The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian the voice of the Jewish community of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Running title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Physical Description:
4 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 8, no. 41 (Dec. 24, 1982)-v. 11, no. 26 (Aug. 30, 1985).
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44606415
lccn - sn 00229548
ocm44606415
System ID:
AA00014310:00132

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)


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Full Text
Hostage Aftermath May Hurt Israel
By LLOYD RESNICK
Assistant News Coordinator
As these words are being read, the American
hostages will probably be home with their families,
though this is written as they languish in a
schoolyard in a Beirut suburb, spending their
seventeenth day of captivity waiting for another
^jjg in the labyrinthine web of diplomacy to be
ironed out.
The hostage crisis may well be over, but the
aftermath will be just setting in. This most unusual
hijacking, where not one but two countries were
targeted as victims, could not have come at a worse
time for Israel.
Even before the American hostages were taken,
U.b.-Israel relations were strained due to Ad-
ministration proposals to supply Jordan with $750
million in military aid.
The Israeli reluctance to release the Shiites
without a public request by the United States fur-
ther alienated the two allies at the outset of the
hostage crisis. The Israeli government was still
smarting after criticism of the lopsided Palestinian
prisoner exchange a few weeks ago, and Israeli of-
ficials felt that the United States was asking them
to bow unilaterally to terrorist demands while Ad-
ministration officials claimed that the United
States would never do so.
Continued on Page 15
THE VOICE OF
THE JEWISH
COMMUNITY OF
PALM BIACH
COUNTY
"Jewish floridian
VOLUME 11 NUMBER 22
PALM BEACH, FLORIDA FRIDAY, JULY 5,1965
PRICE 35 CENTS
FndSHochti
Israel's Prisoner Exchange
Did It Lead To Shiite Hijacking?
Yitzhtk Navon
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Deputy Premier and Educa-
tion Minister Yitzhak
Navon, former President of
Israel, has clashed with
Defense Minister Yitzhak
Rabin over Navon's conten-
tion that there was a casual
relationship between
Israel's prisoner exchange
deal with a Palestinian ter-
rorist group last month and
the hijack-hostage crisis in
Beirut.
Navon, like Rabin a leader in
the Labor Party, maintained in an
Army Radio interview that
Israel's release on May 20 of 1,150
convicted Palestinian terrorists in
exchange for three Israeli soldiers
captured in Lebanon and held by
the Popular Front for the Libera-
tion of Palestine-General Com-
mand, a Damascus-based terrorist
group headed by Ahmed Jibril.
may "logically have encouraged"
the hijack of a TWA airliner by
Lebanese Shiite terrorists on June
14.
RABIN, who was a central
figure in the prisoner exchange
negotiations, rebutted Navon's
contention. He told the Knesset's
Foreign Affairs and Security
Committee that there have been
nine aircraft hijacks perpetrated
by Shiite gunmen since March,
1982, so there could be no casual
relationship between the latest hi-
jack and the Jibril deal.
Navon was the only member of
the 10-man inner Cabinet five
Labor and five Likud ministers
who opposed the prisoner ex-
change. He said the government
"ought to have had the moral
Continued on Page ft
Refusenik Visit Inspires Local Couples
By LLOYD RESNICK
I Assistant News Coordinator
"If you could go into the
[Warsaw ghetto and help the
[Jews there at no risk to
[yourself, would you do it?"
[This was the rhetorical ques-
Ition posed to Larry and Rena
[Abrams and Bert and Sylvia
I Friedman as they were briefed
|by a member of the South
[Florida Conference on Soviet
[Jewry on the vicissitudes and
[rewards of visiting refuseniks
I in the Soviet Union.
Rena Abrams admitted,
I "We were shaken after the
briefing," which included ad-
vice on how to remain in-
conspicuous and how to handle
potential confrontations with
I the KGB.
t Despite the dangers involv-
ed, these four determined peo-
I pie visited refuseniks in three
[Soviet cities, and those visits
Inside
Response to death of
Wengele... page 4
Support for Jewish
community from
Senators Chiles and
Hawkins... page 4
Aide impressed with
Tom Lewis' support
Israel... page 5
were the highlights of their
trip. The Jowmghts of the trip
were many, including the
overall feeling of being con-
stantly monitored and
controlled.
Hospitality. Soviet Style
"If you think Kafka was jok-
ing," Bert Friedman said,
"walk into Russia." He
described his discomfort as he
stood alone while being stared
down for five minutes by a
Soviet immigrations officer.
Commenting on the society as
a whole, Sylvia Friedman said,
"The people are afraid,
unsmiling," and Rena Abrams
concurred, describing the
Soviet Union as "a police
state" offering "no personal
freedom."
Although all four visitors
agreed that the government-
trained tourist guides were
helpful and articulate, they
were also very restrictive.
"You do not deviate from the
program," Bert Friedman
said, telling an anecdote about
how the group desired to see a
non-itinerary museum and
were told peremptorily that it
was closed.
Nevertheless, it was ap-
parent that the Soviets put
their best foot forward for
American tourists: the
average Soviet citizen gets
meat once every few months,
if he's lucky; the four
American tourists were of-
fered meat twice daily.
Larry Abrams described the
monolithic, 6.f>00-guest hotel
in Moscow, off-limits to Soviet
citizens, with ominous "key
ladies" on each floor and the
two rows of eight doors at the
main entrance, each row
separated by a narrow cor-
ridor manned by an observant
hotel "clerk." Since only one
door in each row of eight open-
ed, at opposite ends of the nar-
row corridor, the guests had to
pass in front of the guard, who
scrutinized the passers-by
carefully.
It took the group 30 minutes
to change a restaurant reser-
vation in Tbilisi, primarily
because telephone directories
for local citizens and
establishments are not
published.
Bert Friedman spoke of
"closed towns," where
tourism is prohibited, and
Rena Abrams was appalled to
learn that "every Russian has
to carry an internal passport"
when traveling within his own
country.
Refuseniks Are Hostages
Despite the Big-Brother-is-
watching atmosphere, the
Friedmans and the Abrams
came home with unforgettable
memories and tales of "un-
mitigated tragedy" from
Soviet Jews whose appeals for
exit visas were met not only
with government denials but
also with devastating
repercussions.
After covertly contacting
refuseniks from out-of-the-way
phone booths, the four resolute
American Jews, laden with
Bert and Sylvia Friedman and Larry and Rena Abrams,
shown here back at home, shared camaraderie and a sense of
mission during their visits to refuseniks on a recent trip to
the Soviet Union.
valuable items to give the
refuseniks for future sale on
the lucrative black market,
began dangerous, unauthoriz-
ed treks into the urban
outskirts.
Larry Abrams told of a
former radio engineer who
previously had worked on the
space program but who, for 13
years, ever since he applied for
an exit visa, has been assigned
menial, low-paying jobs. This
refusenik's 17-year-old son
took part in a minor teenage
fracas and was sent to Siberia
for four years, while the other
youngsters involved received
no punishment whatsoever.
The father's sense of guilt was
so overwhelming that in an at-
tempt to allay it he spent 2,000
rubles, one year's salary, to
visit his son in Siberia.
Rena Abrams relayed a
tragi-comic anecdote about
another refusenik, this one a
former physicist, who was so
defiantly outspoken and seem-'
Continued on Page 13


I
Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, July 5, 1985
Day School Holds
First Promotion Exercises
There was standing room
only on the evening of June
11. 1985 as over 400 Jewish
Community Day School sup-
porters, parents, students, and
staff attended the first promo-
tion ceremony at the school.
The ceremonies were
preceded by a one-act play
featuring the kindergarten
class. Perseverance was the
theme of "The Little Engine
That Could." From the way
that their human train chugg-
ed around the stage, it was
easy to see that this class will
be able to accomplish anything
that they set their minds to in
the future.
The Jewish Federation and
the Jewish Educator's Council
of Palm Beach County award
for excellence in Jewish
Teaching was presented by
Ann Lynn Lipton. Jewish
Education Director of the
Palm Beach County Federa-
tion, to two Jewish Communi-
ty Day School teachers. Mr.
Skip Paille, a ten-year veteran
of the school, and Mr. Jack
Rosenbaum, Judaic Studies
teacher, were honored with
the award.
Mr. David Katz, who has
made the initial gift to
establish the David and Stella
Katz Library and Resource
Center at the Day School, was
honored by Dr. Arthur Vir-
shup, the school's president.
"You have planted seeds for
the future of the Jewish people
with your generosity," noted
Dr. Virshup in his presentation
of a special plaque to Mr. Katz.
Students were honored for
special achievements in sports
and the school's Read-a-Thon.
The first Hayil awards were
distributed for outstanding
performance in service,
character, leadership, and
scholarship. An elite group of
students, who excelled in all
Hayil award categories,
received gold seals on their
promotion certificates and the
first Jewish Community Day
School "letters" which can be
placed on "letter sweaters."
Student* is each class were
congratulated by the assembly
as they were promoted to the
next highest grade level for
the 1985/86 school year.
Career Women Plan
Third Mission To Israel
Business and professional
women are invited to be a part
of the third national United
Jewish Appeal Career
Women's Mission to Israel on
Oct. 20-28. Sponsored by the
UJA Young Women's Leader-
ship Cabinet, the mission is
open to career women of all
ages from all over the United
States. They will have the op-
portunity to meet with Israeli
women to discuss ac-
complishments at home, in the
community and in the Jewish
homeland.
Ellen Rampell, vice presi-
dent of the Business and Pro-
fessional Women's Group of
the Women's Division oi the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County, has announced
that Ruth Berman will chair
the mission locally.
I
Appreciated Stock Offers
Opportunity For Increased Giving
"With the Dow Jones Average currently hovering
around 1300, persons holding stocks purchased several
years ago when the Dow was around 700 are in a favorable
position to use the appreciated stocks for charitable dona-
tions to philanthropic funds with little actual cost," accor-
ding to Stanley Brenner, chairman of Federation's Endow-
ment Fund Committee.
There are several tax and philanthropic advantages of
donating appreciated securities to a philanthropic fund
within the Federation's Endowment Fund program. A gift
of securities is tax deductible for its full market value and
the donor pays no capital gain tax on the appreciation. The
Endowment Fund sells the securities and the sales pro-
ceeds are then available for distribution to the donor's
recommended charities.
"By avoiding the capital gain tax, the donor's gift of ap-
preciated securities costs less than making an equivalent
gift of cash," Brenner noted.
Other advantages of establishing a personal philan-
thropic fund with the Federation's Endowment Fund in-
clude creating a permanent endowment fund in your name
or in the name of one you may wish to memorialize or
honor. The fund increases through investments made by
the Endowment Committee. Additional gifts may be added
to the fund at any time. There is no tax on income within
the fund, and cost-free administration is provided by the
Endowment Fund program.
For further information on how you can set up your own
personalized philanthropic fund, please contact I. Edward
' dler. Endowment Director at 832-2120.
The kindergarten class at the Jewish Community Day School
dramatized the theme of perseverance with a one-act presen
tation of "The Little Engine that Could."
The audience at the Jewish Community Day School con-
gratulated the recipients of Hayil awards in all four
categories: service, character, leadership and scholarship.
"I'm very enthusiastic about
the mission," said Ms. Ber-
man, who added that the mis-
sion will allow the travelers to
"see what's going on right
now" as well as acquire the all-
important historical
perspective.
Participants will have the
opportunity to meet women
executives, government of-
ficials, and artists and to
observe military life amongst
women. The career women
will visti Israeli women in their
homes and study with
scholars-in-residence.
Highlights of the trip also in-
clude an opportunity to ex-
plore the ancient ruins of
Masada, learn about life at
new settlements, discover the
role of women in Project
Renewal programs, and ex-
amine the meaning of the
Holocaust at Yad Vashem.
For more information con-
tact Lynne Erlich, Women's
Division director, at the
Federation office: 832-2120.
Dr. Arthur Virshup, president of the Jewish Community Day
School, presented a plaque of appreciation to Mr. David Katz
for his support in the establishment of the David and Stella
Katz Library and Resource Center at the Day School, while
Mrs. Barbara Steinberg, director of the Day School looked
on.
WHAT'S YOUR JOB SITUATION?
Do you know what kind of vocation you wish to pur-
sue.' Do you hate your present job and don't know
where to turn?
There will be a free job seminar on Monday, July 8
and 15, at 10 a.m., at Jewish Family and Children's
Service, 2250 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd. For more infor-
mation contact Carol Roth, Vocational Guidance
Specialist, at 684-1991.
AHJIT MY CAM Is a MM program now being offered by the JoMph L. Mom
6riamc Center of the Jewish Home for the Aged of Palm Batch County for per-
sons awaiting admission to area nursing tonm or wto miy be conoMtrmg nur-
sing homo care. Tha full day of structured and supervised therapeutic activities
and services wi Include .
* HEALTH SCREENING & EVALUATION *
PHYSICAL. SPEECH & OCCUPATIONAL THERAPIES
* HOT KOSHER LUNCH *
* RECREATION THERAPY *
* RELIGIOUS SERVICES *
* WELLNESS PROGRAMS *
* SOCIAL SERVICES'
The mm Ut CAM program > offered each woofc on
Ifctt a.m. 3:M p.m.
Foi ferfcer Wwrnojun about the program, feat and avatobiHty of transporta-
*^P* contact At*/ nefeinLliu, Socfe) Worker, at the Morse Geriatric
Csofer. 471-5111.
m* AOULT DAY CAM,
'!


