal campaign in Golden Lakes Village, hosted
a workers' training session at the offices of the
Jewish Federation. The group heard Mr. Norman
J. Schimelman. Executive Director of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach County and Mr. Henry
Bassuk, Campaign Director. They discussed the
structures and mechanics of successful cam-
paigning. The entire committee is actively cam-
paigning at the present time and the effort at
Golden Lake* Village seems to be headed for an
all-time high.
1981-82
Jewish Federation/UJA
Campaign
Calendar of Events
February 14-21
February 18
March 21
April 18
JEWISH
FEDERATION
OFRMMDEACH
COUNTY
SuperWeek
United Jewish Appeal National Dinner at
The Breakers
Women's Victory Gala
Women's Division Phone-A-Thon


.....


Page 14
Page 4
i rij ewian f lorulian at Hmimi //* -*
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday. February 5t jcgg
Pattern of Events
Portends New Pressure
We have never put ourselves into the position of
predicting events. But these news reports suggest a
pattern: (1( Bethlehem Mayor Elias Freij's unprece-
dented call for a mutual declaration of recognition
between Israel and the Palestine Liberation Organi-
zation; <2) Egypt's Deputy Premier Kamal Hassan
Ali's call for the same thing; (31 ditto, Gaza Mayor
Rashad Shawa.
Against these reports must be placed the latest
Hosni Mubarak decision to normalize relations be-
tween Egypt and the Soviet Union. Despite the State
Department's downgrading of the significance of this
latest bombshell, it is in our view a development in
the Middle East of monumental proportion.
The calls by Freij and Shawa, spectacular
though they may be, show a trend, undoubtedly en-
couraged behind-the-scenes at least in Cairo and
Washington, to reach a workable autonomy accord
within the framework of the Camp David agreements
before Apr. 25, when Israel is expected to withdraw
from the last segment of the Sinai Peninsula now un-
der its control.
More to the point is the same suggestion by
Egypt's Deputy Premier Kamal Hassan Ali, who
brought up this bitter sweet tempered by a milk
chocolate morsel at the same time: he called his
meeting in Cairo with Israel Defense Minister Ariel
Sharon last week an "historic success and a promo-
tion of relations between the two countries."
Saudis Next Target
In effect, the pressure is now on Israel, and our
prediction is that similar pressure is being placed on
the PLO, for the two to make an accommodation be-
tween them nowin short, to put up or shutup if
either refuses.
But if there is pressure on Israel and the PLO,
there is also pressure on Egypt, which is wearied by a
social and economic feudalism that is staggering to
its future. Egypt must either solve the problem or
submit to the destabilization efforts of the Moslem
Brotherhood and-or other forces in the country com-
mitted to destroying the peace with Israel and re-
turning it to the Arab family fold.
Furthermore, Syria discounted for the moment,
it is Saudi Arabia that must come to realistic levels
of awareness of pressure on it, too. Oil billions in pro-
fits do not necessarily make for a stable nation, and
Saudi Arabia is far from stable, a situation that
could be effectively remedied if it came to an accom-
modation with the Israel-Egypt peace process, as
well, based on the Camp David accord, not the so-
called Prince Fahd proposal.
Among other things, bringing Saudi Arabia into
the peace camp would make the U.S: assertion that
Riyadh is a "moderate" Arab nation one that is
realistic. What is more, it would strengthen the
Egyptian determination to deal with its domestic
woes. Supported by a renewed Saudi friendship,
Egypt would now be significantly less concerned
about its alienation from the Arab world and ready to
deal with these woes within the framework of what it
currently promisespeace between Israel and Egypt
after Apr. 25 now and forevermore.
Syria to be Defanged?
Beyond all these goodies would be the impact on
Syria's single-minded determination to destroy Is-
rael under any circumstances. In the face of the re-
sumed Egypt-Soviet relationship, it would serve to
tether that determination, if not quite stifle it, since
Syria could no longer claim to own the single hotline
to the Soviet ear.
As we see it, for the first time, it is the PLO that
is being called upon to make concessions if all of this
is to occur. Our own prediction is for flurries in this
direction through Apr. 25. Much sound and little
fury. Thereafter, the Israeli agony of sharply height-
ened xenophobias marked by endless debate over
whether or not the Sinai should have been given up in
the first place.
We would be foolish to attempt to predict
whether the withdrawal will take place on time as
called for by the peace process. Our bets are for with-
drawal on time. We would not be surprised if we are
wrong. But we don't think we are. We would be sur-
prised for some acknowledgement by the PLO that
somebody who purports to lead it, including Yasir
Arafat, is prepared to be serious and finally and
genuinely to talk about peace.
President of Zionist Organization of
America Addressed Community Relations
Council Israel Task Force
Ivan Novick, 25th National
President of the Zionist Or-
ganization of America (ZOAI.
addressed a meeting of the Com-
munity relations Councils Israel
Task Force on Thursday.
February 4. at Temple Israel.
Presidents of local Jewish or-
ganizations were present.
When asked what were his
priorities. Ivan Novick answered
clearly. "Humanitarian causes,
concern for Israel, her growth,
security and development." He is
a vice-president of the American
Section of the World Jewish Con-
gress, a member of the Board of
Directors of the Jewish National
Fund. Zionist Actions Com-
mittee, Executive of the World
Union of General Zionists, and
Board of Trustees of the United
Israel Appeal and numerous
other Jewish organizations. In
addition, he played a pivotal role
in the Conference of Presidents of
Ivan Novick
Major American
ganizations.
Jewish Or-
Novick is frequently called to
high-level meetings in Washing-
ton, D.C by tht Administration
at the State Department, the
Pentagon and Capitol Hill as a
party in 'ne-to-one meetings, or a
small, select group of Jewish
leadership. His labors truly epi-
tomize his deep love and concern
for all the Jewish people. His par-
ticipation in philanthropic ac-
tivities on behalf of Israel, espe-
cially in his leadership involve-
ment with the UJA Young
Leadership and Israel Bonds,
was the beginning of his basic
commitment to the State of Is-
rael. Says Novick, "After we
solicit funds, and after we give
generously of ourselves. Israel
requires our day-to-day involve-
ment."
The Zionist Organization of
America represents a cross-sec-
lion of the American Jewish com-
munity.
Reagan Bobble to Help Jewish Interests?
An Orthodox legal aid agency
official said it appeared likely
that a significant gain for Jewish
interests will emerge from the
flurry of developments triggered
by President Reagan's surprise
decision to strip the Internal
Revenue Service of authority to
deny tax exempt status to pri-
vate schools found guilty of
racially discriminatory policies.
The controversy began when
the Treasury and Justice Depart-
ments announced on Jan. 8, with
the President's approval, that the
IRS would no longer deny tax
exemption to racially segregated
private schools. A storm of criti-
cism prompted the President to
declare on Jan. 13 that he was
sending legislation to the Con-
gress to outlaw such tax exemp-
tions.
THE NATIONAL Jewish
Commission on Law and Public
Affairs (COLPA) said it wel-
comed the fact that the Presi-
dent's proposal for legislation
specified racial discrimination as
the governing criterion for deny-
ing tax exemption.
Dennis Rapps, COLPA execu-
tive director, said COLPA of-
ficials had met with Administra-
tion and Congressional officials
to discuss the terminology of the
proposed law. He told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency that the pro-
posed legislation had been trans-
mitted to the House Ways and
Means Committee, which origin-
ates all tax law changes, and to
the Senate Finance Committee.
Rapps noted that the Internal
Revenue Code provides tax ex-
emption for "charitable, educa-
tional, religious and scientific"
non-profit organizations and in-
stitutions. He said that during
the 11 years the IRS has been
acting on such cases, in accord-
ance with a ruling by President
Nixon, subsequently upheld in a
number of lower federal court rul-
ings, the IRS had construed that
language as implying that the
policies of the tax exempt insti-
tution must be in accord with
"public policy." That general
policy is that government rejects
discriminations based on race,
creed or sex.
RAPPS SAID the problem for
Jewish institutions arose from
the fact that, in the absence of
specific guidelines embodied in a
federal law, the IRS, in specific
situations, applied its criteria oc-
casionally in arbitrary fashion
He cited, as an example, an
IRS challenge several years ago
to the tax exempt status of Jew-
ish day schools on alleged
grounds they practiced racial dis-
Ben Gallob
crimination by not admitting
Blacks, Chicanos and children of
other racial minority groups.
Rapps said that problem was
essentially resolved when the
IRS accepted the contention of
COLPA and Torah Umesorah,
the Society for Hebrew Day
Schools, that while there were
few Black children who were
Jews and no known Hispanic
Jewish children, the policy of all
Jewish day schools was to admit
all qualified Jewish children, re-
gardless of race.
Rapps added that while the
IRS interpretation of what con-
stituted conformity with "public
policy" in acting on claims for
tax exempt status has generally
been applied, during the 11 years,
in the context of racially dis-
criminatory schools and related
institutions, Jewish leaders have
felt concern that the IRS might
soon broaden its definition of
public policy to include as dis-
criminatory differing treatment
of men and women in synagogues
and boys and girls in Orthodox
day schools.
RAPPS SAID that concern
had been heightened by efforts at
passage of the Equal Rights
Amendment, as well as federal
and state laws aimed at elimina-
tion of discrimination by sex,
which the Jewish leaders felt had
raised the possibility that the
IRS might hold such religion*
practices to be violations of pub-
lic policy against discrimination
by sex.
He said that the proposal soon
to be considered by the two Con-
gressional committees contains
language which narrows the de-
finition of racially discriminatory
policy to exclude practices based
on demonstrably religious pre-
mises.
The language of the proposed
legislation states that "an or-
ganization has a racially dis-
criminatory policy if it refuses to
admit students of all races to the
rights, privileges, programs and
activities generally accorded or
made available to students by
that organization ... in a man-
ner that does not discriminate on
the basis of race.
"THE TERM 'racially dis-
criminatory policy' does not in-
clude an admissions policy of a
school, or a program of religious
training or worship of a school
that is limited or grants prefer-
ence to members of a particular
religious organization or belief,
provided that no such policy,
program, preference or priority it
based upon race or upon a belief
that requires discrimination on
the basis of race."
The COLPA official disputed
predictions that Congress might
fail to enact the proposed legisla-
tion, noting that the absence of
such a law could create a situa-
tion in which private schools and
related institutions could freely
claim tax exempt status no mat-
ter how extensively they prac-
ticed racially discriminatory poli-
cies.
Rapps also said failure of Con-
gress to enact the requested
legislation would touch off a flood
of litigation and create wide-
spread chaos over eligibility gen-
erally for tax exempt status.
RAPPS SAID the President's
proposed legislation will be con-
sidered by the Senate Finance
Committee on February 1 and by
the House Ways and Meant
r"nmitte on February 4. He
said COLPA representatives will
testify before both Congressional
committees.
He said they will urge that the
measure, when approved, contain
language to clarify that differing
treatment of men and women by
religious institutions for religious
reasons is not grounds for deny-
ing tax exempt status to such in-
stitutions or to religious schools
restricting admission to members
of their own faith.
This report was filed byJTA m
New York.
Jewish Floridian
of Palm Beach County Fred Shocriet
FRfnuwy-c, Combm.no OurVwce' and-Federation Report..- _
c?. **lOCMET SUZANNE SMOCHET RONNI TARTAKOW
Editor and Publnher Eecutie Editor NMf Coord"-*'*
Publiehed Weekly October through MkS May Qi Wearily balinca erf rn-
Sacond Ciau Poetage Paw at Boca Raton. Fla USPS fOMOSO
PALM BEACH BOCA RATON OFFICE
2200 N Fadarai Mwy Suila 206. Boca Raton, Fla 33*32 Phona 3SSS001
aJl!Ln Cornbinad Jeansr. Appaal Jewish Federation ol Palm Beach County. Inc Ollicefe Preeidenl Jaaiv
JLuL u r,,,'f" **<: Enoahjietn. Arnold J Hoffman. Or Richard Shooarman Barbara
SEZST'^rr*' *"'* Tanan. Traaaurer. Al,n W.lenaky. E.eeulwe Oiractor
R*ahoV m,""*n Sut,m" W*l fo publication to Ronn. Tartako*. Director ol Put**
on no' Ouerantee KaatVuth ol Merchandise Advertised
fUSSJTL0 o *l l-0el *" U Annu" J M.n.mum W SOl. or b, membership **
B322UI CUn" "' S "** ^ WMI Pllm "* F" 334' '*n'
FriduL February 5, 1982
Volufc
12SHEVAT5742
^ Nun***


