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The Jewish Floridian ( June 21, 1985 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian the voice of the Jewish community of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Running title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Physical Description:
4 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
June 21, 1985

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 8, no. 41 (Dec. 24, 1982)-v. 11, no. 26 (Aug. 30, 1985).
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44606415
lccn - sn 00229548
ocm44606415
System ID:
AA00014310:00131

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian the voice of the Jewish community of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Running title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Physical Description:
4 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
June 21, 1985

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 8, no. 41 (Dec. 24, 1982)-v. 11, no. 26 (Aug. 30, 1985).
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44606415
lccn - sn 00229548
ocm44606415
System ID:
AA00014310:00131

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)

Full Text
THE VOICE Or
THEJE""SM
COMMUNITY Or
PHMBtACH
COUNTY
ewish floridian
VOLUME 11 NUMBER 21
PALM BEACH, FLORIDA FRIDAY, JUNE 21,1985
PRICE 35 CENTS
I FrtdShocflml
New Federation President Sets Goals
Erwin Blonder, the new
Usident of the Jewish
federation of Palm Beach
aunty, outlined his objectives
for the upcoming year in an ad-
ess to the annual meeting of
e Federation.
i "I see my first goal to be the
Lntinuation of improved rela-
tions between the Federation
Cnd its constituent agencies,"
plonder said.
Noting the importance of
Irecruiting more committed
members into Federation ac-
tivities, Blonder added, "The
key to the success of any com-
munity is cooperative planning
and cooperative
commitment."
Blonder urged the local
Jewish community to unite to
support five vital projects:
"We must work to build the
most successful Jewish Com-
munity Center program in the
country; we must expand the
Erwin Blonder
services we provide to our
elderly population through our
geriatric center; we must con-
tinue to teach our young the
traditions and the beauty of
our heritage; we must increase
our ability to counsel those in
need; and we must continue to
insure the survival of the state
of Israel and improve the
quality of life for Jews all over
the world."
Knowing that these objec-
tives require financial
resurces, Blonder also pledged
himself and the Federation
board of directors to continued
leadership in campaign efforts.
Since next year's campaign
goal is ambitious, Blonder pro-
mised, "As president I will
strive for the total cooperation
of all leadership in all our
agencies through their involve-
ment and commitment to the
Federation's annual
campaign."
An Inspirational Success9
{Campaigners Look Back At '85, Ahead To '86
Calling the 1985 Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County-United Jewish Appeal
[Campaign "an inspirational
success," Arnold L. Lampert,
general campaign chairman,
noted that the local Jewish
community raised over $7
[million this year, including
[$6.6 million for the general
[campaign and over $500,000
por Operation Moses.
The campaign welcomed
lover 2,000 new givers during
[1985, raising the total number
pf contributors to 11,300.
For the second year in a row,
he general campaign raised
ver one millon new dollars.
The contribution of the
Women's Division, which rais-
1 $1.6 million, or approx-
ately 25 percent of the total
mpaign funds, was con-
dered "tremendously signifi-
wt in this community by
'mpert and other community
ders.
[As in the past about two-
Ms of the money raised will
1 {o the people of Israel and
Jews in 30 other countries
nd the world. One-third of
f revenue will be put to work
1 ^encies and services here
"thePalm Beaches.
None of these ac-
pnplishments, of course,
TjMd have been possible
"TO the concerted efforts
of committed citizens in the
Jewish community. Emphasiz-
ing the contribution of the in-
dividual campaigner, Lampert
observed that "what makes
this whole effort work is the
volunteer, the solicitor who
works, who asks others to join
in this historic life-saving
effort."
While Operation Moses,
which provided for the vital,
immediate costs of migration
to Israel for almost 10,000
Ethiopian Jews, was an impor-
tant and successful effort,
campaign leaders warn that
the cost of housing, educating
and vocationally training these
new arrivals will be higher
than projected. Many more
thousands of the new arrivals
than first thought are children,
most without parents.
Although there are no plans
for a bona-fide second-line
campaign this coming year,
campaign strategists realize
that the challenge posed by the
arrival of the Ethiopian Jews
is far from being solved. This
fact, combined with the ex-
pected doubling of the local
Jewish population within the
next six years and the atten-
dant pressures on Federation
services, will be cited as a few
of the primary reasons for in-
creased giving in the future.
Another focus of the 1986
campaign will be the revitaliza-
tion of the Project Renewal
program, which creates a
direct funding link between
particular diaspora com-
munities and especially needy
Israeli towns. Although local
contributions to our Project
Renewal town of Hod
Hasharon continued in 1985,
second-line emergency cam-
paigns in recent years have
deflected some support away
from this vitally important
program.
Stressing the ongoing need
of Israel's people for support
Erwin Blonder, president of
the Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County, said that the
1986 Federation-UJA cam-
paign "has to reach out into
the community and share its
sense of vision and mission."
Blonder emphasized the need
to market the campaign
among the young professional
community throughout the
next decade.
In looking back at the 1985
Federation-UJA campaign, it
is apparent that great strides
have been made but there is
still a long way to go.
Son Says Mengele Is Dead
FREIBURG, West Germany The son of Josef Mengele
last week announced that his father is dead. Rolf Mengele,
in a brief statement, said that the person buried at the En-
bu cemetery, Brazil as Wolfgang Gerhard is, in fact, his
father.
In his statement, Rolf Mengele apologized for the suffer-
ing and agony of the victims of Auschwitz "Angel of
Death."
Public Hearing:
Federal Budget Cuts Discussed
Inside
Lobbying in Tallahas-
5* Legislative work-
wops informs law-
makers ... page 2
LetterWriting cam-
paign urged to help
re"Jsenik...page4
Negotiations First:
Jewish settlers try
'"endly persuasion
page 9
The effect of federal budget cuts on the delivery of
social services in Palm Beach County was discussed at
a June 13th public hearing called by the Palm Beach
County Ad Hoc Coalition on Human Services.
Representatives of local social service agencies,
elected officials, and concerned citizens attended.
Rabbi Alan Sherman, chairman of the Community
Relations Board of Palm Beach County, opened the
hearing by stressing the need for local service
organizations to work together. "We don't want in-
dividual agencies competing for a shrinking dollar,
he said. Since the budget cuts have a significant im-
pact on everyone, Rabbi Sherman emphasized the
need for cooperation.
Dr. Michael Robbins, director of community ser-
vices for the United Way, noted that due to current
emergency demands for social services, planning for
the future is difficult. For the last two years requests
for United Way services have exceeded its ability to
provide. "When the money runs out, and it does very
quickly, the phone doesn't stop ringing,' said Dr.
Robbins.
Continued on Page 13
i
Discussing the public hearing agenda with Helen Hoff-
man (center), chair of the Community Relations Council
of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County, which
initiated the formation of the Ad Hoc Coalition on
Human Services, are Dino Caras (left), executive direc-
tor of United Way of Palm Beach County and Bill
Howden (right), general campaign chair of United Way.


Page 2 The Jewish F.orx
>alm Beach County/Friday, June 21, 1985
Fiddler Highlights Featured
Midrasha Graduates 109 Machon Promotes 12
Graduation ceremonies for
the Midrasha-Judaica High
School and grade promotions
for the Machon. the eighth-
grade program, were held on
Wednesday evening. May 29.
at the Jewish Communitv Dav
School.
After the invocation by Rab-
even Westman of Teaple
Beth Torah. Nor-
Scnimelman. executive direc-
tor of the Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County, com-
mented on the growth of
Midrasha. which began three
years ago with 20 students and
now enrolls just under one
hundred.
Dr. Paul Klein, chairman of
the Midrasha Committee,
stressed the importance of
continued Jewish education to
follow up bar and bat mitzvah
studies, and he added that the
two programs also "provide
important and needed social
interaction." Dr. Klein then
thanked Ms. Ann Lynn Lipton.
director of Midrasha and
Jewish Education Director of
the Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County. "We would not
be what we are now without
Ann." Klein said.
Calling the Midrasha class of
5745 "the best of our young
people." Ms. Lipton emphasiz-
ed the commitment shown by
the graduates. "It's easier to
drop out." she said, "but these
young people chose to stay in-
volved." Ms. Lipton also
thanked the faculty, the
Midrasha Committee, the rab-
binical leadership and the
nurr.er is volunteers
After Ms. Lipton highlighted
the accomplishments of each
graduate, the students
presented individual readings.
ir.: M::cheli Levy played a
piano rr.e-iley
Following a pr-
graduates ar. i their families
-n by Rabbi Howard
Shapiro of Temple brad Ms
I :>n presented
academic awards. Ellen
Berger received the award for
excellence :n Hebrew, and
Kimberiy Kapner and Daniel
Melman were r-
excellence in Jewish Issues.
Awards for ach;- T~~r-. ..-.
Jew-.sh Studies were presented
to Deborah Soloman and I
Cohan, while William Harr.i
and Shoshana Chazin were
recognized for excellence
Jewish arts. Mrs. Linda
Chazin was given a plaque of
appreciation for her efforts as
drama coach, and Ms. Lipton
also thanked her secretary.
Sylvia Brochstein. and Margot
Brozost for her artistic help
with diplomas.
The Machon students were
then recognized by Rabbi
William Marder of Temple
Beth David: Ruth Levow. prin-
cipal of Temple Beth El: and
Ceceil Tishman. principal of
Temple Israei. Tammy
Bleiman. Jonathan
Fleischman. Stephen M. Gor-
don. Tammi Kachel. Allison
Kapner. Ariel Morrison. Held:
Schonberg. Rachel Shapiro.
Tricia Heidi Slomowitz. K
Wagner. Robin Wassermr
and Angie Zalia were offidaiiy
promoted and received a gift
book and praise for their hard
Sudan Plans
Airlift Charges
LONDON (JTA) Sudan has formally begun a
judicial investigation seeking to charge those involved in
the clandestine airlift of thousands of Ethiopian Jews to
Israel, the World Jewish Congress reports. The airlift was
halted last January following its public disclosure.
WJC MONITORING SOURCES here reported that
Radio Khartoum said that "the file of Ethiopian Jews
Falashas (sic) case is judicially opened here." The broadcast
said that the ousted Vice President, Umar Muhammad al-
Tayyib, who directed the state security apparatus during
the former regime of President Gaafar al-Nimeiry. is being
charged with treason and espionage with the case.
An official source in the investigating committee said
that separate suits on political and economic corruption will
soon be filed against al-Tayyib.
Surviving The Death Of A Spouse
The Jewish Family and Children's Service of Palm Beach
County. Inc., 2250 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd.. Suite 104,
West Palm Beach, is sponsoring a workshop for recent
widows and widowers, dealing with grieving and recovery.
The course will cost $25 for five sessions, beginning July 3
and continuing for four following Wednesdays.
Information about the grieving process, social, emotional
and practical changes will be presented and discussed. Pre-
registration is mandatory. For information and registra-
tion, call 684-1991.
Occupations For The Future
Are you choosing a career of the future? There will be a
free Job Strategies Seminar on Monday, June 24 and Mon-
day, July 1, at 10 a.m., at Jewish Family and Children's
Service of Palm Beach County, Inc., 2250 Palm Beach
Lakes Blvd., Suite 104, West Palm Beach. Participants will
learn how to identify their employability skills for use in
finding future positions. For more information please call
Carol Roth, MA,.Vocational Guidance Specialist at JF&CS.
Golde iShoshana Chazin) and
Tevre i Eric Sleppi are con-
fronted by the Inkeeper (Tim
Johnson) and Grandma
Tzeitel (Rachel Levitt).
-: and unity Because you
ltd Mi Levow said.
rontinue to be a
M i.:.- r : r c~z.rr.
?" r-a-.v. on behalf of the Na-
i. "Council of Jewish
".V -.--. V. PlonOM Wu
presented the annual Senior
Award to Judy Tenzer.
The audience of three hun-
dred was then treated to
highlights from Fiddler on the
R~ Te-.ye. Shoshana Chazin as
Golde. Shari Koningsburg as
Tzeitel. William Harris as
Motel and Ivy Harris as Fruma
Sarah. The entire cast,
directed by Ms. Linda Chazin.
with assistance by Julie Cook.
Mark Mendel and Mitchell
Levy, received a round of hear-
ty applause a: the curtain call.
Midrasha Class of 5745 (left to right), Nanci Chertoff, Davidl
Shapiro, Mitchell Levy, Jeff Tochner. Marshall Brozost, Kiml
Kapner. Nancy Farber, William Harris, Beth Chertoff. SnJ
Judv Tenzer.
The cast of Fiddler on the Roof greets an enthusiastic au-
dience at curtain call.
Lois Chepenik, president of the Florida
Association of Jewish Federations; Steve
Press, state legislator from Highland
Beach; and Barbra Kaplan, chair of the
Local Concerns Task Force of the Com-
munity Relations Council, were par-
ticipants in the May 7 Legislative
Workshop in Tallahassee.
Legislative Workshop Informs
Lawmakers, Constituents
The Florida Association of Jewish Federa-
tions recently participated in the annual
Legisative Workshop in Tallahassee
organized by lobbyist Elaine Bloom '
A^rding to Barbra Kaplan, a participant
from Palm Beach County^ne purpose oTSe
? aPPrise dtizemTof what
legislation is being considered in areas tha
concern the delivery of social ^Srvicet
g^aUy those per^^com^
health care, care of the elderly and education
Conversely the workshop gives erouns of
concerned citizens the op^rLiiu^K
base w*h state legislators in an attempt toS
form the lawmakers about their constituent
feelings about specific legislation. "*""
xJu^^ f ?* workshP- according
!?* M" that "it reinforces toti
legislators that there is an organized Jewish
commumty that is concern^* 133
Highlights of the day's planned activities
were moving tributes to the memory of the
Holocaust, one in the House and one in the
Senate. Participating on the podium at each
ceremony were survivors, liberators and
Righteous Friends.
Another pertinent issue raised at the
workshop was the danger that could be
created if 34 state legislatures call for a Con-
stitutional Convention. Currently 32 states
have made such a call, and the Florida
legislature recently failed to rescind its seven-
year-old call for a Constitutional Convention.
Since the agenda at such a convention would
by law be completely open, fundamentals
outlined in the Bill of Rights could be
threatened. "There has never been a conven-
tion to amend since the adoption of the Con-
stitution," said Mrs. Kaplan, pointing out
that the Founding Fathers explicitly warned
against tampering with the original
Constitution.