Friday, July 5, 1985/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 3
Youth Aliyah Budget Reduced
Despite Program's Success
JERUSALEM Reflecting
Israel's current economic
risis, the Jewish Agency's
Sar budget for Youth
AliVah has been reduced from
$52 million to $50 million, -
this despite continuing signs of
the program's success.
The reduction was caused by
other pressing needs in-
cluding those of thousands of
voung, recently-arrived new
immigrants, and insufficient
income from Diaspora Jews.
Youth Aliyah will enroll
18 600 youngsters in the fiscal
year recently begun, but must
deny access to 1,600 ap-
plicants. With more funds,
another 6,000 from distressed
neighborhoods could also
benefit from enrollment. An
Agency spokesman said, "If
we receive more funds we will
admit more youngsters as our
first priority."
The needs of Ethiopian
Jewish teenagers will be fully
met by a separate allocation.
To maintain the 18,600
enrollment level, other reduc-
tions will be necessary. For ex-
ample, the Kiryat Shmona
Youth Center's budget has
been reduced from $184,000 to
$156,000, limiting program
content and delaying plans for
full health and dental services.
Youth Aliyah costs only
$2,300 a year for most residen-
tial youngsters, the majority
on scholarship. Seventy five
percent is for food, clothing,
shelter and such essentials as
textbooks; 20 percent for
health and educational ser-
vices; five percent for
administration.
Still, the program is high-
quality and nigh-potential, as
shown by these examples:
A Youth Aliyah village,
Hofim, just received the
prestigious "Speaker of the
Knesset prize,'' for helping
200 newly-arrived youngsters
with comprehensive services.
Two Youth Aliyah
graduates have received com-
mendations at the president's
residence, for performance of
skills learned at Aliyah
residences and needed for
Israeli security.
Six thousand youngsters
rallied at the Western Wall
May 19 to mark the 18th an-
niversary of the reunification
of Jerusalem and demonstrate
their love of Israel.
Most Youth Aliyah funds
come from American Jews giv-
ing through United Jewish Ap-
peal/Federation campaigns.
Opening Day '85
Something For Everyone
At Camp Shalom
Swinging pre-schoolers and staff members enjoy the opening day sunshine.
*poup of Maccabees learns
ow to handle a racquet dur-
N a tennis lesson.
JDC Briefs
Heinz Eppler, President of the Joint Distribution Com-
mittee, told the members of the board that allocations for
the JDC relief and development programs in Ethiopia now
stand at $4.5 million. He said that more than $1.9 million in
cash donations have been received since the JDC "opened
its mailbox" on November 1, 1984 and that donations of
goods, such as clothing, cloth, medicine and medical sup-
plies with an estimated value of $2 million had also been
received. An additional $600,000 was committed from
JDC's regular budget.
Eppler also reported that support had been given to the
construction of three tent cities in Ethiopia by Abie
Nathan, the Israeli humanitarian and peace activist. JDC,
he said, was receiving $350,000 from the U.S. AID for the
most recent of these camps now being built in Ibenat in the
Gondar province.
Mr. Eppler advised of plans to ship 100,000 life-
sustaining packages to needy Jews in Eastern Europe dur-
ing 1985-86. Over $20,000,000 is budgeted.
Mr. Eppler reported that as part of the continuing review
of Jewish Education programs, which in 1984 received 23.1
percent of the total budget of $45.4 million, the Jewish
Education Committee had established that JDC efforts are
to be directed towards assisting overseas communities to
assess their needs, to help them to develop long-term plan-
ning and to improve their financial and technical resources.
Mr. Eppler also advised that the JDC caseload in Vienna
has increased due to an influx of Iranian Jews, adding that
if current trends continue, the annual cost could rise to
$2,000,000. Strenuous efforts are being made to cover the
costs from relatives in the United States, where this is
possible.
Dr. Saul B. Cohe'n, executive vice-president of JDC,
spoke about JDC's role in Israel a catalytic force bring-
ing together ministries and other agencies, which has
strong impact on important national and local programs.
He told how impressed he was with the spirit of the part-
nership between JDC, the Israel Government and the
Jewish Agency. He added that JDC operates from a posi-
tion of great professional strength in seeking to help im-
prove the quality of life in Israel.
Mary Ann Coppola discusses the natural world with a group
of K'ton-ton campers.
Maccabee swimmers await their chance to cool off in the Pre-schoolers listen intently as Matthew Miller provides the
pool. tunes-


Page 4 The Jewish Ploridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, July 5, 1985
No Sadness Now \
That Mengele Is Dead
We must join the crowd and accept the
verdict. Even Rabbi Marvin Hier, dean of
the Simon Wiesenthal Center for the
Holocaust in Los Angeles, concludes that
Dr. Josef Mengele is dead. This is the pro-
nouncement of the various teams of forensic
experts that examined the exhumed remains
of a skeleton in Brazil that were alleged to
be Mengele's. Death, it was said, came
following a stroke while Mengele was swim-
ming in 1979.
There may be cause for sadness that
Mengele beat the rap that he was not
brought to the bar of justice for his
murderous crimes as the "Angel of Death"
at Auschwitz concentration camp during the
Hitler era.
His Bones on Parade
But sadness may not be the proper
response. He was arrogant, yes. To the end
of bis days, according to the notes and
papers in his personal effects found in
Brazil, he believed in the hideous principles
of Nazism and was convinced that he bad
done nothing wrong.
There are victims of his still alive today
who recall him standing before lines of arriv-
ing Jews at Auschwitz where he pointed
with a calm and almost disinterested hand
either right or left, signifying life or death
for those passing him by.
On the other hand, it is Mengele who has
now been paraded for the past three weeks
before a watching world in a most ap-
propriate fashion for a man himself once
preoccupied with the deaths of others. His
bones have been permitted no rest. His
grave has been violated and opened, and his
remains have been examined, poked and
prodded down to hair and a handful of teeth
m his coffin, for experts to analyze and final-
ly to declare him Mengele's skull in their
hands passed from one to another that
this was the criminal.
Like Shakespeare's Yorik in Hamlet, like
Shelley's Ozymandius, the mighty have
turned to the bits and pieces of their own ab-
surd past a rag, a bone, a hank of hair
signifying nothing while those who come
after Mengele know him for what he was
and can take solace in the fact that justice
was done.
Irony of His Teeth
We are most taken by the iron; in the
forensic statement of Lowell Levuit, fhfi.
American dental expert at Sao Paulo who
confirmed that the remains are Mengele's.
Said Levine: the gap between his two upper
front teeth, so clear in the photos of him and
in the skull, was not only "distinctive, but
fairly rare in whites."
What a final statement! This fabricator of
a woud-be Nazi master race by his cruel and
vicious experiments at Auschwitz this ad-
mirer of "perfect" Aryan features should
be distinguished by dental qualities un-
characteristic of whites, let alone of
"supreme" Aryans.
Let there be no sadness.
"-Jewish f londia n
FHOK SMOCMET
E*io< and Puousner
*
ol Palm Beach County
uspsomuo
Combining Our Voice and Federation Reporter
SUZANNE SMOCHET RONNI EPSTEIN
Executive Editor News Coordinator Aa
LLOYO
t News CoonttnMor
Published Weekly October through Mid May B. Wee.i balance o' year
Second Class Postage Paul at Boca Raton Fi*
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E/win H Blonder; Vice Presidents AJec EnoMstem. Arnold L Lampert. Murray M Goodman Arvln
W,iene*y Secretaryjjonel Greenbaum. Treasurer. Barry S Berg Sufrmit matenal to Room Epstein
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Out Ol Town Upon Reone^i
U.S. Senators Fight
For Jewish Community
Hawkins Amendment For Radio
Broadcasts To Soviet Jews Passes
WASHINGTON, D.C. -
Authorization has been given
by the U.S. Senate for
Russian-language radio broad-
casts designed to provide en-
couragement and support for
Jews living in the Soviet Uion.
The legislation, authored by
Senator Paula Hawkins of
Florida, requires Radio Liber-
ty, the U.S.-sponsored radio
station broadcasting into the
Soviet Union, to increase its
Russian-language programm-
ing for Soviet Jews and coor-
dinate all Jewish programming
into one unit to be known as
Radio Maccabee.
Hawkins' amendment also
establishes the position of
"Chief Editor" of the Radio
Maccabee program, who will
manage the broadcasts and ad-
vise the Director of Radio
Liberty on general programm-
ing issues of interest to the
Jewish community in the
USSR.
In addition, the amendment
instructs Radio Liberty to take
into account the special con-
cerns of the activists and
refusenik population in the
Soviet Union and to provide
news, commentary, analysis
and other programming ap-
propriate to those needs and
concerns. Presently, less than
one percent of Radio Liberty's
Russian-language broadcasts
(1.5 hours per week) is
directed to Soviet Jews. Under
Radio Maccabee the broad-
casts will be expanded to 18 to
20 hours per week.
"We must be sensitive to all
means of encouragement and
support for Russia's Jewish
population," said Senator
Hawkins. "Radio Maccabee
provides us with an opportuni-
ty to do something construc-
tive, something tangible to
help those courageous people
to maintain their hope for a
better future," she said.
Radio Maccabee will provide
broadcasts dealing with
general cultural, intellectual,
political and religious interests
as well as Hebrew education
courses. It will not have its
own frequency or transmitted
but will be apart of H"
Liberty broadcasts. rSJ*
Liberty has been broadcastrnJ
information concerning thl
Soviet Union to residents ofl
that country since the 1950's [
"The Soviet government is
actively and systematically at I
tempting to cut off the flow ofl
information to those imprison I
ed within its borders/' said
Hawkins. "Those who have
had their requests to leave that
country denied are in par.
ticular need of information
from the free world, for the
knowledge of the efforts and
accomplishments of their com
patriots is critical to the fur-
thering of their own cause."
The House of Represen -I
tatives passed an amendment
providing for a study ofl
Jewish-oriented broadcasting.
Differences between the
House version and the Senate
bill to initiate actual broad-
casting will have to be ironed
out by a conference
committee.
Chiles Co-Sponsors Resolution
Opposing Arms Sales To Jordan
Friday. July 5,1985
Volume 11
16 TAMUZ 5745
Number 22
Senator Lawton Chiles of
Florida has joined Sen. Ed-
ward Kennedy, D-Mass., and
70 other senators in sponsor-
ing a bi-partisan resolution
that opposes arms sales to Jor-
dan and calls on that country
to enter into direct peace
negotiations with Israel.
Senator Chiles was troubled
by recent reports that the
Reagan Administration will be
sending a request to Congress
seeking approval for a $750
million advanced arms sale to
Jordan and by the administra-
tion's recent request for $250-
million in nonmilitary
economic aid that would do lit-
tle more than pat Jordan's
King Hussein on the back for
voicing intentions that his
country is at last on the verge
of embracing the Camp David
peace process.
The resolution's sponsors
have sent a clear signal of their
desire to give priority to the
Camp David process and of
their deep opposition to using
arms sales or economic aid as a
mechanism to get Jordan
involved.
"Intentions will not bring
lasting peace to the Middle
East, only actions will.
Although I am pleased with op-
timistic reports stemming
from King Hussein's recent
visit to this country, we must
keep in mind that many years
have passed since the Camp
David accords were for-
mulated with Jordan as a key
in the process, yet Jordan has
done little to acknowledge its
role," said Senator Chiles.
Instead, that country has
turned to the Soviet Union to
acquire advanced arms, and its
military forces have been
trained on Soviet soil and by
Soviet technicians in Jordan.
The weapons that would be
supplied in the $750 million
sale would significantly in-
crease Jordan's military threat
against Israel. It is known that
Arab states give high priority
to strengthening their air and
ground forces and that Jordan
has the best geographic posi-
tion to spearhead a coor-
dinated attack on Israel. If ad-
vanced new military weaponry
is provided, Jordan may find it
impossible to stay out of any
future conflict in the Middle
East.
"I believe that U.S. interests
for a stable and peaceful
balance in the Middle East are
best advanced by a strong
commitment to Israel. Any
diversion from this would be)
harmful to our most trusted al-
ly in the Middle East.
"What is needed now from
the U.S. is not more
sophisticated arms for Jordan,
but more sophisticated
diplomacy in bringing that na-
tion into the Camp David
peace process," concluded
Chiles.
*