Friday, February 5,1982
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 5
Basic Techniques for
Saving Income Taxes
By STANLEY HYMAN
Endowment Director
Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County
Instead of just getting angry
about taxes, resolve to do what
you can to ease the pain in 1982.
Tax experts agree that there
are four basic long-range tech-
niques for minimizing the impact
of the Federal Income Tax.
1. Diversion of income to a
family member who is in a low in-
come tax bracket;
2. Defer income to a later year
when you expect to be in a lower
tax bracket:
3. Arrange your investments
so as to produce a tax free or
favorably taxed income;
4. Deliberately qualify for
maximum deductions, exclusions
and credits.
Diverting income from a high
tax bracket individual to the low
tax bracket of a child or parent
can result in significant tax sav-
ings. Depending upon one's own
personal situation this diversion
can be accomplished through an
outright gift of income-producing
property, through the use of so
called "short-term" trust, or sim-
ply by making an interest-free
demand loan to a family member.
Interest-free loans are a tax sav-
ing device the IRS doesn't like,
but so far it has been unable to
block them in court. An example
of this is the person in a 50 per-
icnl bracket who gives an elderly
parent $1,500 a year. If that per-
son made a demand no-interest
loan to that parent in an amount
sufficient to generate $1,500 a
war, the 50 percent bracket in-
dividual could continue to help
I he parent while cutting back on
what must be paid in taxes, since
I hat individual must earn $3,000
before taxes to pay that parent
SI,500. Of course, the income
would be taxable to that parent
but the presumption ia that par-
ent is in a lower bracket. If the
income is no longer needed, the
loan can be recalled at any time.
Deferring income can be for-
mally accomplished through a
qualified retirement plan; or by a
simple agreement with your em-
ployer. In addition to these, there
are other deferral plans that may
be of special interest to profes-
sional and business people. Un-
der the new IRA regulations, em-
ployee contributions to an IRA of
up to $2,000 a year can be de-
ducted from taxable income. All
interest credited to an IRA is tax
free until withdrawn.
Investment planning designed
to produce long-term capital
gains instead of interest or divi-
dends, or taking advantage of
federal income tax exclusion for
interest received on state or
municipal bonds should also be
considered. Under the new tax
law, the maximum rate on capital
gains is 20 percent.
Deductions or depreciation or
other costs often make real pro-
perty or oil and gas investments
very attractive. Planning is of
considerable importance in this
area as there are dozens of other
possible deductions, exclusions
and credits that may be avail-
able These include recognized-
tax shelters, and the need to keep
good records of expenses of
working, medical items, your car,
your house, the taxes you pay
and charitable contributions.
Another way to possibly save
laxes and definitely benefit your
community is to consider a gift to
the I'.ndowment Fund of the Jew-
ish Federation of Palm Beach
County. Such gifts are of course
tax deductable, and if you contri-
Prizes For Photos
Mr. Ken Steinhoff, Director of
Photography for the Post and
Kvening Times will be giving a
special workshop on Sunday,
Feb. 21, from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. at
the Jewish Community Center
for aspiring young contestants
who plan to enter the Third An-
nual I. S. Rapaport Memorial
Photography Contest.
The contest is designed for
ages 10 to 21 years and is divided
into two separate divisions which
will be judged individually
Division A is for ages 10 through
15 and Division B for ages 16 to
21 years. The subject matter
must depict some form of Jewish
life. The contest will be held from
March 8 to March 25. Cash prizes
will be awarded.
Watch for complete details in
the mails and through newspaper
articles. Call Sara Glenn, 689-
7700 for additional information
regarding the workshop and how
to register for the contest.
STATE OF
ISRAEL BONDS
BOUGHT AND SOLD
Invest in
Israel Securities
WE RE SPECIALISTS IN
ISRAEL SECURITIES.

TRANSACTIONS DAILY VIA TELEX
TO ISRAEL STOCK EXCHANGE.
Leum.
NAM i
Sank L*uffM M-lsraM M
18 East 48th Street
New York NY 10017
Securities (212)759-1310
atiOfl Toll Free (800) 221-4838
bute appreciated property to one
of the many charitable devices
available, under the endowment
program, you gain a double bene-
fit; an income tax deduction plus
the avoidance of capital gains
taxes.
A deferred gift to the Endow-
ment Fund of the Jewish Federa-
tion can be extremely attractive.
Your gift can be planned to give
you an immediate tax deduction;
capital gains avoidance: good,
favorably taxed lifetime income;
and several other tax advan-
tages.
If you have a desire to benefit
your Jewish community, and you
also want to minimize your in-
come taxes, planned gifts are well
worth investigating.
MWMMMMWMMAMMM)AAAAMMMMAMAMMA
FURNISHED COTTAGES
Catskill Mts., Sullivan Co., N.Y.
ADULT COMMUNITY
Pool Rec. Hall, Near Golf
Rental and Co-op
(305)962-5854
Art International
Presents Exclusively in the United States
nSKB
Art International
3098 Fuller Street, Coconut Grove
Florida 33133 (305) 443-0176
Lise Charron, Director
Gallery Hours 11-5 Monday-Saturday or by Appointment
NOTE: (This column is written
M (i service to provide general in-
formation to the public about the
Endowment Program of the.lew-
ish Federation of Palm Peach
County Information contained
herein is not designed as legal or
tax advice. You should take up
such matters with your respec-
tive attorneys and accountants
Should you leant additional in-
formation about charitable giv-
ing, and the various methods
which may be Utilized through
the Federation's Endowment
Program, please contact Stanley
llyman. Endowment Director of
the Jewish Federation at KB-
2120).
Attention
Israel Bond Holders
You do not help Israel by keeping your Israel
Bonds after maturity.
Israel must place the proceeds at the Chase
Manhattan Bank. Israel prefers you reinvest
your mature bonds into new bonds or file with
the Chase Manhattan Bank to collect your
principal plus interest.
For Information Call the
Israel Bonds Office
659-1445
Pie most respected name
in Jewish funeral service.
In the world.
Not surprising,it's River-
side, and there are many
reasons.
If you've ever worked with
any of our people on com-
munity projects ranging from
fund-raising drives for Israel
to enhancing Jewish education,
you'd understand. If you've
ever experienced the compas-
sion and kindness of Riverside
counselors.you'd have an even
deeper appreciation of the
reasons for Riverside
leadership.
At Riverside, we have
the largeet Jewish staff
available from any funeral
director in Florida. More
important, they are people who
understand Jewish tradition
and honor it.
They carry on a tradition
that for over three generations
has been a priceless assurance
to Jewish families.
Our people. They make
Riverside the most respected
name in Jewish funeral service
in the world.
The Largest Jewish Staff
In The World.
Carl Grossberg, President
Andrew Fier, Vice President,
New York and Past
President of the Jewish
Funeral Directors of
America.
Charles Salomon, Vice
President, New York.
In Florida:
Alfred Golden, Executive Vice
President.
Leo Hack, V.P., Religious
Advisor.
Sam Rosenthal
Kenneth Kay, V.P.
Keith Kronish, F.D.
Harvey Pincus, F.D.
Douglas Lazarus, F.D.
Carmen Serrano, F.D.
Robert Burstein
Arthur Zweigenthal
Isaac Nahmias
Samuel Gotland
Jutes Fischbein
Elaine Gardner
Lena Rothfeld
SoniaGale
Bernard Eilen
I Charlie Blumkin
Ida Rosenberg
Barney Selby
Edward Dobin
Ralph Rubell
Guardian Plan Counselors:
Ira Goldberg, Manager
Steve Fischman
Joel Kay
Syd Kronish
DickSorkin
Joseph Bass
ADDRESSES:
MIAMI BEACH: 1920 Alton
Road (19th St.)/531-1151
NORMANDY ISLE: 1250
Normandy Drive/531-1151
MIAMI: 1717 S.W. 17th St.
(Douglas Rd.)/443-2221
NORTH MIAMI BEACH: 16480
N.E. 19th Ave./947-8691
HOLLYWOOD: 2230 Hollywood
Blvd./920-1010
FT. LAUDERDALE (Tamarac):
6701 West Commercial
Blvd. (E.of University Rd.)/
587-8400
WEST PALM BEACH: 4714
Okeechobee Blvd./
683-8676
Five chapels serving the New
York Metropolitan area.
RIVERSIDE
M*morW Chap*. Inc/Funaral Uractors
Tradition. It*s what makes us Jew*.
|.iponrlni th. Guardian Plan
. Pre Arrartfrt Furwral.
< .lutrdlan
"an-