Friday, June 21, 1985/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 3
Camp Shalom Readies For June 24 Opening
Camp Shalom, sponsored by
iThe Jewish Community
Center of the Palm Beaches, is
rearing up for another season
Sf fun and learning for
| children from pre-school age to
! 15 years.
Camp director Hareen Ber-
tisch expects to have more
I than 300 campers on hand for
opening day on June 24.
The camp staff, comprised of
high school and college
students, along with several
professionals, includes an
Israeli Scout. This year's
scout, Sagit Keden, will be
joined by a group of friends on
June 25, when the Friendship
Caravan, a group of Israeli
Scouts, will entertain the
campers with songs,
demonstrations and discus-
sions about Israel.
Camp Shalom is divided into
groups according to age:
K'ton-ton consists of pre-
schoolers and kindergartners;
Maccabees are first and second
graders; and the Sabra group
involves campers in third
through sixth grades. In addi-
tion Camp Shalom offers a
parent/toddler program and a
Teen Travel camp for seventh,
eighth and ninth graders.
Along with the traditional
athletic, water sports and arts-
and-crafts activities, Camp
Shalom offers enrichment pro-
grams which are both en-
joyable and educational. For
example, campers in K'ton-ton
are frequently visited by local
groups and organizations, such
as the Dreher Park Zoo and
the Science Museum. Mac-
cabees have the opportunity to
select from a diverse offering
of club-type activities, and
campers in the Sabra group
Local Leaders Attend JDC Semi-Annual Meeting
Heinz Eppler, president of
the American Jewish Joint
Distribution Committee, and
Myron Nickman, past presi-
dent of the Jewish Federation
of Palm Beach County, attend-
I ed the semi-annual meeting of
I the board of directors of the
American Jewish JDC in New
York City on Wednesday, May
29.
The JDC is the overseas
relief arm of the American
Jewish community and
receives the bulk of its $49.5
million 1985 budget from UJA
Federation campaigns. JDC,
established in 1914, has pro-
vided relief and rehabilitation
programs for Jews and Jewish
communities in more than 70
countries around the world.
Mr. Eppler, president of the
JDC, reported to the Board on
recent developments in
Ethiopia and Eastern Europe
and on programs affecting
Jewish education and
refugees. He presented the
1984 Annual Report, which
covered the theme "Lo al
halehem levadoh yihiyeh ha
adam ..." "Man cannot live
on Bread alone.''
Deuteronomy, 8:3. *
According to Eppler, alloca-
tions for the American Jewish
Joint Distribution Committee
famine relief and development
programs in Ethiopia now
stand at $4.5 million.
Guest speaker at the lun-
cheon session of the board
meeting was Dr. David S.
Wyman, Professor of History
at the University of
Massachusetts and author of
The Abandonment of the Jews:
America and the Holocaust
mi-ms.
JDC is active on every conti-
nent but North America in-
cluding the nations of Israel,
France, Italy and Austria for
Soviet transmigrants, Spain,
Hungary, Rumania,
Czechoslovakia, Yugoslavia,
Argentina, Brazil, Uruguay,
Chile, Morocco, Tunisia,
Egypt, Greece, India, Burma,
China and Ethiopia.
The JDC is a beneficiary of
the Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County-United Jewish
Appeal campaign.
choose from among several
"selectives," including nature
craft, performing arts, com-
puter skills, and, for the first
time this year, horseback
riding and equine studies.
The Teen Travel camp is
divided into two four-week ses-
sions, the first featuring local
excursions and overnight trips
to Miami and Orlando. The se-
cond session includes 15 days
of extensive travel to Boston,
New York, Lancaster, Penn-
sylvania and Washington, D.C.
Special events at Camp
Shalom this year will include
Israeli Day, Olympic Day, and
Inter-Camp Day, when
campers will meet in Fort
Lauderdale with their peers
from other Florida JCC camps.
Throughout the season there
will also be visits from several
acting troupes.
According to camp director
Bertisch, there is still room in
all age groups except K'ton-
ton. For more information con-
tact The Jewish Community
Center of the Palm Beaches.
Jewish Community Day School
Honors Graduates
Graduation Exercises for
the eighth grade of the
Jewish Community Day School
took place Thursday even-
ing June 6, at 8:00. Com-
mencement ceremonies were
held in the "Merkaz" on the
Jewish Community Day School
campus at 5801 Parker Ave.,
West Palm Beach.
Over 300 proud parents,
relatives and fellow students
attended his ninth annual
graduation at the Day School
The Honorable Carol Roberts,
Mayor of the City of West
Palm Beach and one of the
Founders of the Day School,
was the keynote speaker at the
ceremony.
Graduating from the eighth
grade with highest honors was
Valedictorian Deborah Leslee
Pevsner. Ms. Pevsner was this
year's outstanding student
and therefore recipient of the
Benjamin S. Hornstein
scholarship Award, a unique
gold charm and check. She also
received the Hyman and Carol
Roberts Award for outstan-
ding scholarship in Judaic
Studies and the Maurice M.
Rattinger Memorial Award for
Science achievement. Deborah
attended the Jewish Communi-
ty Day School for four years
and next year will attend Twin
Lakes High School.
Salutatorian Yonith Chayah
Bickel was a student at the
Day School for five years. Ms.
Bickel was the recipient of the
North County Region of
Women's American ORT
Award for displaying ex-
cellence in Science and of the
Eve A. Morton Award for ex-
cellence in creative writing.
Adam Joseph Benilous, also
a student of the JCDS for five
years, was given the Faculty
Award for motivation, attitude
and perserverance. Mr.
Benilous will continue his
education at Twin Lakes High
School.
Mitchell Boyd Cohen was
honored with the Eve A. Mor-
ton Award for excellence in
Mathematics. Mr. Cohen has
been a student of the JCDS
since kindergarten. He also
will attend Twin Lakes High
School.
For service to the Jewish
people and scholarship in
Jewish and secular studies, the
Rabbi Dr. William H. Shapiro
Memorial Award was bestow -
Continued on Page 5
The audience at the Jewish
Community Day School
graduation applauds Ben-
jamin S. Hornstein, long-
time benefactor and sponsor
of the Benjamin S. Hornstein
Scholarship Award.
Kids Write
The Funniest
Things
The Floridian would like
to request copies of letters
sent to parents from their
children at overnight sum-
mer camps. If you'd like to
share your children's poig-
nant witticisms with us,
please submit letters to
the Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County, 501
Flagler Dr., Suite 305,
West Palm Beach, FL
33401, Attn: Lloyd
Resnick.
Sia!Uate8 of the Jewish Community Day School class of 5745
brate their commencement.
WOMEN OF CENTURY VILLAGE
You are Cordially Invited
to our
FIRST ANNUAL "SOCIAL
Sunday, June 23, 1985
3:00 4:30 p.m.
at the
Joseph L. Morse Geriatric Center
of the Jewish Home for the Aged of Palm Beach County
Sponsored by
THE WOMEN'S AUXILIARY
OF THE MORSE GERIATRIC CENTER
Tour the Facility.
Learn about the Center's programs of geriatric care
and plans for future expansion.
Discover the important role of Women's Auxiliary.

R.SVP 471 5111 or
any member of committee
Transportation available
for those in need.
Refreshments will
be served.
CENTURY VILLAGE WOMEN'S AUXILIARY COMMITTEE
Tillic Becker Okja Prince
Blossom Cohen Helen Roberts
Evelyn Fisher Connie Rosen
Ema Gerringer Ruth Rubin
Elaine Mark Claire Schwartz
Esther Molat
(Appeal for Life and Annual Membership to the Women's Auxiliary will be made )


Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, June 21, 1985
Hussein's Visit Won't Bring Direct Talks Nearer