Democracy Works'
Friday, July 5, 1985/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 5
[Aide To Congressman Lewis
Works With The System
"The generation of
luathetic youth is coming to a
dose rapidly," claimed Mar-
shall Brozost, an 18-year old
college-bound member of the
local Jewish community and
Laduate of the Midrasha-
tfudaica High School, who
[since May has been working as
Li aide in Congressman Tom
luwis' local office in Palm
I Beach Gardens.
The job began as an intern-
ship through the Senior Work
Experience program at the
Benjamin School and turned
Into a paid position for
'Brozost. whose interest in pur-
suing politics as a career has
loeen fueled by the experience.
The youthfulness of the
lother aides and their concern
[for the problems of local con-
stituents have impressed
lyoung Brozost. While admit-
|'ting that he works at the
I lowest level of representative
(government, Brozost also
(notes that it is the "most
Ipersonal."
Marshall's job entails
[answering mail and taking
[calls from local constituents
Iwho want to get a message or
I pinion through to
I Washington; the aides are in
daily contact with Lewis' of-
Ifice in Washington, and
[Brozost expressed admiration
[for the efficiency of com-
munication between the con-
Istitutents and their represen-
ftative. "We deal with the peo-
ple. It is an excellent working
loffice. We don't turn anybody
|off." commented Brozost.
Oftentimes the aides
|themselves can lead a consti-
tuent to the proper source for
[help. At other times the aides
[promise to refer the problem
lor question to Mr. Lewis. Oc-
Icasionally the aides must
justify or explain a particular
[stance that Congressman
I Lewis has taken, explanations
Ithat Brozost says are usually
[prefaced with, "It is Mr.
iLewis' belief that. .."
Radio/TV/ Film
_S/
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MOSAIC Sunday, 9 a.m.
with host Barbara Gordon.
Sunday, July 7: Pre-empted.
Sunday, July 14: Morse Geriatric Center.
L'CHAYIM Sunday, July 7 and 14, 7:30 a.m. -
WPBR 1340-AM with host Rabbi Mark S. Golub The
Jewish Listener's Digest, a radio magazine.
SHALOM Sunday July 7 and 14, 6 a.m. WPEC
Channel 12 (11:30 a.m. WDZL TV 39) with host Richard
Peritz.
ISRAELI PRESS REVIEW Thursday, July 11 and 18,
1:15 p.m. WLIZ 1340-AM; summary of news and com-
mentary on contemporary issues.
* Sponsored by the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County
"MOVING &
STORAGE
However, the aides are more
|than intermediary com-
Ijnunicators. Recently Hank
[(rossman. Century Village co-
chair for the FederatJon-UJA
Icampaign, telephoned Mar-
Marshall Brozost, aide to Congressman Tom Lewis, peruses
correspondence from local constituents.
Lewis as "an extremely strong
supporter of Israel" with a
near-impeccable voting record
on issues regarding the Jewish
state. However, some
animated discussions took
place amongst aides in the
local office after Lewis declin-
ed to sign a congressional peti-
tion urging President Reagan
to cancel his recent visit to Bit-
burg, Germany.
Brozost said that the issue of
American aid to Israel is a
popular one with local consti-
tuents, most of whom seem to
want the United States to
decrease aid. "It hurts when
you know the constituent has
the facts wrong," Brozost
said, but it is not the aide's job
to attempt to sway the political
views of the voters.
Regarding Jordan's recent
request for $750 million worth
of military aid, Brozost says
Mr. Lewis has "many reserva-
tions" about such a sale,
although the discussion of the
subject has been postponed
twice already in Congress.
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With regard to the recent
hostage situation in Beirut,
Brozost noted that like many
congressmen Mr. Lewis has
[shall asking "for help in shipp- kept a low profile in order to
m to Israel a large bundle of let the President and the State
Idothes that he and other con- Department work on the pro-
cemed Century Villagers had blem with no interference.
Mected for the newly-arrived
|ttniopian Jews.
Ik^ter sPen<*ng several
[lours contacting many Jewish
[service agencies, Brozost
received one overriding
[response to his plea for help in
[shipping the clothes: the
Ittnionian Jews need money,
[* clothing. It occurred to
I Marshall that the collected
I garments might be put to good
IJ* in the Glades for the
benefit of disadvantaged
""Pant workers. Ironically,
MBrozost phoned to make this
%estion to Mr. Grossman,
wossman told Marshall that
I1* nad already done just that.
Brozost characterizes Mr.
Overall, Marshall s ex-
Erience has reinforced his
lief that the government can
work for the people and that
beneficial change can anse
from working vnthxn tne
system.
"Each voice makes its im-
pact," Brozost said, and he
feels that the peoples' opinions
are heard in Washington.
Having received assurance
this summer that "democracy
works," Marshall plans to pur-
sue studies in Russian and in-
ternational relations in college
and to "use what I've learned
in the field of politics."
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Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday. July 5, 1985
JCC Services Foster Friendship
Partner Connection: Matchmaker, Mail Me A Match
Matchmaking, an oft-
maligned tradition in many an-
cient cultures, is alive and well
but with a modern twist
in the "Partner Connection"
program, a service offered by
the Jewish Community Center
of the Palm Beaches.
However, unlike the system
in bygone days, where men
and women were matched on
the basis of socio-economic
equality and parental wishes
(with love often seen as an ir-
relevant criterion), the "Part-
ner Connection" seeks to br-
ing together people of all ages
who share similar interests
and compatible personalities.
Moreover, the goal of the
"Paltrier Connection" is not
necessarily marriage or a per-
manent bond; a simple desire
for companionship is often the
reason people turn to the
"Partner Connection."
Inaugurated in November,
1984 by Terri Lubin. director
of youth services at JCC,
"Partner Connection" duties
were assumed by Jenifer
Fischer, singles coordinator
for JCC. in January 1985.
Since its inception over 100
people have placed personal
ads in the monthly "Partner
Connection" column, and ap-
proximately 100 replies are
received in response to each
month's edition.
For four dollars a partici-
pant submits a letter or some
other personal statement of
100 words or less describing
himself (or herself) and what
he is looking for in a compa-
nion. Each ad, sent to JCC
along with the client's full
name, address and phone
number, is given an ID.
number which appears in the
column. Ms. Fischer collects
responses to a given ad and
forwards them to the adver-
tiser, who then may contact
the respondent to arrange for
a first brief encounter at a
"safe" spot such as a
restaurant or singles event.
The number of responses to
an ad often depends on the
age, sex and writing style of
the advertiser. Ms. Fischer
noted that the ads of older men
and younger women seem to
get the most responses, with
one older man receiving a
record 15 responses in a single
month. One participant advis-
ed prospective clients to be
direct and creative when com-
posing an ad; the uniqueness of
the ad reflects the uniqueness
of the individual writing it.
Although there are other op-
portunities to meet single.
Jewish people, such as the om-
nipresent singles bars and the
more attractive singles ac-
tivities sponsored by the
Jewish Community Center,
the "Partner Connection" pro-
vides for private, one-to-one
meetings between two people
who are almost sure to have
Chaverim Program:
Mutual Giving Between
Little And Big Friends
"Chaverim" means
"friends" in Hebrew, and the
chaverim Big Friends-Little
Friends program, sponsored
by the Jewish Community
Center of the Palm Beaches
and the single parent commit-
tee of the Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County, provides
children from single-parent
homes with the opportunity to
establish a healthy relationship
with a Big Friend, an adult
from the Jewish community
who becomes a friend and role-
model.
"We consider the children's
needs and the parents' desires
for them in making a match,"
said Bonnie Altman, volunteer
coordinator for the JCC, who
also emphasized that Big
Friends are not primarily
baby-siu rs or counselors.
Friendship is the goal.
Other p-nmeters for mat-
ching Big Friends and Little
Friends are the age group
desired by -he Big Friend, the
sex of both the Big Friend and
the Little Friend, and the
needs and interests of the Lit-
tle Friend.
After a tentative match is
made, the Big Friend meets
the child's parent, and if that
meeting goes well, the Big
Friend m^ets the Little
Friend.
Big Friends sign a contract
by which they agree to commit
themselves to spend a
minimum of two to three hours
a week with their Little
Friends for one year. Reliabili-
ty on the part of the Big
Friend is very important, ac-
cording to Ms. Altman, since
most of the children have ex-
perienced extreme disappoint-
ment in their lives. "Consis-
tent, honest concern" are the
most important assets a Big
Friend should have, said Ms.
Altman.
Happiness is reflected in the face of Alan Zangen who is
a Big Friend to Louis Shapiro. They were connected
through the Jewish Community Center's Chaverim Pro-
gram.
Most but not all Big Friends
are single, and all must be over
18 years of age and must com-
plete a two-hour training pro-
gram after having their
references checked through
the Florida Department of
Law Enforcement.
Big Friends are encouraged
to involve their Little Friends
in activities which are not cost-
ly but which promote
togetherness and broaden the
children's horizons. Therefore,
visits to the library, a park and
the zoo are common, and
sometimes the Big and Little
Friends simply play board
games or bake cookies.
"I think the program is ter-
rific," said Sharon Syden,
mother of 3^-year-old Emily,
the youngest child in the pro-
gram, which on the whole in-
cludes children between ages 5
and 15. Although Emily's Big
Friend, Bea Greenfield is 58
years older than Emily, their
relationship transcends that of
a grandmother and her grand-
daughter, according to Ms.
Syden.
Gail Shapiro, mother of two
boys who have Big Friends,
calls the program "very suc-
cessful." Ms. Shapiro pointed
out that "being a single parent
and working mother, it s nice
to have the free time" provid-
ed when the boys are off with
Continued on Page 11
Jenifer Fischer, singles coordinator for the Jewish Communi-
ty Center of the Palm Beaches, reviews "Partner Connec-
tion" ads and responses.
things in common.
While the service is utilized
mainly by newcomers to the
community for the purpose of
dating, some people use the
"Partner Connection" to
establish friendships with
others of the same sex. Bridge
partners and fishing compa-
nions have been found through
the "Partner Connection,"
and many people, according to
Ms. Fischer and Ms. Lubin,
read the ads simply to have fun
trying to guess which of their
friends wrote them.
Most importantly, "Partner
Connection" clients are
satisfied, and only a small
minority have pulled their ads
after one month. One partici-
pant, a local Jewish profes-
sional, indicated that "the peo-
ple who responded were dif-
ferent than ones you'd meet at
JCC." Mr. Lucien Picard, a
painter and interior designer
from Palm Beach, responded
to several ads and "one of
them clicked," he said. Mr.
Picard was so grateful that he
wrote a letter to "Partner
Connection" thanking them
for the service. In fact, Ms.
Fischer encourages more feed-
back from participants so that
the program can become even
more successful.
Commenting on the impor-
tant "Partner Connection"
goal of establishing friendships
and encouraging community
involvement amongst adult
Jews of all ages, Jerry
Melman, executive director of
the JCC called the program "a
mitzvah."
In all, the "Partner Connec-
tion" is a refined, effective and
non-threatening modern
analogue to the antiquated
custom of matchmaking. For
more information contact the
Jewish Community Center at
689-7700. The Jewish Com-
munity Center is a beneficiary
agency of the Jewish Federa-
tion of Palm Beach County.
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Friday, July 5, 1985/The Jewish Ploridian of Palm Beach County
4,000 Jewish Athletes From
35 Countries In 12th Maccabiah
represent 17 of the adult
delegation.
The opening ceremony is ex-
pected to draw a crowd of
some 50,000 spectators, and
the special closing ceremony
will take place at Sultan's Pool
Stadium in Jerusalem on July
25.
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) A
record 4,000 athletes,
representing Jewish com-
munities from 35 countries,
will participate in the 12th
Maccabiah games due to open
in the Ramat Gan Stadium on
July 15.
Israel, the host country, will
field the largest contingent, of
800 athletes, while the
smallest contingent will be
that of Monaco, sending a lone
representative from the tiny
principality. The U.S. will have
the biggest contingent from
abroad, with 503 athletes
attending.
THE JEWISH communities
from Zaire, Monaco and
Gibraltar will make their debut
at the games, and Yugoslavia
is returning to the games for
the first time in 50 years, the
first Eastern Bloc country to
participate since World War
II.
The 29 listed sporting events
will take place all over Israel,
and the participants will be
housed in 14 localities accor-
ding to the placement of the
event in which they are
participating.
While the official games are
in progress, events will be
staged for veterans, and for
the first time 330 youngsters
up to the age of 15 will be able
to participate in six events and
CORRECTION
Gary Shephard Lesser was a member of the Midrasha-
Judaica High School graduating class of 5745, a fact ac-
cidentally omitted in the June 21 issue of The Jewish
Floridian.
Mr. Lesser did not attend the graduation ceremonies
because of his commitment as captain of a team from
Forest Hill High School which was competing at the Na-
tional Academic Championship in Dallas, Texas at the time.
Mr. Lesser, the sports editor of the Forest Hill High
School newspaper, plans to attend George Washington
University and major in international relations.
People who don't have
a doctor sometimes get taken
for the ride of their lives.
For some people, not having
their own personal physician is like
getting taken for the ride of their
fives every time they get sick.
And the last thing you want when
you're sick, is to spend all your time
and energy trying to find a doctor.
Sometimes you are forced to
rely on the recommendation of a
neighbor, or thumb through the
Yellow Pages hoping to find the
right doctor.
Unfortunately, neither of those
methods are the best way for
finding the right doctor for your
particular needs.
And what if the illness was one
that required the prompt attention
of a physician.
You would most likely end up
going to the emergency room,
when all you really needed to do
was to see your personal physician.
Visiting the emergency room
with an illness that doesn't require
the emergency room, can be time-
consuming. And costly.
Thanks to the Physician Referral
Center at JFK Hospital, finding your
own physician no longer has to
be a major ordeal.
Whether you're new to this area,
a long-time resident orjust visiting,
the Physician Referral Center can
find you the doctor you're looking
for. And one that's convenient
to you.
The first thing you need to do
is talk with one of our counselors.
They'll even make the appointment
foryou, if you wish.
Having your ownphysician is
July the healthiest favor you could
do for yourself Andyour family.
With a personal physician,
who's familiar with your medical
background, you and your family
have a better chance of avoiding
future health problems altogether.
The best ofhealth for many years
to come. That truly is just what the
doctor ordered.
So if you don't already have your
own doctor, don't wait a minute
Call the Physician Referral Center
at JFK Hospital. And let us find you
a doctor you can feel good about.
For free.
Because the last thing you need
when you're sick, is to get taken for
the ride of your life.
JFK Hospital
The Future of Health Care is Here.
4800 South Congress Avenue
Adantis, Florida 53462
The Physician Referral Center
at JFKHbspitaL Call 433-3634.
.