Page 14
*
1/
P*|t*6
1 nFJeWlsnflOfulUUl at faim. Hear* i v...-*-
...'.' The Jewish Flaridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, February k
Sara Fredericks to Honor
Givenchy for Benefit of the
Palm Beach Festival
OLS Senator Carl Levin of Michigan Praise*
Work of Federation and CJF in Senate Speech
Sara Fredericks will personally
present Hubert de Givenchy, the
epitome of the understated^ ele-
gant man, and his 1982 Resort-
Spring fashion collection for the
benefit of the Palm Beach Fes-
tival
Givenchy, the couturier who
has remained true to the prin-
ciples of classicism and per-
fection, will meet guests for the
first time in Palm Beach at a
black-tie champagne reception in
his honor at the Worth Avenue
Salon and apartment of Sara
Fredericks Sunday evening,
February 7. from 6 to 8 p.m.
Th> presentation of Monsieur
Givenchy's collection will be
shown promptly at 6:30 p.m.
Tickets are $100 per person, a
tax deductible contribution to the
Palm Reach Festival.
__ Mrs. Rudolph Light and Mrs.
Stephen Sanford are chairmen.
Their committee members are
Mrs. J. James Akston, Mrs.
Henry Bagley, Mrs. Leonard
Davis. Mrs. Rodman de Heeren,
Marquesa de Larrain, Mrs.
Lorraine Gallagher Freimann,
Mrs. Thomas A. Hoadley, Mrs.
Albin O. Holder, Mrs. James
Stewart Hooker, Mrs. Arnold
Kramer, Mrs. Frank M.
McMahon, Mrs. Charles Merrill,
Mrs. Harry C. Mills. Mrs.
Charles Munn. Mrs. Samuel
Newhousc, Mrs. Dorothy H.
Rautbord, Mrs. Allan D. Scherer,
Mrs. William Todman, Mrs.
Harold P. Whitmore.
Sara Fredericks has also in-
vited Van Cleef and Arpels
jewelers to coordinate their pre-
cious jewels with the collection.
For further information please
telephone 686-6800 or send your
check, payable to the Palm Beach
Festival. P.O. Box 3511, West
Palm Beach. Fla. 33402.
Creative Exercise
Men and women who want to
start their day feeling good about
themselves are invited to join the
new and exciting exercise class
held at the Jewish Community
Center. 2415 Okeechobee Blvd..
Tuesdays from 9 a.m. The class is
under the direction of Sara Glenn
who believes in starting your day
with music, fun and toning up
and tuning in to your body.
I^oose and comfortable clothes
are suggested. Also, bring a tow-
el.
For additional information
please call Sara at 689-7700.
1,1 It 111 l.t ULUJUUUUUULU11111M n 1111 l.l MJC
Wanted:
WASHINGTON. DC. The
work of Jewish Federations in
meeting communal needs, assist-
ed through coordinated planning
by the Council of Jewish Federa-
tions, has won praise on the floor
of the U.S. Senate from U.S.
Senator Carl Levin of Michigan.
"Jewish Federations through-
out the country have provided di-
rect highly professional volunteer
leadership which has met the
needs of the Jewish community
as well as the non-Jewish com-
munity in which the agencies are
located," the Senator stated.
He pointed to the role played
by the Council of Jewish Federa-
tions, noting that CJF is current-
ly celebrating its 50th anniver-
sary.
"The Council of Jewish Fed-
erations," Sen. Levin remarked,
"has symbolized to me and to
millions of others around the
United States some of the best
examples of what voluntarism
can produce in the delivery of rear
services to citizens throughout
the United States.
"This 50th year anniversary is
one of particular great celebra-
tion because of the splendid work
the Council and its local affiliate
Federations have consistently
done," he told his fellow Sena-
tors.
"In addition, the Council and
its local Federations have contri-
buted mightily through their
voluntary activities as well as
their financial assistance to com-
SUMMER STAFF -
C.l.T'S.
JUNIOR COUNSELORS
SENIOR COUNSELORS
SPECIALISTS
Call Harreen Bertisch at 689-7700 for
more information and an application.
ft_M IMJIJULM tittitimmiiiiiinillti
<


munities in need throughout the
world and to the continuing rela-
tionship with the people of the
State of Israel," the Michigan
Senator stated.
Sen. Levin also had words of
praise for the selection of Martin
Citrin of Detroit as the new
President of the CJF, noting Ci-
trin "has had a long and distin-
guished career as a national lead-
er in the philanthropic sector."
Calling special attention to the
50th General Assembly of the
CJF held last November in St.
I-ouis, Sen. Levin asked that sue
major resolutions adopted by th'
Assembly be printed in the Con
gressional Record "so that thia
body and the country can hav
the benefit of the thinking of this
outstanding organization and fa
membership."
The six resolutions include
those dealing with Peace in the
Middle East, Women's Concerns
and Women's Rights, Reduction
in Government Funds for Human
Services, Strengthened Advo-
cacy on Behalf of Soviet Jewry
U.S. Holocaust Memorial and
Energy Conservation.
For Advertising
Call Staci
at 588-1652
TAPES
CARTONS
HANGERS
POLYETHYLENE
BUSINESS FORMS
TAGS LABELS
BAGS BOXES
WIPES
PALM BEACH
832-0211
"HOWARD
* A .
ACKACIMC
IMC
1201 N E 45 STREET
FORT IAUDERDALE
/ PASTA AND VEGETABLES Sl!PREMEN
The Jewish Homemaker's Guide to Delicious Italian Cooking
Gets its Zest from Chef Boy-ar-dee Ravioli.
1 cup chopped red pepper
1 package (10 oz.) frozen com.
cooked and drained
1 package (10 oz.) chopped
broccoli, cooked and drained
1 cup sliced mushrmms
Hi cup butler or margarine
(4 (abk-p 2 tablespoons chopped parsley
' 4 cup chopped onion
1 tablespoon butter or margarine
1 can (15 oz.lChei Boy-ar-dee
Cheese Ravioli in Tomato Sauce
1 cup waii t
1 packet (. Washington's (iolden
Seasoning and Broth
1. Saute chopped parsley and onion in 1 tablespoon butter.
2. Combine parsley, anon, Cheese Ravioli.water and G Washington's in
2 quart sauce pan. Cover; simmer fa 10minutes. '
.'. Meantime, saute red pepper in 1 tablespoon butler. Remove to warm
sen-inn dish.
I. Continue to saute each vegetable separately in 1 tablespoon oJ butter
Remove each vegetable to separate warm dish. Serves four.
larlsberg.
Its a big
wheel with
all lovers of
fine cheese.
The flavorof Jarlsberg Brand Cheese is as natural as the Norwegians who
make it The lull. nch. distinctive, nut-like tasle makes it a favorite for noshing,
nibbling, serving with fruit or wine, and using it in your recipes. Jarlsberg.
Every good store carries it
JSirfc*1 ^ Br*< Gjetost cheese, Nokkeiost
spiced cheese and many other fine cheeses from Norway.
c IMP Nor liana fooot wc SumlorO CTOJSOI


Friday, February 5,1982
The Jewish, Floridian of Palm Beach County
"^"^ '' !rt I.
Bi7
Fleischnmnns.Margarine
wants you to know...
THE NEW YORK TIMES, TUESDAY, JANUARY 5,1982
Life-Saving Benefits of Low-Cholesterol
Diet Affirmed in Rigorous Study*
By JANEE BRODY
A MAJOR, well-designed study has
shown more persuasively than
any previous experiment that
I eating less fats and cholesterol
can reduce the chances of suffering a
heart attack or of dying suddenly from
heart disease. The study also showed a
smaller benefit from stopping smoking
or reducing the number of cigarettes
smoked.
The study, conducted in Oslo among
more than 1.200 healthy men who had
high levels of cholesterol in their blood, is
considered by experts in the United
States to be the best evidence to date of
the life-saving value of changing dietary
habits. After five years, the men in the ex-
perimental group had a 47 percent lower
rate of heart attacks and sudden deaths
than did a comparable group of men who
served as controls.
Previous studies were mostly con-
ducted with smaller groups, among men
living in institutions or among those who
had already suffered one heart attack. In
1980. the Food and Nutrition Board of the
National Academy of Sciences concluded
that no study had yet convincingly shown
a life-saving benefit of dietary changes
designed to reduce cholesterol levels in
the blood.
Dr. Henry Blackburn, a heart-diet ex-
pert at the University of Minnesota and a
director of several major studies in this
country, described the Norwegian study
as well designed and neatly executed. He
said that it showed for the first time the
benefits of dietary change in a large group
of ordinary noninstitutionalized men.
The Norwegian study was begun in
1972 among 1,232 men 40 to 49 years old
who were selected because they faced a
high risk of developing heart disease.
Though their blood pressure was normal,
their cholesterol levels were considered
highfrom 290 to 380 milligrams of cho-
lesterol per 100 milliliters of bloodand
80 percent of them smoked cigarettes.
An analysis of the subjects' regular
diets showed that most consumed foods
high in saturated fats and cholesterol,
which tend to raise cholesterol levels in
the blood. Prominent in their diets were
butter, sausage, high-fat cheese, eggs and
whole milk. By contrast, poiyunsaturated
fats, which help to lower cholesterol levels
in the blood, were infrequently consumed.
The men were then randomly assigned
either to an experimental or a control
group. The experimental group was given
guidance on stopping smoking and ad-
vised to follow a cholesterol-lowering
diet. The dietary recommendations in-
cluded the following: substitute skim
milk for whole milk, eat no more than one
egg a week, use poiyunsaturated oil for
cooking and baking, eat fruit for dessert,
make sandwiches on high-fiber bread us-
ing fish or vegetable filling or low-fat
cheese or meat, and rely on main dishes of
fish, whale meat and low-fat meat with po-
tatoes and vegetables.
Margarine
No drugs were used and no recommen-
dations were made for changing exercise
habits or losing weight, which changed
only minimally in the five-year period.
Over all, five years later cholesterol
levels were 13 percent lower in the experi-
mental group, averaging 263 milligrams
per 100 milliliters of blood as against 341
in the control group. Triglycende levels,
another risk factor in heart disease, had
also dropped substantially in the experi-
mental group, and the ratio of protective
HDL cholesterol to harmful LDL choles-
terol had risen.
Those men who experienced the great-
est drop in cholesterol levels had adhered
most closely to the dietary recommenda-
tions, according to the research team. The
team, from the Oslo Department of
Health and the Life Insurance Compa-
nies' Institute for Medical Statistics, was
directed by Dr. I. Hjermann.
The team cited the consumption of less
saturated fat (mostly animal fat) as the
single most influential dietary change.
They calculated that dietary changes ac-
counted for 60 percent of the difference in
the number ol heart attacks and heart
deaths suffered by the two groups of men.
Changes in smoking habits were less
dramatic, accounting for approximately
25 percent of the reduction in heart dis-
ease, the researchers said. The average
consumption of tobacco per man fell 45
percent in the experimental group, but
only 25 percent of the group completely
stopped smoking.
The researchers conceded that "if this
had been a diet trial only, the difference in
MI Imyocardial infarction, or heart at-
tack) incidence in the two groups would
probably not have reached statistical sig-
nificance." However, they added, the com-
bination of diet and smoking examines
"two important life-style factors" and is
"more relevant to usual medical prac-
tice."
The reduction in heart deaths in the ex-
eerimental group was not accompanied
y an increase in deaths from other
causes. Some previous studies had sug-
gested that a cholesterol-lowering diet
may increase the risk of cancer. No such
effect was seen in the Oslo study, where
men in the experimental group had fewer
cancer deaths than men in the control
group.
96-
95-
94-
Experimental Group
/
Percentage of Men
Without Heart Attack
-L
-1_
12 24
Source The Lancet
36
48
60
72
84 96
Months
* Experimental group was on low-fat diet and smoking was reduced.
Fleischmann's
096 Cholesterol.
Corn Oil.
Copyright 1982The New Mxk Times. Reprinted by permission.