By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
While Israel has shown less
than enthusiasm for the
results of the talks in
Washington last month bet-
ween the Reagan Administra-
tion and King Hussein of Jor-
dan, the Administration is
maintaining that the talks
have moved the peace process
forward.
Yet there are no signs that
Hussein's visit has brought the
United States any closer to
achieving its announced goal
of direct face-to-face negotia-
tions between Israel and a
joint Jordanian-Palestinian
delegation.
Hussein made it clear that he
will not enter into direct talks
with Israel. He is not Anwar
Sadat nor does he want to
meet the fate of the former
Egyptian President. After all,
he witnessed the assassination
of his grandfather, King Ab-
dullah, for moving toward
peace with Israel and he
himself has thwarted several
assassination attempts since
ascending to the Hashemite
throne in 1952.
Hussein made it plain that he
needs the "umbrella" of an in-
ternational conference to have
what he said would be direct
talks with Israel. He also said
this conference should include
the five permanent members
of the United Nations Security
Council which would bring the
Soviet Union into the talks.
Before leaving Washington,
the King also stressed that the
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion must be included in any
negotiations with Israel. All
these demands have up to now
been opposed by the Reagan
Administration, not to say
Israel.
The Administration, which
immediately after Hussein's
meeting with President
Reagan seemed to be soften-
ing its opposition to an inter-
national conference, made it
clear that it was opposed to in-
cluding the Soviet Union in
any Mideast conference until it
met certain conditions, in-
cluding restoring diplomatic
relations with Israel, ending
anti-Semitic propaganda and
allowing Soviet Jews to
Revlon Founder Hosts Local
Attendees Of ARMDI Tour Of Israel
Mr. and Mrs. Mark Soroko
hosted a luncheon on June 13
in the Harbour House South,
Bal Harbour, for delegates and
members of the American Red
Magen David for Israel of the
Southeast District who will be
attending the National Con-
vention and Tour of Israel of
ARMDI. The program includ-
ed an address, "Highlights of
Israel," by Uri Cohen, the
Regional Director of the Israel
Aliyah Center.
The Sorokos have recently
donated $100,000 to the Na-
tional Blood Bank and Blood
Fractionation Center now
under construction in Ramat
Can, Israel, thus they are
classified as benefactors of the
institution. This Blood Center,
a $12 million project, has been
assisted greatly by dedicated
contributors througout the
world, and especially through
ARMDI, which has pledged
itself to take a major part in
assisting Israel in this
necessary undertaking to
prepare her for the blood
emergencies of the years
ahead.
Mark Soroko, who was one
of the founders of the Revlon
cosmetic company, opened a
factory in Israel in 1963 with
an investment of more than
$1.5 million, despite a massive
boycott by several Arab coun-
tries. His courage in the face
of adversity served him well,
as Mr. Soroko observes, "It
was ironic that as a result of
the boycott, the Revlon beauty
products were regarded as for-
bidden fruit to the Egyptian
women, and we did more
business in Egypt after the
boycott than before."
People attending the ARM-
DI National Convention and
Tour of Israel include, from
the Netanya Chapter of West
Palm Beach: Sophie
Menschenfreund, Mr. and Mrs.
Harry Lerner, Jeanette
Kaplan, Al Sheer and Sidney
Sklar.
Robert L. Schwartz,
Southeast District Director of
ARMDI, expressed the convic-
tion that this convention and
Tour of Israel will enthuse
these members regarding the
wonderful work that Magen
David Adorn (MDA) is doing in
Israel, and show them first-
hand the results of their ef-
forts in fostering the lifesaving
work of MDA.
African Nurses Training At Hadassah-
Hebrew University Med Center
Ten nurses (including two
male nurses) from four African
countries Liberia, Lesotho,
Swaziland, and Tanzania'
have arrived at the Hadassah-
Hebrew University Medical
Center for a six-month course
in ophthalmological nursing
according to Zeva Lahis, the
African course coordinator.
The course includes lectures
and practical work in the treat-
ment of glaucoma, tumors,
corneal diseases and all
emergency situations concern-
ing the eyes of both children
and adults.
Hadasaah's Ophthalmology
Department has had a "long
tradition of having: close links
with many countries in
Africa," says Dr. Hanan
Zauberman, head of the
Department of
Ophthalmology, at a ceremony
welcoming the nurses. "We
have developed eye services in
many African countries by
training foreign doctors and
nurses at Hadassah in
Jerusalem, while
simultaneously establishing
Hadassah clinics in the coun-
tries concerned."
Referring to the African pro-
grams, Dr. Zauberman said, "I
Feel it is perhaps more impor-
tant to train nurses than doc-
tors, as nurses have much
greater contact with the local
populations. And, I believe
these nurses must be trained
to carry out some of the pro-
cedures usually done by doc-
tors like cataract surgery."
Ghana Kurtzman, the Direc-
tor of the Henrietta Szold-
Hadassah-Hebrew University
School of Nursing, told the
African nurses who had
already begun their practical
work in the Hadassah eye
clinics and wards, "We hope
that your visit here will
strengthen our traditional
ties."
emigrate.
Another objection not em-
phasized as such is the Ad-
ministration's belief that an in-
ternational conference would
deteriorate into a stage for
political rhetoric from all sides
rather than serious negotia-
tions. After all, disarmament
is supposed to be dealt with by
the UN, but when serious
negotiations are called for they
are confined to face-to-face
talks between the U.S. and the
Soviet Union.
However, there was an in-
dication that the Administra-
tion would try to find some
type of international forum
that would not include the
Soviets and thus still give Hus-
sein his protective "umbrella."
However, before even this
step can be reached an agree-
ment must be made on the
Palestinian members of the
joint Jordanian-Palestinian
delegation. Hussein repeatedly
argued that through his
February 11 agreement with
PLO leader Yasir Arafat and
especially in his recent talks
with the PLO, he has received
PLO acceptance of UN Securi-
ty Council Resolutions 242 and
338 and an agreement to
negotiate with Israel.
The Administration, while
declaring it was encouraged by
this, stressed that it still wants
"explicit and public" accep-
tance by the PLO of the two
resolutions as well as the ter-
rorist organization's
acknowledgement that Israel
has a right to exist before it
will enter into any talks with
PLO members.
Both Hussein and the Ad-
ministration agree that the
"next step" should be a U.S.
meeting with the joint
Jordanian-Palestinian delega-
tion. Here, too, the question is
membership with the U.S.
refusing to talk to PLO
members unless the organiza-
tion meets its conditions.
However, Secretary of State
George Shultz repeated the
Administration's long held
view that the U.S. would talk
with members of the Palentin
National Council who 2r2
members of the PLO lRraol
Foreign Minister Yitffi
Shamir said he would never S
down with PNC member?
although Premier Shimon'
Peres is being vague about hk
position. "*
While Washington is keen.
ing Jerusalem informed it
may not necessarily seek
Israel's approval before
meeting with the joint deleea
tion. From the time of Epvd
tian Presdient HoTni
Mubarak s visit to Washington
in March through Shultz's
Mideast visit last month, the
U.S. insisted it would agree to
meet with the joint delegation
if that would lead to direct
talks between the delegation
and Israel. But Administration
spokesmen argued that the
Palestinian members of the
delegation that meet with the
U.S. might not necessarily be
the same ones who would
negotiate with Israel.
Administration spokesmen
also argued that progress in
the Mideast must come
through increments. But as of
now any increments from Hus-
sein appear small. More likely,
the Administration, which by
saying before Hussein's arrival
that no breakthroughs should
be expected upset the King,
could not let Hussein leave
Washington without the ap-
pearance of some
accomplishment.
There are of course some
skeptics who believe the entire
visit was aimed at paying the
way for U.S. arms to Jordan.
Likud MK Dan Meridor told
the Middle Eastern Affairs
Committee of the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith that Hussein's pro-
posals are "nothing more than
a smoke screen for the arms he
wants to buy from the U.S."
Reagan said that the U.S.
would meet Jordan's economic
and security needs. But Hus-
sein met with members of Con-
gress and he certainly was told
of the strong Congressional
opposition, in both the Senate
and House, against any Arms
to Jordan unless it enters into
direct negotiations with Israel.
Readers Write
Toby Wilk Lauded
EDITOR,
The Jewish Floridian:
I read The Jewish Floridian
with great interest and com-
mend you upon the success
with which you inform us, and
the thoughtful articles which
stimulate our interest.
I find the writing of Toby
Wilk particularly timely and I
hope she receives adequate
praise and appreciation from
all your readers, among whom
please include,
HARRIET KRASS
Somerset, Florida
laving ciose linns lam to train nurses than doc- W
Jewish floridian LetterW"tng Campaign Urged
the
ol Palm Beach County
USPS 008030
Combining Our Voice' and 'Federation Reporter
FREOK SMOCMET SUZANNE SMOCMET RONNI EPSTEIN LLOYO RESNrCK
Editor and Publisher Eieculive Editor Newt Coordinator Assistant News Coordinator
Published Weekly October through Mid May Bi Weekly balance ol year
Second Class Postage Paid at Boca Raton Fla
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POSTMASTER: Sand address changes to The Jewish Floridian,
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Advertising Director Slaci Lesser. Phone SM1652
Combined Jewish Appeal Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County. Inc.. Officers President
Myron J. Nickman. Vice Presidents Peter Cummings. Alec Engelstein. Arnold Lampert Barbara
Tanen and Alvm Wilensky: Secretary.Or Elizabeth S Shulman. Treasurer. Barry Berg Submit
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Out Of Town Upon Reoiienl
Friday, June 21,1985
Volume 11
2TAMUZ5745
Number 21
The trial of Kharkov
Hebrew teacher Evgeny
Aisenberg is expected to take
place very soon. Evgeny has
already talked to his lawyer. A
major response is needed now
from the West telegrams,
phone calls, and letters,
ESPECIALLY to the pro-
curator in Kharkov.
Evgeny was arrested on
March 19, 1985 and charged
with "spreading false informa-
tion defaming the Soviet
state." The investigation
started after he participated in
Purim festivities last year and
included searches of his apart-
ment. Marina, Evgeny's wife,
has a malignant breast tumor.
The KGB told her to get a
medical certificate to certify
her illness; otherwise she
would be liable for arrest.
Evgeny's family was misled
on their rights as far as selec-
ting lawyer. They were told
they could only choose so-
meone local and could not get a
Moscow lawyer.
Evgeny first applied for an
exit visa in 1978. He is a
mechanical engineer, born in
l*/Oe.
To protest the arrest under
false charges, telegram:
USSR, UKR SSR, Kharkov,
Bogdan Khmelnitsky 4, Pro-
curator, Mr. LOGUN0V;
-AND- USSR, MOSCOW
103009, 15a Pushkinskaya
Street, Procurator General of
USSR, Alexander
REKUNKOV.
Send messages of ""*{
his wife atruSSR, UKR SSR.
Kharkov 310023, Ul. V***
skovo 97, Apt 57a, Aisenberg,
Marina.


