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The Jewish Floridian ( May 24, 1985 )

Jew5hFTo7!aianof Palm Beach County Friday. May 24, 1985
Midrasha, Machon To Hold Graduation Ceremonies
Highlights From Tiddler On The Roof Featured
Graduation ceremonies for
the Midrasha Judaica High
School Class of 1985 will be
held on Wednesday evening,
May 29, 7 p.m., in the Merkaz
of the Jewish Community Day
School, 5801 Parker Avenue,
West Palm Beach. Eighth
graders, who have completed
the first community Machon
program, will also be honored.
Dr. Paul Klein, chair of the
Midrasha Committee of the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County, invites the com-
munity to attend the gradua-
tion. "We look forward to see-
ing family, friends, and com-
munity members join us for
this special evening. We are
proud of the accomplishments
of Midrasha and all our
students and invite everyone
to join in honoring our
graduates. In addition the
drama class will present
"Highlights from Fiddler on
the Roof."
Midrasha graduating seniors
are Marshall Seth Brozost.
Beth Ivy Chertoff, Nanci Ann
Chertoff, Nancy Beth Farber.
William Harris, Kimberly Ann
Kapner, Gary Shephard
Lesser, Mitchell Reed Levy,
David Ira Shapiro, Judy
Tenzer, and Jeffrey Alan
Tochner.
Eighth graders who have
completed a year of study in
the inter-congregational
Judaic studies program and
will be entering Midrasha in
the Fall are Tammy Bleiman,
Jonathan Fleischman, Stephen
M. Gordon, Tammi Kachel,
Allison Kapner, Ariel Mor-
rison, Heidi Schonberg, Rachel
Shapiro, Tricia Heidi
Slomowitz, Kevin Wagner,
Robin Wasserman and Angie
Zalla.
Several of the graduating
seniors and other Midrasha
students have been studying
drama with instructor Linda
Chazin. Their efforts will
culminate in a production of
"Highlights from Fiddler on
the Roof which will debut at
graduation.
According to Mrs. Chazin,
the actors are very talented. "I
really enjoy working with
them. We have a warm,
cohesive group," she said.
Included in the cast are
Shana Chazin, Shoshana
Chazin, Kyle Cohen, Erica
Eisenberg, Billy Harris, Ivy
Continued on Page 13
-vv
i
Midrasha drama students rehearse a scene from "Fiddler i
the Roof."
(Left) Nathan Allweiss, chair of the Chaplain Aides, greets
Pauline Edelstein (right) at the annual Chaplain Aides
recognition luncheon. Looking on are Sol Mollen and Ilsa
Mollen. Mrs. Mollen sang the Israeli and American national
anthems accompanied on the piano by Mrs. Edelstein.
Summer Problem Stressed
At Chaplain Aide
Recognition Luncheon
By MURRAY J. KERN
It was an attractive lun-
cheon table, set with a variety
of salads and cake. Ilsa
Mollen's rendition of Hatikvah
and the Star-Spangled Banner
was stirring. Rabbi Alan Sher-
man delivr.-ed the invocation.
Chairperson Nat Allweiss
chanted a melodious motzi
blessing, Alice and Charles
Kurland's songs received a
standing ovation. The mood of
the 75 participants was most
convivial at the 6th Annual
Recognition Luncheon of the
Palm Beach Jewish Federation
Chaplain Aides Program.
However, after chair Nat
Allweiss thanked the Chaplain
Aides for their wonderful ef-
forts in behalf of the elderly at
the nursing homes and retire-
ment centers, and the patients
at hospitals, and Rabbi Sher-
man announced the imminent
opening of three new nursing
centers and two new hospitals
in the Palm Beach community,
the extent of the Chaplain
Aide problem came to light.
Jeanne Glasser, co-chair, ask-
ed for a show of hands of those
who would be in the Palm
Beach area duringlhe summer
months. The hands of precious
few Aides went up. "Precious"
is used in the literal sense
because of their high value and
rarity.
For the institutionalized
elderly, in the winter of their
years, the summer is par-
ticularly difficult. Confined to
the indoors because of the
heat, for many older persons
the long summer days can be
interminable. There is a dearth
of volunteers in all categories
from June through September.
Jeanne Glasser, who. coor-
dinates the work of the
Chaplain Aides in nursing
homes during the summer, is
responding to the needs of the
various centers for the elderly.
There will be Sabbath services
on Friday afternoon at most
places, but not as often.
"Friendly visiting," one to one
relationships between
residents and volunteers, in
many cases will be cut off for
the summer. At this time of
the year, for the aged living in
a community which is depen-
dent on volunteers, the quality
of life takes a steep decline.
The professionals attending
them daily at best cannot supp-
Conthraed on Page 5
JCC Director
Chosen For Israel Study Seminar
Jerome Melman of the
Jewish Community Center of
the Palm Beaches has been
honored by being chosen, as
one of 14 executive directors
nation-wide, to participate in
the Study Seminar for Ex-
ecutive Directors which will
take place in Israel from June
17 to June 28.
The Joint Education Fund of
the Ministry of Education and
Culture of Israel and the
Jewish Agency, WZO, have
provided a grant to cover most
of the costs for the 14 JCC ex-
ecutive directors selected.
The seminar will take place
at several learning institutions
such as the Shalom Hartman
Institute, The Melton Center
for Jewish Education in the
Diaspora, Yad Vashem and
The Harry Karen Institute for
Propaganda
(Herzliah).
Anal
y sisl
#
Jerome Melman
Topics to be covered include:!
Biblical and historical Torch I
values and their application to I
Center work; perspectives i\
historical to modern Israeq
with visits to key locations of
significance; current in-1
itiatives of JWB and JCCs in
maximizing their JewishI
educational effectiveness.
historical perspectives of th I
Holocaust as related to pro-1
gram development; insight in-
to the plight of Ethiopian Jews I
and courses to enable ex-
ecutive directors to better
analyze media and assess hid-'
den messages and their,
impact.
Consider A
'Charitable Remainder9 Trust!
An Income NOW... A Gift TOMORROW
Have you considered making a charitable contribution where you keep the income
from the gift for as long as you and/or spouse live? Then, upon the demise of the
donorjs), you provide a lasting gift to the Jewish Federation to carry on its philan-
thropic purpose. w K
This can be done by establishing a "charitable remainder" trust which essentially
involves placing assets in a revocable trust now. The key points of such a trust are:
S?uget' Ux deduction U year in which the trust is established
(with carryovers for up to 5 additional years if you exceed the
maxim am tax deduction limit for one year).
You get a guaranteed lifetime income, either a fixed sum or a
percentage of the trust assets, payable quarterly, semi-annuaUy
or annually. w
No capital gain tax is paid if the trust is funded with long term
capital gam securities or property.
Estate tax savings are generated for you and/or surviving spouse.
-wa Vid^i!frred PhiUnthroPic fund to the Jewish Federation
wnicn may be designated as a memorial fund in your name or names.
" ^.Pfn^tuate your commitment to Taedakah by helping to assure
the future and strength of the Jewish community
pU^treSrTa^a^18 F ""^V ENDOWMENT FUND COMMITTEE
of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
Stanley B. Brenner, Chairman
For farther information, please contact
MIS Fl.i \**waZ*.Adl~> Endowment Director
501 SFlaglerDnve. Suite 305 West Palm Beach. FL 33401
Telephone: (305) 832-2120


?4B
Friday, May 24,1985 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 3

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41 SUM MmMo by MM BoroM
Members of the Austin Jewish community make a three-mile trek on Freedom Day for Soviet
| Jewry.
What's A Parade In Texas Have
To Do With Palm Beach County?
By MURRAY J. KERN
And. who is Sheila Schwiff,
Header of the parade? Three
hundred people marching for
Soviet Jewry on Freedom Day
is great... but it would seem
(to be hardly newsworthy in
Palm Beach.
However, this particular
march, to raise the
consciousness of the 500,000
Austin, Texas population
(20,000 Jewish) to the plight of
I Soviet Jewry, was the culmina-
j tion of a two year effort, which
was born here, at a Palm
Beach Jewish Federation.
meeting, two years ago.
A string of events was
touched off when Jeanne
Glasser, co-chair of the
Chaplain Aide Program and
member of The Community
Relations Council, told Rabbi
Alan R. Sherman, chaplain
and CRC director, that she and
her daughter were planning a
holiday in Israel during March
of 1983. Rabbi Sherman sug-
gested that she represent the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County at the Third
World Conference for Soviet
Jewry, which was to be held in
Israel at the time she would be
visiting.
Accreditation was arranged
for Jeanne by Norman Schim-
melman and Jeanne's
daughter (Sheila Schwiff) ob-
tained accreditation from the
Jewish Federation in Austin,
where a Task Force For Soviet
Jewry did not exist.
Although the two women
had planned to spend one day
of their brief visit in Israel at
the conference, theyremained
tor all three days. The report
on the Conference by Jeanne
Wasser (Floridian, April 3,
1983) describes a meeting of
1500 delegates from 32 coun-
tries, including lawyers,
judges, and 41 legislators.
Speakers included Jeanne
Kirkpatrick, Father Robert
Drinan, Jesuit priest, and
Menachem Begin. The
message was "Let My People
G-" The atmosphere was elec-
"Let My
People Go77
trifying and Sheila Schwiff
was stirred.
She returned to Austin and
galvanized her community into
action for the Jews in Soviet
Russia. Letters to Russia,
which are the lifeline to
refuseniks from the outer
world, began to flow ... two
hundred a year at this time.
Hillel at The University of
Texas organized a "Struggle
for Soviet Jews." The Austin
Soviet Jewry Task Force,
Sheila Schwiff, chair, is work-
ing with six Jewish organiza-
tions to raise the con-
sciousness of the Austin
population; An Adopt-A-
Family Program is operating
effectively. As a result of the
march and rally, which
featured speeches by the
Mayor of Austin and Con-
gressman Jake Pickle, a small
group of local residents is plan-
ning a visit to the Soviet Union
to meet six refuseniks. Inten-
sive diplomatic negotiations
are in progress between Con-
gressman Pickle and Am-
bassador Dobrynin for the
release to Austinians of two
adopted Russian families.
It all started here in Palm
Beach because of our own ac-
tive Jewish Federation Com-
munity Relations Council. For-
ty members of the Palm Beach
CRC Soviet Task Force, under
the chairmanship of Shirlee
Blonder, meet each month to
get an update on the state of
Soviet Jewry, particularly ac-
tivists and refuseniks. The
Task Force plans strategy to
raise the consciousness of our
community to the plight of in-
dividuals in Russia and the
danger of Soviet
demagoguery, which portends
a threat to members of all
religious sects.
The task force program
stresses the importance of
every Jew accepting the
obligation to let Russian ac-
tivists know that they are not
forgotten; that we are part of
their fight; that we let the Rus-
sian State know that its ac-
tions are being monitored; that
we let our legislators know we
are interested in their actions
on behalf of the Soviet Jews
and enlist their aid in par-
ticular situations; that we pro-
test Soviet harassment such as
the recent arrest and exile of
Hebrew teachers.
If you want to know how you
can act constructively for
Soviet Jewry, how you can join
the Adopt-a-Family program,
call Rabbi Sherman at the
Federation's additional office,
655-7706.
Find That "Right" Job
Participate In a free Job eeminar on
Employee Ability Skills
June 3,10 a.m.-ll:30 a.m.
Jewish Family and Children's Service
2250 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd., Suite 104
For reservations and more information, call:
Carol Roth, vocational specialist, at 684-1991.
Morris M. Messing
Albert J. Dreitzer
Community Leaders Die
Albert J. Dreitzer
Albert J. Dreitzer, a philanthropist who was actively in-
volved in the Jewish community of the Palm Beaches, died
May 5 in Palm Beach.
Dreitzer took an active interest in many organizations. A
resident of Palm Beach and New York, he was a supporter
of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County and involv-
ed in local Jewish concerns. He was a member of the Palm
Beach Country Club.
A Fellow of Brandeis University, Dreitzer was responsi-
ble for the establishment of the Dreitzer Gallery in 1965.
According to the Brandeis Board of Directors, the gallery
enhanced the aesthetic appeal of the campus and aided the
arts program at Brandeis.
In New York Dreitzer was a member of the Central
Synagogue and the Glen Oaks Club. He was a board
member of Camp Vacamas.
Dreitzer is survived by his wife, Shirley Wolff Dreitzer,
daughter Judith, grandchildren Amy, Steven and Diane
and great-grandchild Adina. The funeral and interment
were held in New York.
Morris M. Messing
Morris M. Messing, community leader, a Palm Beach
resident for 12 years, died May 12 at the age of 75.
A supporter of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County, Messing was a member of Temple Emanu-El,
Rotary, Palm Beach Chamber of Commerce and the Palm
Beach Country Club.
Messing was active in many local, state and national
charitable organizations. He was president of the board of
trustees of the United Hospitals of Newark, New Jersey
for six years. In 1975 he was elected Florida state chairman
of the American Friends of Hebrew University.
Prior to retiring in 1972 from Occidental Petroleum Cor-
poration, he served as executive vice president for
chemicals and was chairman of the board and chief
operating officer of Occidental's Hooker Chemical
subsidiary.
Messing received an honorary doctorate from Bloomfield
College in New Jersey in 1978.
Messing is survived by his wife, Elsa, four children,
Robert, Gilbert, Andrew and Madeline, and eight grand-
children. A memorial service held at Temple Emanu-El was
directed by Rabbi Joel Chazin. Interment was in New
Jersey.
Missions *' Possible

Join with other community members on a
Federatlon-UJA Mission to Israel
Singles Mission.............July 21 July 31
Family Mission........August 11 August 21
Community Leadership
Mission...........October 12 October 22
Career Women's Leadership
Mission...........October 20 October 28
For more information contact JACK KARAKO, staff
associate, at the Jewish Fedaratlon of Palm Baach
County office, 832-2120.


MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian the voice of the Jewish community of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Running title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Physical Description:
4 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
May 24, 1985

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 8, no. 41 (Dec. 24, 1982)-v. 11, no. 26 (Aug. 30, 1985).
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44606415
lccn - sn 00229548
ocm44606415
System ID:
AA00014310:00129

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian the voice of the Jewish community of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Running title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Physical Description:
4 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
May 24, 1985

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 8, no. 41 (Dec. 24, 1982)-v. 11, no. 26 (Aug. 30, 1985).
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44606415
lccn - sn 00229548
ocm44606415
System ID:
AA00014310:00129

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)

Full Text
jTHE VOICE OF
THEJEW'SM
COMMUNITY OF
MLMBIACH
COUNTV
ewish floridian
VOLUME 11 NUMBER 19
PALM BEACH, FLORIDA FRIDAY, MAY 24.1985
PRICE 35 CENTS
Ban on MKs Who Voted
For Law of Return
THE LAST JEWS OF SIDON. Mrs. Jaffa Levy, who
with her family were the last Jews to leave the Southern
Lebanon city of Sidon, pauses in Sidon's synagogue and
reflects. When the family left, with the withdrawing of
Israeli Defense Forces, they ended five generations of
living in the picturesque city on the shores of the
Mediterranean.
NEW YORK (JTA) The announce-
ment by the Rabbinical Assembly, the
association of Conservative rabbis, that 51
members of Israel's Knesset should consider
themselves unwelcome at American Conser-
vative synagogues as speakers or honorees
was lauded here by a Reform leader as one
that might be emulated by the Reform move-
ment, and denounced by an Orthodox rab-
binical leader as "divisive political
blackmail."
The Conservative rabbinic action was taken
in response to those Knesset members, most-
ly Likud and National Religious Party
members, who voted to support changes in
the Israeli validity of Conservative and
Reform conversions of non-Orthodox Jews
settling in Israel. The proposed change failed
to become part of the Law of Return.
THE REFORM leader, Rabbi Alexander
Schindler, president of the Union of
American Hebrew Congregations (UAHC),
said that while the idea of a "blacklist" of
Knesset members was "abhorrent" to such a
liberal movement as Reform, equally abhor-
rent to Reform was the system in Israel "that
relegates Reform and Conservative Jews to a
second-class status in Jewish life."
He added that Israel's Orthodox state-
financed rabbinate also denied "full and equal
rights to Reform rabbis and synagogues."
He said the Conservative action had "at
least the merit of serving notice that the de-
mand of non-Orthodox Jewish religious
movements for full equality in Israel is not a
mere matter of rhetoric but rather represents
a deeply-felt concern of the preponderant ma-
jority of American Jews."
RABBI Louis Bernstein, president of the
Orthodox Rabbinical Council of America,
which supports change in the Law of Return,
called the RA position "degrading to the
Jewish people and Israel," an example of
"single issue politics" which could lead to
"dangerous consequences."
He added that "the State of Israel cannot
permit foreign groups of any persuasion to
pressure it in such an unprecedented
fashion." He said, "We are certain that even
those in Israel's government who oppose
changing the Law of Return, will condemn
this dangerous, divisive and unprecedented
action."
Federation Agencies Elect Presidents
Dr. Arthur Virshup
Jewish Community Day School
The Jewish Community Day School receiv-
I excellent marks for the year at the 1984/85
nnuai Meeting of its Board of Directors, ac-
>rding to incoming president Dr. Arthur
Virshup.
"The year was one of great progress and
owth for the school; and we look forward to
eeting the challenge of providing the best
[Jewish education available anywhere," said
Dr. Virshup. The newly-elected president has
been active in this community and particular-
ly at the Jewish Community Day School for
many years.
The D'var Torah was delivered by past
president Barry Krischer; followed by reports
of the vice presidents. They were met by ap-
plause as each stated the accomplishments of
his or her committee, and the role it played in
the Jewish Community Day School s continu-
ing success this past year.
Outgoing president Dean Rosenbachi con-
gratulated the outgoing officers and board
members on a job well done and welcomed the
spirit of the new board in continuing the job.
Jewish Community Dav School executive
director, Barbara S. Steinberg, chronicled the
DMt year as one of accomplishment and noted
Sat the future is bright for the Jewish Com-
munity Day School. Mrs. Steinberg announc-
ed the establishment of *J^opment C4fice
for the school noting that funoraiamg and
public relations are continuing ^
W attention. Michael Alexander hasi been ap-
3SS Development and Public Relations
Director.
David Kate was honored at the Awards
Ceremony for I* -tetending^ c
Joseph L. Morse Geriatric Center
Inside
Shavuot begins the
evening of May 25
and Is observed on
'he following two
days. This holiday
has more names than
any other... page 4.
Jm of India...
Page 4
pto Boynton Beach
winch office of the
Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County
18 closed for the sum-
mer and will reopen in
Member.
$100,000 to establish the David
Continued on Pag* 14
Stella
At the April meeting of the Board of
Trusteesof the Joseph L. Morse Geriatric
Center, ^Bennett Berman was unanimously
elected to complete the term of president left
vacant by Erwin H. Blonder. Blonder resign-
ed from the Center's Board to assume the
presidency of the Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County.
Berman, who has served as vice president
of the Morse Geriatric Center since its
establishment in 1982, has been actively in-
volved in the^Jm Beach Jewish community
and in his rfatfWhome, New York.
As a leader of the United Jewish Appeal,
the Anti-Defamation League and other major
Jewish organizations, Berman's interest in
the aged began with his understanding of the
growing needs of elderly Jews who retired to
Palm Beach County, and the need for a quali-
ty Jewish home for the aged.
"It is an honor and privilege to be elected
president of the Morse Geriatric Center,'
stated Berman, "especially at a time when
the Center is moving forward in its expansion
Qram to develop additional long term care
as well as viable alternatives to the in-
stitutional setting." Berman asked for the
continued support and leadership of the
Center's Board. "I will Took forward to work-
ing with the lay and professional leadership of
the Center as we move forward to meet the
many challenges which lie ahead," concluded
Berman.
As founding president, Blonder was in-
strumental in the establishment of the 120
bed skilled nursing home, and its develop
ment as one of the finest geriatric facilities in
the state of Florida.
Bennett Berman
Continued on Page 5
Federation Annual Report Special Insert


JewishFIoridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, May 24, 1985
Midrasha9 Machon To Hold Graduation Ceremonies
Highlights From Tiddler On The Roof Featured
Graduation ceremonies for
the Midrasha Judaica High
School Class of 1985 will be
held on Wednesday evening,
May 29, 7 p.m., in the Merkaz
of the Jewish Community Day
School, 5801 Parker Avenue,
West Palm Beach. Eighth
graders, who have completed
the first community Machon
program, will also be honored.
Dr. Paul Klein, chair of the
Midrasha Committee of the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County, invites the com-
munity to attend the gradua-
tion. "We look forward to see-
ing family, friends, and com-
munity members join us for
this special evening. We are
proud of the accomplishments
of Midrasha and all our
students and invite everyone
to join in honoring our
graduates. In addition the
drama class will present
"Highlights from Fiddler on
the Roof."
Midrasha graduating seniors
are Marshall Seth Brozost,
Beth Ivy Chertoff, Nanci Ann
Chertoff, Nancy Beth Farber,
William Harris, Kimberly Ann
Kapner, Gary Shephard
Lesser, Mitchell Reed Levy,
David Ira Shapiro, Judy
Tenzer, and Jeffrey Alan
Tochner.
Eighth graders who have
completed a year of study in
the inter-congregational
Judaic studies program and
will be entering Midrasha in
the Fall are Tammy B lei man,
Jonathan Fleischman, Stephen
M. Gordon, Tarn mi Kachel,
Allison Kapner, Ariel Mor-
rison, Heidi Schonberg, Rachel
Shapiro, Tricia Heidi
Slomowitz, Kevin Wagner,
Robin Wasserman and Angie
Zalla.
Several of the graduating
seniors and other Midrasha
students have been studying
drama with instructor Linda
Chazin. Their efforts will
culminate in a production of
"Highlights from Fiddler on
the Roof* which will debut at
graduation.
According to Mrs. Chazin,
the actors are very talented. "I
really enjoy working with
them. We have a warm,
cohesive group," she said.
Included in the cast are
Shana Chazin, Shoshana
Chazin, Kyle Cohen, Erica
Eisenberg, Billy Harris, Ivy
Continued on Page 13
1
Midrasha drama students rehearse a scene from "Fiddler on
the Roof."
(Left) Nathan Allweiss, chair of the Chaplain Aides, greets
Pauline Edelstein (right) at the annual Chaplain Aides
recognition luncheon. Looking on are Sol Mollen and Ilsa
Mollen. Mrs. Mollen sang the Israeli and American national
anthems accompanied on the piano by Mrs. Edelstein.
Summer Problem Stressed
At Chaplain Aide
Recognition Luncheon
By MURRAY J. KERN
It was an attractive lun-
cheon table, set with a variety
of salads and cake. Ilsa
Molten's rendition of Hatikvah
and the Star-Spangled Banner
was stirring. Rabbi Alan Sher-
man delivr.ed the invocation.
Chairperson Nat Allweiss
chanted a melodious motzi
blessing, Alice and Charles
Kurland's songs received a
standing ovation. The mood of
the 75 participants was most
convivial at the 6th Annual
Recognition Luncheon of the
Palm Beach Jewish Federation
Chaplain Aides Program.
However, after chair Nat
Allweiss thanked the Chaplain
Aides for their wonderful ef-
forts in behalf of the elderly at
the nursing homes and retire-
ment centers, and the patients
at hospitals, and Rabbi Sher-
man announced the imminent
opening of three new nursing
centers and two new hospitals
in the Palm Beach community,
the extent of the Chaplain
Aide problem came to light.
Jeanne Glasser, co-chair, ask-
ed for a show of hands of those
who would be in the Palm
Beach area duringlhe summer
months. The hands of precious
few Aides went up. "Precious"
is used in the literal sense
because of their high value and
rarity.
For the institutionalized
elderly, in the winter of their
years, the summer is par-
ticularly difficult. Confined to
the indoors because of the
heat, for many older persons
the long summer days can be
interminable. There is a dearth
of volunteers in all categories
from June through September.
Jeanne Glasser, who.coor-
dinates the work of the
Chaplain Aides in nursing
homes during the summer, is
responding to the needs of the
various centers for the elderly.
There will be Sabbath services
on Friday afternoon at most
places, but not as often.
"Friendly visiting," one to one
relationships between
residents and volunteers, in
many cases will be cut off for
the summer. At this time of
the year, for the aged living in
a community which is depen-
dent on volunteers, the quality
of life takes a steep decline.
The professionals attending
them daily at best cannot supp-
Continued on Page 5-
JCC Director
Chosen For Israel Study Seminar
Jerome Melman of the
Jewish Community Center of
the Palm Beaches has been
honored by being chosen, as
one of 14 executive directors
nation-wide, to participate in
the Study Seminar for Ex-
ecutive Directors which will
take place in Israel from June
17 to June 28.
The Joint Education Fund of
the Ministry of Education and
Culture of Israel and the
Jewish Agency, WZO, have
provided a grant to cover most
of the costs for the 14 JCC ex-
ecutive directors selected.
The seminar will take place
at several learning institutions
such as the Shalom Hartman
Institute, The Melton Center
for Jewish Education in the
Diaspora, Yad Vashem and
The Harry Karen Institute for
Propaganda
(Herzliah).
Analysis
Jerome Melman
Topics to be covered include:
Biblical and historical Torah
values and their application to
Center work; perspectives of j
historical to modern Israeli
with visits to key locations of |
significance; current in-
itiatives of JWB and JCCs in j
maximizing their Jewish
educational effectiveness;
historical perspectives of the
Holocaust as related to pro-
gram development; insight in-
to the plight of Ethiopian Jews
and courses to enable ex-
ecutive directors to better
analyze media and assess hid-
den messages and their
impact.
Consider A
'Charitable Remainder9 Trust!
An Income NOW... A Gift TOMORROW
Have you considered making a charitable contribution where you keep the income
from the gift for as long as you and/or spouse live? Then, upon the demise of the
donorls), you provide a lasting gift to the Jewish Federation to carry on its philan-
thropic purpose.
This can be done by establishing a "charitable remainder" trust which essentially
involves placing assets in a revocable trust now. The key points of such a trust are:
You get a tax deduction in the year in which the trust is established
(with carryovers for up to 5 additional years if you exceed the
maximum tax deduction limit for one year).
You get a guaranteed lifetime income, either a fixed sum or a
percentage of the trust assets, payable quarterly, semi-annually
or annually.
No capital gain tax is paid if the trust is funded with long term
capital gain securities or property.
Estate tax savings are generated for you and/or surviving spouse.
You provide a deferred philanthropic fund to the Jewish Federation
which may be designated as a memorial fund in your name or names.
X.OU.P!rpetuaie your "wnniitment to Ttedakah by helping to assure
the future and strength of the Jewish community.
Du^nniWto^ST!!^ trU8tS are ***** advantageous to retirees, persons
IaiftSar^S^ IT3?116 ma Paitioa to *** advantage of the tax benefits by
a gift of appreciated securities or property or "windfall" profits
ENDOWMENT FUND COMMITTEE
of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
Stanley B. Brenner, Chairman
For further information, please contact
Wlicui IJ?,W"dAd,er' Endowment Director
501 SFlagler Drive. Suite 305 West Palm Beach. FL 33401
Telephone: (305) 832-2120