Page 14
Page 8
l ne'J ewisnfloruuan ot fatm Hear* l >#
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, February 6,
The Odd Couple
Haig, Weinberger Working Toward Opposite Ends
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
the
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) While Secretary
of State Alexander Haig
was on his way to Jeru-
salem in part to heal the rift
between Israel and the Uni-
ted States, Defense Secre-
tary Caspar Weinberger
seemed to be working to-
ward the opposite end.
Weinberger charged in a Cable
News Network television inter-
view that it was Israel which can-
celled the strategic cooperation
agreement with the U.S. even
though the U.S. had announced it
was suspending the agreement in
reaction to Israel's extension of
its civilian rule to the Golan
Heights.
THIS WAS followed by a
story in the Baltimore Sun that
the Defense Secretary would be
visiting Saudi Arabia and poss-
ibly Oman in February but not
Israel in an apparent "snub" to
demonstrate Weinberger's anger
over Israel's action on the Golan.
Pentagon spokesman Henry
Catto immediately stressed that
Weinberger had accepted a Saudi
invitation, and "Israel has never
been considered as part of the
itinerary for this particular trip."
He said the Defense Secretary
"does plan to go to Israel this
year." Nachman Shai, the Israel
Embassy's spokesman, also de-
nied that Israel felt any snub. He
said Weinberger is expected to go
to Israel sometime this year.
While this may be true, the ori-
ginal implication that Wein-
berger was demonstrating his
displeasure with Israel by not go-
ing to the Jewish State after
visiting Saudi Arabia did nothing
toward healing the rift between
the Reagan Administration and
the always sensitive Israelis.
THIS SITUATION, with Haig
appearing as the "good guy" in
relation to Israel and Weinberger
as the "bad guy," is nothing new
for the Reagan Administration
which began its second year on
Jan 20. Of course, the Adminis-
tration has been under constant
attack for speaking publicly with
divergent voices not only on the
Middle East, but on most crucial
foreign policy issues.
But it is on the Israel-Arab re-
lations that this split has been
most public. It was Weinberger
who, over Haig's opposition,
pushed through the sale of the
five A WACS last year. After Is-
rael's destruction of Iraq's nu-
clear plant and the bombing of
terrorists' headquarters in Bei-
rut, it was Weinberger who
sought an even harsher U.S. re-
action than the temporary sus-
pension of the delivery of F-15
and F-16 fighter planes to Israel.
Weinberger also seemed less
than enthusiastic about the stra-
tegic cooperation agreement
worked out between President
Reagan and Israeli Premier
Menachem Begin during Begins
visit to Washington last Septem-
ber. In fact, when the memoran-
dum of understanding was signed
in November by Weinberger and
Israeli Defense Minister Ariel
Sharon, the ceremony was not
held at the Pentagon, where the
two defense officials held hours of
talks, but at the National Geo-
graphic Society building without
any press photographers present.
ALTHOUGH IT was the State
Department that announced the
U.S. was suspending the strate-
gic agreement over Israel's action
on the Golan, the Pentagon has
been much harsher in its criti-
cism. On Dec. 20, only hours after
Begin had strongly attacked the
U.S. for its decision, Haig, Wein-
berger and Edwin Meese, coun-
sellor to the President, all ap-
peared on separate Sunday tele-
vision interview programs. All
stressed the continuing U.S.
friendship toward Israel.
Haig, as he did after the Iraqi
and Beirut bombings, stressed
that it was the task of American
diplomacy to work with Israel to
"repair the damage" and "not
exacerbate" the problems be-
tween Israel and the U S.
Weinberger, however, did just
that by accusing Israel of violat-
ing both the "spirit and the let-
ter" of United Nations Security
Council Resolution 242. He said
the U.S. has to "bring home to
the world" that the "cost" of ac-
tions such as the Golan annexa-
tion and Israel's bombing of the
Iraqi nuclear reactor cannot be
condoned.
Some people looking for ex-
planations for Weinberger's ap-
parent anti-Israel attitude note
that he came to the Pentagon
from being general counsel and
vice president of the Bechtel
Group Inc., the San Francisco
construction company that does
millions of dollars of work in
Saudi Arabia.
WHILE THERE may be some
validity to this, others attribute
Weinberger's attitude on
Middle East and other for
policy issues to his previous^ V
vice in government as finance di-
rector for Reagan when he wM
Governor of California and direc
tor of the Office of Management
and Budget and then Secretary of
Health, Education and Welfare
under President Nixon, with no
experience in foreign affairs or
defense policy. Weinberger has
apparently accepted the military
establishment's view of the
world.
Specifically, he appears to ac-
cept the view that the U.S. must
depend more on Saudi Arabia
"tilting" toward the Saudis in
the hopes they will allow the US.
to establish permanent bases in
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Offer expires July 31,1982
NET wT i>0Z (364*)


riday, February 5,1982
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Jthe desert kingdom, replacing
ose lost when the Shah of Iran
is deposed.
This is a forelorn hope, as
,'illiam Quandt, the Mideast ex-
ert on the National Security
Council during the Carter Ad-
ministration, points out in a
t-i udy published recently by the
bookings Institution. "U.S.
military planners invariably fan-
asize about the merits of bases
Saudi Arabia," Quandt wrote.
['Politically, the Saudis are likely
continue to refuse, arguing
thai it could be politically de-
stabilizing and that it would
erve as a magnet to draw more
soviet forces in the area."
AS THE Reagan Administra-
tion begins its second year, much
Jf the course of its policy toward
srael will depend on the attitude
William Clark, the President's
ew National Security Advisor.
Clark replaces Richard Allen,
rho was widely regarded within
be Jewish community as a
trong supporter of Israel.
Clark's position on Israel is
irgely unknown. Except for
pme harsh words about Israel
jfter the Beirut bombing, he has
jot spoken about the Middle
last during his term as Deputy
Tetary of State. In fact, he
ne to the State Department
rithout any knowledge about
preign affairs. But since then he
as won respect in the Adminis-
ai Hin and in Congress as a con-
lliator and organizer. Perhaps
bore important, unlike Allen,
flark will have direct access to
agan; and unlike Haig, but
ke Weinberger, he is a California
tiend of the President.
Dutch Socialist
DankertNew
{Parliament Chief
By EDWIN EYTAN
I PARIS (JTA) The newly
fected President of the European
brhament, 48-year-old Dutch
kcialist Piet Dankert, is de-
Iribed in Strasbourg as a friend
1 Israel but critical of some aa-
cts of Premier Menchem
fegm's policies. Dankert was
feted by 191 votes to 175 to
[t'st German Christian Demo-
V Kgon Klepsch, succeeding
*non Veil to the presidency of
10 member-state legislative
[Dankert, a veteran member of
Socialist International, has
sited Israel on several occa-
pns and is on good personal
ms with Israel's Labor Party
lairman Shimon Peres and
her Labor Party leaders.
Bough he generally supports Is-
el at most international forums
nich he attends, sources in
Irasbourg said he has con-
pnned several Israeli decisions
is known to favor the in-
usion of Palestinians in Mideast
ace talks.
Born in The Netherlands, Dan-
ft joined the Socialist Party in
I youth, and became a full time
ty worker. A member of Par-
ent from 1968 to 1981, he
P'red the Foreign Affairs com-
Bsion for seven years till 1980.
jSmone Veil, who did not seek
ttion after the expiration of
hS' Wa" known for >
rsonaily warm feelings for Is-
Page9
5TDWT
TRAVEL CONSULTANTS
fnnounce their association with
ROBIN'S TRAVEL
nmalcheo Ell.cinl, Perton.liMd Srvlc
582-1960
INPALM BEACH
Grossman to Receive
Israel Leadership Awawd
Louis Grossman of Leisureville
in Boynton Beach will receive the
Israel Leadership award at a re-
ception being held in his honor on
February 16, according to
Iieisureville Israel Bond Chair-
man Nicholas Lenovits.
The reception will take place in
the Social Hall of the Boynton
Beach Congregational Church.
Unovits noted that Grossman is
being honored for his involve-
ment in Jewish service organiza-
tions, and for his work in the
community. Grossman has been
a leisureville Block Captain for
five years, has served as Chair-
man of the Entertainment and
Social Events Committee, and
has taught dancing to Leisure-
ville residents.
Entertainment at the reception
will be provided by Eddie Schaf-
fer, stage and television
comedian.
Louis Grossman of Leisureville in
Boynton Beach will receive The
Israel Leadership award at a
Leisureville-Israel Bond spon-
sored reception in Grossman's
honor on February 16.
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But hurry, our greatest miracle ends March 3
How far can you go for less than $700 this winter? How
about Israel? The Miracle on the Mediterranean.
El Al is offering you a vacation in brael for the miracu-
lous price of $M9. Including round-trip airfare from New
York.
Spend a whole week on a Mediterranean beach, at the
4-star Concorde Hotel in Tel Aviv. (And enjoy a 15% discount
on their wonderful food and wines.) Or. stay 5 nights at the
Concorde, and one at Jerusalem's Tirat Bat Sheva Hotel.
We're even throwing in a free Avis rental car for four days.
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If you prefer a 5-star hotel, for only $53 more you can
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Sound miraculous? It is. As part of the deal,
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with all the tour features. '
or as long as 60 days on your own. So
pick up the phone, and call El Al, or your
travel agent for details. So you
can reserve, fly. arrive, and
en|oy.
The Airline of Israel