Radio/TV/ Film
MOSAIC Sunday, June 23, 9 a.m. WPTV Channel
5 __ with host Barbara Gordon Jewish Community Day
School. Sunday, June 30, Bella Abzug, former con-
gress woman from New York.
L'CHAYIM Sunday, June 23 and 30, 7:30 a m -
WPBR 1340-AM with host Rabbi Mark S. Golub The
Jewish Listener's Digest, a radio magazine.
SHALOM Sunday, June 23 and 30, 6 a.m. WPEC
Channel 12 (11:30 a.m. WDZL TV 39) with host Richard
Peritz.
ISRAELI PRESS REVIEW Thursday, June 27 and
July 4,1:15 p.m. WLIZ 1380-AM, summary of news and
commentary on contemporary issues.
Sponsored by the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County.
Community Calendar
June 23 ,
Congregation Aitz ChainT: 10 a.m. Temple B'nai Jacob
Men's Club 9 a.m. Golden Lakes Temple Sisterhood 10
Friday, June 21, 1985/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 5
a.m.
June 24
Women's American ORT Mid Palm 1 p.m. Hadassah -
Z'Hava board 10 a.m. Jewish Federation Executive
Committee 4 p.m.
June 25
Congregation Anshei Sholom 1
Women Masada board 7 p.m.
Sisterhood 8 p.m.
p.m. B'nai B'rith
Temple Beth David
June 26
Yiddish Culture Group Cresthaven 1 p.m. Women's
American ORT North Palm Beach County Region 9:30
a.m. American Red Mogen David for Israel 1 p.m.
B'nai B'rith No. 3196 board 7 p.m.
June 27
Jewish Community Day School Education Committee 8
p.m.
Jewish Community Day
School Honors Graduates
Continued from Page 3
I ed upon Bree Danielle Deller-
son. Ms. Dellerson will attend
North Shore High School and
was a student at the JCDS for
| eight years.
Nicole Renee Feuer, a stu-
dent at the Day School for two
[years, received the B'nai
B'rith Century Lodge No.
2939 Award for cooperation
and leadership. Ms. Feuer will
attend high school at San-
I taluces next year.
Most Improved student was
Ayal Goldstein, who received
the Gussie Cohen Achieve-
ment Award. Mr. Goldstein at-
tended the Day Schol for four
years and will attend Forest
| am High next year.
The Day School's second
w?e year attendee was
Eluabeth Gail Lerner, the
japient of the Eve A. Morton
Inward for academic achieve-
^,nt'n Hebrew. Ms. Lerner
I* attend Twin Lakes High
|fcnoolinthefall.
Stacy Lynne Pariser was
warded the Parent Teacher
Organization "Chai," spon-
sored by the Ambrosia
Restaurant, for displaying the
most school spirit and
fellowship. Ms. Pariser was a
student at the Day School for
sue years. She will attend Twin
Lakes High School.
Shawn Barton Schrager
received the Jewish War
Veterans Post No. 408 Citizen-
ship Award and the B'nai
B'rith Lodge No. 3113 Award
for displaying excellence in
Science. Mr. Schager will con-
tinue his education at San-
taluces High School and was at
the Jewish Community Day
School for six years.
The fine teachers that have
instructed these students are
Skip Paille, Math, Social
Studies; Jack Rosen baum,
Judaic Studies; Shoshana
Sharf, Hebrew; Peggy Lez-
noff, Language Arts; Pat
Walker, Science; Michele
Cramer, Music; June Zimmer-
man, Computer Science;
Theophilus Jones, Physical
Education; and Diane
Eichfeld, Art. Congratulations
to all of these hard working
graduates!
Jewish Day School
In Tampa
Staking Full-Tim* Hebrew Teacher, and
Part-Time Kindergarten Aide.
11 interested In either position, please call:
813-875-8287
Argentine Jews Concerned
Over Anti-Semitism
BUENOS AIRES (JTA)
- A year-and-a-half after the
democratic change in regime
in Argentina, the recurrence
of anti-Semitism and the
weakening of Argentine-
Israeli relations have come to
be major concerns of Jewish
communal leadership here, the
World Jewish Congress
reported.
According to the Latin
American branch of the WJC,
the Jewish community remains
one of the most enthusiastic
supporters of the Alfonsin
government but its en-
thusiasm has been tempered
by its concern with not only
rising anti-Semitism in the
country but a perceptible shift
away from Israel by Argentina
in its Middle East policy.
These Jewish fears were ex-
pressed during a meeting bet-
ween the Minister of Interior,
Antonio Troccoli, and
representatives of the DAI A,
the representative body of
Argentine Jewry and the WJC
affiliate here. Following the
meeting, the president of the
DAIA, David Goldberg, told
reporters:
"There is an anti-Semitic
escalation in the country, with
a clear anti-democratic con-
notation, which finds expres-
sion in attacks against
synagogues, Jewish schools
and cultural centers, graffiti in
central streets, and
anonymous telephone and
written threats against leaders
and other members of the
community."
Goldberg noted that during a
recent soccer game a Nazi ban-
ner with a swastika was rais-
ed. "All this does not just hap-
pen. It is a well-orchestrated
campaign undertaken by anti-
democratic sectors and this is
why society as a whole must
forcefully react to such in-
cidents." He added: "We know
that anti-Semitic organizations
are active in Argentina."
The Jewish community has
also been shaken by the non-
fulfillment of the planned visit
of President Raul Alfonsin to
Israel, the WJC further
reported. Since the beginning
of the year it had been
understood that the head of
the Argentine government
would visit the Jewish State in
June either before or after his
presence in Geneva to address
the International Labor
Organization.
However, hardly had Alfon-
sin ended his American tour
when the Foreign Ministry an-
nounced that "it had never
been forseen that the Presi-
dent would make an official
visit to Israel," which in turn
led to a statement by the
Israeli Ambassador that "the
invitation (to visit Israel) had
been accepted" but no definite
date had been set.
Third World expectations
about Argentine diplomacy
evidently prevailed in this mat-
ter, and in particular, con-
siderations concerning United
Nations votes and the role
which Argentina believes it
can play among the non-
aligned countries. Since the in-
auguration of the democratic
government, on 74 UN issues
concerning Israel, Argentina
voted negatively on 71 cases
and abstained on three.

Sam learned about
The GUARDIAN PLAN, program and
changed his mind about
buying cemetery property in Florida.
Like your family. Sam's family also had strong traditions. One of those was
burial in the family cemetery property in New York. But now that he and his wife
have retired to Florida, he was led to believe that his family tradition was no
longer practical, even though he would prefer to have funeral services back
home. Sam was worried about the emotional burden on his family. And frankly,
he was worried about the cost.
Then a friend told him about The GUARDIAN PLAN, insurance funded
prearranged funeral program.* Here are the facts Sam got.
He learned he could have funeral services in New York at a very reasonable
price. He learned he could arrange all the details in advance and set the price
he could afford to pay for the services he wanted. And The GUARDIAN PLAN
program would guarantee the amount would never increase. He also learned he
could select RIVERSIDE or one of the other guardian family of Jewish funeral
directors including BOULEVARD PARK-WEST. SCHWARTZ BROTHERS or
JEFFER who honor The GUARDIAN PLAN program in Florida and in New \brk.
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S5.000.00 shall be funded through a trust established in accordance with Chapter 639. Fla. Stats


rage b The Jewish'VionSuin o? Palm l^ach County/Friday, June 21, 1985
JCC News
SINGLES SUNSET CRUISE
Singles of the Jewish Community Center will "Sail into
the sunset" on the Island Queen, Sunday, June 23. The
boat leaves from Phil Foster Park (Singer Island) promptly
at 6 p.m. There will be a cash bar, food, live music, dancing
and a good time for all.
Mail a $7 check, per person, payable to the JCC, 2415
Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach, 33409, Att: Terrie,
immediately.
EAT AND SWIM
Saturday, June 29, at 6 p.m. the Single Pursuits (35-55)
of the Jewish Community Center will gather at the home of
Mim Levinson to relax and just get to know each other. Br-
ing your bathing suit and BYOB.
Reservations are a must. The fee for the evening is $8.
Call Mim for directions.
A BUDDY FOR FISHERMEN
Walter Lipiner of the Jewish Community Center's Single
Pursuits invites those who wish to go fishing Sundays to
call and work out the arrangements with him. This is an op-
portunity to enjoy the sport as well as the company.
YOUNG SINGLES HAPPILY PLAN
The Young Singles (21-35) of the Jewish Community
Center will meet Thursday, June 27 at 6 p.m. at
Margarita's, to enjoy margaritas and munchies. The
restaurant is on Palm Beach Lakes Blvd. behind
Bennigan's.
On Monday, July 8, all are invited to meet at the JCC,
2415 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach, at 7:30 p.m. to
make plans for July and August. All ideas are cheerfully
accepted.
Board of Trustees of Temple Israel gathered at the Howard
Johnson's in Deer field Beach recently for a board retreat.
Shown here in a leadership training session are (left to right),
Lillian Dobrow, Ceceil Tishman, Esther Szmukler, Dr. Lee
Heller, Howard Debs, Dan Forstein, Warren Murray and
Steven Cohen.
Elaine Feldmesser, Barbara Ackerman, Mark Feldmesser,
Jerry Tishman, Ceceil Tishman, Irene Levine, Richard
Yosinoff, Dr. Robert Wacks and Howard and Sheila Debs
shield the flame from the ocean breeze while Andrea Yosinoff
holds the Havdallah candle.
Todd Kahn, the son of Mr.
and Mrs. Edward Kahn of
Palm Beach, Florida, receiv-
ed double honors at the
eleventh annual commence-
ment exercises of Touro Col-
lege held on May 23 in New
York City. Mr. Kahn, a
management major and pre-
law student, received a
coveted Outstanding
Academic Achievement
Award for achieving an
overall grade point average
above 3.6 (on a scale of 4)
during his studies at Touro.
In recognition of his long
record of extra-curricular ac-
tivities and the leadership he
demonstrated as President of
the Men's Division Student
Government in 1983 through
1984, Mr. Kahn was also
given the Touro College
Distinguished Student Ser-
vice Award. Mr. Kahn plans
to enroll at Boston Universi-
ty Law School in the fall.
Wally Hickman
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-J


Friday, June 21, 1985/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 7
Despite Rumors of Demise
Israel to Continue the Search for Josef Mengele
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
A Justice Ministry
spokesman said that Israel
^l continue the search for
Nazi war criminal Josef
Mengele despite reports
from Brazil that the
Auschwitz death camp doc-
tor died there by drowning
six years ago.
As long as there is no definite
identification of the body found in
Brazil, Israel will continue its ef-
forts to capture Mengele and br-
ing him to justice and the $1
million reward for information
leading to his capture and trial re-
mains in effect, Yitzhak Feinberg
I of the Justice Ministry said.
HE WAS referring to the re-
mains of a man buried under the
name Wolfgang Gerhard in a
cemetery in Enbu, 20 miles south
of Sao Paulo in 1979, the victim of
a swimming mishap. The body has
been exhumed and is undergoing
forensic tests. Mengele's dental
X-rays were flown to Sao Paulo
from West Germany over the
weekend to help with the
identification.
Israelis and Nazi-hunters here
and abroad are largely skeptical of
the information that has emerged
so far, which apparently has
almost convinced some Brazilian
officials that the body belongs to
Mengele. Menahem Russak, head
of the Nazi War Crimes Depart-
ment of the Israel Police declared
in a radio interview recently that
Mengele is still alive.
Russak maintained that the
report on the body was a fraud
perpetrated because for the first
time since the end of World War
II a serious international effort
has been mounted to track down
Mengele and substantial rewards
have been offered by Israel, West
Germany and by organizations
such as the Los Angeles-based
Simon Wiesenthal Center.
SOURCES HERE noted that
ever since Israel offered its
reward, the search centers in
Israel, the U.S. and West Ger-
many have received information
indicating that Mengele is alive,
adding to similar information
amassed over the years. Sources
also observed the "remarkable"
coincidence: As the heat was be-
ing turned on Mengele, it is sud-
denly alleged he has been dead six
years. The question raised is why
the peple who provided this infor-
mation chose to remain silent until
now.
The Brazilian authorities were
led to the body in Enbu on the
basis of claims by an elderly cou-
ple of Austrian origin, Wolfram
and Lisolette Bossert, that a man
they found out was Mengele had
lived with them for a time and
died while swimming. The
Bosserts, who are Brazilians
citizens, claimed they kept silent
for fear of being accused of
sheltering a wanted war criminal.
pictured receiving the prestigious Prime Ministers Award is
Esther Molat, left, and Mrs. Jack Chiat, right, receiving the
distinguished Shomer Shalom Award on behalf of the
[Sisterhood of Congregation Anshei Sholom. Making the
presentation is Rubin L. Breger, executive director of the
Israel Bond Community. Mrs. Molat stated, "I support my
(country, the good old United States of America and believe
that Israel is our only democratic ally in the Near East." Mrs.
iChiat, speaking on behalf of Sisterhood said, "Our member-
ship of 1,000 are proud to support Israel Bonds as a group.
f0H
KOSHER
CATERING
Hyah Palm beaches
833-1234
Another immigrant to Brazil,
Gitta Stammer, 65, who is from
Hungary, told police that Mengele
lived with her family between
1961-74 under an assumed name
and managed the family farm. She
said in Sao Paulo recently
that the man admitted he was
Mengele after she confronted him
with a newspaper photograph.
STAMMER SAID she and her
husband feared to denounce him
because he made veiled threats to
harm their children. She said the
man died in a 1979 drowning.
Sao Paulo police chief Romeu
Tuna said last week that
documents and a diary produced
by the Bosserts made him "90 per-
cent convinced" that the man
buried in Enbu was Mengele.
Israeli, West German and U.S. of-
ficials involved in the search for
Mengele and forensic experts
from those countries arrived in
Sao Paulo over the last week to
assist in the investigation. The
Brazilian authorities reportedly
rejected their help in identifying
the remains which include a skull
with seven teeth.
The tests on the remains began
last week and according to
sources in Brazil it could be a mat-
ter of days or weeks before con-
clusive evidence is produced.
Vienna-based Nazi hunter
Simon Wiesenthal, in New York
over the weekend, was quoted in
press reports as saying he was
"less skeptical" now than when he
heard the first report of
Mengele's alleged drowning,
drowning.
In Los Angeles, Rabbi Abraham
Cooper, associate dean of the
Wiesenthal Center, said the
Center welcomed the seriousness
with which the Brazilian
authorities are conducting the in-
vestigation. But he said, all infor-
mation pertaining to the alleged
death of Mengele should be con-
sidered with caution.
U.S. OFFICIALS said that Neil
Sher, chief of the Justice Depart-
ment's Office of Special Investiga-
tions (OSI) involved in the interna-
tional search for Mengele, is in
Sao Paulo to help with the
investigation.
Sen. Alfonse D'Amato (R.,
N.Y.) said in Washington "we
should not jump to any quick con-
clusions" about the reports from
Brazil. He warned they may be a
"Mengele smokescreen" and urg-
ed the Justice Department to send
a team of four forensic specialists
to Brazil to verify whether or not
the exhumed remains are those of
Mengele.
A federal prosecutor in West
Germany said last week that the
police were treating the case
seriously, but he also cautioned
against jumping to conclusions.
Hans Ebergard Klein, the
Frankfurt official in charge of the
Mengele case, said at a press con-
I)r. Josef Mengele
ference recently that there was
little date to go by. The only
positive knowledge is that
Mengele was about 5 feet 10 in-
ches tall and was born on March
16, 1911 which would make him
74.
He said the dental records sent
to Sao Paulo were from 1938 and
may be of limited value in deter-
mining the identity of the re-
mains. "A lot can happen to a
man's teeth in over 40 years," he
said.
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children will absolutely love it as
a delicious hot lunch and as a
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'