Friday, May 24,1985 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 3
IMVBBBaHBHBHHBM^Bi^HBHIBHBBMBHlBr tun Pfcoto by m*. Boron
Members of the Austin Jewish community make a three-mile trek on Freedom Day for Soviet
Jewry.
What's A Parade In Texas Have
To Do With Palm Beach County?
By MURRAY J. KERN
And, who is Sheila Schwiff,
leader of the parade? Three
hundred people marching for
Soviet Jewry on Freedom Day
is great... but it would seem
to be hardly newsworthy in
Palm Beach.
However, this particular
march, to raise the
consciousness of the 500,000
Austin, Texas population
(20,000 Jewish) to the plight of
Soviet Jewry, was the culmina-
tion of a two year effort, which
was born here, at a Palm
Beach Jewish Federation,
meeting, two years ago.
A string of events was
touched off when Jeanne
Glasser, co-chair of the
Chaplain Aide Program and
member of The Community
Relations Council, told Rabbi
Alan R. Sherman, chaplain
and CRC director, that she and
her daughter were planning a
holiday in Israel during March
of 1983. Rabbi Sherman sug-
gested that she represent the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County at the Third
World Conference for Soviet
Jewry, which was to be held in
Israel at the time she would be
visiting.
Accreditation was arranged
for Jeanne by Norman Schim-
melman and Jeanne's
daughter (Sheila Schwiff) ob-
tained accreditation from the
Jewish Federation in Austin,
where a Task Force For Soviet
Jewry did not exist.
Although the two women
"ad planned to spend one day
of their brief visit in Israel at
the conference, they remained
for all three days. The report
on the Conference by Jeanne
vFa (F1.0Lridian. April 3,
i22P descnbes a meeting of
1500 delegates from 32 coun-
tries, including lawyers,
judges, and 41 legislators.
speakers included Jeanne
wrkpatrick, Father Robert
"rinan, Jesuit priest, and
Menachem Begin. The
message was "Let My People
Uo- The atmosphere was elec-
Let My
People Go
1~ w
trifying and Sheila Schwiff
was stirred.
She returned to Austin and
galvanized her community into
action for the Jews in Soviet
Russia. Letters to Russia,
which are the lifeline to
refuseniks from the outer
world, began to flow ... two
hundred a year at this time.
Hillel at The University of
Texas organized a "Struggle
for Soviet Jews." The Austin
Soviet Jewry Task Force,
Sheila Schwiff, chair, is work-
ing with six Jewish organiza-
tions to raise the con-
sciousness of the Austin
population; An Adopt-A-
Family Program is operating
effectively. As a result of the
march and rally, which
featured speeches by the
Mayor of Austin and Con-
gressman Jake Pickle, a small
group of local residents is plan-
ning a visit to the Soviet Union
to meet six refuseniks. Inten-
sive diplomatic negotiations
are in progress between Con-
gressman Pickle and Am-
bassador Dobrynin for the
release to Austinians of two
adopted Russian families.
It all started here in Palm
Beach because of our own ac-
tive Jewish Federation Com-
munity Relations Council. For-
ty members of the Palm Beach
CRC Soviet Task Force, under
the chairmanship of Shirlee
Blonder, meet each month to
get an update on the state of
Soviet Jewry, particularly ac-
tivists and refuseniks. The
Task Force plans strategy to
raise the consciousness of our
community to the plight of in-
dividuals in Russia and the
danger of Soviet
demagoguery, which portends
a threat to members of all
religious sects.
The task force program
stresses the importance of
every Jew accepting the
obligation to let Russian ac-
tivists know that they are not
forgotten; that we are part of
their fight; that we let the Rus-
sian State know that its ac-
tions are being monitored; that
we let our legislators know we
are interested in their actions
on behalf of the Soviet Jews
and enlist their aid in par-
ticular situations; that we pro-
test Soviet harassment such as
the recent arrest and exile of
Hebrew teachers.
If you want to know how you
can act constructively for
Soviet Jewry, how you can join
the Adopt-a-Family program,
call Rabbi Sherman at the
Federation's additional office,
655-7706.
Find That "Right" Job
Participate In a free Job seminar on
Employee Ability Skills
June 3,10 a.m.-ll:30 a.m.
Jewish Family and Children's Service
2250 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd., Suite 104
For reservations and more Information call:
Carol Roth, vocational specialist, at 684-1991.
Morris M. Messing
Albert J. Dreitzer
Community Leaders Die
Albert J. Dreitzer
Albert J. Dreitzer, a philanthropist who was actively in-
volved in the Jewish community of the Palm Beaches, died
May 5 in Palm Beach.
Dreitzer took an active interest in many organizations. A
resident of Palm Beach and New York, he was a supporter
of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County and involv-
ed in local Jewish concerns. He was a member of the Palm
Beach Country Club.
A Fellow of Brandeis University, Dreitzer was responsi-
ble for the establishment of the Dreitzer Gallery in 1965.
According to the Brandeis Board of Directors, the gallery
enhanced the aesthetic appeal of the campus and aided the
arts program at Brandeis.
In New York Dreitzer was a member of the Central
Synagogue and the Glen Oaks Club. He was a board
member of Camp Vacamas.
Dreitzer is survived by his wife, Shirley Wolff Dreitzer,
daughter Judith, grandchildren Amy, Steven and Diane
and great-grandchild Adina. The funeral and interment
were held in New York.
Morris M. Messing

Morris M. Messing, community leader, a Palm Beach
resident for 12 years, died May 12 at the age of 75.
A supporter of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County, Messing was a member of Temple Emanu-El,
Rotary, Palm Beach Chamber of Commerce and the Palm
Beach Country Club.
Messing was active in many local, state and national
charitable organizations. He was president of the board of
trustees of the United Hospitals of Newark, New Jersey
for six years. In 1975 he was elected Florida state chairman
of the American Friends of Hebrew University.
Prior to retiring in 1972 from Occidental Petroleum Cor-
poration, he served as executive vice president for
chemicals and was chairman of the board and chief
operating officer of Occidental's Hooker Chemical
subsidiary.
Messing received an honorary doctorate from Bloomfield
College in New Jersey in 1973.
Messing is survived by his wife, Else, four children,
Robert, Gilbert, Andrew and Madeline, and eight grand-
children. A memorial service held at Temple Emanu-El was
directed by Rabbi Joel Chazin. Interment was in New
Jersey.
Missions Possible

Join with other community members on a
Federation-U J A Mission to Israel
Singles Mission.............July 21 July 31
Family Mission........August 11 August 21
Community Leadership
M ission...........October 12 October 22
Career Women's Leadership
Mission...........October 20 October 28
For more information contact JACK KARAKO, staff
associate, at the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County office, 832-2120.


Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Frklay, May 24,1985
The Five Names
Of Shavuot
HAG HA-KATZIR (FEAST OF THE HARVEST)
The completion of the reaping of the wheat is celebrated with a
testival And the Feast of the Harvest, of the first fruits of your
work, of what you sow in the field." (Exodus 23.16)
HAG HA-SHAVUOT (FEAST OF WEEKS)
The relationship of Shavuot to Passover, when the omer counting
Begins, gives Shavuot this other name:
" Youshalllobserve the Feast of Weeks, of the first fruits of the wheat
harvest. (Exodus 34.22)
17w 8h*U.cou?t ff ^en weeks Then you shall observe the Feast
of Weeks for the Lord your God"
"From the day after you bring the sheaf (omer) of wave offering, you
shall keep count until seven full weeks have elapsed: you shall count
fifty days, until the day after the seventh week" (Leviticus 23.15-16)
YOM HA-BIKKURIM (DAY OF THE FIRST FRUITS)
This designation of Shavuot is found in the verse:
"On the day of the first fruits, your Feast of Weeks, when you brine
SffoSgS^ ** R yOU *- 0b9rVe a -3 occa"
ATZERET (CONCLUDING FESTIVAL)
SeVen*"16 ^"^ frm ^ Talmud ^^ the following Bible
Translated as "solemn gathering" from Deuteronomy 16.8 (the
seventh day of Passover) and Leviticus 23.26 (the eighth day of Suk-
kot). Another interpretation is "concluding festival"
OURLAW)*"** T0RATENU (SEASON OF THE GIVING OF
After the destruction of the Second Temple when first fruits and
SffSXT? no longer brought to Jerusalem, Shavuot became iden-
^"lth ?e#:?* ?,f the Uw at Mount Sinai- The word "season" is
Hag ha-Bikkurim. By Jossi Stern. Color lithograph
Jews Of India:
Small Community Becomes Smaller
The Magen David Synagogue in Calcutta is one of the largest
Jewish housea of worship in the Orient, with seats for 2,000.
Today, barely a minyan, ten men, arrive on a Friday night.
The Akron HaKodesh, the Holy Ark, is s foil room adjacent to
the sanctuary aad once held 100 Toraha. In this century, many
Jews have migrated, especially since 1948 to Israel, and many
of those who remained have died of old age.
the
FRED* SMOCMEr
Editor and PuDlilfie'
Jewish floridian
ol Palm Based Counry
USPSM8030
Combining Our Voica and Federation Reporter
SUZANNE SMOCMET RONNI EPSTEIN LOUISF Bfl
Second Cla.j Poetaoe Paid al Boca Raton Fia
.. r. PALM BEACH OFFICE
501 S Fiegie. O- West P.im Beacn. Fla 33401 Phone 83? ?I20
B/eTun.eii.* ""' 'WNE ,hSl M,,m FLM'<>1 Phone 3/3*605
POSTMASTER: Sand address changes to Tha Jewish Floridian
P.O. Box 012973, Miami. Fla. 33101
r. .. Adwllatnfl O.ractor Slaci Letter, Phona SMV1W2
Combined JewiMi Appeal Jewitn Federation ol Palm Beacn Count, mc Ollirer. R... m...
Tanen and Ai. vy,ien,. Secretary O. En/aDein S Shuim/n Treasure. Barry Bern %*%.-
iWSo! e""n "*CX' "' PU"C P","nS *" Sou,h "SSJft Weil pJSn lea
Ou?of,Tr?oSrR?'S.COUn,> M,S F"0,'D' ^P'-8n,F?aB33^r(Sro'n,:'eV2e2^h
By RICHARD LOBELL
UJA Press Service
The hazy light streaming
through the many stained
glass windows falls on the or-
nate pillars and carved wooden
railings of the Magen David
Synagogue in Calcutta, India.
Two thousand members once
filled the hall with song and
prayer, but now the synagogue
gains rarely more than a mi-
nyan, ten men, on a Friday
night. They sit apart from one
another and their voices echo
in a ghostly manner in the
nearly empty chamber.
Today some 5,000 Jews re-
main in India. The majority
are in Bombay and are called
B'nai Israel, Sons of Israel.
Most others are in New Delhi
Cochin and Calcutta, but tiny
groups or families live in other
cities.
They've left, some for
England and America, others
for Israel. They've gone, and
soon only empty buildings
unused books, and old, forgot-
ten diaries will remain to tell
the centuries-old history of the
Jews of India.
Interestingly, the Jews of In-
dia have never suffered from
anti-Semitism. Shellim
bamuel, Chief Prosecutor of
Bombay's Supreme Court a
leading figure in India's legal
community, is one of many
prominent Jews. Prominent in
his law office are pictures of
David Ben-Gurion and
Iheodore Herzl.
Jewishness has never been a
hindrance, professionally or
socially."
Bombay's B'nai Israel say
their ancestors arrived as
refugees, who fled from the
Holy Land at the time of the
destruction of the First Tem-
ple 2,500 years ago. They
believe their ancestors were
seven men and seven women
who survived a shipwreck on
the Konkin coast, south of
Bombay.
Verifiable Jewish history
dates back 1,000 years to
Cochin, which is a group of
islands in the State of Kerala
on India's southwest coast.
Two ancient copper plates,
preserved today in the
400-year-old Pardesi
Synagogue there, show that
the Jews received a charter
from the area's Emperor dur-
ing the Chola-Chola War in the
tenth century. Scholars believe
the Jews may have been
rewarded for financial or
military aid to help repel a
foreign aggressor.
The charter grants the Jews
full sovereignty over their own
island m Cochin. With this
charter, the island of
t-ranganore apparently
became the only sovereign.
Jewish state to exist between
the times of the ancient
Kingdom of Israel and the
modern State of Israel near-
ly 2,000 years.
Friday, May 24, 1985*
Volume 11
4 SIVAN 5745
Number 19
says Samuel, "ind for m Oriental m ". folled vast
for d, other .ndiao JewTS %?%?&&
were known to all and they liv-
ed in mansions of exotic splen-
dor and earned untold wealth.
In 1920, the first Zionist
organization was established
in India and the local com-
munity organization passed a
resolution expressing full sym-
pathy with the Zionist cause.
Although Jews in other coun-
tries were sometimes hesitant
to speak out for Zionism. In-
dia's Jews were not and there
were no untoward
consequences.
After Israeli statehood was
established in 1948, aliyah, or
the "going up" to Israel,
began in earnest for Indian
Jews. Aliyah accelerated in
the early 1960's and, in the
first 20 years of Israeli
statehood, roughly half of the
B'nai Israel community of
20,000 emigrated to Israel.
Today, for many of those
who remain, the American
Jewish Joint Distribution
Committee and the Organiza-
tion for Rehabilitation
Through Training, which JDC
helps support, serve as the
main links to the outside
Jewish community. JDC helps
elderly Indian Jews with day
centers and homebound ser-
vices and it aids youngsters in
schools. It receives virtually all
its $49.5 million world budget
from the United Jewish Ap-
peal/Federation campaign.
ORT, which is celebrating its
20th anniversary in India, ad-
ministers both girls' and boys'
schools for over 700 students.
ORT-India graduates boast a
100 percent job placement rate
no mean feat in a subconti-
nent of poverty.


Friday, May 24,1985 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 5
Radio/TV/ Him
. MOSAIC Sunday, June 2, 9 a.m. WPTV Channel
5 with host Barbara Gordon Mosaic will be pre-empted
on May 26.
. r'CHAYIM Sunday, May 26 and June 2,7:30 a.m.
WPBR 1340-AM with host Rabbi Mark S. Golub The
Jewish Listener's Digest, a radio magazine.
SHALOM Sunday, May 26 and June 2, 6 a.m. -
WPECChannel 12 (11:30 a.m. WDZL TV-39) with host
Richard Peritz).
Spcmsored by the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County
Community Calendar
Women's American ORT West Palm Beach board 9:30
a.m.
May 25
Erev Shavuot
May 26
First Day of Shavuot
Second Day of Shavuot Memorial Day
May 28
Congregation Anshei Sholom -1 p.m. Women's American
ORT Boynton Beach board 12:30 p.m. B'nai B'rith
Women Masada board 7 p.m. Temple Beth David
Sisterhood installation Federation Long Range
Federation Agency Meeting Noon Federation -
Education Committee 8 P.M.
May 29
Federation Board of Directors Meeting 4 P.M. Yid-
dish Culture Group Cresthaven 1 p.m. Golden Lakes
Temple Sisterhood 10 a.m. Federation Midrasha
Graduation 7 P.M. Federation Long Range Gover-
nance Committee Noon
May 30
Federation Long Range Human Resources Sub-
Committee Noon Federation Long Range Campaign
Sub-Committee 7:30 P.M.
May 31
Women's American ORT District 6 Biennial Convention
at the Hyatt Hotel
June 1
Federation Leadership Development Cocktail-Reception
at Hyatt 8:30 P.M. Women's American ORT Evening -
end of year celebration Federation Midrasha "Fiddler
On The Roof
June 2
Golden Lakes Temple Sisterhood board -10 a.m. Jewis
War Veterans No. 501 10 a.m. Temple Beth El Men'
Club Installation
June 3
Rishona Chapter of Amit Women board Women's
American ORT Royal board 9:30 a.m. Women's
American ORT Mid-Palm board 1 p.m. B'nai B'rith
Women Mitzvah Council 7:15 p.m. Jewish War
Veterans Auxiliary No. 408 board 10:30 a.m. Con-
gregation Anshei Sholom Men's Club board 9:30 a.m.
Jewish Community Day School board 8 p.m. Women's
American ORT Okeechobee 1:30 p.m.
June 4
Temple Beth David board 8 p.m.
June 5
Yiddish Culture Group Cresthaven 1 p.m. Hadassah -
Lake Worth board 10 a.m. Pioneer Women Cypress
Lakes board -10 a.m. American Jewish Congress board
noon National Council of Jewish Women Palm Beach -
ward -10 a.m. Temple Beth Sholom Men's Club board -
30 a.m. Jewish Community Center executive board
6:30 p.m. and board of directors 8 p.m.
June 6
B'nai B'rith No. 2939 board 1 p.m. Hadassah Chai -
ward -10 a.m. B'nai B'rith Women Ohav 1:30 p.m.
pioneer Women Theodore Herzl 1 p.m. Federation
j-ommunity Relations Council Noon Golden Lakes
Temple board 10 a.m.
Chaplain Aides
Continued from Page 2
ly important ingredients which
are often more ameliorative
than the medication the af-
fection of a friend, and the
knowledge that they are
remembered.
Chaplain Aide work, helping
with Friday Sabbath services
or 'friendly visiting' is most
rewarding. The turn-over
among Chaplain Aides is very
small. Once involved, people
stay and enjoy the work, fin-
ding it physically and emo-
tionally exhilarating. If you
are planning to be in Palm
Beach County anytime during
the summer months, why not
relieve the tedium, give
yourself a lift and volunteer.
Call the office of the Jewish
Federation Chaplain 655-7706
and ask what you can do to
help.
Morse
Geriatric
Continued from Page 1
In his letter of resignation to
the Center Board, Blonder ex-
pressed his deep appreciation
to the trustees, staff and
volunteers for helping to
create a program of geriatric
care which has been a source
of great pride and accomplish-
ment for the total Jewish com-
munity of Palm Beach County.
The Board of Trustees con-
gratulated Blonder on his
nomination as Federation
president and pledged full sup-
port to its newly elected presi-
dent, Bennett Berman.
The Morse Geriatric Center
of the Jewish Home for the
Aged of Palm Beach .County is
a beneficiary agency of-the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County.
Ellie Halperin (right), outgoing chair of the Busineaa and
Professional Women's Group of the Women's Division of the
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County, receives a present
and words of appreciation for the effort and time she has
given to the women's group. Making the presentation at the
SAP's concluding program meeting is Ellen Rampell,
Women's Division incoming BAP vice president. ___
Ellie Halperin (right) thanks Penny Beers, outgoing
Women's Division BAP vice president, for her tireless com-
mitment to that group for the last several years.
Co-chairs for the evening's meeting are (left to right) Debra
Fields and Shari Brenner. After the business portion of the
meeting, the women viewed "Women in Portraits" presented
by the Actors Conservatory Theater.



Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, May 24,1986
National ORT President
To Address Convention
Gertrude S. White, national
president, Women's American
ORT, will serve as installing
officer for the newly elected
leaders of District VI,
Women's American ORT. The
installation will take place at
the sixth Biennial Convention
of Women's American ORT,
announced Zelda Magid, con-
vention chair.
"Technology with Tradi-
tion" will be the theme of the
convention at the Hyatt Palm
Beaches, May 31-June 2. The
400 delegates will represent
26,000 members of the seven
southeastern states that com-
prise District VI.
In addition to serving as na-
tional president of Women's
American ORT, Mrs. White
holds the office of vice presi-
dent of the American ORT
Federation, is a member of the
executive committee of the
World ORT Union, and sits on
the board of trustees of the
Bramson ORT Technical In-
stitute in New York City. She
has served in many leadership
positions including president
of the North Central Jersey
Region in 1964 and chairman
of the National Committee on
Organization from 1971-1979
during which time ten districts
were established.
Other speakers include
Gertrude S. White
Marillyn Tallman, co-chair of
Chicago Action for Soviet
Jewry and a member of the na-
tional board of the Union of
Councils for Soviet Jews;
Elaine Bloom, former member
of the Florida House of
Representatives; Parvine
Motamed Amini, educational
supervisor for ORT's girls'
schools with direct respon-
sibility for the operation of
ORT in Morocco and India;
and Gene Greenzweig, ex-
ecutive director of the Central
Agency for Jewish Education
in Miami.
GETTING THE CHILDREN
yv/1 TO EAT A DELICIOUS
/'* / HOT MEAL IS EASY AS
are tasty
pasta alphabet
letters and
numbers covered
with a rich tomato sauce. The
children will absolutely love it as
a delicious hot lunch and as a
tasty dinner side-dish. And so
will the adults! Either way you
serve it. getting the children to
eat is as easy as Aleph Bez!
ABC's &123s
from
Chef Boy-ar-dee
ABC s& 123 s
from Chef
Boy-ar-dee"
JULY 4th WEEK-END CELEBRATION
5 days & 4 nights
July 3 to July 7
H15

4 days & 3 nights
July 4 to July 7
$90
plus tax A gratuities
INCLUDING MEALS
Reserve Now For The
HIGH HOLY DAYS & SUCC0TH
Services Will be Conducted by Prominent Cantor
SPACIOUS OCEANFRONT SYNAGOGUE
Private Beach Olympic Pool Pooliide Therapeutic
Whirlpool Color TV in All Rooms Resident Mashgiach
^pj Appropriate Nightly Entertainment
Beautiful Oceanlronl Succah
GROUP
tne awm-oMuiON ooilar kosmh

GLATT
Directly on the Ocean 40th to 41st St Miami Beach
For Reservations Phone | "00 I "U I I
For more information con-
tact individual ORT chapters
or Valerie Silverman, publicity
vice president, North Palm
Beach County Region of ORT.
Students Raise
Over $600
For U J A
Under the auspieces of the
B'nai B'rith Hillel, over 25
students were involved in the
UJA Student Campaign in the
Palm Beach Area. Under the
direction of Bobra Bush, a
Hillel student at Florida Atlan-
tic University, the students
raised over $600 for the cam-
paign. The students were also
involved in Super Sunday,
both in Palm Beach and Boca
Raton. Other activities includ-
ed in the campaign were
solicitation training, speakers,
films, a dance marathon, and
an Operation Moses drive. The
highlight of the campaign was
an 18 Karat Gold Affair. Over
100 students danced all night
to a mixture of American and
Israeli music.
COLLEGE STUDENTS
SUMMER PROGRAMMING
Pool parties, brunches, pic-
nics, sports day, Shabbat ac-
tivities are all part of the sum-
mer programs being offered
for the second year by B'nai
B'rith Hillel of Broward-Palm
Beach for students home for
the summer. To be placed on
the mailing list for a calendar
of events, contact Nancy Tobin
at the FAU United Campus
Ministries office.
Organizations in
the News
AMIT WOMEN
Rishona Chapter will have their regular meetine on
Wednesday, June 12, 12:30 p.m., at the American Savin
Bank, Westgate, C.V. ngs
Entertainment and collation will follow.
B'NAI B'RITH
Haifa Lodge's regular meeting will be held on Sunday
June 2, 9:30 a.m., at the Royal Palm Clubhouse, 22nd Ave
and North Federal Highway.
Guest speaker will be Robert Schachter, regional direc-
tor of American Technion Society. Schachter has recently
returned from the campus of the University of Technion
and will bring with him a film narrated by Theodore Bikel
entitled "Future Tech," which depicts Israel's science
based industries.
Tickets available for luncheon and matinee of "Chorus
Line" with Masada Chapter at Burt Reynolds Jupiter
Theatre Wednesday, July 31. Contact Frances Chodash.
A performance of the movie, "Kazablan," sponsored by
Mitzvah Council, will be held on June 9, 2 p.m., at Lake
Cinema 3, Jog and Lake Worth Road. Call Rose Dembo for
tickets.
HADASSAH
On June 4 to 6 Tikvah Chapter will sponsor a trip to
Warm Mineral Springs in Venice, Fla. Included are dinners
and shows at Naples Dinner Theatre and Golden Apple
Dinner Theatre.
JEWISH WAR VETERANS
POST 520
The Ladies Auxiliary will hold a mini-lunch-card party
on Monday, May 31,11:30 a.m., at the Chase Federal Bank
in the Cross County Mall, W. Palm Beach.
WOMEN'S AMERICAN ORT
Century Chapter will see the Saturday matinee of "Guys
and Dolls" at the Burt Reynolds Dinner Theatre on June 1.
The next regular meeting will be held on June 6 at the
American Savings Bank. The program will be "Keeping Fit
While Sitting Down." On June 20,12:30 p.m., there will be
a card party and luncheon at the Red Lobster restaurant.
Order off the menu and bring own canasta, bridge, Mah
Jong, etc. Contact Esther Bluestein for more information.
SanKP. The first name
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Friday, May 24, 1985 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 7
Learning, Fun Combine In
JCDS Lag B'Omer Celebration
By JO'ANN SELKA
i Special
I to the Jewish Floridian
Laming and fun, a true
liar's holiday, was how Je
Lents and staff of the
Eri Ebrated Lag B'Omer. On
lidav May 10 from 8:30 am.
I3-30 p.m., all participated in
field day consisting of ac-
Ljties such as running, three
L,ed race, Apache Relay,
Eer softball, volleyball,
Ekbal'l and basketball. The
nale of the competition was
aeagerlv anticipated game of
Lpture the Flag.
Ilhis was the first year the
Ltire school, grades
Indergarten through 8th
ade, participated together in
he celebration. The field day,
Cider the supervision of Jack
losenbaum, athletics director,
las a week in the planning by
laff and students. Students
[ere divided into four teams
Taianced according to age and
bilitv. Each team chose the
ne" of a Jewish leader as
feir team name. They then
udied about the leader they
chosen and planned their
itegy.
i The Red Team, captained by
Hatt Kurit, Nicole Fever, and
eborah Pevsner, chose Rabbi
tohanan ben Zakkai. The
White Team, led by Mitchell
Cohen and Jonathan Davidoff,
(hose Rabbi Akiva. Rabbi Meir
was the choice of the Blue
[earn, captained by Shawn
Bchrager, Matt Brown, and II-
kna Wollf. David Simon and
pis Black Team championed
Bar Kochbah. Stacey Pariser
was score keeper.
The day dawned hot and as
Jthe temperature rose higher,
jso did the enthusiasm and the
pint of competition. Ann Ap-
|t'f i of the Black Team was sure
he White Team had the ad-
vantage. Her team was wear-
ing black shirts and "black at-
tracts the sun!" However, the
teachers came to their rescue
fend brought them wet cloths.
[Randy Rosenstein of the
[White Team was "looking for-
ward to winning this year
[because it feels good." His cap-
|tain, Jonathan Davidoff, said
[the secret to their success was
Itheir "running and cheering
[and encouragement."
The Apache Relay was the
I last event before the BBQ pic-
Jnic lunch. The relay consisted
I of ten stations involving a com-
plicated orchestration of
students, staff and activities.
Even the director of the day
school, Barbara Steinberg,
was called on to help. The first
station required a 6th grader
to run 80 yards, chew a mat-
zah, and whistle "Mah Tovu."
Another station required 4th
graders to break three
Jaloons by sitting on them.
^termination and team spirit
Proved more important in ac-
complishing many of these
| 'eats than athletic ability.
At the end of the field day
vents the Red Team had won,
the Black Team came in se-
ffiS Blue Team third, and
Je White Team fourth. Matt
Brown won four out of five of
*e faces, and Mitchell Cohen
*n the 50 yard dash and the
"> yard dash.
Students of the Jewish Community Day School cheer their
teammates on to victory during the Lag B'Omer athletic com-
petition held recently at the school.
Evident throughout the day
was the enthusiasm and
dedicated work that the staff
put forth to make this celebra-
tion such a success. The
cooperation and leadership of
the student captains were
outstanding. Although spirited
cheering and intense competi-
tion abounded, good sportman-
ship and orderly conduct were
not forgotten. School books
had been put aside for the day,
but much was learned from
this Lag B'Omer celebration.
JCC News
JUNE 15 IS GRADUATION
Thirty nine four-year olds of the Keren-Orr Pre-School of
the Jewish Community Center will be experiencing their
first graduation exercises Thursday, June 6, 7 p.m., at
Camp Shalom.
They will be dressed in the traditional cap and gown and
will receive diplomas. All are expected to go on to higher
education institutions to begin kindergarten.
Surprise entertainment for the guests is planned as well
as refreshments.
FALL BROCHURE IN THE MAKING
The Jewish Community Center is now accepting adver-
tisements from business establishments, restaurants, pro-
fessionals and individuals for their Fall brochure which will
be published in the form of a desk calendar.
This informative booklet will list such things as Center
programs, descriptions or organizations in the community,
Palm Beach County events, government representatives
and much more. The desk calendar will be useful for nota-
tions and appointments.
For an informative pamphlet listing all rates and descrip-
tions, or any additional information, call Fran Witt at
689-7700.
make low cholesterol blintzes with
Fteischmann's*Maroarine and Egg Beaters?
Fleischmann's
Margarine is perfect
for your Shevuoth
blintzes. It's made
from 100% corn oil,
has 0% cholesterol
and it's low in satu-
rated fat. Best of all,
Fleischmann's Sweet
Unsalted Margarine,
parve. and Regular
margarine have a
delicious taste that's
perfect for cooking.
So are great-tasting
Egg Beaters 99% real
egg product, with
0% cholesterol. They
taste like real eggs
and are parve, too.
Fleiscnmann's
Margarine and Egg
Beaters. They're both
certified Kosher.
And with this holi-
day recipe they'll
show you how satis-
fying low cholesterol
cooking can be!
K Certified Koahar
Fleischmann's Gives Every Meal
A Holiday Flavor.
SAVE15*
VHN VtXI BUY ANY ONE POUND Of
FLEISCHMANN S. MARGARINE
&330L0
rfiAsnm
LOW CHOLESTEROL
APPLE BLINTZES
i Mdkrs Sixteen*
1 container {I cup)
Egg Beaters
teaspoon salt
'4 cup skim milk
1 cup flour
Fleischmann's* Margarine
1 medium apples, peeled, cored
and chopped
l2 cup chopped walnuts
1 tablespoon honev
'? teaspt>on ground cinnamon
Mix Kgg Heaters' and s.ilt. .iltrr
nalelv mix in skim milk and flour
until smooth
Lightly grease a 6-inch skillet
with Fleischmann's' Margarine:
heat skillet. Puur 2 tablespoons
baiter into skillet; tilt pan to dis-
tribute evenly tlook until batter
blisters Tarn out onto wax paper.
Repeat to make 1ft. using more
margarine as needed.
Mix apples, walnuts, honey and
cinnamon. Place one tablespoon
mixture on each blintz Fold in
sides to form squares. Melt 3
tablespoons margarine in large
skillet. Brown squares on both
sides. Serve hot with mock sour
cream or your favorite topping
For MOCK SOUR CREAM, puree
y* cup low fat cottage cheese,
3 tablespoons skim milk.
2 teaspoons lemon iui. e
Makes one cup.
C i'H'> NtihiM a Mr.iiKls Jim..