Page 14
Page 10
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, February 5,1982
Organizations hi The News
Community Relations Council Speakers available
Topics Israel, Community Concerns, Soviet
Jewry, Energy, Holocaust
For information and bookings, contact
Rabbi Alan R. Sherman's office
at the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County. 832-2120
l. iimi yiiii||i|y|yM[|M|||||i|||
iiiiiiiiHii.HiBwniiiiiiiiiiiiiiin
HADASSAH
Shalom West Palm Beach Ha-
dassah features an education
program at its meeting on Wed-
nesday, Feb. 17, 12:30 p.m., at
Anshei Sholom, Century Village.
Rabbi Howard J. Hirsch, spirit-
ual leader of Temple Beth El. wil'
be the guest speaker, and his top-
ic will be "Jerusalem and Jewish
Survival." All welcome.
B'NAI B'RITH
WOMEN
B'nai B'rith Women Olam
Chapter of Lake Worth will hold
their next meeting on Feb. 5 at
Community Calendar'
February 5
B'nai B'rith Women Olom 1 2:30 p.m.
February 6
Einstein College of Medicine Dinner Breakers FEDERATION
YOUNG ADULTS COCKTAIL PARTY HYATT HOTEL 8 p.m.
Temple Judea Musical Evening Women's American ORT -
Evening
February 7
B'nai B'rith No. 3113 Board 10 a.m.
February t
National United Jewish Appeal Women's Division $3,500Event
Women's American ORT Mid-Palm B'nai B'rith Women -
Boynton Beach 12:30 p.m. Women's American ORT Lake
Worth West 12:30 p.m. Hadassah Tamar Board 9:45 a.m.
Women's American ORT Palm Beach Board 10 a.m. Uni-
ted Order of True Sisters No. 61 10a.m. Board and 12:30 Meet-
ing B'nai B'rith No. 3046 Board 3 p.m. FEDERATION EXECU-
TIVE COMMITTEE 8 p.m. FEDERATION COMMUNITY RELATIONS
COUNCIL SOVIET JEWRY TASK FORCE 10 a.m.
February 9
Hadassah Lee Vassil Board 10 a.m. Hadassah Henrietta
Szold Board 1 p.m. B'nai B'rith Women Masada Board 8
p.m B'nai B'rith Women Menorah Temple Beth Torah Sis-
terhood 8 p.m. FEDERATION CHAPLAINS AIDE MEETING 2
p.m. Community Feasibility Study Committee at Temple Israel
- 7.30p.m.
February 10
FEDERATION WOMEN'S DIVISION EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEET-
ING 8 p.m. Hadassah Angel of Mercy Luncheon Breakers
Temple Beth David Sisterhood Board 7:30 p.m. Congrega-
tion Anshei Sholom Board 1 p.m. B'nai B'rith No. 3046 8
p.m Temple Israel Men's Club Board 8 p.m. FEDERATION
MEN'S CAMPAIGN CABINET MEETING 8 p.m. Jewish Com-
munity Center Comprehensive Senior Service Center 5th An-
niversary 1:30 p.m. at Congregation Anshei Sholom
February 11
Anti-Defamation League Palm Beach Dinner Breakers Hadas-
sah Yovel Board 10 a.m. Hadassah Aliya Board 9:45
a.m. Hadassah Shalom Board 10 a.m. American Jewish
Congress Board 12:30 p.m Women's American ORT Cen-
tury Temple Beth Sholom Board 9:30o.m. Hadassah -Gol-
da Meir Board 10 a.m. FEDERATION CENTURY VILLAGE
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WEST PALM IEACM
12:30 p.m. in the Poinciana Room
of the Challenger Club, Poinciana
Drive, Lake Worth. The program
for the day will be a film called
"This Very Special Place." The
film deals with our most impor-
tant project, the Children's Hom<
in Israel.
B'nai B'rith North Lodge No.
3115 will have their installation
brunch on Sunday, Feb. 21, at
the new PGA Sheraton Resort
Hotel, 400 Avenue of the Cham-
pions, Palm Beach Gardens.
Wives are invited. Contact Stan
Reiff for reservations.
WOMEN'S AMERICAN ORT
On Monday, Feb. 8 at 12:30
p.m. the Lake Worth West Chap-
ter of Women's American ORT
will hold their monthly meeting
and will present guest speaker,
Ruth Turk, whose topic will be
"The Second Flowering of a Wo-
man." The meeting will be held at
the Senior Citizen's Center, N.
Dixie Highway and 2nd Avenue
North in Lake Worth.
PIONEER WOMEN
Theodore Herzl Club of Pioneer
Women will hold a Membership
Tea on Feb. 10 at 1 p.m. at the
home of Sylvia Burke, 2521
Emory Drive West, Villa D. Be-
come a new member. Join our
club.
BRANDEIS
UNIVERSITY
Brandeis University National
Women's Committee, Boynton
Beach Chapter will hold its
monthly general meeting on
Monday. Feb. 15 at 12:30 pjn. at
the 22nd Avenue Clubhouse.
Janet Asher, Program Chairman
has announced that the guest
speaker will be Tom Kelly E,
of The Post. Refreshment w?
served.
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Maxwell House" Coffee
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Shopping for a "good buy" has be-
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Another favorite pastime is to come
home from shopping, kick off the
shoes and relax with a good cup of
coffee. Maxwell House* Coffee. The
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.{..-'
|iday,-FebruBiy5.-1982-
The Jewish Floridianof Palm Beach County
Pagell
nai B'rith Century Lodge Issues
Brotherhood Proclamation
In keeping with traditional
ewish objectives of promoting
wtual respect and understand-
il' among all religious and racial
roups. the B'nai B"rith Century
U>dge undertook an ambitious
Brotherhood program this year.
fhey prepared a Proclamation of
brotherhood and submitted it to
group of civic leaders in the
nlm Beaches and environs for
iritten endorsement. The letter
lolkiting signatories stated, in
fart. "Racial antagonisms as re-
jected in the Liberty City riots,
lrn- recent Gainesville disorders
Ind ongoing activities of the Ku
\ Klan alert us to our con-
nuing obligation to promote
Vot hirhood attitudes among our
Luth and all citizens, not only
ImT a year or just when it be-
times necessary to ameliorate
iitrial problems.*'
As was expected, over one
lumired and thirty community
laders responded by endorsing
proclamation. These included
nlkw chiefs, mayors, judges,
bgislators, clergymen, educators,
[residents of civic groups and
[mfrssionals. Among the signers
|re: Senators Law ton Chiles and
hil;i Hawkins. Representatives
Ibniel Mica and Claude Pepper,
superintendent of Schools
hiomas Mills, Kditor of the Palm
|<>mh Post Thomas Kelly, Palm
leach County Commissioners
Bailey. Peggy Evatt, Frank
[osier. Norman Gregory and
lennis Koehler. West Palm
i.kIi Mayor Michael Hyman,
livieni Beach Mayor Bobbie
|niks, Delray Beach Mayor
urn Wirkes, United Way Presi-
Mil John l.instroth. Urban Lea-
An-nell
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larch 17-31,1982
TWO
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ISRAEL
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Tides, Air, Hotel, Trensf era
In Israel, Sightseeing
and 2 Meals Dally.
ISRAEL AS NEVER
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Stop in and tee
the itinerary.
So. Dixie Hwy
i Ul Worth '
(OS
585-6870
gue President Percy Lee and
many other leaders.
The sponsoring committee of
the B'nai B'rith Century Lodge,
under the chairmanship of Murry
Weinman, and including Presi-
dent Sol Margolis, Vice-Presi-
dents Victor Duke, Herbert Edel-
stein, and Isidore Greenberg,
Trustee Max Harlem and Execu-
tive Board Member Irving Stahl
are planning to provide the
school system with copies of the
signed proclamation. Hopefully,
this will be used in the classroom
of all Palm Beach schools as a
teaching aid in furthering the in-
structional program.
As a feature of this year's pro-
tect, n Brotherhood Convocation
has been scheduled to be held at
the Rusarian Academy in West
Palm Beach on the evening of
Tuesday. Feb. I6th at 7:30.p.m.
The program will feature brief
addresses by William Dwyer,
Vice-President of Pratt and
Whitney on the sub-topic,
"Brotherhood as an Avenue for
Strengthening the Economy";
ludge Edward Rodgers of the
Iftth Judicial District Circuit
Court on the sub-topic, "Brother-
hood as an Expression of Demo-
cracy": and Thomas Hennessey.
Chief Executive Officer of St.
Mary's Hospital on the sub-topic.
"Brotherhood in Serving Human
Needs." A choral group of forty
Academy students under the di-
rection of Mrs. Martha Adkins
will present an inspirational
musical interlude. The invocation
will be given by Sister Madeline
Sophie. Principal of Rosarian
Academy and the benediction
will be offered by Rabbi Harry
Schectman of Temple Anshei
Sholom. The proclamation signa-
tories and the public are cordially
invited to attend free of charge.
Murry Weinman, chairman of '
the Brotherhood Committee ex-
pressed t he hope that this project
will help enlighten our young
|x>ople on some aspects of whole-
some human relationships. Also,
that it will help promote a
stronger commitment to Broth-
erhood in the entire community
and will be reflected in a healthier
working relationship among the
racial and religious groups that
comprise the Palm Beaches. It is
also planned to expand this un-
dertaking in future years by en-
listing a broad spectrum of spon-
soring groups.
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been a Jewish tradition for generations
because they're so light. (Your grandmother
might have used them in her own kugel!)
For a delicately delicious holiday Kugel
your family will loveand for loads of other
holiday dishesjust remember the red,
white and blue colors that say Mueller's
egg noodles.
PS. Remember to try light Mueller's
spaghetti and macaroni, too!
f Crusty-Tbpped
Noodle Kugel
1 package (8 ounce*) crea m
cheese, softened
V4 cup pane margarine.
. softened'
IU cups sugar
eggs, well beaten
4V4 cups milk
2 teaspoons vanilla
S-MW
xxt lemon juice ^M
Upside-Down
Noodle Kugel
I teaspoon lemon juice
Dash salt
8 ounces Mueller's egg
noodles
V4 cup graham cracker
crumbs
I teaspoon cinnamon
V
Beat together cream cheese and margarine: add sugar: mix well.
Blend in eggs Stir in net four ingredients. Meanwhile, cook
noodles at directed: drain: combine with cheese mislurc; pour
into IJ" 9" x 2" baking dish. Mix graham cracker crumbs and
cinnamon: sprinkle on top of noodles. Bake at JWF.about It*
hours oi until browned and crusty on top. Allow to cool at least
30 minutes: cut in squares to serve. 10 to 12 servings
lA.
tt cup parve margarine,
softened
W cup light brown sugar
t slices canned pineapple,
well drained
2 eggs
I* cup cooking oil or melted
parve margarine
t* cup sugar
U teaspoon salt
Coal a 9" square pan with margarine: sprinkle with brawn
sugar Cut pineapple slices in half: place on sugar mixture. In
large bowl, beat eggs and oil with next five ingredients. Mean
while, cook noodles as directed: drain: stir into egg mixture.
Add remaining ingredients: loss well. Spoon into pan. Bake
40 to SO minutes at 350*F. until set and golden brown. Lei
stand S minutes: loosen with spalula and invert over serving
dish. 8 serving*.
1 tablespoon lemon juice
t teaspoon grated
lemon rind
8 ounces Mueller's egg
noodles
W cup finely cut dried fruit*
(apricots, prunes, dales)
ts cup raisins
t cup chopped nuts
/