rage o me jewisn flondian of Halm Beach County/Friday, June 21, 1985

Mengele-Hunters Doubt Veracity of Remains
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) Sear-
chers for Josef Mengele, the
notorious Auschwitz death
camp doctor, have expressed
strong skepticism over reports
from Brazil that he died there
six years ago accidentally by
drowning.
There have been other
reports, over the years, that
Mengele, known as the "angel
of death" because he selected
inmates for the gas chambers
and performed fatal or crippl-
ing medical experiments on
others, was dead. This time,
however, reports of his demise
seem to be taken seriously by
officials in Brazil and West
Germany.
THE LATTER COUNTRY
has been participating in an in-
ternational search for the
wanted Nazi war criminal and
has offered a reward for infor-
mation leading to his capture.
The German newspaper Die
Welt reports that officials of
the Federal Criminal Office
were in Brazil examining
evidence that Mengele drown-
ed in 1979 while swimming off
Beroga, 60 miles northeast of
Sao Paulo.
Sao Paulo Police Chief
Roneu Tuna told reporters he
asked the Justice Ministry for
permission to exhume the body
of a man buried at Enbu, 20
miles west of the Brazilian
metropolis and that he was 90
percent certain that the body
was Mengele.
BUT NAZI-HUNTER
Serge Klarsfeld said here, "I
don't believe Mengele is dead,
and I don't believe the German
judicial system believes it."
Abraham Foxman
Klarsfeld's wife, Beate
Klarsfeld, has returned from
Paraguay where she tried, un-
successfully to obtain
Mengele's extradition.
Mengele who would be 74,
had been reported living for
years in Paraguay under the
protection of its German-born
President, Alfredo Stroessner,
and his rightwing military jun-
ta. Stroessner's office denied
any knowledge of Mengele's
whereabouts and denounced
the Klarsfelds as "dangerous
agitators."
Klarsfeld, a lawyer, said he
and his wife have numerous
reports that "Mengele is in
fact alive." He noted also that
Mengele's grisly reputation
weighs heavily on his family's
business in Guenzburg, 100
miles northwest of Munich in
Bavaria. Two of his nephews
run the family's agricultural
machinery factory there.
ACCORDING to Klarsfeld.
"Had Mengele really died, his
relatives would have been the
first to want to announce it."
In New York, Abraham Fox-
man, associate national direc-
tor and head of the interna-
tional affairs division of the
Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith, noted that "This
is not the first time there have
been reports of the death of
Josef Mengele, nor is it sur-
prising that they are surfacing
today at a time when there is a
concerted international effort
by the United States, Germany
and Israel to find him."
Foxman, himself a
Holocaust survivor, said,
"What is surprising is why if
the body really is Dr. Mengele,
and he drowned in 1979, that
nobody came forward in the
last six years to confirm it.
Certainly no lives would have
been in danger by making the
news of his death public."
Foxman added, "If the body
in Brazil is indeed that of Dr.
Mengele, it closes one of the
ugliest chapters in the tragedy
of the Holocaust."
Brooklyn District Attorney
Elizabeth Holtzman, who as a
member of Congress was in-
strumental in moving the
Justice Department to search
for alleged Nazis living in the
United States, was also skep-
tical. "But, it (the report)
should be thoroughly examin-
ed. U.S. Justice Department
officials are doing this right
now," she said.
HOLTZMAN noted the coin-
cidence that "the report of
Mengele's supposed death
should be made shortly after
the report of the most inten-
sive and coordinated interna-
R slice of lochs.
Was it really the game of golf that tempted Jewish immigrants to call
Scotland their home? Was it the taunting call of the little white hall.' The
lure of those infernal sand traps? Rahaps some strange appeal in the
monstrous-ness of the lochs.' And just what accounts for todays weekly
pilgrimage to the country club outside Glasgow?
One thing we can account for. After an invigorating day chasing
divots those frazzled duffers are apt to require a neat shot of Scotch
whisky. For that is surely one of Scotland's more nothing pleasures. The
one preferred stateside is J&B Rare Scotch. It is blended from the liest
whiskies its native country has ID offer. That makes for a scotch that is
smooth. A far cry, indeed, from the strokes seen on the Kick nine.
86 Prod Blended Scotch Wfcycy 1984 The Parjrjmgton Corporation N Y
J&B Scotch
Sao Paulo police chief Tun,
acknowledged that West G~
man police were in Brazil te
help with the investigation H
said three West German
agents arrived when Brazilian
police interrogated an elderlv
couple living in Santo Arnaro
in the southern part of the San
Paulo district, who appeared
to be of German origin.
He said that documents in.
eluding a diary found in'the
couple s home, indicated that
Mengele had most certainly
lived there for a time. The coU
pie apparently provided the in
formation of Mengele's alleged
drowning.
Die Welt reported that
security experts have X-raw
of Mengele's teeth which
She also noted that if he had should be able to determine
died six years ago his family whether or not the body is fe
would have made it public. deed Mengele.
Serge Klarsfeld
tional search for Mengele ever
mounted."
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Friday, June 21, 1985/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 9
Jewish Settlers Try Friendly Persuasion
By GIL SEDAN
are resorting to friendly
^ion to convince local
, leaders to take a hand in
l,nz the territory of Palesti-
w terrorists released in the
C 20 prisoner exchange.
i delegation of settlers from
Ion Moreh. near Nablus,
ited the Arab village of Deir
iKhatab to urge the mukhtar
iHage leader) to make sure
that freed terrorist Samir
Saleh Yussef departs. Yussef
was convicted on December 2,
1980 of murdering an Arab
suspected of collaboration with
Israel. He was serving a
25-year prison sentence when
he was among the 1,500
Palestinians freed from Israeli
jails in exchange for three
Israeli soldiers held captive by
a Palestinian terrorist group in
Damascus.
Some 600 of the released
convicts were allowed to
return to their homes in the
West Bank, Gaza and Israel.
Jewish settlers in the ter-
ritories are determined that
they leave. At least three are
known to have fled to Jordan
after several days and nights
of harassment and threats by
settlers.
The settlers are now employ-
ing peaceful means, to avoid
intervention by the security
forces, but mainly not to spoil
the chances for the early
HIAS Launches Speakers Bureau
INEW YORK HIAS the
brew Immigrant Aid Socie-
_ has announced the
blishment of a Speakers
.jau as an educational and
formations] service to the
jierican Jewish community.
I explaining HIAS' decision
launch the Speakers
eau, Robert L. Israeloff,
\S president, stated, "For
more than a century HIAS has
been the vehicle through which
American Jewry has express-
ed its commitment to Jews
around the world seeking to
restart their lives in freedom
and dignify. Today, the fact is
that many American Jews
know little of the work and ac-
tivities of an organization that
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Tax and gratuities not Included
A great place for that getaway from it all.to rtall.Vanderbllt Inn
on the Gulf You'll find the sugar sand beaches of the Gun* of Mex
'to at your door, heated swimming pool, excellent dining, live
entertainment in lounge, tennis and golf nearby with SPECIAL
GOLF DISCOUNTS AVAILABLE. Boat trips available for sightseeing.
'isning and shelling galore Children 16 and under FREE In room
"itn parents Children's meals at menu prices
Package includes:
Two nights double occupancy
Continental breakfast for two for two mornings
Dinner for two one evening In Garden Room Restaurant
Welcome cocktail for two In Gangplank Lounge
^mparabtepartagfofSdays,4nigrnSOTly$104.9S
par parson, double occupancy.
Prices do not Include taxes and gratuities
OFFER GOOD APRIL 15 THROUGH DECEMBER 15. 1985;
iSlul)"19 M*forial Day and Labor Day weekends
offer cannot be combined with any other discount packages
'Present this ad at check-in time to qualify for package rate
Contact your travel agent for reservations or call:
Tv.u.iaYu | mmp, :i.i.i.j.n:i^HMm,iJii.iJi.ni
'>*' 11000 Gulf Shore Drive. Nvt" Naples Florida 33963
must surely be considered an
American Jewish institution.
The HIAS Speakers Bureau,"
he concluded, "has been form-
ed in an attempt to bridge this
information gap."
HIAS is offering speakers
for Jewish organizational pro-
gramming free of charge. The
HIAS Speakers Bureau is
strictly an educational service;
no fundraising will be involved
in its presentations.
c 1985 Bealnc* Comoanw. Inc
release of alleged members of
a Jewish terrorist
underground presently on trial
or serving sentences for acts
of violence against. Arab
civilians.
A spokesman for the settlers
told the mukhtar of Deir el
Khatab, Suleiman Mustafa Ab-
dul Karim, "We come to you as
friends." But there was an
underlying threat of violence
as the spokesman added, in
broken Arabic, "We are telling
the residents of the village
that there are those among us
in the Jewish settlements who
will not remain idle if the
released terrorist does not get
out of here. We want to avoid
unpleasantness and to main-
tain good neighborly rela-
tions," he said. The settlers
came to the village apparently
unarmed, except one of them
who openly carried a gun. He
was identified as Avner Uzan.
He wore a yarmulka with the
symbol of Rabbi Meir
Kahane's extremist Kach Par-
ty which advocates the expul-
sion of all Arabs from Israel
and the territories regardless
of whether or not they are guil-
ty of crimes.
Beatrice
The settlers have the names
of the released Palestinians,
obtained from the Interna-
tional Red Cross which par-
ticipated in the prisoner ex-
change. The mukhtar told the
visitors politely that he would
convey their demands to the
family of Yussef but that he
was in no position to force the
man to leave his home.
The settlers went to
Yussef s home to be told by his
brother that he had gone to the
Jordan valley. They said they
would return to make sure he
had left.
Security forces in the West
Bank have not intervened so
far in the settlers' drive to oust
released terrorists. But
sources in the defense
establishment called their tac-
tics childish.
Meanwhile, one of the ter-
rorists freed on May 20 and re-
arrested three days later for
allegedly inciting against
Israel in a local mosque, was
released by order of a
Jerusalem magistrates court
after he promised not to
engage in anti-Israel activities.
The man, Mussa Awda, had
been serving a life sentence for
murder. He has since returned
to his home in the Silwan
quarter of East Jerusalem.
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'age 1U The Jewish Floridian ofPalm Beach County/Friday, June 21, 1985
Star Wars* Director:
Israel's Defense Can Benefit
By JUDITH KOHN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
The director of research and
technology for the United
States Strategic Defense In-
itiative (SDI), commonly dubb-
ed "Star Wars," suggested
that the development of a
nuclear defense program in
space could have a direct im-
pact on Israeli defense
capabilities against conven-
tional weapons.
Asked in a WORLDNET
satellite interview with Euro-
pean and Israeli journalists
whether the SDI, in which the
U.S. has invited Israel to par-
ticipate, could also serve to in-
tercept short range missiles in
the Middle East, Lt. Gen.
James Abrahanson, director
for the SDI organization, an
office of the Defense Depart-
ment, said that some of the
very short range tactical
missiles that threaten Israel as
well as Europe are "a very dif-
ficult problem."
But he added, "I believe that
as we are successful with that,
then it can contribute not only
to the nuclear strategic
defense, but also to the many,
many conventional threats
that are indeed facing many of
our allies in different ways
than they are threatening the
United States. But I think the
answer is yes, simply and
clearly yes. Advanced
technology can be applied not
only in the strategic arena, and
that is one of the benefits of a
participative program."
Israeli participation in the
SDI has been a topic of debate
in the Knesset since Defense
Secretary Caspar Weinberger
extended the invitation also
proposed to NATO allies and
Japan and Australia in
April. Israeli Minister of
Science and Industry Gideon
Patt has endorsed the idea,
recommending that Israel seek
to become involved in "civilian
aspects" of SDI research. He
said that Premier Shimon
Peres and Defense Minister
Yitzhak Rabin were favorably
disposed to Israeli
participation.
Abrahanson said Israeli par-
ticipation in the SDI could
cover a broad range of areas,
including some of the more
conventional applications of
some of the advanced
technology, meaning improv-
ing missiles making missiles
more effective.
Organizations in
________the News
AMIT WOMEN
Amit Women, Rishona Chapter, are having a mini lun
cheon and card party on Sunday, June 23 at 11:30 a mt
be held in the party room at the clubhouse. '
WOMEN'S AMERICAN ORT
The Mid-Palm chapter of Women's American ORT
holds its regular meetings on the fourth Monday of each
month. The board meeting is on the first Monday of Pa^k
month. Both begin at 1 p.m. eacn
HADASSAH
July 3: Yovel Hadassah offers "The Boyfriend" to be
shown at the Royal Palm Dinner Theatre at a matinee per-
formance. Lunch, show, transportation and tips are includ-
ed in the one price.
Armand Shutter;
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Rabbi Views
Soccer Riots
LONDON (JTA) Britain's
Chief Rabbi, Sir Immanuel
Jakobovits has publicly compared
Britain's response to the Brussels
soccer riot, in which 38 people
were trampled to death, with the
German people's post-war
response to the Nazi Holocaust.
Writing in the London Times,
Jakobovits said that Britain had
shown a quite remarkable accep-
tance of collective shame for the
deeds of some miscreants. This,
he said, represented a demonstra-
tion of moral solidarity that is as
rare as it is significant among the
most civilized of nations.
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pupils Compete For 'Mensch'
Of The Week Award
Friday, June 21, 1985/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 11
kEW YORK (JTA) A
Uer in a Knoxville Jewish
' tested the idea of
toK a "Mensch of the
V to reward her pupils
, desirable classroom
avior and reported that the
Ljct "worked beautifully to
inee behavior and to teach a
Irish concept that is too little
led about."
Nancy Becker, teacher and
ucation director at the
Lska Amuna Religious
Lol reported on the experi-
fct in the current issue of
|he Pedagogic Reporter," of-
ial publication of the Jewish
bcation Society of North
Krica(JESNA).
Jhe reported she had seen
L "very unacceptable"
vior in her Bet-Gimel class
1 decided that talking about
rot and gemilut hasadim
(acts of loving kindness) "was
pointless if the children saw it
only as an intellectual
exercise."
Then a parent mentioned to
the teacher the concept of
"mensch of the week" which
the parent had tried in his
home and the teacher decided
to give it a try in her
classrooms.
She reported that when she
first mentioned the word
"mensch" only one pupil knew
what it meant. So she describ-
ed what a mensch is and what
constituted mensch-like
behavior in an individual's life.
She suggested as examples a
pupil giving a classmate the
courtesy of listening when he
or she spoke; and helping each
other at clean-up time, instead
of the much more familiar "I
didn't make that mess."
Young Judeans
Reunion Planned
Ilk American coeducational
lonist youth movement
Jebrates its 75th anniversary
Is year, and to commemorate
> event a reunion for all Ju-
ans of the South will take
ice on August 23-25 at Camp
Idea in Hendersonville,
k>rth Carolina. The program
will give everyone a chance to
celebrate 75 years of Young
Judea and nearly 25 years of
Camp Judea. More informa-
tion is available by writing to
the Atlanta Young Judea of-
fice at 1655 Peachtree St. N.E.
Suite 405, Atlanta, Georgia
30309.
First we created
the complete
summer vacation.
Thenw|erfectej
Thai s ,i big statement. But Kutsher's is a
m Even by Catskills' standards. We're
bis enough to offer poolsindoors and out
goll racquetball, tennis, indoor ice-skating, a
supervised day camp, two nightclubs with new
shows nightly. and that's just for starters! If
you want to find out just how complete a sum-
met vacation can be come!
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She said she posted a chart
with each student's name.
Each week she put a star next
to the name of the pupil who
had earned the title "Mensch
of the Week." The pupils
quickly responded in a positive
way, she declared.
She reported that one week,
she asked the class members
whom they would nominate for
the star and why. She called
"astounding" the "outpour-
ing" of praises for fellow
students and willingness to
recognize mensch-like
behavior.
She reported that every
pupil that week earned a star
and she declared the need for
the project was over: Experi-
ment successful.
Wiesel Film
Showing
On July 3 at 2:00 and
7:30 p.m. the film Eli
Wiesel's Jerusalem will be
shown at the Palm Beach
Gardens Branch of the
Palm Beach County
Library System, 8895 N.
Military Trail, Bldg. C,
Palm Beach Gardens. This
program is free and open
to the public, but seating is
limited. Please call the
library for further
information.
Irving Zwickel (seated) was installed May 5 as president of
B nai B'rith North Lodge No. 3115. Past presidents of the
lodge are (left to right) Stan Lustig, Stuart Wanack, Stan
Cohen, David Neier and Sy Fine.
"Til A IUACH ClIM ^"|ffc%
OPCMA.il vrm ^m^
OPCN ALL YEAR
Reserve Now For The
HIGH HOLY DAYS & SUCCOTH
SUCCA on premises
Services will be Conducted by a Prominent Cantor
Private Beoch Swimming Pool TV In All Rooms
Free Parking Entertainment
Your host Rabbi 6IMPEL ORIMLANO
I IK I GWTT KOSHER
NATIONAL KASHRUTH A*-
Phone 1-538-7811^
ON TMt OCIAN AT INK St. MtanH BMdi
I
For delrciously tool summer -
timei refreshment, poor on the
Scrap Brand Decaffeinated
Coffee
Place one rounded tea-
spoon Santo Instant or
Freeze-Dried Decaffeinated
Coffee in o tall glass Stir in one cup cold water Add
ice and serve with cream and sugar, if you want Or
ask for it at your favorite restaurant. You'll hove a de-
lightful summer cooler Rich real coffee that's 97%
caffein-free. And Kosher, too. Santo '
for summer is such a mechoieh the rest
of your summer should only be so
refresh'ngl
K Certified Kosher
1
-ootis
\W? CeVMtKOf f<>odCo*prahe>*