Psfe 8 The Jewish Floridum of Palm Beach County/Friday. Joly 5. 1985
Update-Opinion
grams. Israeli Jewish families
are receiving financial
assistance if they accept Chris-
tianity. The missionaries have
managed to infiltrate kibbu,
am, absorption centers. eoC'
tional institutions and ml
yeahivot. CTen
By TOBY F. WILK
Sunday mornings in Dublin,
an official limousine wends its
way to a section where the
Republic's only bagel factory is
located. There, the rolls with
the holes are purchased forDr.
Garret FitrGerald, the Irish
Prime Minister. This is not an
affectation adopted for the
visit of President Herzog of
Israel, but a need of Prime
Minister FitzGerald, who in-
sists that only bagels can make
his Sunday mornings
complete.
For the first time since 1967,
an Israeli TV correspondent
has been permitted to work in
the Soviet Union. David
Witstrum has been admitted
to Moscow on his Israeli
passport. His first report, sent
via satellite, concerned the
Soviet commemoration of the
defeat of Nazism.
In the foyer of London's
Regent's Park Mosque, an edi-
tion of the notorious anti-
Semitic forgery "The Pro-
tocols of the Elders of Zion" is
being sold clandestinely.
Sandor Szenes. a Hungarian
journalist, completed a
remarkable series of inter-
views with Hungarian church
leaders of various denomina-
tions, devoted to the theme of
what, if anything, they had
done to help Hungarian Jews
escape Adolph Eichmann's
clutches after the Nazi
takeover, an 55 days. 437.000
Jews, from babes to geriatrics
were transferred to Auschwitz
where 80 percent were
murdered.) The Szenes inter-
views promised to lift the lid
on ugly chapters of modem
Christian history in its rela-
tionship with Jews. To date,
there is no sign of this book
although the manuscript was
delivered to the Hungarian
publishers last year and a con-
tract signed for 40,000 copies
of a first edition with rights to
a second edition. Curiously,
government consent to
publication has not been for-
thcoming. Budapest should be
asked whv.
The Wall Street Journal in a
trenchant leader about the
new slaughter at Sabra and
Chatila demanded: "Where
are all the moralists now? They
aren't blaming the Syrian
Defense Minister; they aren't
asking for a Commission of In-
quiry in Damascus."
Teddy KoUek. Mayor of
Jerusalem, has been awarded
the 1985 Peace Prize of the
West German Booksellers'
Union for his untiring support
for Israeli-Arab reconciliation
LOROWARD
[JAPER a
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IJACKAGING
over the decades.
Israel has the highest per
capita foreign debt in the
world. In 1984. hyper-inflation
in Israel was a staggering 450
percent. If current trends con-
tinue, inflation this year will be
an unimaginable 1,200 per-
cent. Israel's economic crisis
could pose as serious a threat
to her security as any hostile
neighbor in the region. A
crucial issue facing our 99th
Congress will be maintaining
and increasing aid to Israel in
the face of our own $200 billion
deficit and Arab lobbying via
sophisticated media propagan-
da opposing any aid to Israel.
The systematic persecution
of Soviet Jews has moved into
a darker, more chilling phase.
It is no longer necessary to
seek emigration to Israel to in-
cur the wrath of Soviet
authorities. Just being Jewish
will do. Concentrated action
can impel our government to
press wholeheartedly, urgent-
ly and persistently for Soviet
Jews. Human rights is what
our country is all about. It
should be a guiding principle
for us individually and interna-
tionally. Our involvement is
their passport to freedom.
Every dsy, thousands of
Jewish families in the Soviet
Union hope and pray that com-
passionate people in other na-
tions will learn about them,
ask about their whereabouts
and come to their aid. For
them, we represent their only
hope.
The Christian Council in
Israel has admitted their aim is
to promote evangelism among
Jews. They admit they are sub-
sidized by worldwide mis-
sionary groups such as Jews
for Jesus and the American
Board of Missions to the Jews.
The Christian Embassy in
Jerusalem is accused of
violating Israeli law by con-
cealing their missionary pro-
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Tisoner Exchange
|Coitinne j to tell the families (of the
'captured Israeli soldiers)
I (jure is a line beyond which
fcould not go." According to
! the prisoner exchange
' lour criteria."
KIT NAVON hinted that his
Etion would be different if and
a the Cabinet were called
I to decide whether to release
than 700 Shiite guerrillas
J in Lebanon and present-
j in the Atlit detention camp
J" Haifa in exchange for some
| American airline passengers
held hostage by the hi-
in Beirut. This is the
i demand of the hijackers.
Ifavon said if there were "direct
hes" the Cabinet would
i them, "taking into account
[specific facts in the case." The
hes would have to be
e by the U.S., however. Israel
not act without an
irican request, Navon said.
He U.S. has made no such out-
i request of Israel so far, and
Reagan Administration
thai it would not ask
J for any concessions to the
Jters. Rabin told the Knesset
iimittee that Israel is sticking
[its official position of non-
i(vement in the hijack crisis,
; it has received no requests
ji the U.S. or the International
J Cross with respect to the to-
ilers' demands. He noted that
hijackers "address" their
inds to Washington.
[AVON'S VIEW that last
pth's prisoner exchange was a
bibutory factor in the hijack-
lis shared by a growing number
Israelis. More and more Israelis
of all political persuasions are now
maintaining that the lopsided
prisoner exchange was one of the
worst mistakes Israel ever made
and will have grave consequences
in the future.
At a meeting with leaders of the
religious party, Morasha, Shamir
said "perhaps the government
went too far," adding that had
Likud been the sole governing
party of Israel, the prisoner ex-
change would not have taken
place.
LABORITES, for their part,
contend that it was the Likud
government, headed by Shamir,
that contracted the basic prin-
ciples of the exchange before the
unity government took office last
Septembmer and there was little
choice but to go through with the
deal.
Specifically, Labor claims that
the Likud government agreed not
to "veto" the names of any
Palestinian terrorists submitted
by Jibril, who he wanted released
in return for the three Israeli
soldiers he was holding in
Damascus.
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The Likud government also
agreed that the terrorists, once
freed, could return to their homes
in the West Bank, Gaza Strip or
even in Israel if they had been
legal residents at the time of their
arrests, the Laborites say.
As a result, terrorists serving
life sentences for murder were
freed and about 400 of them
elected to return to their homes in
Israel or the administered
territories.
THE SITUATION with the
Shiite prisoners at Atlit is dif-
ferent. They are not terrorists but
guerrillas captured in Lebanon
where they were attacking Israeli
troops in the process of withdraw-
ing. They were not tried or con-
vinced of any crimes. It was, in
fact, Israel's intention to release
them once the withdrawal of the
Israel Defense Force from south
Lebanon was completed.
The Israelis say they would have
been freed by now had it not been
for the tense situation that
developed in the south Lebanon
security zone after the Israel-
backed South Lebanon Army
(SLA) detained 21 Finnish
soldiers of the United Nations In
terim Force in Lebanon
(UNIFIL). The soldiers have since
been released.
Friday, July 5, 1985/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 9

Bert Sales,
62, Passes

Bert Sales
Bert Sales, recently-retired manager of Palm Beach
County Israel Bonds, died Monday, June 24, at the age of
62.
A native of Pittsburgh, Sales began his career with Israel
Bonds in the Allegheny region in 1957. By 1974, when
Sales moved to West Palm Beach, general bond revenues
in the Allegheny region had increased by 600-800 percent
to three or four million dollars.
In our area Sales was responsible for selling $200 million
in Israel Bonds through drives at local synagogues and at
private gatherings.
Rabbi Joel Levine of Temple Judea in West Palm Beach
said of Sales, "He was just a jewel. I've met many Israel
Bonds professionals since I became a rabbi in 1973, and he
was one of the finest in the United States."
"Many people here and in the state of Israel have lost a
great friend," said Gerald Lesher, chairman of Israel
Bonds for Palm Beach County.
Mr. Sales is survived by his wife and two children, Fay
and Arnold.