Because Someone Cared
The following is a guest
article written by Sanford
Grunther, LCSW, staff
member of the Jewish Family
and Children's Service of
Palm Beach County, Inc. Mr.
Levitt's articles will resume in
subsequent issues.
(All case names mentioned
in these articles are fictitious;
client information at Jewish
Family and Children 's Service
is held in the strictest con-
fidence..
With the rising divorce rate
affecting the family system, a
growing concern to many is
explaining divorce to children.
Since divorcing couples are so
often consumed by their own
problems and concerns, the
children's needs are often the
last to be considered. Family
therapists need to clue their
clients into this and remind
them that children rarely
totally comprehend what has
happened and the changes that
will take place. This article will
raise some of the issues young
children need brought to their
attention.
In discussing problems with
children, honesty is the best
policy. When couples
I
Sanford Grunther
separate, or are about to
separate, this indicates thai
they are not happy with each
other and do not, nor cannot
live together. Couples cannot
pretend otherwise. Typically,
lying or deception leads to
confusion and misconceptions
by children. The matter must
be faced for then it becomes
less frightening.
The child may believe
himself responsible for the
separation. Unreasonable guilt

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mav result in self-degradation
and punishment. Parents must
reassure the child over and
o\er again that they are
unhappy with each other and
not him. As long as the child
believes that he has caused the
separation, he can nurture the
idea that he has the power to
bring the couple back together
again.
Man> children think parents
are perfect. A child must
realize that adults are not this
a\. A child recognizes
humanness when parents
admit weakness and mistakes.
A child also recognizes his
own feelings when allowed to
express resentment and fear.
Parents should try to en-
courage an expression of these
feelings so that the child can
deal with them accordingly.
Of most significance to the
child is the recognition that he
still has two parents. The child
needs to feel wanted by both
parents. Children will often
feel a tremendous hurt when
one parent belittles the other
(i.e.. "Your father would not
ha%e left if he really loved
us"). On the other hand, a
parent should not, obviously,
praise the other parent.
Children know this to be false
and may often question why
were they getting divorced. In
short, a parent should refrain
from portraying a false picture
of each other's strengths and
weaknesses.
For all involved, separation
and divorce is a time of stress
and strain. Certain signals
from a child may indicate
more professional help is
needed: withdrawal, actingout
behaviors, and learning
difficulties in school. Seeking
help is not an admission of
weakness but a demonstration
of love and strength.
(The Jewish Family and
Children's Service of Palm
Beach County, Inc., is a non-
profit agency designed to meet
the social, emotional and
counseling needs of the Jewish
community of Palm Beach
Countv. Our office is located
at 2250 Palm Beach /QJ
Blvd., Suite 104. o*
telephone number is 684-/99.
The Jewish Family n.
Children's Service (J .
beneficiary agency 0f ,a,
Jewish Federation of p/m
Beach County,. """
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Israel:
Survival Through Technology
Friday, May 24,1985 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 9
By MICHAEL SABIN
Israel is a nation rich in
hrainpower but poor in natural
resources. Consequently, in-
novative research, and the ex-
of science-based in-
dustries and high-tech exports
are essential to Israels
economic viability key to the
Jewish State's growth, secun-
j ty, and very survival.
The Technion Israel In-
stitute of Technology in Haifa
has played a primary role since
1924 in the scientific and
technological development of
the Yishuv and the emergent
State of Israel. When
Statehood was still a dream,
the Technion and its friends
throughout the world were
.already creating the
technological basis that has
I been and continues to be one of
Israel's major resources.
On its 37th anniversary of in-
dependence, the Jewish State
faces severe economic
challenges triple-digit infla-
tion, constant devaluation,
foreign debt, and a deleterious
balance of trade. The creation
of highly sophisticated goods
that can be sold abroad is a na-
tional priority. These will pay
for essential imports and,
more importantly, win even-
tual economic independence.
The Technion serves this
goal eminently and effectively
as Israel's primary academic
resource for advanced
technological teaching and
research, with more than
25,000 graduates since its
founding serving as the core
of Israeli scientific expertise
and application. Technion pro-
vides the necessary research
and brainpower to help make
Israel's high-tech products
competitive in the world
marketplace.
There are 28 special
research centers and institutes
at the Technion focusing on
virtually every major field of
science, engineering, architec-
ture, and medicine. Many of
these centers are the only ones
of their kind in Israel. At any
given time, there are hundreds
of projects in progress, many
of these directly or indirectly
supported by related
industries.
The Gutwirh Science-Based
Industries Center at the Tech-
nion is an example of the In-
stitute's active role in scien-
tific industrialization. A new
company can use the Center's
facilities as an industrial park
setting for three years and
then is expected to compete in
the open marketplace.
Fibronics, for example, began
with a staff of three in 1978.
The company now emloys over
275 people in Israel and had an
impressive $13 million in sales
and $1 million in profits in
1984.
Another example is the
Lidex Corporation, whose
chemical separation devices in-
clude Dynomat, a liquid
chromatography system,
Now It's Time To Blossom
Now one can have a living
remembrance of a simcha,
such as a wedding or bar mitz-
vah, or in memory of a loved
one, by having a tree planted
along the "Avenue of the
Trees" on the grounds of the
proposed new Jewish Com-
munity Center.
"Each tree will become a
lasting symbol of your commit-
ment to Jewish life in the Palm
Beaches," stated Zelda Pin-
court, JCC president.
Every donated tree will have
individually inscribed banding
and donors will receive a cer-
tificate suitable for framing or
gift giving.
Donations for the "Avenue
of the Trees," which are fully
tax deductible, may be made in
cash, by check, or with State of
Israel bonds. Payment of $500
may be made in full, or donors
^n pay $250 now and the
balance within one year. The
commemorative inscription
will be placed when payment in
full is received.
"Over the past ten years, the
Jewish Community Center of
the Palm Beaches has touched
the lives of thousands. We are
firmly rooted in our country's
Jewish experience, serving
everyone from toddlers to
seniors.
"As the area's Jewish
population has grown, so has
demand for the Center's ser-
vices. A host of programs with
professional staffing is in
Elace, but our facilities are
ard pressed. For the wellbe-
ing of today's families and of
those to come, the JCC must
have a campus for all to en-
joy," stated Ms. Pincourt.
For further information,
please contact Diane Sandier
at the Jewish Community
Center at 689-7703.
designed for quick, precise
separation of compound
chemical mixtures with ap-
plications involving the
manufacture of solid state
electronic components, the
development of new polymers
and plastics, and facilitation of
genetic engineering research
as well as wide applications for
the pharmaceutical industry.
Technion has similarly been
the catalyst for the growth of a
long list of firms including
Scitex, a Herzliya-based firm
and a world leader in computer
graphics, Haifa's Elscint, the
world leader in the field of ad-
vanced medical imaging equip-
ment, Tadiran, Israel's largest
electronics company, Elbit,
Elron, and others.
Israel's electronics industry
has become a real hope for the
future. About one-third of the
roughly $3.5 billion in goods
exported from Israel last year
were electronics exports. It is
expected that these will rise to
at least half of Israel's export
business by 1990.
Israel is ranked third
worldwide (after the United
States and Germany) in the
field of medical sensing
technology. Computer-aided
tomography the CAT scan-
ner produced by Elscint, is
now an indispensable
diagnostic tool in most
hospitals, an excellent exam-
ple of a revolutionary
breakthrough in medicine
which is being marketed
globally.
The Jewish state is con-
sidered a world leader in pro-
sthetic devices. Technion's
Julius Silver Institute of Bio-
Medical Engineering has come
up with new designs which use
hydraulic and mechanical
engineering principles to
create better artificial limbs.
Other projects include a
visual diagnostic device which
detects minute obstructions in
a patient's visual pathway, a
computer system enabling doc-
tors to diagnose and study
heart disease with greater ac-
curacy, a successful surgical
Catholic/Jewish Dialogue
Bishop Thomas Daily, newly appointed bishop of the Diocese
of Palm Beach, addressed the concluding meeting of the
Catholic/Jewish Dialogue. The dialogue brought together
Catholic and Jewish community leaders in a series of ten
monthly discussions and two communitywide dialogues held
in January.
procedure for the treatment of
Legg-Perthes disease (a hip
joint ailment in young
children), a new "nursing
robot" to serve the disabled, a
more effective method for the
resuscitation of heart attack
victims, and research on sleep,
diabetes, and victims of "crush
syndrome."
Israel's accomplishments as
an agricultural innovator are
world renowned. Many of
these contributions stem from
the Technion's Department of
Agricultural Engineering, in-
cluding the "trickle" method
of irrigation, the pioneering
use of computers to maximize
crop yield, and the use of algae
to clean muddy ponds
tt,0fi2N'jfi-S-C f!8l
In such diverse areas as
telecommunications, computer
engineering, computer-aided
design and manufacturing,
fiberoptics, and the use of
solar energy, the Technion's
role has been inestimable.
Recent projects with wide
appeal include a new road-
building method using con-
crete instead of asphalt, cool-
ing cars with power from
waste heat, producing ethanol
from corn tor fuel, floating
breakwaters, and an "elec-
tronic wallet" a complete
electronic money handling and
payments system capable of
replacing cash, check books,
and credit cards.
Leading-edge research is be-
ing pursued in aeronautics,
robotics, lasers, genetic
engineering, and agri-
techonology.
The Samuel Neaman In-
stitute for Advanced Studies
in Science and Technology is
Israel's foremost
academically-based "think
tank." It recruits scientists, in-
dustrialists, scholars, and ex-
perts from a wide range of
disciplines to consider national
froblems connected with
srael's technological, social,
and economic development.
TJiese i include ^alternative,
energy," water, and mineral
resources and policies, work
productivity, agricultural avia-
tion, labor relations, and voca-
tional and technical education,
along with a wide spectrum of
other diverge subjects.
The Technion stands ready
to meet the challenges facing
Israel assuming a vital role
in building a strong and secure
Jewish State.
For more information, con-
tact the American Society for
Technion, 271 Madison
Avenue, New York, NY 10016.
t. /** "KHcImb Shower," Temple Israel Sisterhood
EV rai,e fand- * and re-supply the temple Ut-
. Members of the "Shower" committee are Qett to right)
ST? ferine, Roz Okun, Corhy Cooler, Eileen Shapiro,
s? Ad,b*rF' B*tty su>mon "*she"*D More than 220 students, parents and sup-
porters of the Jewish Community Day
School came out Sunday, May 5 to show
their appreciation for the ^m" and
staff. The program was highlighted by
special recognition for thoee teachers who
have been at the Jewish Community Day
School for five years or more.Jhey are (left
to right) Elaine Weneek, Rachel Stein,
RenJ sUl-Lange. Debond. ^...Sjiah
Allinson, Peggy Lemon, George snip
Paille, Helen Schwartz, and Shoshana
Sharf. Special recognition also was given
to the director of the JCDS, Barbara
Steinberg, who was honored for her
outstanding progress during her first year
at the school in the areas of educational
development and administrative care. John
Lombardi, assistant to the director, was
lauded for his fine work in coordination of
the day to day operations of the school.


Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, May 24,1985
EDITOR,
The Jewish Floridian:
On behalf of Russian Jewry,
Ethiopian Jewish refugees,
local service organizations of
Jewish Federation and all the
people they take care of, also
on behalf of the state of
Israel's social service pro-
grams, we write to con-
gratulate and thank the
residents of Century Village
for their generosity in the re-
cent 1985 Jewish Federation
of Palm Beach County-United
Jewish Appeal.
We especially thank the
many Century Villagers who
volunteered their time in mak-
ing door-to-door solicitations.
We got our knocks, but we also
received warm greetings and
generous responses.
This year's (1985) total is
well over $150,000, better
than any previous campaign
in Century Village. We must
thank Martin Adolf and Abe
Bisgaier, formerly chairmen
for many years, for the work
they did which made our pre-
sent effort possible.
We also want everyone to
know that there is, right now,
a dedicated cadre of men and
women working and planning
for an even better 1986 cam-
paign. With the continued
open-hearted support of Cen-
tury Village residents, we
hope to set a model for other
large condominium complexes
to follow.
SAM WADLER
HANK GROSSMAN
Co-Chainnen
Century Village
1985 Jewish Federation of
PaJm Beach County-United
Jewish Appeal Campaign
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166 Jews Leave Russia
NEW YORK (JTA) -
More Soviet Jews were per-
mitted to emigrate to Israel
during April than in any
month since July 1983, with
166 leaving, the National Con-
ference on Soviet Jewry
reported. The total includes
over 100 Jews from Moscow 11
city where there has been litti!
emigration movement in rJ
cent years.
(Center) Nat Cohen receives an award as the outstanding
volunteer campaigner in Century Village for the 1985 Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach County-United Jewish Appeal
Campaign. The presentation was made by Sam Wadler (left)
and Hank Grossman (right), co-chairs of the Century Village
fund-raising drive.
Readers Write
Century Village Can Be Very Proud
Kutsher's
lights your
summer days
with sun.
And your nights
withxxstars.
NEIL
SEDAKA
JULY 4th
.WEEKEND
Give us
your summer.
And well give
you all the day
and evening
pleasures
of our
thousand-
acre estate.

fcfitff

MB
LOLA
FAUN*
'GLADYS
KNIGHT
& THE
PIPS
lf on an 18-hole. 7.157
yard championship
tours*. 12 all-weather
and clay tennis courts
A fully equipped
health cluh
lakeside walking
trails. Outdoor
and indoor pools.
Three delicious
meals daily,
geared to your own
special diet.
BEN
VVEREEN,
ROBERT
KLEIN
Jfc*
Call us for information about transportation
from New York area airports to Kutsher's!
Kutsher's
Monticello. New York 12701 |914| 794-6000
CALL TOLL FREE: 1800)431-1273
Compute Convention Faohtwt Mate Credit Cards Honored
IW WE'LL MEET YOU
AT THE NY AIRPORT,
CLAIM AND CARRY
YOUR LUGGAGE /siioa
TO OUR LIMO.
Then well drive you and your be
longings to Brown's door And
when you leave, well drive you back
^
lo the airport Just say when, and well be there to deliver you to
your most memorable vacation in the Catskilb At a packaqe
price that includes nothing but the best, and plenty of it
Baggage handling and Hmo transportation to and from hotel All taxes and gratuities
\SE2E!L: 0a,"c,n9 ,o 4 orches,ras Coc,rta( p**5 2 s*> 55
^t*' 2*! *<* "* on ^ 18-hoie courses Tenn.s Roller skatmg
Extra care tor special diets Supervised chWrens camp and teen programs
SUMMER OF STARS
* B0B8Y VfNTON SHECKY GREENE STEVE UWRENCE A EYDIEG0RME
Greg Etonham rWghtly from Christee Lee's """""^
my yam
Orig Section-Man Btdg
Bel Air I & ||
California & Celebrity
Beverly Hills
Imperial & Regency
Process
<*" roil PM for Information and Raaatvations 1-800-431-3856
2-WfEKS 3-WKKS
$ 996 $1,464
$1,073 $1,570
$1,145 $1,677
$1,175 $1,724
$1,186 $1,739
$1,236 $1,814
PW person doubte occupancy
.
Charles & Lillian!
i. OHM
Loch Sheldrake, NY 12769
314) 4345151 mayor crncftf cards honored