.'/vr*AMn .\/iiUioii ox i
Sft?,rr^*iS"u^iTTuia>/rriuay, June zi, iyD
Senior News
FROM THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
The Jewish Community Centers Comprehensive
Senior Service Center is a network of services for seniors
designed to encourage and foster growth, independence
and activity for persons in their later years. Varied services
through a Federal Grant Title III of the Older Americans
Act. awarded by (.u If stream Area Agency on Aging,
enhance the everyday lives of older adults throughout the
community.
HOT KOSHER
LUNCH CONNECTION
Each weekday, seniors
gather for intimate talk,
educational discussions, game
playing, leisure and song.
These activities are followed
by a hot, kosher, nutritious
lunch served with warmth and
hospitality by our dedicated
volunteers. Join the unique
and enriching Kosher Lunch
program at the Jewish Com-
munity Center. We offer im-
aginative and innovative ac-
tivities plus stimulating discus-
sions and lively musical
presentations. A delicious
strictly kosher lunch is served.
There is no set fee, but persons
are asked to make a contribu-
tion each meal. Reservations
must be made in advance. Call
689-7703 for information.
MENU
Monday, June 24 Orange
Juice, veal (2) patties with pep-
per sauce, mashed potatoes,
spinach, orange, Italian bread.
Tuesday, June 25 Apple
juice, sliced turkey with giblet,
peas, sweet potatoes, pear
halves, rye bread.
Wednesday, June 26
Grapefruit juice, gefilte fish
with horseradish, rice, peas
and carrots, peaches, pumper-
nickle bread.
Thursday, June 27 Orange
juice, sliced roast beef, mixed
vegetables, rice, cookies,
whole wheat bread.
Friday, June 28 Pineapple
juice, sauteed chicken, noodle
kugel, chopped broccoli, mixed
fruit, challah bread.
Monday, July 1 Apple
juice, meat balls with tomato
gravy, parsley potatoes, peas
and carrots, pineapple tidbits,
Italian bread.
I laach'i 6l*TT KOSHER
HOTEL A IEACH ClUI ^C^
AMKftl a\l W*a\a*
OWEN ALL YEAR
JULY4th WEEKEND CELEBRATION
4 DAYS & 3 NIGHTS *?S 5 OAYS & 4 NIGHTS
Tuesday, July 2 Pineapple
juice, roast chicken, mixed
vegetables, zuccini with onions
and celery, apple, rye bread.
Wednesday, July 3 -
Grapefruit juice, fish fillet with
lemon and butter, rice, zuc-
chini, plums, pumpernickle
bread.
Thursday, July 4 Pineap-
ple juice, beef with cabbage
sauce, mashed potatoes,
squash, pear halves, whole
wheat bread.
Friday, July 5 Orange
juice, baked chicken with
tomato sauce, glazed carrots,
sweet potatoes, mixed fruit,
challah bread.
HOME
DELIVERED MEALS
Persons who are homebound
and need a Kosher meal please
call for information. Call Carol
in West Palm Beach at
689-7703.
SENIOR ACTIVITIES
Monday, June 24 -
'"Adventures in Living," 1:15
p.m. Mary Tinker, Instructor;
Kosher Meal Program -
Games, 11:30 a.m.
Tuesday, June 25 Timely
Topics/Round Table Talk
Discussion, 1 p.m.; Kosher
Meal Served 12 noon.
Wednesday, June 26
"'Energizing Your Life," 11
a.m., Bea Bunze; Kosher Meal
Served 12 noon.
Thursday, June 27 -
"Financial Awareness for
Women," 1:15 p.m., Joe Ray,
Instructor; Speakers Club, 10
a.m.; Kosher Meal Program,
11:30 a.m., Susan King,
Nutritionist.
Friday, June 28 Kosher
Meal Program, 11:30 a.m.
Monday, July 1 '"Adven-
tures in Living," 1:15 p.m.
Mary Tinker, Instructor;
Kosher Meal Program -
Games, 11:30 a.m.
*90
par ptraon
doubla occ
118
par pt'ion
doubk occ
SPECIAL GROUP DISCOUNTS AVAILABLE
INCLUDING GLATT KOSHER CUISINE
TV in All Rooms Dancing A Entartainmant
Cord Room Movtaa Fmo Parking

rw HIGH HOLY DAYS A SUCCOTHstf ><
Services Will Be Conducted by a Prominent Cantor
SUCCAonpremi*ei _____j
im' GLATT KOSHER 1
Phont) 1-538-7811
STATE OF
ISRAEL BONDS
BOUGHT AND SOLD
Invest in
Israel Securities