Page 10
.-*-
4 .
Page 12
Thf.Touneh PI^-J. ~en-i r>
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday. Pebruary ft,
1982
Jewish Community Center Senior News
The Jewish Community Cen
ter, Comprehensive Senior Serv-
ice Center, receives funds from a
Federal Grant, Title III of the
Older Americans Act, awarded
by Gulfstream Areawide Council
on Aging, and the Florida De-
partment of H.R.S. enabling us
to provide transportation for the
transit disadvantage*! as well as
a variety of recreation and educa-
tional services.
Transportation is available to
the transit disadvantage*! Call
689-7700 for information.
Programs For The Week
Round Table Talk for Men
Timely Topics for Thinking
Women Joe Greenberg and
Sylvia Skolnik, group leaders,
Tuesday I p.m.
Speakers Club Morris
Shuken. president, Thursday 10
a.m.
Adult Community Education
Classes School Board of Palm
Beach County
Winter program Adult Com-
munity Education classes are
now in session. The following
classes are open:
Psychology for Everyday Liv-
ing Mondays, 1-3 p.m.
Living With Your Ailments
Tuesdays 9:30-11:30 a.m.
Dancercise in The Chairs for
Men and Women Wednesdays
1-3 p.m.
Lip Reading Wednesdays 4-
5:45 p.m.
Know Your Car Fridays 2-4
p.m. .
We are sorry that Oil Painting
and Writers Workshop classes
are closed at this time
Extension Classes
Fxtension classes are being held
al (he following locations:
Psychology for Everyday Liv-
ing, Temple Israel Thursdays
1 1 p.m.
Transact ional Analysis. Tan-
glewood Mondays 9:30-11:30
a.m.
There is no fee for any of the
Adult Community Education
classes. Everyone is invited to
attend.
Other Classes
Joy Through Movement An
extension class at Poinciana,
Lake Worth. Call Ceil Golden,
904-1455, instructor, for informa-
tion.
Coining Events
Fifth Anniversary Celebration
The fifth celebration of the
CSSC Federal Grant Title III of
the Older Americans Act, will
take place on Wednesday, Feb.
10 at 1 o'clock at Congregation
Anshei Sholom in Century Vil-
lage. Ruth Turk, author,
columnist and champion of older
adults, will salute the CSSC.
"liove is Ageless," the theme of
the program, will be carried out
in, song by Carl Martin, singer of
musical comedy and grand opera,
accompanied by Mr. Sidney
Schuman. Lillian Pokedoff will
sing the Star Spangled Banner,
accompanied by Ruth Hyde.
Rverone is invited to attend.
Hypertension Screening
Florida Nursing Care provides
hypertension screening the
second Friday of the month from
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Delightful
Sammy Abe, R.N. will also
answer your questions and
discuss with you your hyperten-
sion problem.
The Institute of new Dimen-
sions an extension of Palm
Reach Junior College will offer
the following programs this
month of Feb. at 12:45 p.m.
Thursday, Feb. 11 "The
Genius of Rembrandt." There
will be an illustrated lecture on
the life and work of this artist.
F.li/.abeth Chodrow, Artist,
Teacher of Art Appreciation.
Thursday. Feb. 18 "Invest
ing in Stocks
intricacies of
and Bonds." The
financial invest-
ments described for the layman.
Morris F. Marks. Investment
Counselor and Financial Analyst.
Thursday, Feb. 25 "Ask the
Doctors." Free-form discussion
of health problems guided by
physicians with many years of
experience. Hyman Lieberman,
M.D. and a Panel.
Prime Time Singles This
group consists of singles who are
55 and over. We continue to have
very successful parties and invite
you to join us in our up-coming
events. The first Thursday of the
month will always be a "Coffee 'n
Conversation" at someone's
home. Please join us and partici-
pate in the warm, friendly envir-
onment that has already evolved.
February Activities
Feb. 13, Saturday, 7:30 p.m.
You're invited to the "Presiden-
tial Golf View Apt. Clubhouse"
at 1700 N. Congress Avenue. One
of our members, Hannah, has re-
served her clubhouse for this
date. Call her at 684-8894 for di-
rections. Refreshments will be
served. Donation $1.
Feb. 21, Sunday, 7:30 p.m. -
The Whole Body" by Dr. Mi-
chael Davis. Chiropractor and
Naturalist Refreshments will
be served. Donation $1.
Tax Counseling It's that
time of the year again. Tax coun-
seling for the elderly, a special
program that provides free tax
aid and advice in preparing your
Federal Income Tax Return, is
again available through the JCC
- Roslyn Ram, Volunteer Tax
Counselor. Call Rhonda Cohen
for information.
Temple Israel
JCC
Do you know that an exciting
psychology class meets every
Thursday at 1 p.m. at Temple Is-
rael with a most stimulating in-
structor provided by Palm Beach
County Adult Education? Tem-
ple Israel Jewish Community
Center jointly sponsor this pro.
gram and invite everyone esiicki
ally people in the Pahn -
area to attend' There is ml
Call Jean Rubin at 689-77oti
information.
ROBERT A. WACK8. M.D.
ANNOUNCES THI OFININO OP HIS OFFICE
roN
THI FRACTICI OF
INTERNAL MEDICINE
AT
2601 NORTH FLAGLER DRIVE
WEST PALM BEACH. FLORIDA SS40T
OFFICE HOURS:
Y APPOINTMENT
TO-SPHONI:
(SOB) eas-im
DENTURES
Our individual custom constructed dentures
are GUARANTEED
Senior Citizen Consideration With This Ad
jo Medicaid Dcntir
Upper or Lower Dentures
Cast Vitallium Partials
llnnurnr I nuuoi P<; $1 1 0 & Uo
$150 to $180
Reline 550
Mepair $10&Up
Extractions $10 per Tooth
Minimum lees applied in all cases harrmg complications
By Florida Licensed Dentists
DR. PAUL E. KLEIN, D.D.S.
DR. TERRY A. HORNADAY, D.D.S.
MICHAEL AXELROD, D.D.S.
ANDREW ADELSON, D.D.S.
689-0593
In Same Location Over 7 Years
1800 Upland Rd West Palm Beach, Fla.
/JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
2415 Okeechobee Blvd. W. Palm Beach 689-77001
GENERATION TO GENERATION
Celebration of the C.S^.C^Federal Grant III
FEBRUARY 10, 1982 at 1:00 P.M.
V
3NGRE6ATION ANSHEI SHOLOM
CENTURY VILLAGE
"LOVE IS AGELESS
'Featuring:
Ruth Turk
Carl Martin
Sidney Schuman
Lillian Pokedoff
Ruth Hyde
How to
be an Askabh
~NVarent
EVERYONE IS INVITED
C*il 689-7700 for
more information.
Learn to feel comfortable in talking
about sexuality with your children;
for parents of Pre-School youngsters
through adolescence. I I
A 4 session mini course given by the Planned Parent-
hood of the Palm Beach Area at the Jewish Community
Center, on Wednesdays l|
FEBRUARY 17TH & 24TH ~ MARCH 3RD & 10TH
MORNING COURSE 9:30 A.M. to 12 NOON
EVENING COURSE 7:00 to 9:30 P.M.
For further information call Harreen Bertisch at 689-7700.
O


y, February 5,1982
Synagogue News
The Jewish Floridian ofPntfn Bealh CdUrW/1
bi Pilrhik
TEMPLE ISRAEL
his friend, teacher, and
tor Dr. Ely Pilchik, past
.dent of the Central Confer-
lof American Rabbi's will in-
" Rabbi Howard Shapiro as
Spiritual Leader of Temple
[1, the oldest Reform Jewish
pie between Jacksonville and
in. Florida. Installation
ces are scheduled for Friday
jig, Feb. 12 at 8 p.m. in the
Ituary of Temple Israel, 1901
Eh Flagler, West Palm Beach,
Ida.
bbbi Pilchik will be coming
IfUTCM MANDCL
^RTMAN MILLER
mm.
Of CHKAGO
)vv, Chicago's two
iding Jewish
ineral organizations
ive joined in
rsociation with
vlenofah \w\
CfypdsT:
|THESE SOUTH
)RIDA LOCATIONS:
bo West Oakland Park Blvd.
It Lauderdale (Sunrise)
|5 Park Drive at US 441
{gate 427-4700
pWest Hillsboro Blvd.
Afield Beach 427-4700
ayne Blvd. at 209th Street
hn Miami Beach
toward, 742-6000
)ade, 945-3939
Palm Beach, 833-0887
from Short Hills, N.J. where he is
Rabbi Emeritus and Senior
Schoiar of Congregation B'nai"
Jeshurun where he has served as
Rabbi since 1947.
Dr. Pilchik established the
Hillel Foundation at the Univer-
sity of Maryland. He is a
prominent author and playwright
on Jewish topics and sermons.
He has also written plays and
cantatas and an Oratorio with
famous1 composer Max Janowski.
During his distinguished career
he has received the Man of the
Year Award from the New Jersey
National Conference of Chris-
tians and Jews and has served on
the Board of Trustees of the
Naval Museum, UAHC and the
Jewish Institute of Religion.
While fulfilling his role as
Rabbi he served on many Local
and State committees in New
Jersey, appointed by the Govern-
or and is also the past president
of the Jewish Book Council of
America, The Association of Re-
form Rabbi's of New York and
the New Jersey Board of Rabbi's.
The entire community is in-
vited to share in this historical
occasion for Temple Israel. Serv-
ices will be followed by an Oneg
Shabbat reception.
TEMPLE JUDEA
Rabbi Bruce Warshal, Execu-
tive Director of the South County
Jewish Federation, will speak on
the problem of "The American
Jews or the Jewish American?"
at the monthly meeting of the
Adull Education Committee of
Temple Judea on Sunday
morning. Feb. 14 at 10 a.m. at the
studio of the Weight Watchers,
Gun Club Road and Military
Trail, in the Gun Club Shopping
Center.
Rabbi Warshal has a Doctor of
Jurisprudence degree and a
masters of Economics from Yale
University. He practiced law for
seven years and taught
economics on the faculty of the
University of Miami, Oxford,
Ohio. He has served congrega-
tions in Blytheville, Ark., Ann
Arl>or, Mich., and New Orleans,
La. He has published in many
scholarly journals, including Ju-
daism Theology Today (Prin-
ceton University), and Central
Conference of American Rabbis
Journal. His latest article was
published in the Fall issue of the
Journal of Reform Judaism.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
On Feb. 10, at 7:30 p.m. the
Adult Education Committee of
Temple Kmunu Kl will present
the film "Image Before My
Eyes" in the Wershaw Social
Hall at the Temple, 190 N.
County Rd., in Palm Beach.
Jewish Poland before its de-
struction was the largest and
most important center of Jewish
culture and creativity in the
world. Ironically, the last genera-
tion of Polish Jews is better
known for its annihilation in the
Holocaust than for its achieve-
ments in life. We're all too aware
of how it died, yet few of us know
how it lived. "Image Before My
Eyes" brings this rich and unique
period in Jewish history, a
vanished era. to life.
Through rare films originally
tnken as "home movies" by those
who returned to visit Poland in
the BOB after emigrating to the
United States as well as through
photographs, memorabilia, music
and interviews with survivors of
this lost culture, we have an op-
|>ortunity to experience a way of
life, tradition and hope that was
thought lost forever.
"Image Before My Eyes"
vividly recreates Jewish life in
Poland from the late nineteenth
century through the 1930s the
rich and the poor; the religious
and the secular: the shtt'tt and
the city, the wordly and the pro-
vincial: the many political
tendencies each marching under
its own banner to a future that
vanished with the Holocaust.
The film is in color and 90
minutes in length. Admission $2.
The public is invited.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
SISTERHOOD
The Sisterhood of Temple
Emanu-EI, Palm Beach, is hold-
ing its Annual Donor Luncheon
on Feb. 17. at noon in the Vene-
tian Ballroom of the Breakers
Hotel. The entertainment will be
delightful, gay and nostalgic.
Gene Murray, and his four piece
musical ensemble will take us on
a musical trip around the world.
There will be early bird prizes,
door prizes and prizes galore. All
members, husbands and friends
are invited to attend. For further
information, please phone
Temple Emanu-EI.
_
Page13
WANTED TO BUY ~'
Signed Oil Paintings. Polish-
Dutch-Belgium-Norwegian
Swedish-Danish-German-
Hungarian-Austrian
(Not by Artists Living Today)
Private Collector
655-3286
Evnr-^Wi
BNSTBN
In the
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of Jewtoh tradition.
WEST MLM BEACH 68*8700
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5411
MQruehow
AwmresTKATon
Julian Almeida F.D.
P*ck Sandera F.D.
Pre Arranged Funeral* Available Thru
Guaranteed Security Plan
TEMPLE BETH DAVID
Temole Beth David of North-
ern Palm Beach County will hold
its monthly family service on Fri-
day evening. Feb. 5 at 8 p.m. It is
an opportunity for families of all
ages to come together for wor-
ship, singing, and a festive Oneg
Shabbat following the service.
Rabbi William Marder. Spiritual
Lender, will lead the Service ac-
companied by Cantor Earl Rac-
koff. All are welcome.
TEMPLE BETH EL
Dr. Doris K. Hibel is the lec-
turer for the "Life Passages"
series at Temple Beth El on Mon-
day night. Feb. H at 7:30 p.m.
Her topic will be "Mind-Body
Link to Stress."
Dr. Hibel is a psychotherapist
at the Community Mental Health
(enter. Consultant for Palm
Beach County Home, Certified
Clinical Specialist-Psychiatric
Mental Health Nursing, Ad-
vanced R.N. Pactitioner and
Director of J. J. Dorbel Consult-
ing Corp. She is also in private
practice in North Palm Beach.
Her specialties are stress man-
agement and healthy life-styling.
imperially for the aging.
Dr. Hibel holds honors of
Who's Who in American Women,
Who's Who in International
Women and has the Mental
Health Association Award for
Distinguished Service. She is a
member of Florida Nurses Asso-
ciation Council of Clinical Spe-
cialists in Psychiatric Nursing,
American Nurses Association,
American Geriatric Society, In-
ternational Association of
Preventive Medicine, and Effec-
11\ cness Training Associates.
AITZCHAIM
SISTERHOOD
Sisterhood of Ailz Chaim Con-
gregation is very pleased to an-
nounce that our president Lillian
Yelowitz, has been selected as the
1982 llonoree for this year's Wel-
lington Israel Bond Drive! She is
the first woman in Wellington,
ever to be accorded this distinc-
tion! We feel, with justifiable
pride, that the Committee has in-
deed chosen a most deserving
person for this tribute!
A breakfast to culminate the
Wellington Israel Bond Drive, is
U-ing planned for the Sunday of
Feb. 21. at 9:30 a.m.. at the
U-autiful Hyatt of the Plam
Benches. If you would like to
attend this breakfast, please
make out a $r> check to Tribute
Committee, and send it to: Mike
Goldberg Wellington J 469 or Al
Baker Wellington K 387. They
will be happy to give driving di-
rections u the Hyatt to any who
request them.
ANNOUNCING
,,,.. SHALOM n
b|u4_f Mmof.l ChapU
Memorial ChapU
PHILIP WEINSTEIN
rrin*lir..<
No 1 CMilr*
_>._ an i
S tan Sen. 27S-44M "".........CI
CHAKlt AVA-.A-U THROUGHOUT MOW AM). DAM OUTH PALM KM COUNT*!
*o B>owacd
"Wfe've discoveted / I
THEMENQRAH
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our own choices and a cost set at today's prices. And at Menorah, the
traditions of our faith will be upheld. "
The Menorah Pre-Need Plan offers these guarantees:
ALL PAYMENTS are held in trust and are TOTALLY REFUNDABLE
ALL CONTRACT FORMS are APPROVED BY the office of the
FLORIDA INSURANCE COMMISSIONER
Interest free payments for up to five years
Funds may be used toward funeral expenses both locally and
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Only the purchaser can cancel for reasons other than non-payment
To learn more about the Menorah Pre-Need Plan, just fill out and
return this coupon to:
I Menorah Chapels, 6800 W. Oakland Park Boulevard,
| Fort Lauderdale, FL 33313. Attn: Pre-Need Director. |
| I WOULD LIKE MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THE MENORAH |
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Ar^d coming soon to North Miami Beach.
Menorah Chapels Cemetery Counseling Service is available at no charge.