Friday, May 24,1985 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 11
Pan Am.
The Key To
A Great European
\focation.
Low Fares. No airline has lower fares to
more European destinations than Pan Am.
And .inly Pan Am flies all 747's to Europe.
Affordable
Hotel Accom-
modations.
Thanks to
Pan Am, you
can rest as-
sured that al-
most anywhere
you spend a day,
you'll have a place
to spend the night.
You'll be able to
check into any of
these select ho-
tels: Holiday Inn
-$26 a night. Best
Western$28 a
night including
breakfast. Trust-
house Forte Hotel
$27 a night including
breakfast? The only
..ling harder than finding a
hotel room in Europe is finding
one at these prices.
Lowest Priced
Car Rentals.
With Pan Am, you're
free to see as much or
as little of Europe as
you want. And, at
your own pace.
Rent a Kemwel
economy car,
with unlimited
mileage, for as
little as $69 to
$79 a week. No
one has lower
prices.
Call Your Travel AgentTbday.
Fws Shown Are Each Way, Based On Roundtrip Purchase And Do Not Include $3 Departure Tax.
*399w
6 I i W 1 MXAB
$42700
$483
fcil-9/M VHXAr
418oo
1. I 114 YHXAB3M
*471M
611-WMVYHXAP
$47700
1 n YHXE2M
*44400
fcll-9ll4YHXABlM
,53300
h/|-/'YHXAP
Brussels
Athens**
Dubrovnik
Amsterdam
Hamburg
Belgrade
Munich
Bucharest
$449*0
SI9I4 YHXAP
$508
6 KSVYHABftM
$523
S1S-8I4 YHXAP
$449s"
6 1 M YHAP
41800
6 1*W'YHXAB3M
*508
V15*14 YHXAP
ill-*
$44400
fWYHXABJM
580s0
an -wwyhap
Stuttgart
Nuremberg
Zagreb
Istanbul
Budapest
Geneva
Vienna
418
n 1 1 14 YHXAB1M
$44400
h I M4/YHXAHM
508
s IS-K 14'YHXAP
*563
(. IH JliYHXAP
533
S/IS-WYHXAP
47150
6/1-9'M'YHXAP
$49300
fl-WM'YHXAP
* *W .urchjruf (. rrturn It.vd to US 8/B-
20
1 y. Fic,,: There are advance purchase and length of
I JW ^"irements depending on your destination.
I rr., 1 Penalties may also apply. Some fares require
IT, ""specific days of *ne w** Travel at these fares
TL u1riRlnj,- and/or terminate by a specific date
"Pending on your destination. Seats are limited. All fares
TL,e r',und,rjP purchase and are subject to change
Bud, 1 ,: C dr rer,t*ls not available in Bucharest,
"F**t. Istanbul or Warsaw. Car offer good now thru
October 31 1985 There are some age requirements and g,
orfSS insurance, collision damage wa.ver, taxes and 1
" CKF^Ho.el accommodations not avauab.e in
only in U.K.
las.
Irop-
The key to a great European vacation this summer is flying
Pan Am. For starters, Fan Am is the key to incredibly low fares,
spacious 747's, and the choice of the most cities in Europe of any
au-line. Then you get a key to something to help you see Europe
once you've arrived. A Kemwel rental car with unlimited mileage
for as little as $69 a week. And last, a key to one of the rarest sights
in all of Europe: Hotel Accommodations. Hotel vouchers must be
purchased in advance for the number of nights you plan on being
m Europe. And, they're refundable, in case you have a change of
63 Pan AmWe'U get you keyed up about going to Europe this
SUmForrmore information on Pan Am Holiday 497 call your
Travel Agent or Fan Am in Miami at (305) 87^5 (305) 874-4455, in Ft. Lauderdale/HoUywood at (305) 462->W,
and in other areas at 1-800-221-1111.
Pan Am
^ju Cant Beat THe Experience:
^\ fm^^


Senior News
" FROM THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
The Jewish Community Centers Comprehensive
Senior Service Center is a network of services for seniors
designed to encourage and foster growth, independence
and activity for persons in their later years. Varied services
through a Federal Grant Title III of the Older Americans
Act, awarded by Gnlfstream Area Agency on Aging,
enhance the everyday lives of older adults throughout the
community.
TRANSPORTATION
Transportation is available
in our designated area for per-
sons 60 years of age or over
who do not use public
transportation. We take peo-
ple to treatment centers, doc-
tors' offices, to hospitals, nurs-
ing homes to visit spouses, to
social service agencies and
nutrition centers. There is no
fee for this service, but par-
ticipants are encouraged to
contribute their fair share.
There is a great demand for
this service, so please make
your reservations in advance.
For information and-or reser-
vations, call 689-7703 Monday
through Friday.
HOT KOSHER
LUNCH CONNECTION
Each weekday, seniors
gather for intimate talk,
educational discussions, game
playing, leisure and song.
These activities are followed
by a hot kosher, nutritious
lunch served with warmth and
hospitality by our dedicated
volunteers. Join the unique
and enriching Kosher Lunch
program at the Jewish Com-
munity Center. We offer im-
aginative and innovative ac-
tivities plus stimulating discus-
sions and lively musical
presentations. A delicious
strictly kosher lunch is served.
There is no set fee, but persons
are asked to make a contribu-
tion each meal. Reservations
must be made in advance. Call
689-7703 for information.
MENU
Monday, May 27 Center
Closed.
Tuesday, May 28 Apple
juice, sliced turkey with giblet,
peas, sweet potatoes, pear
halves, rye bread.
Wednesday, May 29
Pineapple juice, baked salmon
with lemon and butter, boiled
potatoes, chopped broccoli,
peaches, pumpernickle bread.
Thursday, May 30 Orange
juice, sliced roast beef, mixed
vegetable, rice, cookies, whole
wheat bread.
Friday, May 31 Pineapple
juice, sauteed chicken, noodle
kugel, chopped broccoli, mixed
fruit, c hall ah bread.
Monday, June 3 Apple
Juice, meat balls with tomato
gravy, Parsley potatoes, peas
and carrots, pineapple tidbits,
Italian bread.
Tuesday, June 4 Pineap-
ple juice, roast chicken, mixed
vegetable, zucchini with onions
and celery, apple, rye bread.
Wednesday, June 5
Grapefruit juice, fish fillet with
lemon and butter, rice, zuc-
chini, plums, pumpernickle
bread.
Thursday, June 6 Pineap-
ple juice, beef with cabbage
sauce, mashed potatoes,
squash, pear halves, whole
wheat bread.
Friday, June 7 Orange
juice, baked chicken with
tomato sauce, glazed carrots,
sweet potatoes, mixed fruit,
challah bread.
Please come and join us. For
information and reservations
(which must be made in ad-
vance) call Carol or Lillian at
689-7703 in West Palm Beach.
HOME
DELIVERED MEALS
Persons who are homebound
and need a Kosher meal please
call for information. Call Carol
in West Palm Beach at
689-7703.
STATE OF
ISRAEL BONDS
BOUGHT AND SOLD
Invest in
Israel Securities

WERE SPECIALISTS IN
ISRAEL SECURITIES
***
TRANSACTIONS DAILY VIA TELEX
TO ISRAEL STOCK EXCHANGE
* SuDVOil'f OlSn B" l.m W llrlfi 6 M
NASD
Securities
Corporation
18 East 48th Street
New York. N Y 10017
(212)759 1310
Toil Free (800) 221 48381
SENIOR ACTIVITIES
FOR THE WEEK
The Palm Beach County
School Board Adult Com-
munity Education provides in-
struction for a variety of
classes throughout the year.
No fee for these sessions.
Other daily activities are pro-
vided by volunteer community
leaders and professionals.
SENIOR ACTIVITIES
Monday, May 27 Holiday
Memorial Day and Second
Day of Shavuot. CENTER
CLOSED.
Tuesday, May 28 Fitness
over 60 11 a.m.; Koeher
Meal 11:30 a.m.; Timely
Topics-Round Table Talk 1
p.m. change of time; Joy
Through Movement
9-10:30 a.m.
Wednesday, May 29
"How To Look Better And
Live Longer" 11 a.m. Dr.
Robert K. Alsofrom; Kosher
Meal Served at 12 noon.
Make your reservations early
today.
Thursday, May 30 Joy
Through Movement 9-11
a.m.; Kosher Meal 11:30
a.m. Susan King, dietician.
Friday, May 31 Kosher
Meal 11 a.m. Traditional
Kiddish Charles Kurland.
SUMMER SESSION
BEGINS JUNE 17
WATCH FOR NEW
CLASSES
Monday, June 3 Arts and
Crafts 1:30 p.m.; Kosher
Meal Program Games
11:30 a.m.
Tuesday, June 4 Fitness
Over 6011 a.m.; Second
Tuesday Council Meeting
10 a.m.; Kosher Meal 11:30
a.m.
Wednesday, June 5
Kosher Meal 11:30 a.m.
"Dollars and Sense" Money
management Paula
Wheeler, consumer credit
counseling.
Thursday.June 6 Kosher
Meal Program 11:30 a.m.;
Health Insurance Assistance
2 p.m.
Friday, June 7 Kosher
Meal 11:30 a,m. "Southern
Bell Today," BUI Bursen.
SENIOR NOTEBOOK
Trip to Burt Rej
Jupiter Theater ty
day, June 19, "a nT
Line." Cost $30 which in?
transportation, lunch tin .
stow. Pick up at West (i*
Century Village. To resell
Elace, call Marlene 689-7?
etween 10 a.m. and 3 !
Monday thrugh Thursday
Sabina 683-0852
SALESPERSON
WANTED
Advertising Representative
for
Jewish Floridian
Contact: STACI LESSER
588-1652
f20A
KOSHER
CATERING
Hyattj Palm Beaches
833 1234
"The
Brickman
Hotel...
a Catsklll
resort
that lets you
stop eating
long enough
to have
some fun..."
$375-5390
Per week, per person (dbl. occ)
Every room with Private Bath.
Air Conditioning and Color TV.
When you escape the Florida heat this
Summer, escape to something more
than non-stop overeating.
Escape to the Brickman.
Mxi go on vacation to do more than live
from one meal to the next That s why we're
on the Modified American Plan, serving two
sumptuous meals daily. Breakfast (until 1130
am), and Dinner (from 630 to 830 prn).
Mid-day snacks? Magnificent Pooiside
Coffee Shop.
There will be no announcement at 1 pm
calling you back to the Dining Roomiwhich
you just left, no need to rush off gof course
or tennis courts. Linger at the pool all day if
you choose. We have one outdoor and
indoor (containing health club and jet
whirlpool spa). Play duplicate bridge, take
art classes, go folk dancing, jog, or work out
on our Universal mini- gym. In short, enjoy a
full day of outdoor activities and sunshine,
and all the other fabulous things we have to
offer, including entertainment that's second
to none.
So come to the Brickman. Where the
meals are fun...not something that gets
in the way of fun!
For reservations and
information phone
_ n TOLL FREE
1-800-431-3854
Hotel Brickman
South Fallsburg. MY 12779
^ster Card. Visa. Arnex
Overlooking a great
18 hole golf course.
Brie.
MWe don't fit the mold,
Your host for three generations.
The Posner Family


Friday, May 24,1985 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 13
<&

Saul Kramer, former chair-
man of the board of Kraft
Corrugated Containers and a
resident of New Rochelle,
N.Y., and Palm Beach, was
presented with the honorary
degree of Doctor of Humane
Letters by the Albert Einstein
College of Medicine of
Yeshiva University.
Bar/Bat Mitzvah
BBEE DELLERSON
"ee Danielle Dellerson,
lighter of Dr- and Mrs. Gary
Qerson of West Palm Beach,
f| become a Bat Mitzvah on
Lturday. May 25 at Temple
Eh El. She will also par-
cipate in the Friday evening
fcrvices.
, an eighth grade
duating student at the
wish Community Day
jiool, has attended the Day
chool since kindergarten. She
i presently president of the
uiesset, the students' self
Jverning body. Bree plays
he piano and enjoys com-
uters and many sports.
STACEY WISEMAN
Stacey Wiseman, daughter
If Mr. and Mrs. Michael
tertian of Lake Worth, will
1 called to the Torah as a Bat
ifitzvah on May 24 at Temple
Israel. Rabbi Howard Shapiro
ind Cantorial Soloist Susan
taiss-Speth will officiate.
Stacey is in the eighth grade
Conniston Junior High
chool where she is an honor
ndent. Her hobbies include
rimming and needlepoint.
BRENT BERGER
Brent Berger, son of Mr.
nd Mrs. Steve Berger of
Jupiter, will become a Bar
iitzvah on Saturday, May 25,
Temple Judea, during its
Brst Sabbath morning service.
the location will be the tum-
ble's permanent site near the
hrner of South Chillingworth
Midrasha
Continued from Page 2
Harris, Steven Jacoby, Tim
Johnson, Shari Koningsburg,
Rachel Levitt, Eric Slepp, Jeff
Tochner, and Missy Yespy.
Julie Cook, a Palm Beach
Junior College student, and
Mitch Levy, a Midrasha senior,
serve as the assistant direc-
tors. Midrasha students Randy
Leipzig and Edward Steinhoff
serve as stage manager and
lighting director respectively.
Rabbi Steven Westman of
Temple Beth Torah will play
the piano accompaniment.
There will be a reception im-
mediately following the pro-
gram. For more information
contact Ann Lynn Lipton,
Jewish education director, at
the Federation's auxiliary of-
fice, 655-7706.
QROWARD
IJAPER *
QACKAGING
Bree Danielle Dellerson
Drive and Congress Avenue,
south of Palm Beach Lakes
Blvd. Rabbi Joel Levine and
Cantor Anne Newman will
officiate.
Brent is in the eighth grade
at Edison Russell. He is an ac-
tive member and organizer of
Temple Judea's new junior
youth group for sixth through
eighth graders. He also is in-
terested in computers and
playing soccer.
Brent will twin his Bar Mitz-
vah with Mikhail Goltsman of
Kishinev to highlight the
plight of Soviet Jewry. Mikhail
cannot be called to the Torah
as a Bar Mitzvah due to pre-
sent Soviet policy.
Travel the world the Jewish way
WITH
Kesher Kosher Tours
X
fc\JW
*
0&
^
*.
V)S
NN

3*edr.is*:*r:

'Cto
o*
'*>
*&
Wj.
*SK I OK oi k SPRING A Si MMI l< HK()( Ml R
FOB MORE INFORMATION CALL
YOUR TRAVEL AGENT
KESHER KOSHER TOURS
1501 BROADWAY NY NY 10036
(212)921-7740(800)847-0700
More than 30 young leaders representing the Jewish Federa-
tion of Palm Beach County attended the Florida Region
Young Leadership Retreat at Grenelefe Resort. Pictured
above are (seated) Dr. and Mrs. Moshe Adler and their
children, Michael, Malka and Matthew. Standing are Mr. and
Mrs. Marvin Rosen and their children, Joseph and B.J.
FREE DELIVERY FLORIDA
PALM BEACH 832-0211
0ROWARD
QAPER &
QACKAGING
:
l^VK OCEMFMM socJ*Progr.-0'*
SSrSSSSU
R.bW(clSupwvWon
RHnlAJl,ch
OCe/HFMMT
BOAWnVAtf HOTEL
Miami Baach. FL 33140
Comp" m' t-------
MEMORIAL DAY
(SHABUOTH) -AY 24-28
5 DAYS/4 NIGHTS
** INCLUDES:
$108
a*X*r%oo
par parson
dbte-occ.
INCLUDES:
9 FULL MEALS DAILY
..JuLs^hSSoM holidays.