WERE SPECIALISTS IN
ISRAEL SECURITIES
***
TRANSACTIONS DAILY VIA TELEX
TO ISRAEL STOCK EXCHANGE
Leumi
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Securities
18 East 48th Street
New York. NY 10017
(212)759 1310
nasd Corporation Toil Free<800) 221 4838
Tuesday, July 2 Timely
Topics/Round Table Talk, 1
p.m.; Kosher Meal Served 12
noon; Second Tuesday Council
Meeting, 10 a.m.
Wednesday, July 3
"'Energizing Your Life," 11
a.m., Bea Bunze; Kosher Meal
Served 12 noon.
Thursday, July 4 Center
Closed. Holiday.
Friday, July 5 Kosher Meal
Program, 11:30 a.m.
Palm Beach County Adult
Education Classes
RIDE AND SAIL
Take an air-conditioned bus
11 a.m. Wednesday, July 17, at
the Westgate of Century
Village and board (h, m
dlewheel Queen RiVertil
12:30 p.m in Fonua
Choose a lunch of either U
chicken or tuna fish J
enjoy a luxurious cruE
enclosed first deck of thu
pie deck boat. Boat lI V
back at 4:30 p.m. A i
drive back will take all to Wl
b p.m. The cost for the enH
day is $20 for JCC Z2
and $25 for non-member?
This is another Jewish I
rnunity Centers Second 1
day Council's activity Sa
Gottschalk, chairperson !
additional information nU
call Nina Stillerman, volum!
coordinator 689-7703
JULY 4tti WEEK-END CELEBRATION
5 days & 4 nights
July 3 to July 7
$115
of
p'S0n
OoutH*
OCC
*
4 days & 3 nights
July 4 to July 7
$90
M'
peison
30uOH
occ
plus tax A gratuities
INCLUDING MEALS
Reserve Now For The
HIGH HOLY DAYS & SUCC0TH
Services Will be Conducted by Prominent Cantor
SPACIOUS 0CEANFR0NT SYNAGOGUE
Private Beach Olympic Pool Poolside Therapeutic
Whirlpool Color TV in All Rooms Resident Mashgiach
___ ,i^ Appropriate Nightly Entertainment
CJrtftflL Beautiful Oceantront Succah
BS2^
!
The
Brlckman
Hotel...
a catsklll
resort
that lets you
stop eating
long enough
to have
some fun...N
S375-S390
Per week, per person (dbL occ.)
Every room with Private Bath
Air Conditioning and Color TV.
for reservations and
information phone
1-800-431-3854
_ L HotelBrickman
aouth Fateburg, MY. 12779
Master Card, visa, Amex
Overiookingagreat
18 hole gel course.
Hotel
When you escape the Florida heat this
Summer, escape to something moce
than non-stop overeating.
Escape to the Bnckman.
Vbu go on vacation to do more than live
from one meal to the next That's why we re
on the Modified American Plan, serving two
sumptuous meals daily. Breakfast (until 1130
am), and Dinner (from 630 to 830 pm).
MkWay snacks? Magnificent Poolside
Coffee Shop.
There wl be no announcement at 1 pm
calling you back to the Dining Roomiwhfch
you just left, no need to rush off golf course
or term is courts. Linger at the pool all day i
you choose. We have one outdoor and
indoor (containing health ctub and jet
whJripool spa). Play duplicate bridge, take
art classes, go fcfc dancing, jog, or work out
oni our Universal mini- gym. to short, enjoy a
full day of outdoor activities and sunshine,
and all the other fabulous things we have to
offer, including errtertatomerrt mat's second
to none.
So come to the Bnckman. Where the
meals are fun...not something that gets
in the way of fun!
&&Ss
Your host for three generations.
The Posner Family



^deral Budget Cuts Discussed
Friday, June 21, 1985/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 13
Cotinued from Page 1
mty Health Department
or Dr. Carl Brumback
jed the need for con-
m funding of preventive
E, care, such as pre-natal
and immunization pro-
ms which, if not provided,
j|y lead to demands for
ire costly criticial care.
riback said that preventive
Trices are cost-effective
cause they "save money and
Kiote the otimum quality of
r .
Jjnda Tilghman, director of
C Beach County Employ-
nt and Training program
ta introduced Will McTier,
fconal manager -for the
_j Department of Labor
Employment Security,
, stated that further fun-
rcuts will have a profound
id on the Job Corps and
| cause the elimination of
Working Incentive
Noting that refugee services
i seriously lacking in Palm
County, Luciano Mar-
director of Hispanic
nan Resources (HHR),
ned that Palm Beach
nty has not effectively
sd what funding has been
__ble. Warning that "by
fend of September this year
I will be no refugee ser-
ai in Palm Beach County"
i to lack of funding, Cathy
lade, assistant director of
X echoed Dr. Robbina by
ting, "If the funds dry up,
I problems don't go away.'
Bpeaking about social ser-
for the elderly, Paul
latrice, director of the
wide Council on Aging,
I that recent aits have
"blasted a hole in (the
elderly's) safety net." The in-
dependence and dignity of the
elderly have been compromis-
ed according to Beatrice.
"With the new mandates and
the constantly growing popula-
tion, there is no way to meet
the needs," he said.
Alan Schnier, director of
Palm Beach County Housing
Development, suggested that
county officials could be more
aggressive in seeking funds.
The county has "traditionally
not received its fair share of
housing funds," said Schnier,
who pointed out that Palm
Beach County is the 18th
fastest-growing county in
the nation.
Brother Joe Ranieri of The
Lord's Place pointed out that
"funding affects everything
and everybody," not just the
needy. "We need to go out and
beat the drums about fun-
ding," Brother Ranieri
claimed.
Summing up, A. Thomas
White, director of Palm Beach
County Social Services, said,
"We've got to begin to look at
(the problem) as one, as we are
doing now with the coalition
... It is not just a county or
state or federal responsibility;
It's all our responsibility."
Responses were then heard
from County Commissioners
Ken Adams, Jerry Owens, and
Dorothy Wilkins. Hinting at
Washington's view of Palm
Beach County as a playground
for the rich, Commissioner
Wilkins asked rhetorically,
"Who could possibly believe
that Palm Beach County could
be in trouble?" Ms. Wilkins of-
fered to work closely with the
Ad Hoc Coalition. "What I
have learned has deepened my
commitment," she said.
Commissioner Ken Adams,
taking a cue from Dr. Brum-
back, urged continued support
of preventive social programs.
Mr. Adams said the county
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For t Healthy Breakfast
Bran Muffins..............6 99*
Prices Effective
Jine 20 thru 26.1985
T,
fc
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McCalft
COOKBOOK
COLLECTION

This week's feature
VOLUME 8
Divine Desserts
81.79
WMch for
New Books Weekly
needs to tap more of its own
resources and needs to make
better use of the limited funds
which are available. Govern-
ment must cooperate and coor-
dinate more effectively with
social service agencies, accor-
ding to Adams.
Representatives from Con-
gressmen Tom Lewis and Dan
Mica said they would report
back to Washington on the
feelings of local service agen-
cies and county constituents.
'MOVING &
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DISCOUNTS
Wast Palm Beaeh
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I or
'
Page 14 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, June 21, 1985
Charlotte Jacobson, president of the
Jewish National Fund of America, signs
the National Council of Young Israel's
agreement to plant a forest of 10,000 trees
near Safed in Israel's Galilee region. Also
pictured at the ceremony at JNF House are:
(Left to right) Dr. Samuel I. Cohen, ex-
ecutive vice president, JNF of America;
Harold Jacobs, president of the National
Council of Young Israel; Rabbi Emanuel
Rothenberg, director of JNF's Religious
Department; and Rabbi Ephraim Sturm,
Young Israel's executive vice president.
The 1985 Confirmation, class of Temple Israel. From left to
right, first row, Alissa Debs, Jill Cohn, Amy Prince and Julie
Sakson; second row, Michael Kapner, Amy Fine, Grace
Jagoda, Deborah Solomon and Rabbi Howard Shapiro.
Bar Mitzvah
MICHAEL EISENBERG
Michael Landon Eisenberg,
son of Lee and Cheryl
Hendelson, celebrated his Bar
Mitzvah at Temple Israel on
June 15. Michael completed his
seventh grade year at the
Jewish Community Day School
and is a member of the Kadima
youth group and the school
newspaper staff.
BUYING COLD & SILVER
Buying...
Scrap Cold
in any form, any condition
Buying...
Coins-Cold & Silver
Collections & Accumulations
U.S. & Foreign
s
NORTH AMERICAN
RARE COINS. ,c
2550 OKEECHOBEE BLVD.. W PALM BEACH. FL
684-1771
HOURS: 9:30 o.m.-6:00 p.m.
Member ANA & Chamber o< Cow
.
Candle lighting Time
O June 21 7:57 p.,
***k June 29 7:59 p.J
Religious Directory
Conservative
CONGREGATION ANSHEI SHOLOM: 5348 Grove St~
West Palm Beach 33409. Phone 684-3212. Rabbi Isaac vZl
Walde. Cantor Mordecai Spektor. Daily: 8:30 a.m. and 530D:
Friday: 8:30 a.m., 5 p.m. and a late service at 8:15 p.m f0|JLj
by Oneg Shabbat. Saturday: 8:30 a.m., 5 p.m., Mincha followedbv
Sholoah Suedos. *
CONGREGATION BETH KODESH OF BOYNTON BEACH'
501 N.E. 26 Avenue, Boynton Beach 33435. Phone 586-9428
Rabbi Avrom'L. Drarin, Cantor Arthur R. Rosenwasser. Mondav
8:30 a.m.; Thursday 8:30 a.m. Sabbath services, Friday 815 D m
Saturday 9 a.m. v' '
GOLDEN LAKES TEMPLE: 1470 Golden Lakes Blvd Wm
Palm Beach 33411. Phone 689-9430. Rabbi Joseph Speiser. Daft
services 8:15 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. Sabbath services Friday 8-15
p.m. Saturday 9 a.m., 5 p.m., Mincha followed by Sholosh Suedos.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID: 4657 Hood Road, Palm Beach Garden.
33410. Phone 694-2350. Rabbi William Marder, Cantor Earl J
Rackoff. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m. Saturday 10 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 2815 No. Flagler Dr., West Palm Beach
33407. Phone 833-0339. Rabbi Howard J. Hirsch, Cantor Elaine
Shapiro. Sabbath services Friday 6:30 p.m. (June 14-July 261
Saturday 9:30 a.m. Daily Minyan 8:15 a.m., Sunday and legal
holidays 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 315 N. "A" Street, Lake Worth
33460. Phone 585-5020. Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg, Cantor Jacob
Elman. Services Monday and Thursday 8:15 a.m., Friday 8:15
p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 224 N.W. Avenue G, Belle Glade
33430. Sabbath services Friday, 8:30 p.m. Phone 996-3886.
TEMPLE BETH ZION: Lions Club, 700 Camelia Dr., Royal
Palm Beach. Mailing address: PO Box 104,650 Royal Palm Blvd.,
Royal Palm Beach, FL 33411. Sabbath services Friday 8 p.m.,
Saturday 8:45 a.m. Rabbi Nathan Zelizer. Phone 793-9122.
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB: 2177 So. Congress Ave., West Palm
Beach 33406. Phone 433-5957. Rabbi Dr. Morris Silberman, Can
tor Hyman Lifshin. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m., Saturday
and holidays 9 a.m., Monday and Thursday 9 a.m.
TEMPLE EMANUEL: 190 North County Road, Palm Beach
33480. Phone 832-0804. Rabbi Joel Chazin, Cantor David Dir-
dashti. Sabbath services, Friday 6 p.m.; Saturday 9 a.m.
THE TREASURE COAST JEWISH CENTER Ben
Abraham: 3257 S.E. Salerno Road, Port Salerno. Rabbi Abraham
Rose. 1-287-8833. Services Friday evenings 8 p.m.
LAKE WORTH JEWISH CENTER: St. Lukes United
Methodist Chapel, 165 Ohio Road, Lake Worth. Mailing address:
6996 Quince Lane, Lake Worth, FL 33467. Phone 965 6053. Fri-
day night services 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.
Orthodox j
CONGREGATION AITZ CHAIM: Century Village, West Palm
Beach. Phone 689-4675. Sabbath services 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. Daily
services 8:15 a.m. and 6:30 p.m.
Reform
CONGREGATION BETH ISRAEL: 1592 Floresta, P.O. Box
857146. Port St. Lucie, FL 33452. Friday night services 8 p.m.,
Saturday morning 10:30 a.m. Phone 466-6977.
THE REFORM TEMPLE OF JUPITEB-TEQUESTA: 759
Parkway Street, Jupiter. Mailing address: Plaza 222, U.S. No. 1,
Tequesta 33458. Phone 747-1109. Rabbi Alfred L. Friedman. Ser
vices Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 4600 Oleander Avenue, Fort Pierce, FL
33450. Phone 461-7428.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM: St Helen's Parish Hall, 20th
Avenue and Victory Blvd., Vero Beach 32960, mailing address:
P.O. Box 2113, Vero Beach, FL 32961-2113. Rabbi Richard D.
Messing. Phone 1-569-0180.
TEMPLE BETH TORAH: at Wellington Elementary School,
J2JX2 Paddock f West Palm Beach. Mailing address: P.O. Box
17008, West Palm Beach, FL 33406. Friday services 8:15 pjn.
Kabbi Steven R. Westman. Phone 793-2700.
TEMPLE ISRAEL: 1901 No. Flagler Dr., West Palm Bead'
33407. Phone 833-8421. Rabbi Howard Shapiro, Cantorial Soloist
busan Weiss-Speth. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE JUDEA: at St. Catharine's Greek Orthodox Church j
Social Hall, 4000 Washington Rd., at Southern Boulevard. R*W
Joel L. Levine. Cantor Anne Newman. Mailing address: 51* j
Okeechobee Blvd.. West Palm Beach, FL 33409. Phone 47M