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Gift From Palm Beach Couple Creates Endowment
For Center For Modern Jewish Studies
WALTHAM, Mass. -
Maurice and Marilyn Cohen of
Palm Beach and Boston, Mass.
have established a $1 million
endowment for the Center for
Modern Jewish Studies at
Brandeis University.
The center the only ad-
vanced research program
devoted exclusively to the
study of contemporary
American Jewry at an institu-
tion of higher learning will
be named the Maurice M. and
Marilyn A. Cohen Center for
Modern Jewish Studies.
"As a member of the
Brandeis Board of Trustees
and a member of the Univer-
sity's Board of Overseers of its
Philip W. Lown School for
Near Eastern and Judaic
Studies, Maurice Cohen has
been a major force behind the
center and its activities," said
Lawrence Sternberg, the
center's acting director.
"Now he is helping to put
the center on firm financial
footing for the future."
The gift by the Cohens helps
Brandeis meet the three-to-
one challenge requirements of
the Charles H. Revson Foun-
dation grant that led to the
center's founding in 1980 and
provides additional endow-
ment funds. This will insure
the continuation of research
into American Jewish life at a
level never before attempted,
according to Sternberg.
The center's mission is to
make certain modern Jewish
studies receive the same
scholarly attention as the more
classical areas of Jewish study.
The center's research has
Day School Students Practice
Budget And Allocations Process
Students in each of the eight
grades of the Jewish Com-
munity Day School counted
the money they collected
this year for Tzedakah, and, in
a process modeled after the
Jewish Federation's budget
and allocations procedure,
sent that money on its way to
help all over the world.
Representatives of Opera-
tion Moses, the Organization
for Rehabilitation through
Training, Lighthouse For The
Blind, The Jewish Federation,
Hadassah and Student Strug-
gle for Soviet Jewry came to
the Jewish Community Day
School and presented appeals
to the students on behalf of
their organizations.
One fourth grade student's
answer to the question, "To
what cause do you want this
year's Tzedakah money
allocated?" was: "To help
other Jewish people in
trouble."
That answer was echoed by
the entire student body when
allocations were announced at
the Jewish Community Day
School promotion ceremonies
on June 11. The largest alloca-
tions and the majority of
student-collected funds went
to Operation Moses and Stu-
dent Struggle for Soviet
Jewry.
All other causes discussed
with students, as well as "Stop
Children's Cancer" and U.S.A.
for Africa, received allocations
from Shabbat funds.
The students were eager to
take the responsibility for the
decision-making process of
Tzedakah allocations. Caring
for others, a major curricular
theme at the Day School, was
transformed into real ex-
perience for the students as
they studied important needs
and funds and took action to
help their brothers.
OUR ISN'T
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SORRY,
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maintained its certification during the past 30 years.
So whether you prefer the good taste of our delicious solid white tuna
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Star-Kist. After all, no one's been (Q) Kosher longer. Sorry, Bumble Bee*
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Maurice M. Cohen
focused on Jewish family life,
intermarriage, Jewish educa-
tion and identity, occupational
patterns among Jews,
unemployment, systems of
Jewish human service delivery
and demography.
The activities of the center,
along with the Department of
Near Eastern and Judaic
Studies and the Benjamin S.
Hornstein Program in Jewish
Communal Service, represent
the most comprehensive
Jewish studies program at *
university outside of igrjj]
Long associated with Z
philanthropic efforts
this country and abro
Maurice Cohen is the for
president and chief ex<
officer of Lechmere ;
Company, a leading retail I
headquartered in Cambrid
Mass.
A former fellow of Br
and a trustee of the univen
since 1974, Cohen also is!
trustee of the Combin
Jewish Philanthropies a
past president of the Bosti
New England chapter of
American Friends of
Hebrew University
Jerusalem.
In addition to suppor
various student schola
and faculty fellowship
grams at Brandeis, Cohen i,
has spoken scores of times t.
behalf of the university, offa
ing money management
estate planning semina
throughout the country.
In May, Cohen received
honorary Doctor of Huma
Letters degree at Brande
34th commencement.
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Friday, July 5, 1985/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 11
HIPPY Turns Mothers Into Educators
[since 1968 the Home In-
action Program for Pre-
I Youth (HIPPY), in-
j by the National Council
[Jewish Women's Research
Ljtute for Innovation in
jucation at Hebrew Univer-
K has helped raise the
{u'cational potential for
lOOO disadvantaged Israeli
Wren.
jhe aim of the program, ac-
tding to Research in Action,
(publication of the Research
titute, is "to facilitate the
nation of basic cognitive
and language skills among six-
year old culturally disadvan-
taged children." the most im-
portant technique utilized in
the program is the training of
mothers (or other family
substitutes) to educate pre-
school children in the home.
According to Mrs. Eugenia
Feldman, president of the
Palm Beach section of NCJW,
HIPPY focuses on mothers of
Middle Eastern and Sephardic
Jewish children in an attempt
to raise the children's skills to
a level even with those of
Ashkenazi children, who have
traditionally been less cultural-
ly deprived.
"It's like a ripple effect,"
Mrs. Feldman observed; one
child's mother will teach
another child's mother, and so
on.
Developed in 1968 by Dr.
Avima Lombard, a senior
research associate of the NC-
JW Research Institute for In-
novation in Education, and
Professor Abraham Tannen-
baum of Columbia University,
HIPPY instruction focuses on
formal language skills, sensory
Century Kosher Market To Reopen
me Century Kosher Market
lOkeechobee Boulevard near
Btury Village will re-open
Bsoon as possible" after an
^cted Julv 3 lease closing,
^rted owner Ira Feder.
Illr. Feder, who has owned
Id operated a kosher market
[the West Palm Beach area
30 years, said that the
Lus in operations, which
pn after Passover this
t, resulted mainly from dif-
Jty in negotiating a lease
fith the shopping center
agement, which was in the
:ess of changing hands.
I Citing a "definite need" for
J local kosher market, Mr.
feder acknowledged the ap-
Trehension of the local Jewish
Immunity after the April
losing. "Customers were con-
fcrned," he said, "because
lere wasn't another kosher
irket" in town. Many of
:haverim
Continued from Page 6
pir Big Friends.
lLouis Shapiro. 11 years old,
ks Alan Zangen, a local at-
brney, as a Big Friend, and
Inarlie Shapiro, who is 7 years
|d, is matched with Jack
: ko, a campaign associate
frthe Jewish Federation. Ms.
fapiro feels that both Big
friends are "very happy" with
|e arrangement, and she said
ftingly that her two sons
puld rather be with them
I with me.'-
[The benefits of the program
pthe Big Friend must also be
inphasized. "It's a feeling
'"t someone depends on you,
as you arsd enjoys you for
|Mt you are," said one Big
friend. p
[As with many good things,
Fever, there is not enough
pie Chaverim program to go
found. Presently there are
PS children waiting to be
**> with a Big Friend.
ause six of those waiting
eboys "We are in real need
"men Big Friends," said Ms.
o Friends seem to love
rnat they are doing and derive
I sense of self-worth and
[lendship from the ex-
rice, and the benefits for
uttle Friends are obvious.
gone interested in learning
"J >out the Chaverim pro-
r m volunteering as a
l*"end should call Bonnie
BF *l the Jewish Com-
*y Center of the Palm
"*es at 689-7700.
Feder's regular customers
were forced to travel south to
Delray Beach or Broward
County to find quality kosher
meat.
The new Century Kosher
Market, to be located in a cor-
ner of the same supermarket
which previously housed it,
will be downsized from 28,000
square feet to 6,000 square
feet. The resultant savings on
overhead will allow Feder to
serve the local households that
keep kosher while building his
business into the success it has
been for three decades.
Municipal Workers End Strike
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
80,000 local government
employees who had been on
strike throughout the country
for three days returned to
work recently, except those
from Safed, Beth Shean and
local religious councils.
Municipalities in the three
major cities began making ef-
forts to clear away the gar-
bage which had piled up in the
streets. Mayors hoped they
would clear the backlog by last
weekend.
Meanwhile, motorists con-
tinued their search for gas for
their cars in the face of a
refusal by most gas station
owners to obey temporary
orders by local labor courts to
unlock their pumps.
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discrimination and problem
solving.
"I never knew that I could
help my children with their
lessons Now I've found the
courage to help others," said
one mother involved in the
program. "If only (HIPPY)
had come when the other
children were small," exclaim-
ed another, whose younger
child Moshe participated.
"Moshe is the only one with
any education because he was
lucky enough to get caught up
with the program."
Scientific evaluations of
HIPPY in recent years sug-
gest that its goals are indeed
being achieved. Home-
instructed groups have con-
sistently outscored non-
instructed control groups on
tests administered by the
Research Institute and by the
Israeli government. Test
scores which indicate HIPPY's
success have been cor-
roborated by observations of
kindergarten and first-grade
teachers. "I only have to
demonstrate the task once and
these (HIPPY) children carry
on without further guidance, '
said one kindergarten teacher.
Teachers also noted the in-
creased cooperation of parents
who participated in HIPPY.
Under the guidance of the
Research Institute, many Pro-
ject Renewal communities in
Israel successfully utilize HIP-
PY, and a modified HIPPY
program to educate the newly-
arrived Ethiopian children has
also been developed. Mrs.
Feldman pointed out that the
program is even being used in
Richmond, Virginia with
disadvantaged black children.
Although the strides of the
NCJW Research Institute
have been significant, most of
NCJW's community service
work is done here in the
United States. "We're really
multi-faceted," said Mrs.
Feldman, referring to NCJW,
the oldest major Jewish
women's organization in
America. Mrs. Feldman noted
that benefits from NCJW pro-
grams are not limited to the
Jewish community. "We live
in a community as Jews, but
we want to help our entire
community," she said. Mrs.
Feldman cited the Guardian
Ad Litem program, which ad-
vocates on behalf of abused
and neglected children in Palm
Beach County; the Picture
Lady program, which offers
art appreciation courses to
fourth-graders throughout the
county; and the state public af-
fairs committee, which lobbies
in Tallahassee, as just a few of
the service-oriented programs
sponsored by NCJW.
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rage iz ine JewisfiTionc
Jm
County/Friday, July 5, 1985
Senior News
FTOM THE JEWISH COMMUNrTY CENTER
The Jewish Community Ceaters Comprehensive
Senior Service Center it a network of services for seniors
designed to encourage and foster growth, independence
and activity for persons ia their later years. Varied services
through a Federal Grant Title III of the Older Americans
Act, awarded by Galfstream Area Agency on Aging,
enhance the everyday lives of older adults throughout the
community.
HOT KOSHER
LUNCH CONNECTION
Each weekday, seniors
gather for intimate talk,
educational discussions, game
playing, leisure and song.
These activities are followed
by a hot, kosher, nutritious
lunch served with warmth and
hospitality by our dedicated
volunteers. Join the unique
and enriching Kosher Lunch
program at the Jewish Com-
munity Center. We offer im-
aginative and innovative ac-
tivities plus stimulating discus-
sions and lively musical
presentations. A delicious
strictly kosher lunch is served.
There is no set fee, but persons
are asked to make a contribu-
tion each meal. Reservations
must be made in advance. Call
689-7703 for information.
MENU
Monday, July 8 Orange
juice, beef with cabbage sauce,
succotash, carrots, fresh ap-
ple, Italian bread.
Tuesday, July 9
Grapefruit juice, fish filet with
lemon, boiled potato, chopped
broccoli, sliced pears, rye
bread.
Wednesday, July 10
Pineapple juice, veal patties
with pepper sauce, rice,
spinach, fresh orange,
pumpernickle bread.
Thursday, July 11 Apple
juice, stuffed peppers, mashed
potatoes, green beans,
peaches, whole wheat bread.
Friday, July 12 Tomato
juice, boiled chicken, glazed
carrots, zucchini with celery
and onions, cookies, challah
bread.
Monday, July 15 Orange
juice, meat balls with tomato
sauce, instant potatoes, green
beans, mixed fruit, Italian
bread.
Tuesday, July 16 Pineap-
ple juice, chicken/Spanish
style, yellow rice, peas and car-
rots, plums, rye bread.
Wednesday, July 17
Orange juice, veal with pep-
pers and onions, sweet
potatoes, peas, pineapple tid-
bits, pumpernickle bread.
Thursday, July 18 -
Grapefruit juke, meat loaf
with brown gravy, oven brown
potatoes, sliced carrots, sliced
pears, whole wheat bread.
Friday, July 19 Apple
juice, sauteed chicken with
giblet gravy, chopped broccoli,
sweet potato, sliced peaches,
challah bread.
HOME
DELIVERED MEALS
Persons who are homebound
and need a Kosher meal please
call for information. Call Carol
in West Palm Beach at
689-7703.
SENIOR ACTIVITIES
Monday, July 8 "'Adven-
tures in Living," 1:15 p.m.
Mary Tinker, Instructor:
Kosher Meal Program
Games, 11:30 a.m
Tuesday. July 9 Second
Tuesday Activity. 1:15 p.m.:
Kosher Meal Served 12 noon.
Wednesday, July 10
'"Energizing Your Life," 11
a.m. Bea Bunze; Kosher Meal
Served 12 noon.
Thursday, July 11 -
'"Financial Awareness for
Women," 1:15 p.m. Joe Ray,
Instructor; Speakers Club, 10
a.m.; Kosher Meal Program,
11:30 a.m.
Friday, July 12 Kosher
Meal Program, 11:30 a.m.
Monday, July 15
"Adventures in Living," 1:15
p.m. Mary Tinker, Instructor;
Kosher Meal Program -
Games, 11:30 a.m.
Tuesday, July 16 "Timely
Topics/Round Table Talk," 1
p.m.; Kosher Meal Served 12
noon.
Wednesday, July 17
"Energizing Your Life,"
11 a.m. Bea Bunze; Kosher
Meal Served 12 noon.
Thursday, July 18 -
"Financial Awareness for
Women," 1:15 p.m. Joe Ray,
Instructor; Speakers Club. 10
a.m.; Health Insurance, 2 p.m.
Edie Reiter, Health Insurance
Coordinator; Kosher Meal Pro-
gram. 11:30 a.m.
Friday, July 19 Kosher
Meal Program, 11:30 a.m.
Palm Beach County Adult
Education Classes
SPECIAL EVENT-
RIDE AND SAIL
Take an air-conditioned bus
11 a.m. Wednesday, Jury 17, at
the Westgate of Century
Village and board the Pad-
dlewheel Queen riverboat at
12:30 p.m. in Fort Lauderdale.
Choose a lunch of either baked
chicken or tuna fish salad and
enjoy a luxurious cruise on the
enclosed first deck of this tri-
ple deck boat. Boat will dock
back at 4:30 p.m. A relaxed
drive back will take all to West
Palm Beach at approximately
6 p.m. The cost for the entire
day is $20 for JCC members
and $25 for non-members.
This is another Jewish Com-
munity Center's Second Tues-
day Council's activity, Sabina
Gottschalk, chairperson. For
additional information please
call Nina Stillerman, volunteer
coordinator 689-7703.
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Double Standard
Deplored In Arrested Rabbis' Case
By THEO STONE
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Thirty-three Congressmen
have signed a letter addressed
to Attorney General Edwin
Meese III asking him why the
U.S. Attorney for the District
of Columbia is prosecuting 24
rabbis and one Lutheran
minister who where arrested
last month for protesting in
front of the Soviet Embassy.
The letter, which is dated June
11, 1985 and was sent on the sta-
tionery of the House Judiciary
Committee, was signed by the en-
tire committee with the exception
of three members. It asks the At-
torney General why the rabbis and
the minister are being prosecuted.
The 25 men and women were ar-
rested on May 1 and accused of
violating a law which prohibits
protesting within 500 feet of
embassy.
THE RABBIS, who were pro
testing to dramatize the plight of
Soviet Jewry, were using the
same technique which has proved
so succesful in the anti-apartheid
protests at the South African Em-
bassy. Whereas more than 2,000
protesters have been arrested at
the South African Embassy on the
same charges as the rabbis, the
U.S. attorney has decided not to
prosecute the South African
protesters.
The letter said, "these members
of the clergy were protesting the
difficult plight and discriminatory
treatment of Jews in the Soviet
Union. Like the more than 2,000
people who have demonstrated in
front of the South African Em-
bassy, the 24 rabbis and one
Lutheran minister's demonstra-
tion was peaceful and did not
disrupt the conduct of business at
the Embassy."
The letter asks Meese, "Why
has the government decided to
prosecute these members of the
clergy when it has dropped the
charges against all of those who
have done the same thing at the
South African Embassy?"
THE LETTER goes on to say,
"The behavior of both groups was
identical. Absent of a sound ex-
planation, the decision to pro-
secute in these cases appears to be
arbitrary and discriminatory.
Even if the Soviet Union has re-
quested prosecution, we believe
that the decision whom to pro-
secute and whom not to prosecute
for exercising their First Amend-
ment rights to demonstrate
should not depend upon the re-
quests of representatives of
foreign governments."
The office of the Attorney
General has refused comment on
the Judiciary Committee letter.
Meanwhile, the Rabbinial
Assembly has also sent a telegram
to Meese protesting what the rab-
binical group charged was the
denial of "basic rights" by the
police to a group of 21 rabbis ar-
rested outside the Soviet
Embassy.
ACCORDING to the RA, the
organization of 1,200 Conser-
vative rabbis, the 21 rabbis ar-
rested on June 10 were in-
carcerated for six hours and weJ
not allowed to meet with th,i,
lawyers for five hours, 'The,
were also denied the right to mZ\
telephone calls, have food m
water, (and) decent bathroom
facilities." the RA said TZ\
telegram. I
"Moreover, many of thej.1
leaders in their 60's were forced!
to remain standing for a threeJ
hour stretch while kept in a tiny]
cage," the telegram said. "These
men suffered the indignity of body |
searches and were kept in a cam I
with drunks and drug addicts!
while incarcerated in the!
Washington Superior Court."
"We strongly object to this!
denial of basic rights to a group as I
distinguished and significant as
these 21 rabbis. Furthermore, we I
vow to promote additional!
peaceful demonstrations and ar{
rests if necessary until Soviet!
Jews will be allowed the freedoms
guaranteed in the Helsinki!
Accords."
The telegram was signed by I
Rabbi Alexander Shapiro, RA[
president, and Rabbi Allan
Meyerowitz, RA Soviet Jewry
chairman.
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Friday, July 5, 1985/The Jewish Floridian otfalm Beach County Page 13
Breaking Out Of
The Poverty Cycle
n. LESLIE KLINEMAN
UJA Press Service
JERUSALEM Aliza
I doesn't sing or dance, but
she's part of the well-known
I children's rhyme just the
same. At two years old she
Lges round and round the
Poverty cycle. Mother to
I daughter, father to son,
I generation to generation
deprivation to deprivation
I unless the pattern is changed,
I unless the cycle is broken.
Yossi, Aliza's father, is both
I a victim and a part of the cycle.
I The son of poor, uneducated
I immigrant parents, Yossi
[grew up "without." Without
I adequate attention and home
I life. Without a positive self-
I image. Without the resources
I to break out of the poverty
I cycle.
But in community centers
throughout Israel, the Early
I Childhood Development Pro-
Igram is helping hundreds of
children like Aliza learn, think,
play and see themselves in a
different way. The program is
giving them the tools to build a
better life and a chance to
break the cycle.
Innovative community
center projects such as this
one are supported by the
American Jewish Joint
Distribution Committee, which
receives virtually all its $49.5
million budget from American
Jews contributing to the
United Jewish Appeal/Federa-
tion Campaign. JDC aids over
130 community centers in
Israel, and has additional pro-
grams in Israel and more than
30 other countries.
"We believe that in order for
a child's potential to develop to
the fullest, help must start as
early as possible," said Margot
Pins, a developer of the pro-
gram. "By the age of a year
and a half, these children are
part of a community center
nursery program. It is very im-
portant to understand that a
child's first development is the
result of interaction with
adults."
Refuseniks
In countless informal ways,
the trained staff members in-
teract with the children, help-
ing them to recognize their in-
dividuality and self-worth; to
understand their senses, their
needs and their feelings; to
communicate and express
themselves.
Soft bean bags and resonant
coffee cans filled with dif-
ferent materials help children
develop body senses and
awareness of weight, size, pro-
portion and are fun. Crawl-
ing enhances awareness of
body parts and verbal expres-
sion and sparks laughter. A
3uiet moment with a teacher
uring the toddler's diaper
change strengthens a personal
relationship that helps develop
the child's caring about others.
Lunchtime with all its
tumult and mess is a time
for sharing, group socializa-
tion, development of coordina-
tion and, for many of these
children, their only hot,
nourishing meal that day.
"We start with the children,
but the parents are integral to
the program," Ms. Pins said
Continued from Page 1
ingly unafraid that as they all
walked down the street
I together, he unabashedly
pointed out the KGB agents
i*o were following them.
Bert Friedman told the story
of a young refusenik who was
recognized internationally for
his work in science, but who
had his PhD from Moscow
[University taken away by a
panel of colleagues which in-
| eluded fellow Jews. "You will
I never understand what it
means to have your thoughts
and mind controlled," the
young Russian told the four
Americans. Commenting on
this refusenik's sense of
desperate resignation, Sylvia
Friedman said, "It was as if he
were beaten."
When asked about any possi-
ble political solutions to the
refusenik problem, all four
agreed that these Soviet Jews,
I held hostage as examples of
I dissent, are being exploited by
I the Soviet government, which
seems to ignore the fact that
the contributions of brilliant,
productive citizens are being
negated by illogically
| retributive policies.
It is apparent that the
refuseniks need and want
publicity; the more widely
recognized their plight, the
more likely Washington will
receive pressure from
American Jews to do
something.
The release of the refusenik
hostages can be "bought," ac-
cording to the Abrams and the
rriedmans, if their freedom to
emigrate is a condition of
future American trade deals or
treaties with the Soviet Union.
American-Soviet understan-
ding, however, needs to im-
prove first.
. Bert Friedman recalled that
'n the last 1100 years of Rus-
jj'an history, only 76 years
nave been spent in peace, free
from war or invasion. "The
country is paranoid," Mr.
Friedman said, and this fact
needs to be understood by
statesmen and government of-
ficials who enter into negotia-
tion with the Soviets.
"Do What We Did"
When asked what advice
they would give to other
American Jews who plan to
visit the Soviet Union, the four
returnees announced in
unison, "Visit the refuseniks!"
"Do what we did," Larry
Abrams claimed, and in the
same breath he urged anyone
planning to make a refusenik
visit to go through a briefing
sponsored by a local chapter of
the National Conference on
Soviet Jewry.
"It's a mitzvah," Rena
Abrams said; she and her three
companions felt a concrete
sense of accomplishment, but
there is obviously more
groundwork to be done.
It is estimated that there are
28,000 refuseniks in Moscow
alone, although only the KGB
knows the accurate count.
These people need worldwide
publicity, books with which
they can catch up on a world
that the government has clos-
ed off, and more visits by
fellow Jews who encourage
them to believe that there are
people sympathetic with their
struggle for freedom.
Sylvia Friedman concluded
this extraordinary interview
by saying, "I would go back to
Russia, but only to see the
refuseniks."
For more information on the
refusenik situation, readers
may contact Shirlee Blonder,
chair of the Soviet Jewry Task
Force of the Community Rela-
tions Council of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County, or Rabbi Alan Sher-
man, director ofCRC.
ENJOY THE
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during a brief break in her
duties on a recent day. "The
community center framework
allows for parental involve-
ment. Drawing a parent in is
not always easy, particularly
the fathers, but this may be
the key to the child's personal
and social growth."
When Aliza started in the
program, she was totally
silent, very nervous and
withdrawn. Her father Yossi
never brought her to the
center, until he was forced to
do so by his wife's illness. Then
he noticed a broken door at the
center and repaired it. He lik-
ed the atmosphere and began
to come more often. The
psychologist drew him into
conversation with Aliza.
This became a weekly ses-
sion, quick and informal, but
contact just the same. Yossi
now brings Aliza to nursery
each day. They're developing a
close relationship and she is
thriving from is attention. She
is happy, talks and par-
ticipates. Yossi still has many
problems, but his relationship
with Aliza has changed and
she's improving as a result.
The Early Childhood
Development Program is
building a bridge across social,
economic and family gaps, so
children like Aliza won't have
to go round and round the
poverty cycle any more.
JCC News
A TIME TO PLAN
The Young Singles (22-35) of the Jewish Community
Center will meet at the Center, 2415 Okeechobee Blvd.,
West Palm Beach at 7:30 p.m., Monday, July 8 to plan the
July and August events. All are invited to come and bring
ideas and suggestions.
GIANT SALE
The "One More Time" warehouse, located at 3420 West
45th St., just east of Military Trail (Mercedes-Benz) is hav-
ing a giant sale. All are invited to come in and browse.
Many items such as upholstered furniture, tables, chairs,
bric-a-brac, etc. are on display. The hours are 10 a.m. to 4
p.m., Monday through Friday.
Donations, which are tax deductible, including furniture,
automobiles, drapes, jewelry, etc. are cheerfully accepted.
PRIME TIMERS MARK TIME
Prime Time Singles (60 plus) of the Jewish Community
Center will be on to the Lake Worth Senior Center
Wednesday, July 10 at 7:30 p.m. for an evening of fun and
frolic. All are invited. Donation is $3. Call the JCC for
information.
The Prime Time Singles (60 plus) will be going to Bryant
Park on the Intracoastal at the Lake Worth Bridge Thurs-
day, July 18 for an outdoor concert. Be there early. Ar-
rangements for a bus can be made. Please call Lottie for
information.
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:


Page 14 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, July 5, 1985
Palm Beach philanthropist and communal
leader Jonas Barenholtz (far right) played a
leading role in the recent Chancellor's
council retreat of the Jewish Theological
Seminary. He serves as Palm Beach
Chancellor's Council chairman, and at the
retreat, chaired the session on "Conser-
vative Judaism Today." He is shown here
before a retreat dinner observing other par-
ticipants and leaders of Conservative
Judaism: (from left) Selma Rappaport, past
president, Women's League for Conser-
vative Judaism and current national
cabinet member, Torah Fund residence
halls campaign for the Seminary; Rabbi
Marshall Meyer, Vice President, University
of Judaism (a Seminary affiliate); Irving
Franklin, 1985 Seminary National Com-
munity Service award recipient from New
England.
National Conference On Intermarried
By ANN LYNN UPTON
As we gathered in the sanc-
tuary of the magnificent
Stephen Wise Free Synagogue
in New York City, the at-
mosphere was one of excite-
ment and curiosity. What was
about to happen was indeed
momentous the first Na-
tional Conference on Pro-
grams for the Intermarried.
This inaugural conference was
co-sponsored by the Union of
American Hebrew Congrega-
tions, the United Synagogue,
the Federation of Reconstruc-
tionist Congregations and
Havurot, and the American
Jewish Committee.
The meetings were attended
by representatives of all the
movements as well as leaders,
both professional and lay,
representing every facet of
Jewish communal life.
The subjects of intermar-
riage, outreach, and conver-
sion were addressed by those
in the field doing the work.
The keynote speakers included
Dr. David Gordis of the
American Jewish Committee,
Rabbi David Teutsch of the
Federation of Reconstruc-
tionist Congregations, Rabbi
Alexander Schindler of UAHC
and Rabbi Alexander M.
Shapiro of United Synagogue.
They addressed the subjects of
intermarriage, conversion,
and outreach, and discussed
programs for the parents and
children of intermarrieds as
well as how these groups are
influencing American Jewish
life.
Dr. Egon Mayer, noted
sociologist, talked about the
research that has been done in
the field and the need to do
much more to enable us to
understand better the
phenomenon of intermarriage.
As a participant in the
workshops I was given the op-
portunity to present the model
program we have here in Palm
Beach County. Sponsored by
the Palm Beach County Board
of Rabbis, our "Introduction to
Judaism" course offered
through the Conversion In-
stitute is a cross-movement
program that provides a
16-week study course for all
potential "Jews by Choice."
While involved in their studies,
they also meet regularly with
their sponsoring Rabbi, who
helps them to integrate their
studies into a viable program
of Jewish activities. This com-
bination has worked suc-
cessfully for approximately 35
individuals and couples who
have completed the program.
Our model was received with
much enthusiasm and interest,
and other communities are
considering the adoption of a
similar program.
Community after community
is recognizing the great need
to deal with this growing seg-
ment of our population which
has too often been neglected or
even forgotten. With an
estimated 40 percent inter-
marriage rate we cannot af-
ford to ignore their presence
nor should we be fearful of
opening our hearts and our
doors to them. We are gifted
with a way of life that is
beautiful and unique we
should be proud to share it
with those who marry "in."
As Rabbi Alexander
Schindler stated, "Intermar-
riage is the sting that comes to
us with the honey of our
freedom."
This "painful reality of
Jewish life" in America must
be addressed in a positive man-
ner the First National Con-
ference on Programs for the
Intermarried was a giant step
in the right direction.
Check why it makes sense
to pre-arrange your funeral now.
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The appointment of Judith
Frede Love as Vice President
for Development of The
Jewish Theological Seminary
of America was announced
recently by Seminary
Chancellor Gerson D. Cohen.
Mrs. Love is heading the
Seminary's Campaign to
raise $50 million by June
1987 in honor of the
Seminary Centennial. The
Seminary's field office in this
area is located at 120 South
Olive Avenue, Suite 510
West Palm Beach, Florida.
Candle lighting Time
July 5 7S9 p.mJ
July 12-7:S8p.ra.
Religious Directory
Conservative
CONGREGATION ANSHEI SHOLOM. 5348 Grove Street
West Palm Beach 33409. Phone 684-3212. Rabbi Isaac Vander
Walde. Cantor Mordecai Spektor. Daily: 8:30 a.m. and 5:30 p m <
Friday: 8:30 a.m., 5 p.m. and a late service at 8:15 p.m., followed
by Oneg Shabbat. Saturday: 8:30 a.m., 5 p.m., Mincha followedbv
Sholosh Suedos.
CONGREGATION BETH KODESH OF BOYNTON BEACH
501 N.E. 26 Avenue, Boynton Beach 33435. Phone 586-9428
Rabbi Avrom L. Drarin, Cantor Arthur R. Rosenwasser. Monday
8:30 a.m.; Thursday 8:30 a.m. Sabbath services, Friday 8:15 n m
Saturday 9 a.m.
GOLDEN LAKES TEMPLE: 1470 Golden Lakes Blvd West
Palm Beach 33411. Phone 689-9430. Rabbi Joseph Speiser. Daily
services 8:15 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. Sabbath services Friday 8:15
p.m. Saturday 9 a.m.. 5 p.m., Mincha followed by Sholosh Suedos.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID: 4657 Hood Road, Palm Beach Gardens
33410. Phone 694-2350. Rabbi William Marder, Cantor Earl J,
Rackoff. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m. Saturday 10 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 2815 No. Flagler Dr., West Palm Beach
33407. Phone 833-0339. Rabbi Howard J. Hirsch, Cantor Elaine
Shapiro. Sabbath services Friday 6:30 p.m. (June 14 July 26),
Saturday 9:30 a.m. Daily Minyan 8:15 a.m., Sunday and leg&i
holidays 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 315 N. "A" Street, Lake Worth
33460. Phone 585-5020. Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg, Cantor Jacob
Elman. Services Monday and Thursday 8:15 a.m., Friday 8:15
p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 224 N.W. Avenue G, Belle Glade
33430. Sabbath services Friday, 8:30 p.m. Phone 996-3886.
TEMPLE BETH ZION: Lions Club, 700 Camelia Dr., Royal
Palm Beach. Mailing address: PO Box 104,650 Royal Palm Blvd.,
Royal Palm Beach, FL 33411. Sabbath services Friday 8 p.m.,
Saturday 8:45 a.m. Rabbi Nathan Zelizer. Phone 793-9122.
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB: 2177 So. Congress Ave., West Palm
Beach 33406. Phone 433-5957. Rabbi Dr. Morris Silberman, Can
tor Hyman Lifshin. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m., Saturday
and holidays 9 a.m., Monday and Thursday 9 a.m.
TEMPLE EMANUEL: 190 North County Road, Palm Beach
33480. Phone 832-0804. Rabbi Joel Charin, Cantor David Dar-
daahti. Sabbath services, Friday 6 p.m.; Saturday 9 a.m.
THE TREASURE COAST JEWISH CENTER Ben
Abraham: 3257 S.E. Salerno Road, Port Salerno. Rabbi Abraham
Rose. 1-287-8833. Services Friday evenings 8 p.m.
LAKE WORTH JEWISH CENTER: St. Luke's United
Methodist Chapel, 165 Ohio Road, Lake Worth. Mailing address:
6996 Quince Lane, Lake Worth, FL 33467. Phone 965-6053. Fri-
day night services 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.
Orthodox
CONGREGATION AITZ CHAIM: Century Village, West Palm
Beach. Phone 689-4675. Sabbath services 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. Daily
services 8:15 a.m. and 6:30 p.m.
Reform
CONGREGATION BETH ISRAEL: 1592 Floresta, P.O. Box
857146. Port St. Lucie, FL 33452. Friday night services 8 p.m.,
Saturday morning 10:30 a.m. Phone 465-6977.
THE REFORM TEMPLE OF JUPITER-TEQUESTA: 759
Parkway Street, Jupiter. Mailing address: Plaza 222, U.S. No. 1,
Tequesta 33458. Phone 747-1109. Rabbi Alfred L. Friedman. Ser-
vices Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 4600 Oleander Avenue, Fort Pierce, FL
33450. Phone 461-7428.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM: St. Helen's Parish Hall, 20th
Avenue and Victory Blvd., Vero Beach 32960, mailing address:
P.O. Box 2113, Vero Beach, FL 32961-2113. Rabbi Richard D.
Messing. Phone 1-569-0180.
TEMPLE BETH TORAH: at Wellington Elementary School,
13000 Paddock Dr., West Palm Beach. Mailing address: P.O. Box
17008, West Palm Beach, FL 33406. Friday services 8:15 p.m.
Rabbi Steven R. Westman. Phone 793-2700.
TEMPLE ISRAEL: 1901 No. Flagler Dr., West Palm Beach
33407. Phone 833-8421. Rabbi Howard Shapiro, Cantorial Soloist
Susan Weiss-Speth. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE JUDEA: at St. Catharine's Greek Orthodox Church
Social Hall, 4000 Washington Rd., at Southern Boulevard. Rsbb
Joel L. Levine. Cantor Anne Newman. Mailing address: 5154
Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach, FL 33409. Phone 471-1526.