......
^ where shopping is a pleasure 7doys a week
PubU> Bakri opn at 8:00 A.M.
AvsftsMs at Psbta Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakariae Only.
Try our fresh baked
Hot Dog and
Hamburger Rolls
859*
AvaNatXa at PubHx Storaa with
Fraah Danish Bakarias Only.
OM Fashion
Boston
Cream Pie
il99
AvsMsoto st Pubta Stores wtth
Fraah Daniah Bakariaa Only.
Apricot or Pruna
Bear Claws or
Elephant Ears
3$1
AvsflsM* at M PuNta Store*
and Danish Bskariaa.
Cinnamon -.-
Raisin Rote...................m $1*
ShtglsLsysr a^oa
Coconut Cake..............mm9^
PowdsrsdSuBsr tr .Mii
MiniDonuts................... b- 99*
Prices Effective
May 23rd thru May 29.1985.
oft
Available at Pubaix Storas with Frosh
Danish Bakariaa Only.
Plain or
Raisin Bagels.
McCalft
COOKBOOK
COLLECTION
This week's feature
VOLUME 4
Salads and
Salad Dressings
*1.79_
Watch for
New Books Weekly


i County Friday. May 24. 1986
Temple Judea To Honor
Outgoing President
Judea will honor
outgoing President Dr. Jeffrey
Fahrus at a gala Dinner-Dance.
Saturday evening, June 1 at
the PGA Sheraton Resort.
Cocktails wffl begin at 7:30
p.m. with dinner at 8:30 p.m.
The theme, "Two By Two,"
inspired by the Noah story will
incorporate exciting surprises
and unique decorations. Music
will be presented by the Sam-
my Fields orchestra. Master of
Ceremonies will be Mitch
Beers.
Barbara Chane is chair of
the dinner-dance. Lorraine
H of finger is chair of the
calendar-journal which has
been prepared for this occa-
sion. The committee includes
Dr. Jeffrey Farras
Cynthia Deutsch. Bill and
Edith Grushow. Diane Mit-
chell. Rabbi Joel and Susan
Levine. Denise Meyer. Rosalee
Savel. and Abe and Barbara
Schwartz. Mrs. Schwartz is
preparing special artistic sur-
prises. Rosier* s has donated a
VCR which will be the door
prize. Bill Grushow and Lor-
raine Hoffinger are coor-
dinating the advertising cam-
paign for the calendar-journal.
Special entertainment will
be presented by Cantor Anne
Newman.
Reservations at $50 per
ticket are still available. Call
the temple office for more
information.
Day School
Pact president Max Tochner (lef tl presents
Dlaaue of aDDreciation to William and Pearl
fast president Max Tochner (left) presents a
plaque of appreciation to William and Pearl
Mosow at the Jewish Community Day
School's annual meeting.
Continued from Page 1
Katz Library and Resource Center.
Always active in Jewish communal and
synagogue life, Katz is establishing the David
and Stella Katz Library and Resource Center
at the Jewish Community Day School in order
to provide for the unique educational needs of
this growing Jewish community. Katz's gift is
a tribute to the memory of his late wife,
Stella.
William A. Mosow was honored, with great
appreciation, for his bequest of $50,000 to the
Jewish Community Day School. Mosow and
his wife, Pearl, hope to give needy Jewish
children opportunities to benefit from the in-
tensive Jewish environment at the Jewish
Community Day School by their establish-
ment of the William A. Mosow Scholarship
Fund.
I
Armand Shutters
ESTABLISHED 1967
Plantation Shutters
Hand Made Custom Finished
Expertly Installed
585-6230
Harold Ochstein 1107 3rd Avenue N Lake Worth, FL 33460 Larry Ochstein
BUYING COLD & SILVER
Buying...
Scrap Cold
in any form, any condition
Buying
Coins-cold & Silver
Collections & Accumulations
U.S. & Foreign
s
NORTH AMERICAN
RARE COINS. K
2550 OKEECHOIEE BLVD.. W. PALM BEACH. FL.
684-1771
MOUt 5: 9:30 o.m.-6:00 p.m.
Member *NA & Chamber ol Commerce
Candle lighting Time
* May 24 7,46 p.m.
May 31 7,50 p.m.
Religious Directory
Conservative
CONGREGATION ANSHEI SHOLOM: 5348 Grove Street
West Palm Beach 33409. Phone 684-3212. Rabbi bw
Vender Walde. Cantor Mordecai Spektor. Daily: 8:30 a.m
and 5:30 p.m. Friday: 8:30 e.m., 5 p.m. and a late service at 816
p.m. followed by Oneg Shabbat. Saturday: 8:30 a.m 5 Dm
Mincha followed by Sholosh Suedoe. '
CONGREGATION BETH KODESH OF BOYNTON BEACH
501 N.E. 26 Avenue, Boynton Beach 33436. Phone 586-9428'.
Rabbi Avrom L. Dr&zin, Cantor Arthur R. Roeenwaaecr
Monday 8:30 am.; Thursday 8:30 a.m. Sabbath service*
Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9a.m _
GOLDEN LAKES TEMPLE: 1470 Golden Lakes Blvrj
West Palm Beach 33411. Phone 689-9430. Rabbi Joseph
Speiser. Daily Services 8:15 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. Sabbath
services Friday &15 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m., 5 p.m, Mincha.
followed by Sholosh Suedos.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID: 4657 Hood Road, Palm Beach
Gardens 33410. Phone 694-2350. Rabbi William Marder,
Cantor Earl J. Rackoff. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m!
Saturday 10 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 2815 No. Flagksr Dr., West Palm
Beach 33407. Phone 833-0339. Rabbi Howard J. Hirsch,
Cantor Elaine Shapiro. Sabbath services Friday 8:15 p.m.,
Saturday 9:30 a.m. Daily Minyan 8:15 a.m., Sunday and
Legal Holidays 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 315 N. "A" Street, Lake Worth
33460. Phone 585-5020. Rabbi Emanuel Eenberg, Cantor
Jacob Elman. Services Monday and Thursday 8:15 a.m.,
Friday 8:15 p.m.. Saturday 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 224 N.W. Avenue G, Belle
Glade 33430. Sabbath services Friday, 8:30 p.m. Phone 996-
3886.
TEMPLE BETH ZION: Lions Club, 700 Camelia Dr., Royal
Palm Beach. Mailing Address: POBox 104, 650 Royal Palm
Blvd., Royal Palm Beach, FL 33411. Sabbath Services Friday 8
p.m., Saturday 8:45 a.m. Rabbi Nathan Zelizer. Phone 793-
9122.
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB: 2177 So. Congress Ave., West Palm
Beach 33406. Phone 433-5957. Rabbi Dr. Morris Silberman.
Cantor Hyman Lifshin. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m.,
Saturday and Holidays 9 am., Monday and Thursday 9 a.m.
TEMPLE EMANUEL: 190 North County Road, Palm Beach
33480. Phone 832-0804. Rabbi Joel Chazin, Cantor David
Dardaahti. Sabbath services, Friday 8:30 p.m.; Saturday 9 a.m.
THE TREASURE COAST JEWISH CENTER Ben
Abraham: 3257 S/E. Salerno Road, Port Salerno. Rabbi
Abraham Rose. 1-287-8833. Services Friday evenings 8 p.m.
i LAKE WORTH JEWISH CENTER: St. Luke's United
I M?Jhodiat Chapel, 166 Ohio Road, Lake Worth. Mailing
Address: 6996 Quince Lane, Lake Worth, FL 33467. Phone 965-1
6053. Friday night services 8:16 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m..
Orthodox
S5E5*3" AITZ CHAIM: Century Village, We* j
J^i iTCh' *-*HW& Sabbath services 9Tm. and 5
p.m. Daily services 8:15 a.m. and 6:30 p.m
Reform
CONGREGATION BETH ISRAEL: 1592 Florests. P.O. Box
857146, Port St. Lucie, FL 33452. Friday night services 8 p.m.
Saturday morning; 10:30 a.m. Phone 466-6977.
THE REFORM TEMPLE OF JUPrreR-TEQUESTA: 769
Parkway Street, Jupiter. Mailing address: Plaza 222, U.S. No.
^Tequeeu 33458. Phone 74Tn09. Rabbi XfiS L. Friedman.
Services Friday 8 p.m.
S9SR2 BE EL 460 O'eander Avenue, Fort Pierce. FL
33460. Phone 461-7428.
TESS^JvZ? SS.A!rOM: St- Hel' P-r^h Hall, 20U>
** JSmmSt 32961"2113-BH Rkhard D
rg!*."WHT0aUill at Wellington Elementary School.
r^m XJ'q** Eft Beach- FL 33406Triaay services 8:16
p.m. Rabbi Steven R. Westman. Phone 793-2700.
T^PLELISRAEL: 1901 No- f*1***" Dr- West Palm Beach
83407 Phone 833-8421. Rabbi Howard Shapiro, Cantorial
boloist Susan Weiss-Speth. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m.
So2LP1H.l'fU25n%:^t 2t Cathari' Greek OrtnodoTChurch
hS i-fii 4P- Wa8hin8ton Rd., at Southern Boulevard.
BfPlg*!* If^tt Cantor Anne Newman. Mailing address:
471 1626^ d- We8t Pabn Bemch- fL 33409. Phone


Friday, May 24,1985 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 15
Synagogue News
This year's Confirmands are
Steve Jacoby and Randy Leip-
zig. Both are members of Tem-
ple Judea's Senior Youth
Group and students in the
Midrasha Judaica High School.
Temple President 1>. Jeffrey
Faivus will be honored at Sab-
bath Services, Friday, May 31.
Rabbi Levine will speak on
"What is a Volunteer?" A
Torah yad, designed in honor
of Dr. Faivus by Henri Bouton,
will be formally presented dur-
ing the Torah Service.
During the sermon, the
junior oneg shabbat supervised
by Miriam Ruiz will be held.
Following services, the con-
gregation is invited to the
oneg shabbat sponsored by
Sisterhood in honor of Dr.
Faivus.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID
Shavuot services will be held
ionMay26atlOa.m.YomTov
services will continue on May
27 at 10 a.m. and will include
the Yizkor service. Rabbi
William Marder and Cantor
Earl Rackoff will officiate.
A special Honorial Dedica-
tion Ceremony will be held on
Friday, May 24 at 8 p.m. At
this service all of those donors
of classrooms, offices, library,
youth center and kitchen will
be honored. Also included in
this ceremony will be those
donors who have subscribed to
the principal honorial items of
ritual and other significance.
I In all, 51 families will be
| honored and a Master Plaque
with all of the individual
bronze name plates will be
I dedicated.
TEMPLE
BETH SHOLOM
The Sisterhood will hold the
last meeting of the season on
June 5 at 12 noon.
The Century Village Man-
dolin Ensemble, directed by
Maurice Bell, will entertain.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
The Board of Trustees of
Temple Emanu-El of Palm
Beach wishes to announce that
they have made the following
changes in leadershp positions
on the board: Richard A. Lynn,
MD, president; Norman
Taplin, first vice president;
Edward Kahn, second vice
president; and Milton Birn-
baum, treasurer. Murray D.
Sandier, financial secretary,
and Jesse R. Barbash, recor-
ding secretary, continue on the
Board in the positions to which
they were elected by the
Congregation.
The new officers were
elected to fill the unexpired
terms on the board that were
left by the recent resignation,
for health reasons, of past
president Alan H. Cummings,
and the tragic loss of treasurer
Dr. S. Senior Sack.
TEMPLE ISRAEL
The temple invites the com-
munity to join at their Shavuot
and Confirmation service Sun-
day, May 26, 2 p.m. when eight
students will be confirmed by
Rabbi Howard Shapiro. The
confirmands are Jill Meredith
Conn, Alissa Ellen Debs, Amy
Pamela Fine, Grace Caryn
Jagoda, Michael Scott Kapner,
Amy Prince, Julie Dawn
Sakson and Deborah Gail
Solomon.
The reception following the
service will be hosted by the
parents of the confirmands.
TEMPLE JUDEA
Confirmation Services are
set for Friday, May 24 at 7:30
p.m.
AIDINOFF
Max. 72, of Lake Worth. Menormh Gardens
and Funeral Chapels. West Palm Beach.
(BOSTON
Herman. 79. of 3460 S. Ocean Blvd.. Palm
Beach. Riverside Guardian Funeral Home
West Palm Beach.
BRANDFONBRENER
lames. 87. Bedford D. No. 84. Century
Village, West Palm Beach. Riverside Guar-
lian Funeral Home, West Palm Beach.
BRYANT
Ruby F 71, of 8061 SE Helen Terrace.
Hobe Sound. Riverside Guardian Funeral
Home, West Palm Beach.
DORES
Benjamin. 70. of 6378 Summer Sky Lane,
Lake Worth. Riverside Guardian Funeral
Home, West Palm Beach.
GODELPH
Maurice, 83. of 1401 S. Olive Ave.. West
Palm Beach. Levitt-Weinstein Guaranteed
Security Plan Chapel. West Palm Beach.
GOLOFARB
Eva, 87. of West Palm Beach. Menorah
Gardens and Funeral Chapels, West Palm
Beach.
GOLDMAN
Betty, of 336 Cape Cod Circle, Lake Worth.
Riverside Guardian Funeral Home, West
Palm Beach.
GOLDSTEIN
Benjamin L., 78, of 505 Lake Dora Drive,
West Palm Beach. Riverside Guardian
Funeral Home. West Palm Beach.
BUSH!
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HOROVITZ
Dr. Nathan. 73, of Golden Lakes. West
Palm Beach. Menorah Gardens and Funeral
Chapels, West Palm Beach.
KAUFMAN
Morris, 88. of 2534 S. Garden Drive. Lake
Worth. Levitt-Weinstein Guaranteed
Security Plan Chapel. West Palm Beach.
KOHN
Erwin, 82. Coventry D No. 84, Century
Village, West Palm Beach. Riverside Guar-
dian Funeral Home. West Palm Beach.
LEHMAN
Lilo, 72. of South Ocean Blvd.. Palm Beach.
Levitt-Weinstein Guaranteed Security Plan
Chapel, West Palm Beach.
LOBEL
Jerome, 73. of Ocean Drive. Palm Baech.
Riverside Guardian Plan Chapel.
OSTERMAN
Louis, 83, of Lake Worth. Menorah Gardens
and Funeral Chapels. West Palm Beach.
ROBKOFF
Margaret. 61. of Lake Worth. Levitt-
Weinstein Guaranteed Security Plan
Chapel. West Palm Beach.
ROSE
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Levitt-Weinstein Guaranteed Security Plan
Chapel. West Palm Beach
SCHER
Yetta. 82. of Lantana. Menorah Gardens
and Funeral Chapels, West Palm Beach.
SHAPIRO
Ralph. 91, of 1701 S Flagter Drive, West
Palm Beach. Riverside-Guardian Funeral
Home.
SKLAR
Delores, 81. of 4841 Badger Road. West
Palm Beach. Levitt-Weinstein Guaranteed
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SOLOMON
Edith, 89. of West Palm Beach Levitt
Weinstein Guaranteed Security Plan
Chapel, West Palm Beach.
SORMAN
Hilda, 78, of 4397 Bamboo Drive, Palm
Beach Gardens. Riverside-Guardian
Funeral Home. West Palm Beach.
WEISS
Howard. 82, of Royal Palm Beach. Menorah
Gardens and Funeral Chapels. West Palm
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Page 16 Tto Jewish IToridian of Palm Beach County/Friday. May 24.1986
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Pf 2/J*WMhFwktiDn
'** &e*/Ue "4m &"V ga*i. '7C ^Jlov* yuxttufaevJUty
lAtaty '84
Our memories of the past are the foundation of our future.
Looking back we have seen Palm Beach County grow into a
thriving Jewish community. We have built institutions to educate
our children, to care for our elderly, and to strengthen our overall
identity as a people. With the past as our teacher, we must take
what we have learned and use our knowledge wisely. The
challenge continues. This year has been another strong link in the
chain of our survival. As you read through these pages, take
pride in what you have accomplished and look forward to the
opportunities ahead....
&ede*a/u>n imSmMk wMfam*
%<** '64