Friday, June 21, 1985/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 15
iagogueNews
LAKE WORTH
JEWISH CENTER
During the Sabbath Services
Ion the 21st of June at 8:15
L m the Lake Worth Jewish
Icenter will host Mr. Herman
iHerst who will address the
(topic "How We Jews Got to
\merica and Florida." His
Jks will cover the wandering
of the Jews from the Roman
lispersion to modern times.
REFORM TEMPLE
JUPITER-TEQUESTA
The Reform Temple of
[jupiter-Tequesta held its se-
cond Annual Meeting on May
8. At that time a new Board
Ef Directors was elected for
1985-86. The new officers are:
president. Meredith Goldstein;
'ice-President, A 1
Schlossberg; Secretary,
)eborah Davison; and
'reasurer, Roz Agre. Board
(embers elected were Harriet
Greenblatt, John Shambach,
Paula Deakter, Shaari Rudd,
Herb Foxman, Ellis Tarsches,
penny Greene, Irving Frey,
nd Jeanne Tarsches.
TEMPLE JUDEA
Rabbi Joel Levine will
eview "Double Vision" a new
est selling book by Zeev
fhefits at Temple Judea Shab-
ath Services, Friday, June 21
18 p.m.
Rabbi Levine will share with
he congregation the keen in-
tghts Chefits makes about the
>orld view of Israel as seen
hrough the eyes of the press.
lunches, toys, and sports
equipment.
For more information, call
Alan Block or the Temple
office.
"Questions Jews Ask About
Reform Judaism" will be the
theme of a special Shabbat
evening at Temple Judea on
Friday, June 28 beginning at 8
p.m.
Anyone interested in learn-
ing more about Reform
Judaism is invited to attend.
Questions may be submitted in
advance to Rabbi Levine by
sending them to the Temple of-
fice, 5154 Okeechobee, Suite
2B, West Palm Beach, FL
33409. The next roundtable
discussion will be held on Fri-
day, Aug. 23 on Conversion
and Intermarriage, conducted
by Rabbi Levine and the
Outreach Committee.
For more information, call
the Temple office.
CONGREGATION
BETH KODESH
The Sisterhood will have a
Theatre Party at the Burt
Reynold's Dinner Theatre on
Sunday, Sept. 8.
A delightful musical named,
"The News," will be shown.
Tickets are limited, so be sure
to call early.
Contact Magda Katz or
Marilyn Grunin.
TEMPLE
BETH DAVID
Temple Beth David of Nor
thern Palm Beach County an-
nunces the expansion of its
educational program to in-
clude a pre-school due to open
this fall.
The school for children ages
r 2V2 through 4 will complement
liners and their children, in- the synagogue's full range of
nts through age nine. services.
Phe purpose is to increase For further information
itk u time fatners spend regarding membership and
|tn their children. Fathers enrollment, call the Temple
requested to bring picnic office.
Area Deaths
[As part of Temple Judea's
^renting program, Rabbi Joel
evine will conduct a mini
habbat morning service, pic-
: and activities day on Satur-
ft, June 22 at 10 a.m. at
rlin Park in Jupiter. This
ram will be open to all
m
. *';of Windsor F. Century Village.
Film Beach. Levitt-Weimtein
Security Plan Chapel. Weat
|UU0N
67 of 4539 Luxemberg Court. Lake
id v*rside Guardian Plan Chapel.
I Palm Beach.
pnuin
.... 8' We,t Palm Be*<* Levi"-
PUMn Guaranteed Security Plan
"* Palm Beach
UtIS
S 86, of Century Village, West Palm
lweTWein,tein Guaranteed
nty Plan Chapel. West Palm Beach.
WE
17". f 363 B Bennington Lane. Lake
'iTJp't Gud'n Plan Chapel,
kM of Tuscany, Kings Point. Delray
.pSnSGu*rdUn|i,uneiH^
*owrrz
J"*. "'2213 NEFIrat Court, Boyn-
We ln'd' G^rtun Funeral
west Palm Beach
JTBO
["of 5308 BelleviHe Rcd, We
tt. Riverside Memoruu FWal
Plm Beach.
BR
' No23' f I91 Smk1P'P' Ave.. Royal
Becli Riverside Guardian Plan
Chapel, West Palm Beach.
ZINNER
Alfred, West Palm Beach. Uvitt-Weinste.n
Guaranteed Security Plan Chapel, West
Palm Beach.
ZLATKOFF
Abe, 83, of West Palm Beach. Levitt
Weinstein Guaranteed Security
Chapel, West Palm Beach.
Plan
Palm Beach rabbis host breakfast meeting
to discuss Israel Bond High Holiday Cam-
paign. Shown left to right, seated, Rabbi
Israel Meir Lau, Chief Rabbi of Netanya;
Gerald Lesher, Campaign Chairman; Rabbi
Joel Chazin, Temple Emanu-El and Presi-
dent of Palm Beach County Board of Rab-
bis; Rabbi David G. Shapiro. Standing,
Rabbi Allan Sherman, Jewish Federation;
Rabbi Howard Shapiro, Temple Israel',
Rabbi Samuel Silver, Temple Sinai, Delray
Beach; Rabbi Isaac VanderWalde, Con-
gregation Anshei Sholom; and Rubin L.
Breger, executive director of Palm Beach.
Temple Beth David's graduating class of 5745 (front row),
teacher Mimi Marder, Laura Stern, Alisa Shore, Irwin
Mendelsohn, teacher Ayala Rosen; (back row), Shawn Barat,
Rachel Nelson, Cindy Falk, Betsy Stoller, teacher Ann Lip-
ton, Dannv Rosenblum, and Greg Preiser.
Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg
presents Mrs. Barbara S.
Steinberg, executive director
of the Jewish Community
Day School, with contribu-
tions to the Day School on
behalf of Temple Beth
Sholom of Lake Worth. The
contributions were in
response to the Passover
Yiskor Appeal made by
Jewish Community Day
School past president and
board member Barry
Krischer. "This long stan-
ding tradition of support
shown by President Archie
Levine, Rabbi Eisenberg and
the Congregation of Temple
Beth Sholom of Lake Worth
has significantly helped the
JCDS to further Jewish
education in our communi-
ty," said Steinberg.
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Pag** 16 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, June 21, 1985

Pan Am.
The Key To
A Great European
Vacation.
,
Low Fares. No airline has lower fares to
more European destinations than Pan Am
And only Pan Am flies all 747's to Europe.
Affordable
Hotel Accom-
modations.
Thanks to
Pan Am, you
can rest as-
sured that al-
most anywhere
you spend a day,
you'll have a place
to spend the night.
You'll be able to
check into any of
these select ho-
tels: Holiday Inn
$26 a night. Best
Western-$28 a
night including
breakfast, Trust-
house Forte Hotel
$27 a night including
r breakfast* The only
thing harder than finding a
hotel room in Europe is finding
one at these prices. B
Call Your Travel Ag
Lowest Priced
Car Rentals.
With Pan Am, you're
free to see as much or
as little of Europe as
you want. And, at
your own pace.
Rent a Kemwel
economy car,
with unlimited
mileage, for as
little as $69 to
$79 a week. No
one has lower
prices.
Fares Shown Are Each Way, Based On Roundrrip Purchase And Do Not Include $3 Departure Tax.
London
Paris
Rome
Frankfurt
Zurich
Nice
Berlin
Warsaw
399s0
6 1-9'W/YHXAB
42700
V-9.10'YHXE2M
$483
6 I 14'YHXAP
'41800
I 14 XUABIM
47150
60 -WM/YHXAP
$47700
>'" l YHXE2M
*444
A I M4.YHXAB.1M.
*533
611 9/15/YHXAC
Brussels
Athens**
Dubrovnik
Amsterdam
Hamburg
Belgrade
Munich
Bucharest
*449so
6ll-*l4'YHXAP
,508
6 I-H/3VYHAB6M
14 .MX \r
'44950
fl-4'M'YHAP
6 I P II II. \BM
*508
SIM/14 YHXAP
144400
6.|.9il4'YHXAB.1M
,580S0
VB-9/M'YHAP
Fare Fact*: There are advance purchase and length of
stay requirements depending on your destination.
Cancellation penalties may also apply Some fares require
travel on specific days of the week Travel at these fares
must originate and/or terminate by a specific date
depending on your destination. Seats are limited. All fans
require roundtrip purchase and are subject to change.
Car Facto: Car rentals not available in Bucharest,
Budapest, Istanbul or Warsaw. Car offer good now thru
Stuttgart
Nuremberg
Zagreb
Istanbul
Budapest
Geneva
Vienna
$418
6 1 9 14'YHXABIM
S444<>0
6 I 1 I4.YHXAB.1M
$508
MB4VN YHXAP
$563
6/1*11, YHXAP
'SSS00
V159I4. YHXAP
$471M
6 I" M'YHXAP
149300
6/|9'l4YIAI'
* *S0 sur. h.irKr lur rrlutn Irivrl I,. US 81S 9/JO
October 31. 1985. There are some age requirements and gas
optional insurance, collision damage waiver, taxes and Sod
off charges are extra. ^
Hotel Facto: Hotel accommodations not available in
Athens Belgrade. Bucharest, Budapest. Dubrovnik
sianbul. Warsaw, or Zagreb. Hotel prices are per person
based on double occupancy. Seasonal supplement-
apply in certain cities. Trusthouse Forte Ho
onlv in U.K.
itels available
The key to a great European vacation this summer is flying
1 an Am. For starters, Pan Am is the key to incredibly low tares,
sPa.cious747s, and the choice of the most cities in Europe olani
airline. Then you get a key to something to help you see Eurpp-
once you ve arrived. A Kemwel rental car with unlimited mika;
tor as little as $69 a week. And last, a key to one of the rarest sig.
in all ot Europe: Hotel Accommodations. Hotel vouchers must!
purchased m advance for the number of nights you plan on be*
in hurope And, they're refundable, incaseyou have a change
heart or plans. 7
Pan Am. Well get you keyed up about going to Europe tfc
For^more information on Pan Am Holiday 497, call your
rm?JsE&S*. Pan Am m Miami at (305) 874-5000, en espanol
(305) 874-4455, in Ft. Lauderdale/Hollywood at (305) 462-6600, I
and inother areas at 1-800-221-1111.
Bui Am
You Can't Beat The Experience.