Friday, July 5, 1985/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 15
III
leNews
Hostage Aftermath May Hurt Israel
EMPLE BETH SHOLOM
faring a special Shabbat on
me 28 Cantor Jacob Elman
j honored for ten years of
wee to the congregation,
brine wnicn time temPle
fcmbership experienced
Enarkable growth.
Cantor Howard Dardashti
5 joined the staff of Temple
Sholom on a full-time
uis commencing Friday
wiling, Julv 5. A graduate of
L Jewish Theological
Eminary in New York, Can-
t Dardashti sings in 14
Lmages and has composed a
Jmplete guitar Shabbat
vice.
Icantor Dardashti previously
p-ved at the Suburban Jewish
Enter of Linden, N.J. and at
Cmple Beth Abraham in
Uand, Calif.
TEMPLE JUDEA
| Members of Temple Judea
^ overwhelmingly at the
me 9 congregational meeting
| adopt a building fund of
j per family payable up
ifive years but not less than
pOO per year. This will enable
; building committee to pro-
_ with plans to build the
icial hall, school, kitchen,
administrative wing,
pd chapel.
the June 9 meeting, ar-
Wect Victor Cohen displayed
explained the completed
ins. The social hall will seat
worshippers and will in-
de an outdoor patio
a.The ten-classroom school
I surround a plaza which
i be utilized for outdoor ser-
and programs. The
lapel will also provide a facili-
jforoneg shabbat receptions.
INew officers elected at the
leeting include Stephen
|erger, president; vice
'esidents, Daniel Bakst,
filliam Meyer, and Helaine
ahn; Rosalee Savel,
jcretary, and William Roths-
pn, treasurer. New Board
embers include Abe
.aier, Barbara Kiner, Dr.
phuyler Metlis, Shirley
Area Deaths
NBAUM
71. of Birdie Drive, Lake Worth.
Wt-Wemstein Memorial Chapel. West
fmBeach
pmi
T Junes (Jimmie). 6S, of Atlantis.
*wn Gardens and Funeral Chapels,
* Palm Beach.
pRSOVER
JJur. 63. of Boynton Beach. Menorah
^ns and Funeral Chapels, West Palm
UOT
. of Bent Tree Villas. Boynton Beach.
"Urael-Rubm Family Protection Plan
W, Delray Beach.
Nash
"6. of Palm Beach. Menorah Gardens
funeral Chapels. West Palm Beach.
fUHMAN
of Norwich, Century Village.
fUm Beach. Riverside Guardian
T Home. West Palm Beach.
htntlt m Uke Eve'yn "ve-Wert
j Rlvereide Guard Plan
"West Palm Beach.
of Chatham. Ontury Village.
J* Beach. Rrnrtd. Guardian
* Home, West Palm Beach.
DLER
1* 8I' of Wellington L-214, Weat
lwl-D,Ver8ide Gu"*>n Han
west Palm Beach
**A*TZ
of Palm Beach Gardens. LerHt
WvLG"ntei Security Plan
*" *est Palm Beach.
Cantor Howard Dardashti
Traum, and Mary Parker.
Edith Grushow was elected for
another two-year term. Re-
maining on the Board are Jack
Ainbender, Lew Bennett, Lor-
raine Hoffinger, Douglas
Kleiner, and Aimee Levitt. Dr.
Jeffrey Faivus will serve on
the executive committee as im-
mediate past president.
Rabbi Joel Levine and Cantor
Anne Newman will conduct a
Service-in-the-Round at Tem-
ple Judea Sabbath Services,
Friday, July 5 at 8 p.m. The
format of this service will pro-
vide an intimate setting for the
theme of sharing feelings
about Shabbat. Members of
the congregation will assist
Rabbi Levine and Cantor
Newman in creating what is
called a "free-form" worship
experience.
Services on Friday, July 12
will be held at the special time
of 6:30 p.m. Rabbi Levine and
Cantor Newman will conduct a
Shabbat Dinner-Service.
Members and guests are in-
vited to bring a Shabbat picnic
dinner including candles and
candlesticks, kiddush cup and
wine, and challah. The Shab-
bat evening will include Torah
study, singing and celebration.
Children are welcome as the
entire evening will conclude at
8 p.m.
Continued from Page 1
The rift widened as the
hostage crisis progressed;
many Americans, including
the President, Vice President
and several hostages, declared
that Israel was holding the
700-odd Shiite detainees il-
legally. Defense Minister Yit-
zhak Rabin's explanation of
the proviso in Article 49 of the
Geneva Convention, which
sanctions evacuations of
native populations by an occu-
pying power "if the security of
the population or imperative
military reasons so demand,"
did little to convince many
Americans.
Continued American
references to "Shiite
hostages" held in Israel
created barriers in the lines of
communication between
Washington and Jerusalem,
resulting in garbled and
sometimes implicitly an-
tagonistic messages being ex-
changed at a time when unam-
biguous dialogue was crucial.
Predictably, the TWA
hostage situation eroded
American public support for
Israel. A three-stage
Washington Post-ABC News
poll over a six-day period from
June 17-22 showed a steady in-
crease in the number of
respondents who supported
the statement that "the
United States should reduce
its ties to Israel in order to
lessen the acts of terrorism
against us in the Middle East."
This decline in public sup-
port coincides unfortunately
with the imminent considera-
tion by Congress of a foreign
aid package that provides
more than $4 billion in
assistance to Israel. U.S. Con-
gressmen, who tend to be very
politically sensitive to the opi-
nions of their constituents, are
also concerned about Israel's
difficulties in stemming the
tide of economic chaos, which,
of course, would worsen if
Congress cuts the aid package
significantly.
Amal leader Nabhi Berri is
bound to emerge from the
situation as a significant
political power in Lebanon,
and Syrian President Assad,
the leader of a country which is
the arch-enemy of Israel and
which is suspected of beine one
Reform Temple
Of Jupiter-Tequesta
Religious School Teachers
And Hebrew Teachers Needed
For Education Program
Call: Russell Tarsches at
747-4235
FOR SALE
Two grave package at Menorah Garden West
Palm Beach, including 2 spaces 2 sealed
burial vaults and 1 double granite base w.th
Pricedafornquick sale. Call: H813) 733-3585
or write: |. citron
1476 Kings Court
Dunedln, FL 33528
of the breeding grounds for
the two terrorist attacks on
the U.S. Embassy and Marine
barracks in Beirut, will be hail-
ed as a diplomatic hero; Israel
will be viewed by many as the
villain.
Furthermore, some analysts
claim that if the more
moderate Amal militia derives
renewed political and military
strength from this whole af-
fair, then Israel can heave a
sigh of relief, knowing that the
more fanatic Shiite factions
will be subordinated.
Yet, the most recent series
of diplomatic events indicates
that Syria controls Amal, and
since it is in Syria's strategic
interest to stabilize southern
Lebanon in order to avoid fac-
tional confrontations that
could bring foreign powers in-
to the region, Syrian influence
is not likely to disappear.
Moreover, embarrassing
defections to Amal amongst
militiamen in the Christian-
backed South Lebanon Army
suggest that the SLA is not an
effective military force in
South Lebanon, and Israel is
not likely to venture another
full-scale military campaign in-
to Lebanon, not only because
the economy would be adverse-
ly affected but also because a
large sector of the public and
the government would not
sanction such a move.
So, even though the hijack-
ing was perpetrated against
American citizens, Israel
seems to be the nation that has
the most to lose.
The timing of the hijacking
was so expedient for the
Shiites and the Syrians that
one is led to speculate that ter-
rorists and their supporters
are acquiring a political
shrewdness which makes their
ruthless fanaticism all the
more dangerous.
Although the Israeli govern-
ment is experiencing the
tumultuous social, political and
economic problems which
plague young democracies,
Israel still deserves the utmost
support from the U.S. govern-
ment and Diaspora Jews. Now
would be the worst time for
the U.S. government or the
American people to neglect
their allegiance to the people
of Israel.
If recent history serves as a
precedent, American retalia-
tion against the terrorists will
probably not be forthcoming,
despite the stern rhetoric. The
most sensible American
reprisal would be to show the
world that the forces of ter-
rorism will not daunt the
United States from supporting
the only true democracy in the
Middle East.
MENORAH GARDENS
HAS PALM BEACH'S
UNBEATABLE PRE-NEED
CEMETERY PACKAGE
1 Grave, 1 Concrete Liner/Vault,
Grave Open ing & Closing, 1 Single
Granite Marker w Installation &
Inscription, Documentary Stamps
& State Sales Tax, Perpetual Care.
Single
Package
Includes:
PRE-NEED PACKAGE
PRICED AT
DOUBLE PACKAGE
PRICED AT
$1,117.80
$2,124.50
Available only at Palm Beach County's only all-Jewish
memorial park and funeral chapel at one convenient location.
(This is a limited-time offer, and prices are not guaranteed
unless pre-paid, so call today!)
ASK ABOUT OUR INTEREST-FREE INSTALLMENT
PAYMENT PLAN
^'"Gardens and Funeral Chapels
627-2277
9321 Memorial Park Road
7 minutes west of 1-95 via Lake Park Road Exit.
Cemetery Mausoleum Funeral Chapel Pre-Need Planning
Other locations in North Miami Beach,
Sunrise, Margate and Deerfiekl Beach