Page 10
Page 14
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, Febru
ary5,H,
^ Sabbtntcal
(fortier
Coordinated by
Rabbi Alan R. Sherman
devoted to discessioa of themes end toeet
rele vent ft Jtwih life past ond preie al
Synagogues In
Palm Beach County
Judaism's Eternal Themes: Charity
By RABBI
EMANUEL EISENBERG
Temple Beth Sholom
Lake Worth
The Hebrew root: "Tzodeek
Doled Kof" has many connota-
tions in the Jewish tradition. In
post-biblical Hebrew, Tzedakah
is applied to any work directed
toward aiding the poor. The poor
person's right to food, clothing
and shelter is a legal claim in Ju-
daism which must be honored by
the more fortunate. This senti-
ment is underlined by the Deu-
tronomic prescription: "Poor
people will never cease to be in
the land; hence you shall open
your hand to your poor and needy
in your land."
Tzedakah the act of charity
is not an accidental linguistic
outgrowth of the biblical concept
of justice tzedek. The Torah
contains a variety of laws apply-
ing to the poor: the tithe, the
gleaning of the field, the year of
the release. The owner of the field
may not decide who receives
these gifts since they are the legal
property of tzedakah, including
the collection of food and money
for the poor.
Jewish literature abounds in
expressions of charity. Charity is
equal in weight to all other com-
mandments. A contribution to
Rabbi Eisenberg
the needy is rewarded by a vision
of the Divine presence. "Whom-
ever God loves, he sends a golden
opportunity for charity ..."
Maimonides, in his Mishne
Torah, offers the most practical
advice regarding gifts to the
poor. He writes "Anyone who can
afford it must give charity to the
poor according to their needs.
One's first duty lies towards his
poor relatives, then towards the
needy of his own town, and
finally towards those of other
towns and those of the Holy
Land. Anyone who stays in a
town for 30 days should be com-
pelled to contribute to public
charity. Any person who gives
aid to the poor in a surly manner
JEWISH HJMftr AMD CHILDREN'S SERVICE
An outstanding professional and counseling agency serving the
Jewish community of Palm Beach County. Professional and con-
fidential help is available for
Problems of the aging
Consultation and evaluation services
Marital counseling
Parent-child conflicts
Personal problems
Private Offices:
2411 Okeechobee Blvd.
West Palm Beach, Fla. 3340
Telephone: 684-1991
Moderate fees are charged in family and individual counseling to
those who can pay (Fees are based on income and family size)
The Jewish Family and Children's Service is a beneficiary agency of
the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County.
and with a gloomy face complete-
ly nulifies the merit of his own
deed. Charity should be given
cheerfully, compassionately and
comfortingly. He who induces
others to contribute to charity is
more observing than they."
Tzedakah, also means getting
involved, and we as Jews learned
from Moses as a model personal-
ity. We have learned that when-
ever a person hurts, we hurt.
When another is in trouble, we
are in trouble. When someone
loses we all are losers. We care,
and we have never forgotten our
brethren wherever they are.
Moses's model is to be caring
and to help those less fortunate.
In giving Tzedakah we re-
ceive, and as we lift, we are
raised. The truth is that we Jews
have indeed gone out to our
brothers and we have given
Tzedakah: We have saved our
Jews from Russia, we have
helped build Israel a land that is
ours.
For those who are developing a
compassion fatigue, and are get-
ting tired of giving, may I close
with the words of the poet Edwin
Markahm who speaks directly, to
this mood:
"Giving is living," the angel
said
"And must I keep giving again
and again?
My selfish and querulous
answer ran.
"Ah, no," said the angel, her
eye pierced me through,
"Just give till the Lord stops
giving you."

AUTO MIVUWAY CO
AUTOMOBILES
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ISM Uk* Worth M Lk WOi----SaS-B700
BENJAMIN S. HORNSTEIN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL OF
THE JEWISH COMMUNITY DAY SCHOOL OF
PALM BEACH COUNTY
a limi ted number of applications are being accepted
for the
1981/82 School Year
PRE-SCHOOL THROUGH GRADE 8
Accredited by the Florida Council of Independent Schools
Mordecai Levow
Director
Dr. Howard B. Kay
President
2815 N.Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach, Florida
Telephone 832-8423/4
NEW CAMPUS: 5601 Psrttar Avenue, West Palm Be.ch, Florida
A beneficiary agency of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
Orthodox
Aitz Chaim Congregation Century Village
W. Palm Beach Phone: 689-4675 Sabbath services 9 a.m. and 5
p.m. Dally services 8:15 a.m. and 6:30 p.m.
Congregation Anshei Emuna
551 Brittany L, Kings Point, Delray Beach 33446 Phone 499-7407 or
499-9229 Harry Silver. President Daily services 8 a.m. and 5 p.m
Saturdays and Holidays 9am
Reform
Temple larael
1901 North Flaaler Drive. West Palm Beach 33407 Phone 833-
8421 Rabbi Howard Shapiro Dr. Irving B. Cohen, Rabbi
Emeritus Dr. Richard G. Shugarman, President Stephen j. Gold
stein, Administrator .Sabbath Services, Friday 8 p.m.
Temple Beth El of Boca Raton
333 S.W Fourth Avenue, Boca Raton 33432 Phone 391-
8900 Rabbi Merle E. Singer Cantor Martin Rosen Sabbath ser-
vices Friday 8:15 p.m. Saturday 9:15 a.m. Torah Study with Rabbi
Singer Sabbath morning services 10:30 a.m.
Temple Sinai
at St. Paul's Episcopal Church, 188 S. Swinton Ave., Delray*
Mailing address 2005 N.W. 9 Street, Delray Beach, 33444 Rabbi
Samuel Sliver President, Bernard Etish Friday services at 8:15
pm Temple Beth Torah
at St. David's in the Pines Episcopal Retreat. Forest Hill Blvd. and
Wellington Trace, West Palm Beach. Mailing addreae:1125 Jack Pine Si,
West Palm Beach 33211. Rabbi Edward Conn, Cantor Nicholas FenaW,
President Ronnie Kramer (793-2700). Sabbath service, Friday at 8:15p.m.
Temple Judea
Rabbi Joel L Levine Cantor Rita Shore Barbara Chane.
President 1407 14th Lane, Lake Worth, Fl. 33463* Phone 965-
7778 Services Friday evenings at 8 p.m. Meeting at St.
Catherine's Greek Orthodox Church Social Hall 4000 Washington
Rd. at Southern Blvd. _^_
Conservative Liberal
Temple Eternal Light
at Boca West Community UMC, 8900 Boca West Glades Road (1 mile
west of Boca Turnpike) The Free Synagogue, P.O. Box 3, Boca
Raton 33432 Phone: 368-1600, 391-1111 Rabbi Benjamin Rosayn
Sabbath services, Friday at 8:15 p.m.
Conservative
Qolden Lakes Temple
1470 Golden Lakes Blvd.. W. Palm Beach. Fl. 33411 Rabbi Joseph
Speiser Phone 689-9430 President, Samuel Eisenfel.
Temole Beth El
2815 North Flagler Drive. West Palm Beach 33407. Phone 8330339.
Rabhi Howard J. Hirsch. Cantor Elaine Shapiro.
Shabbath Evening Service at 8:15 p.m. in
The Sanctuary. Saturday morning at 9:30 a.m. Daily Minyan at 8:15
a.m., Sunday and Legal Holidays at 9:00a.m.
Congregation Anshei Sholom
5348 Grove Street. West Palm Beach 33409 Phone 684-3212 Office
hours 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Rabbi Harry Z. Schectman Cantor Mordecai
Spektor Services daily 8:30 a.m. and 5.30p.m. Friday. 8:30 a.m.. 5
p.m. late services 8:15 p.m. followed by Uneg Shabbat Saturday, 8:30
a.m., 6p.m. Mincha followed by Sholonh Seudos.
Congregation Beth Kodeah of Boynton Beach
at Congregational Church, 115, N. Federal Hwy., Boynton Beach
Phone 737-4622 Rabbi Avrom L. Drazin Sabbath services, Friday
8:15 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m.
Temple Beth Sholom
315 N. A' Street, Lake Worth 33460 Phone 585-5020 Rabbi
Emanuel Eisenberg Cantor Jacob Elman Services Mondays and
Thursday at 8:15 a.m., Friday at 8:15 p.m. Saturday at 9 a.m.
Temple Beth David
at Westminister Presbyterian Church, 10410 N. Military Trail Palm
Beach Gardens. Office at 321 Northlake Blvd.. North Palm
Beach* Phone:845-1134 Rabbi William Marder Cantor Earl J.
Rackoff Sabbath services. Friday at 8 p.m.. Saturday 10 am
Temple Beth Sholom ,
224 N.W. Avenue 'G\ Belle Glade 33430 Cantor Jack Stateman
Sabbath services, Friday at 8:30 p.m.
Temple B'nai Jacob
at Faith United Presbyterian Church, 275 Alemeida Drive, Palm
Springs 33461 Temple B'nai Jacob. President Jacob Frant Phone:
964-0034 Sabbath services. Friday at 8 pm Saturday at 9 a.m Mon-
days and Thursdays at 9 a.m.
B'nai Torah Congregation
1401 N.W. 4th Avenue, Boca Raton 33432 Phone: 9324566 Rabbi
Nathan Zellzer Sabbath services, Friday 8:15 pm Saturday 9.30 a.m.
TwnP' Emeth of the Delray Hebrew Congregation
5780 Waal Atlantic Avenue. Delray Beach 33446 Phone: 4883536
Rabbi Barnard Silver Cantor Benjamin Adler Sabbath aervlces,
Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 9 a.m. Dally Mlnyant at 8:46 am and 5
p.m.
km si Temple Emanu-EI
S.W0na County Road, Palm Beech 33480 Phonr. 832-0804.
"ew^jeichazln. Cantor David Dardashtl Sabbath aervlces, ,
Frtdey at 8:30 p.m. Saturday at 9 a.m. t
Temple Beth Zlon
^^"J 70 Camella Dr. Royal Palm Beach Friday night 8 p.m. a


riday, February 5,1982
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Page 15