Page 16 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, July 5, 1986
NORTON
TIRE CO.
MWKtl
Since 1924... your cars best company on the road.
OVER 60 YEARS SATISFYING
THE DRIVING NEEDS
OF FLORIDA
HFGoodrich
FLOMM'S UWGEST FACTORY AUTHOHZH) DBTHWJTOR

FREE14-P0INT
SAFETY CHECK
TRES sVUANCE BRAKES HOSES
BELTS BATTERY SHOCKS A MORE
23?
P155 80612
BanociM
MBtTRK,
mrfSTERCSRB.
FeCHOASSIHT
irrnmus
We will not
be undersold on
BF Goodrich
tires
*~t*3tniS
%Vft&
i A
BECAUSE SO MUCH IS RIDING ON YOUR TIRES
>Ve will not
De undersold
on WicMin
XH' WHITEWALLS
NEW CAR CMANGEOVEBS
XWWTFMillS
BRANONEW
20S7514 XZ4
SET
CLOSE-OUT
p-metrk;
TWHTTRHAUS
PI 95/75-14
P205/75-15
P225/75-15
58.95
63.96
68.95
SIZE PRICE
18580-13 XH 54.95
18575-14 XH 59.95
19575-14 XH 62.95
205/75-14 XH 67.95
205/75-15 XH 68.95
21575-15 XH 71.95
22575-15 XH 73J6
23575-15 XH 77.95
ALL SEASON RADIAL
(Of nact
P17S80R13 61JJJ6
P18S/75R14 64 95
P19S/7SR14 196
P205.70R14 79.95
P20&75R15 78.96
P21S70R15 77.98
XZXofMXL lotpanding on avartebtlity) TUBELESS BLACK
sat '55 12 i wet 33 95
145 13 30.95
15513 34 95
165-13 39.95
165 14 45 95
175-14 47 95
185-14 54 95
165-15 44 95
165/70-13 38.95
17S70-13 41 95
185.70-13 49.98
185/70-14 49 95
18SSS-15 79.95
XZX TUBELESS MffffTE
sac PMCt
P155S0-13 39.95
P16SS0-13 43.95
TRXnACXMLL
18065-390 78.95
94.95
?2ft 55-390
WHITE
P21575R15 79.98
P22S/75R15 195
P23575R15 97.98
LIGHT TMJCX TIRES
ICT 185x14 6 pry 64.23
70O-15XCAT6P1y79 750-16 XCAT 8 Ply 106 95
75-16.5 XCAT I pfy 111 95
9S0-M5 XCAT ply 121.(5
CLM
All-Weather
WHITEWALLS
SIZE PRICE
P155/80813 25.95
P16580B13 26.95
P17580B13 28.95
P18580B13 29.95
P17575B14 30.95
P18575B14 31.95
P195/75B14 f 32.96
P20575B14 33.95
P215/75B14 34.95
P225/75B14 36.95
PI 65/80815 29.95
P205/75B15 34J6
P215/75B15
P225/75B15 37.96
P23575B15 38.95
Mii-we.iiner a
GT-4 XLM
VJ -+ WHITEWALLS
Lifesaver
WHITEWALLS
CUSTOM POLYSTEEL
SIZE
P155/80-13
PRICE
34.95
P18580-13
P185/75-14
P19575-14
42.95
46.95
48.95
P205/75-15 53.95
P21S/7S-15 | 55.95
P22S/7S-15 [ 58.95
P235/75-15 i 59.95
-YOUR CHOICE
SIZE noire piece
P155/80R13 34.96
P165/80R13 37.96
P185/80R13 30.95
P175/75R14 41J6
P185/75R14 42.95
P195/75R14 4646
P205/70R14 46.95 i
P205/75R14 48.95 1
P215/75R14 49.95 "
P22S/75R14 57.95
P205/75R15 51.95
P215/75R15 53.96
P225/75R15 54.95
P235/75R15 59.95
BUY DIRECT
FROM THE FACTORY
AUTHORIZED
DISTRIBUTOR
available in all stores
"WMHk
[HIGH TECH
\RADIALS
WE MAKE CARS PERFKX1M
MODERN. FULLY EQUIPPED BAYS
| 4
Monarch
WHITEWALLS
STEEL-TRACK
BELTED RADIALS
WITH NO-COST 40.000 MILE
WRITTEN LIMITED WARRANTY
Fuel economy
Tread for every climate
lough steel belts
Quiet, smooth ride
SIZE
PRICE
P165V80R13 43.94
P185/80R13 j 46.62
P185V75R14 51.06
P19S/75R14 55J0
P20SV7SR14 j 56.96
P20S/75R15 58.39
P21S75R15 [ 6Z16
P22S75R1S | 64.02
P235V75R15 66.62
POLY BIAS PLY
P16S 80013
P17580013
21.59
24.48
P18575014 25.14
STEEL-BELTED RADIALS
SIZE PRICE
P185V75R14 37.42
P195/75R14 36.25
P205/75R14 38.11
P215/75R14 42.04
P205/75R15 41.52
P21&75R15 40.91
P225/75R15 43.18
P235V75R15 44.75
FIBERGLASS BELTED
SIZE PRICE
P195 75B14 P20&75B14 25.18 26.01
P215V75B14 27.06
P22S75B14 30.23
P215775B15 28.11
P225775B15 29.59
P23&75B15 31.82
NATIONAL ACCOUNTS WELCOME
Y YOKOHAMA written limited
WARRANTY .'"
Y885 STEEL RADIAL
P77BLACKWAUS
P195/70R14 64J6
P206/70R14 69.95
P3BlACKWA1lS
155SR12 2995
jBJ**. 145SR13 26 95
K 155SR13 29.98
165SR13 32.95
J175SR14 37 95
^P3r70BLiVKVyyUIS
165/70SR13 36.98
175V70SR13 39.95*
18570SR13 41.96*
165/70SR14 43.96
195/70SR14 49.95 Complete selection ofworid-famous Pirelli P-6 and P-7 high performance tires. New P44 available in these sizes in some stores
CLEAN AIR-CONDITIONED WAITING ROOMS
i r
Y865 STEEL BELT RADIAL
SIZE PRICE
155SR12 32.40
145SR13 33.17
155SR13 3649
165SR13 3744
175SR14 4363
185SR14 46.02
165SR15 42.91
SIZE PRICE 175/70SR13 43.10
18570SR13 46.36
185 70SR14 49.09
19570SR14 52.42
20570SR14 55.70
SMALL TRUCK
Y45 White
600 i 14
(My
% OFF
IF WE DO NOT
HAVE ANY TIRE IN THIS AD
IN STOCK -
AND WE HAVE TO GIVE YOU
A RAINCHECK
EXPIRES6 30 85
MONEY-BACK
GUARANTEE
It toe any reason roe art not
' sataned (nth any
passeneerear hrerouthiy
l Norton T9 C>.. return it
alone (n** your oriemal
kewitmnMeayiolthe
money (nil berriwi**! in lull
Read hazards md commercial
vehicles excluded
3803
MONROE
SAFETY SERVICE
Most of our mechanics have been TESTED and CERTIFIED |
by the National Institute for Service Excellence
VIP SHOCKS
SPECIAL
91 installation
IMPORTANT
NORTON USES ONLY
MAJOR BRAND PARTS'
Monroe Raytwslos
Gales Remco Moog
BRAKE
SPECIAL
AIR COreDmONING CHECK-UP
AIR, Mil gladly check your tires!
40 MONTH
BATTERY
CROUP 24 24F 7t
Pcmpfful MO
coW-ciankinq AMPS
iNSTaiifoiREt
NORTON
TIRE CO.
ALL STORES OPEN
7:30 AM
CORAL GABLES ............Bird & Douglas Road
CUTLER RIDGE.............. 20390 S Dixie Hwy
DAVIE..............St. Rd. 84 just west of Univ. Dr.
DEERFIELD BEACH .......2265 W. Hillsboro Blvd
FT. LAUDERDALE ...........1740 E. Sunrise Blvd
HTALEAH PALM SPRINGS MILE ......1275 49th St
HOMESTEAD...............30100 S. Federal Hwy
KENDALL DR. HIGATE SQUARE 13872 S.W 88th St
N. KENDALL DR........S.W. 88th St. and 107th Ave
MIAMI AIRPORT......N.W. 25 St. & Milam Oairy Rd
MIAMI BEACH ...................1454 Alton Road
2 Front Mac or 2 Wheel Drum
Insta* new brings o< pads
Check, weed renihydtau
scayetem
Setm-maladc pads or add
pern labor extra needed
Repack*
aWoiLC
OlCHMtGE.
FILTER and LUK
UptoSqts of premium
on for gas or cliesel
engtnes
New lifter Cornp.iuoe
For most US passen-
ger cars and hghl trucks
Bulk
446-8101
233-5241
473-4700
427-8800
463-7588
822-2500
247-1622
387-0128
595-1545
593-1191
672-5353
NORTH MIAMI
N. MIAMI BEACH
PEMBROKE PINES
13360 N.W 7th Ave 681
1700 NE. 163rd St 945
PLaTiTATKM. H "yW d B'Vd "'0i Umv Df 35-
POMPANOBF ACM 381 N. State Rd. 7 587
SOUTH DADF 3151 N Fedral H"V M3
TAMARAC i, 9001 S Dix,e H*"V 667
TAMARAT a. N Un,V Dr McNa *<* 721
W. HOLLYWOOD "1 W Com<< Blvd 735
flWHSLi:--- Bird
497 S. State Rd. 7 987-
jlmmifML-..;.. Bird,55G2ao"sw^dc;T H?
mmsmamam
8541
7454
1383
2186
4200
7575
4700
2772
0450
6656
2520 S.W. 8th St. 551-1141
ALSO STORES IN
OnTTDJM 9AOI
OfUUBf 9f ACM
nmtm
FT. fffrW
ONEEIMCMS
UUtt P*a1l PALM KACH
moMum
NAPUS
HOYAL HI* ACH
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WMT PALM 9EACM


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