UN Resolution Urging Measures
Against Israel Turned Down S
Israel Won't Quit
Continued from Page 1
Sinai
By YITZHAK RABI
(UNITED NATIONS (JTA)
1 The United States has vetoed
Jordanian-sponsored resolution
the Security Council which
i'd for considering "effective
easures" against Israel for ex-
Inding its civil law to the Golan
[eights last month. The vote
ps 9-1 with five abstentions.
he abstentions were cast by
t-itain. France. Ireland, Japan
km Panama.
Ambassador Jeane Kirkpat-
Ick of the United States, speak
\ip just before the vote, called
resolution "an aberration,
irn a perversion" of the purpose
krhich the Council was called on
the UN Charter to fulfill. Its
>le, she noted, was supposed to
a constructive one. "The reso-
iitinn. we believe, would do the
pposite," Kirkpalrick said. "Far
lom preventing aggravation, it
|oufd become a source of aggra-
alion."
JTIIK MAJOR operative pas-
i ol the resolution stated:
he Security Council decides
|at all member states should
nsider applying concrete and
|ective measures in order to
lity the Israeli annexation of
(iolan Heights and to refrain
\m |)roviding any assistance or
I to and cooperation with Israel
Jail fields, in order to deter
pel in its policies and practices
uinexalion.
The resolution differed sharply
the original draft in that it
not call for the imposition of
military, economic and diplomat-
ic sanctions against Israel.
The vote on the original draft,
also submitted by Jordan, the
only Arab country presently on
the Security Council, was with-
held last Friday when it became
apparent that the extreme anti-
Israel resolution would not
receive the minimum nine votes
needed for adoption by the 15-
member Security Council.
Panama and Zaire balked,
leaving it two votes short.
THE SECURITY Council de-
manded on Dec. 17 that Israel
rescind its decision, taken by the
Knesset on Dec. 14, to apply Is-
raeli law and jurisdiction to the
Golan Heights, captured from
Syria in the 1967 Six-Day War. It
gave Israel until Jan. 5 to
comply. Israel ignored the reso-
lution and the Security Council
reconvened on Jan. 6 to consider,
further action.
Mrs. Kirkpatrick told the
Council that "a floodtide of in-
vective has flowed through this
hall, threatening day after day to
overwhelm the spirit of reason
and compromise with hatred and
cynicism."
She declared that "we do not
approve of Israel's annexation of
the Golan Heights. Indeed, we do
not even believe such annexation
has occurred. We believe we
should get on with negotiations
which will demonstrate the fact."
The envoy called for the imple-
mentation of Council Resolution
242 and 338.
mood in Israel has changed and
that more and more people are
opposed to the withdrawal from
Sinai.
She said, however, in response
to a question, that they do not in-
tend to use violence to halt the
withdrawal. She said she believed
that the growing movement
against withdrawal would create
the conditions to stop it.
THE THREE members of the
delegation at the press conference
said that during their visit to the
U.S. they intend to meet with
Jewish leaders. In reply to a
question by the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency, they said their
trip is financed by American
Jews, among them Americans for
a Safe Israel, Young Israel and
other Jewish groups which do not
wish to be identified at this stage.
AMAZING NEW BIOLOGICAL
FACELIFT
Without Surgery
An entirely new concept in facelifts designed by
doctors as a new approach to facelifting.
Totally painless Completely safe
No hospitalization Much less expensive than
surgical procedures
Come in for a FREE consultation and trial treatment
BOYNTON BEACH MEDICAL CENTER
301 N.W. 2nd Avenue
Boynton Beach
Dr. Ronald Stander, Medical Director
Osteopathic, Physician & Surgeon
13 Blocks East of 1-96
Ph. 732-1145
International Flavor
Cosmos Travel Agency on
pth Dixie in Lake Worth is a
agency with a definite inter-
ional flavor. Owner Reijo
iiro:>s is assisted in the travel
Eness l>y his wife Maija, and
pager Bess Berger.
Sii-nroos is a native of
|and and has vast experience
ravel in all parts of the world.
i'ss Berger has been in the
|el business for 10 years. Mrs.
|er recently returned from a
|to Israel where she inspected
JCC Teens,
Veens and
e-Tweens
|Go North
tiesday, Feb. 10 the
^Community Center will be
Iting a special program for
Vers living in Jupiter,
[Palm Beach and Palm
F Gardens at the North
Branch of the YMCA
[at 3205 RCA Blvd., Palm
jardens. Such facilities as
tball Courts, Tennis
I Swimming Pool and Pro-
ems will be available for
I North, boys and girls in
Ih and sixth grades will
om 7 to 8 p.m. This pro-
Jill be designed similar to
} which meets Mondays at
kter.
J>r High Times, a co-ed
I for seventh and eighth
I will meet from 7 to 9 p.m.
fning will be divided into
nents. The first hour will
1 to special interest ses-
the second hour the
oup will get together to
ate in a single activity.
|addtional infornMUJQft*-.*.
Vail Mark'Mandel. 689- "'"
hotels, restaurants, and met with
tour operators. She received a
certificate from the Mayor of Tel
Aviv and from the Israeli
Government Tourist Board.
Mrs. Berger is a knowledgeable
travel agent and works well on an.,
individual basis as well as with
group fundraising projects.
Cosmos Travel offers
assistance in all aspects of travel
including passports, visas,
photos, tours, and connecting
flights. The office is open daily
from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and on
Saturdays 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.
ufi^/nSU^
in the Beautiful Shenandoah Mountains of West Virginia
90 MILES FROM WASHINGTON. DC.
Co-ed 8-week camping for
ages 6-15.
Co-ed 4-week session lor
ages 6-13. Special pro-
gram for 5 and 6.
Co-ed teen-age camp.
4-week session for ages
13-16.
ALL CAMPS FEATURE THESE ACTIVITIES Canoeing. Archery. Photography. Rifle. Terms Horses an Land 4
Water sports Gymnastics Rocketry Arts Crafts Soccer. Handball Softball Hockey Roller Skating. Ml
Ckmbmg. Tnps Doctor and Nurse in residence Mature Stall over 20 Staff inquires mv*ed ______
For Brochure and additional
information write or call
TIMBER RIDGE, IMC
23 Walker Avenue
Baltimore, Md 21206
(301)484-2233________
Contact* your local representative
Mm. Arthur Virwbup
(Loraitu) 626-5967
Kosher Style Food Sabbatb Service*

as*^*-*
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Sniprof Pirtamlnlan and Uberian Registry


Page 16
ie Jewish Flnrirlinn r>f dT/T^TTTT^o
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Friday, February!
NORTON
SINCE 1924-
SARTY
SERVICE
CENTER
IN 1982 THERE'S NO
BETTER PLACE TO BUY
HIPGoodrich
P155/80R13
'Plus 1.52
RET.
LIFESAVER
XLM
P-METRIC
RADIALS
BC1MY
WHITMALLS
FLORIDA
HEADQUARTERS
FORALLBFG
SIZE PRICE F.E.T. I
P175/80R13 50.56 1.791
P185/80R13 51.84 1.91
P195/70R13 52.88 2.24
P205/70R13 54.36 2.13
P205/70R14 59.21 2.35
P175/75R14 49.41 1.88
P185/75R14 54.36 2.04
P195/75R14 5921 2.26
P205/75R14 61.74 2.37
P215/75R14 62.89 2.52
P225/75R14 67.28 2.74
P205/75R15 64.16 2.50
P215/75R15 66.69 2.64
P225/75R15 69.11 2.85
P235/75R15 74.06 3.06
**iC*%&fi &1 II
iPGoodrich BELTED CLM P-METRIC POLYESTER CORD FIBERGLASS BELT FACTORY WHITEWALLS
/.. i I SIZE PRICE F.E.T.
rJ- r*\J P155/80B13 30.43 1.39
If \^S A [ \ EAST K V 1 1 P165/80B13 32.23 1.56
fflTp* LfttVi) P175/80B13 34.02 1.65
m& P185/75B14 37.97 1.77
IVAP P195/75B14 39.77 2.01
P205/75B14 40.85 2.14
VI ) l,\ 1 1 m Wi\' P215/75B14 42.17 2.24
P225/75B14 44.33 2.45
P205/75B15 40.61 2.13
P215/75B15 43.37 2.40
P225/75B15 45.53 2.56
P235/75B15 47.68 2.77
rmwGH TECH
RADIALS

fSSM \YZ~~------~~~\~Zt%G&\ 2.51 \ 195/70x14
^2^4_l^5i ---
n^^^i imfffi
*8r
3;
TUBi
iss
**&&
145
&*
l*s
*13
4T
166
*13
1.
iss
*13
185
*u
les
*U
lZ&?i
*1S
a&7i
H**J
S*e
SfSTlus 2.33 F.E.T.
205/70x14
IWW Plus 2.40 F.E.T.
19*5

mm
IVT
m%WA vwuA \>
IM
i\
MORE AFFORDABLE
THAN YOU MIGHT
HAVE IMAGINED!
<
NORTON
SiMCE 1924-
TIRE C
* COftAL OAM.M HIAI MH/MlM 6"WMQ8)
Btrd a. Dooote. Road 445-8101 Q7540thSt 823-3000
* NO-TW MIAMI t*
*-VANTATK>n
3* N. State Rd. 7 667-26)6
>*PtMMU
2604 Sooth 4m St 464-8020
t*"
MRTT
cami
r MASTER CARD. VISA
AMERICA* EXPRESS.
ONER'S CUN
* N. MIAMI NACH VWST MIAMI
1700 HE. So* 8t 046-7464 Ird 6 OMowy Rd. 662-6666 N
t MIAMI HACH K1NOAlTw}m.OAT1 SOUAM ^^^LSLES?* *t 72V470 3620 i. Oo?D?sVmi
1464 Alton Road 672-6363 OS72 8.W 86th 8t 387^008 ?.fP**'" MOM ?* 2
lOUTHDADf <*HOMIITIAO
9001 8 Dtxta Hwy 667-7676 301O0 8. Ftdwil Hw 247-W22
CUTUHPWDOI *W HOLLYWOOD
20300 8. Obd* Hw* 233-6241 467 S. State Rd 7 987-0450
t*"T. LAUD6ROAL6
174Q E. Sunrt Btvd
*m!*ntHw* O-4200
WMTMlMiuoM
816 South QMS 832-3044
* LAK8 -AfMUN. PALM BKACH
* *DlBHnLD 6CACH
226WHMtooroBtvd_427-6600
690 8OrtandoAU. 646-6306
* OAYTONA SMACM
607 Votuaia Ava. 266-7467
t*NAMJM
2066 E. falRlSlN ". 774-4443
aa*


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