&eA. '83
Women '* QiviUoft ca*n/uupn event Q)^.
'68
Mm i

^** Smm%m fimmmm

Jwh Federation of Palm Bwch County/ page a
president's Report
Development And
Leadership Continuity
Spur Progress
Myron J. Nickman,
President
The Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County has made
significant progress during the past year in its efforts to reach out to
build a strong Jewish community in South Florida.
We are living in a community which is experiencing rapid growth
of Jewish population, requiring the need of our Federation to provide
the necessary resources to guarantee the delivery of services and
programs which will enhance the quality of Jewish life for all our
people here in Palm Beach, in Israel and throughout the world.
Our accomplishments this past year were made possible by the
continuity of leadership and involvement of hundreds of volunteers
who gave of themselves. These are individuals who have com-
municated to others that we, as Jews, have an obligation to help
other Jews. It is a lesson of history which has been carved into our
souls.
This continuity has also enabled us to transmit Jewish values from
generation to generation, to confront crises facing our people with
decisive action and to plan for our children's future.
The 1985 Federation campaign led by General Campaign Chair
Arnold Lampert reached new heights in breaking previous fund
raising efforts. Our community accepted the additional respon-
sibility for the resettlement of Ethiopian Jews by raising $550,000
above the regular campaign. This accomplishment displayed a unity
and the depth of our commitment.
Last year our Federation began a self study which is evaluating
the way our Federation conducts its day to day operation and its
relationship to the overall community, so that we can continue to
strengthen all aspects of Federation responsibilities. Four sub-
committees have been meeting on a regular schedule in deliberations
of the many components which are required to maintain a strong
Jewish Federation. A final report will be forthcoming during the
year.
Through our Community Planning process we are continuing to
study the needs of our elderly and single parent families. Our
community will do all it can to support Jewish education. We will
intensify our links with Israel, the central focus of Jewish life today,
and increase our efforts to provide a full spectrum of social services
to the people of Israel.
In short, we will do everything in our power to meet the needs of
all Jews here in Palm Beach County, in Israel and in communities
around the world.
Our success in meeting the future challenges depends on every Jew
in the community. We must work together collectively to assert the
conviction that we are one people, by understanding where our
community stands today and how we progressed to this point; and
with the commitment of our leadership and the high ideals of our
faith, we can realize even greater achievements which will enrich the
lives of Jews everywhere.
Executive Director's Report
Community
Moves Forward
Norman J. Schimelinan,
Executive Director
The Palm Beach County Jewish community can look back on the
past year with pride, knowing that we have accomplished a great
deal in providing people of all ages with essential human services in
our community, in Israel and worldwide. Thanks to the generosity of
our Jewish community and the efforts of our leadership, the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach County was able to help more people than
ever before during the past twelve months.
While the final totals of our 1985 campaign are not completed as of
this date, we have received an unprecedented response of new gilts
and more dollars raised for the Federation-U JA campaign.
Two years ago our community entered into a special relationship
with an Israercommunity, Hod Hasharon our Projert Renewal
sister city. As a result of our participation in ProjecMM, a UJ.a
program in which diaspora communities provide direct support to
impoverished Israeli communities, Hod Hasharon has undergonea
remarkable physical and social transformation. A very warm
relationship nai developed between Hod Hasharon and our Palm
Beach County Jewish community and we look forward U banging
our communities even closer together in the spirit of partnership.
This year, our Women's Division has, once ;agam .broken its
previous fund raising records and will raise more *Q*jlgf* on
behalf of the Federation-UJA campaign. Add tionaUy, its
educational activities help communicate Federation s importance to
countless individuals.
The important work of our Federation includes the transmission of
our rich cultural heritage. In the past year we have witnessed the
erowth of educational opportunities for Jewish youth through the
Federation sponsored "Midrasha" High School and the improving
quality Judaica and secular education of our Jewish Community Day
School.
Federation's family of agencies, the Jewish Community Center,
the Jewish Community Day School, the Jewish Family and
Children's Service and the Joseph L. Morse Geriatric Center made
significant progress during the past year, offering vital community
services.
In order to meet all the human needs of our community,
Federation will need to initiate a long range planning capital
needs project to determine priorities andcreate a comprehensive plan
for services which must be provided in the 1980s and 1990s.
Underlying all efforts is the awareness that Jews from all walks of
life are partners in shaping our destiny. It has been so for thousands
of years; and through our unity as Jewish communities, we
epitomize the true spirit of humanitarianism. We must be always
willing to reach out to our brothers and sisters, so that all Jews can
share the promise of a proud future in generations to come.
Special thanks to the Federation staff members, whose diligence
and commitment went far beyond the roles expected of them.


Page 4 / Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
fficUfPi ffie&cA cunt/uUyn
@ec. '84
14Uaf& ffioyale nUnd-tndtedott &eA. '85
'85 Campaign Reaches Beyond $7 Million
Arnold L. Lampert Douglas Kleiner,
General Campaign Chair Director I
The 1965 United Jewish Appeal of Palm Beach County campaign
has been our most satisfying and successful ever. We will I
have raised over S6.6 (million in our annual campaign and will also
have solicited over $500,000 in special funds for the unique needs of
Ethiopian Jews now at home in Israel. This is an increase of more
than 25 percent over 1984!
In November, hundreds of our campaign volunteers gathered to
discuss the "Case for the 1985 Campaign" with leaders of the United
Jewish Appeal who came to Palm Beach County from different areas
of the country. This UJA "Caravan" served to motivate our
volunteers, resulted in record fundraising, and "kicked off" the 1985
campaign.
Our retirement and condominium village communities led the
way to an early campaign start. These 17 distinct campaign areas
raised a total of $300,000 in 1985, as compared to $225,000 in 1984.
Century Village itself raised a record total of $150,000! Hundreds of
very special volunteers worked throughout these areas of the
campaign and deserve our thanks. Because of their work, over 6000
givers were involved.
Michael Burrows chaired a very exciting Special Gifts dinner
which resulted in increasing our number of donors who give $10,000
and above by over 25 percent. We are very grateful to Mike for
bringing so many new donors into the Federation family! Senator
Jacob Javits spoke brilliantly that evening about the relationship
between the United Jewish Appeal and Israel, and American Jewry s
historic responsibility for helping to maintain the health of this
relationship.
We also had a tremendously exciting Community Dinner-Dance
in February. We were all delighted to walk into a Bruce Sutka
creation of the Old City of Jerusalem. We danced under its arches,
strolled through its marketplace and enjoyed ourselves as never
before! Carole and Joel Koeppel, who warmly welcomed over 400
; members of our Federation family giving pledges of $1200 or more,
chaired this memorable event.
The Eastpointe Country Club had its 2nd annual sit-down
dinner and the leadership gavel was passed to Al and Frances
Newman by Helen and Lester Sodowick. This campaign, which
began as a cocktail reception with Senator Dan Moynihan at the
home of Sylvia and Arthur Kligler in 1983, had been chaired by the
Sodowicks' since its inception.
Milton Gold and his team did incredible work at the Village of
Royal Palm Beach. Over $100,000 was raised there, a 45 percent
increase! The caucus at the Village of Royal Palm Beach is
something we who were there shall always remember.
Jerry Lorber and his team raised over $300,000 at the Foun-
tains, with a lovely luncheon and the golf tourney in memory of Sam
and Phyllis Youner. An especially important, new major gift was (
solicited at the Fountains for which we are very grateful.
Our Boynton Beach drive was simply incredible and raised
$410,000 in 1985, as compared to $290,000 in 1984. At Hunters Run,
Linda and Ben Frankel hosted a $1500 minimum gift cocktail party
at their home and kicked off the Hunters Run campaign in a special
fashion. The Galaxy Ball which followed was filled with members of
the Hunters Run Club. Both dining rooms in the Club were necessary
to accommodate the crowd, as were two bands! All the best to Rima
and Sam Robinson, Naomi and Harris Kessler and Ed and Rita Stein
for all their hard work.
The Indian Spring community had a tremendously successful
dinner and dance at the Breakers. Joe Berk took the mantle of
leadership from Harold Streem and continued the tradition of ex-
cellence in leadership. We look forward to many more years of their
wonderful organizing skill, helping us to build at Indian Spring. Our
thanks also to Dana Marin for her chairing the dance committee.
Bernie Plisskin returned to chair the Lands of the President
campaign, which raised over $300,000. We look forward to the club at
the Lands becoming a focus for our campaign.
The Palm Beach campaign took flight under the leadership of
Marva Pen-in, Palm Beach chairman, and Mort Weiss, chairman of
the South Ocean Boulevard Council. Hundreds of new givers were
attracted to events located in condominium buildings along South
Ocean Boulevard where brilliant Israelis spoke movingly about the
role of the UJA and American Jewry in the life of Israel. We learned
a lot and are deeply grateful to the members of the South Ocean
Boulevard Council for their time and energy. We look forward to
another fine year in 1986!
In Wellington, our first minimum gift event was held with
Senator Robert Packwood under the chairmanship of Leah and
Phillip Siskin.
Mark and Stacey Levy led the most successful Super Sunday in
history and raised $531,000! They stressed new gifts and brought in
a winning team of volunteers. They even arranged for a rainstorm
which kept everyone at home to answer the phone!
Our mini-mission program helped hundreds of people to see and
touch the programs and services which we offer locally. Our bus was
always full and we will continue this program next year, as well as
continue our building of a business and professional section to our
campaign and a medical and health services division as well. Barry
Berg and Dr. Norma Schulman made the first historic developmental
steps this year.
In conclusion, let it be said that we have also raised over
$500,000 for the special needs of Ethiopian Jews. We did this
wonderful work with only a modicum of publicity, as requested by
the leadership of UJA. All who made a special gift can be proud to
have assisted in this life-saving effort.
-mm
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A B P H
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&eA. '85


Jewish
leration of Palm Beacr
^omen's Division
Women Ackiowledge
Their Own Impact
Sheila Engelstein, Lynne Ehrlich,
President Director
It is my pleasure to report that in this "The Year of the
w man the Women's Division chose as its theme "Jewish and
Female Acknowledge Your Impact." In keeping with that theme,
mir educational and outreach programs offered women the op-
rtunities to explore the diverse choices they must face in our
wimDlex modern world; while at the same time maintain the
tradition of their involvement in Jewish communal life and tzedakah.
In September, we began our year with a Board Orientation for
our Board of Directors with a program entitled "Getting Your MBA
Master of Board Activity." This was the first of many Board
"roerams offered all year designed to provide the tools which enable
women to increase their organizational skills.
Once again, this year we reached out to the more than 90 Jewish
women's organizations in Palm Beach County by holding the 6th
Annual Presidents Coffee. This coffee, held at the Morse Geriatric
Center enabled our Women's Division to address a record number of
organizational presidents who heard a first-hand report on plans to
change the format and schedule of the 6th Annual Jewish Women's
Assembly. For the first time in its six-year history, it was announced
that the Jewish Women's Assembly would be held on a Sunday in
order to accommodate business and professional women and women
of all ages from all parts of our rapidly changing community.
This year's assembly, which continues to be the single largest
Jewish educational program offered in Palm Beach County, had as
its kevnote speaker Bella Abzug who spoke about "Women A
Maior Political Force in 1984. In addition to Bella Abzug s
provocative address, two workshops were offered that day. One
workshop was presented by Dora Roth who addressed the issue
"Jewish Mothers Soldiers of Sacrifice." A second workshop led by
Esther Kurz from the American Israel Public Affairs Committee,
explored "The Power of the Jewish Voice."
In an attempt to maintain the involvement of the more than 625
participants who attended that day, Women's Division utdizedthis
opportunity to invite these women to "acknowledge their infinite
impact" by continuing to participate in other outreach programs all
year.
One of those outreach programs held this past December was
our Annual Open Board Meeting. In keeping with the theme for the
year, the program was entitled^Jewish and Female Beyond the
Damaging Stereotype." A special presentation was also made that
evening the first of its kind in our Jewish community in which
the miraculous story of "Operation Moses" was revealed.
In a continuous effort to keep our Board members informed of
issues relevant to Jews in our community, in Israel and throughout
the world, the following special programs were offered to our Board
members all year.
In October, we explored the woman's role and tzedakah In
January there was a presentation on the budget and aUocations
jSRf the Jewish federation. In February we exarmned^the
topic of conflict resolution. Finally, at our April Bari Meeitog we
took a year-end look at the many pertinent "^2g?,ffWE
Community Relations Council of the Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County. *_^i
Our Business and Professional Networking Group also offered a
$e4V&A Women \ 0ct. '84
variety of programs throughout the year which explored the ways in
which women acknowledge their impact. These programs which
reached out to the more than 450 women who are members of our
B and P Networking Group, included "Women in the Media,"
"Superwomen, Stress and Sexuality," "A Matter of Principle-pal
A Perspective of One Woman in Management," and "Women in
Portraits" a special presentation in play form about five women
struggling against the social pressures that define their role as
females.
As part of our ongoing effort to educate women from all parts of
the community about the social services provided by our beneficiary
agencies, Women's Division conducted four mini-mission tours of the
Morse Geriatric Center, the Jewish Community Center, The Jewish
Community Day School, and the Jewish Family and Children a
Service. These tours were held for the workers who participated in
the first Women's Division Century Village Phonathon, for women in
Eastpointe, for women from the Palm Beach and West Palm Beach
areas and for women who live in the Fountains.
Because Women's Division views leadership as an ongoing
learning process, a special leadership workshop was conducted in the
spring for our Board, various committee members and Jewish
Women's Assembly participants who expressed an interest in
learning more about Federation and the role women play in Jewish
communal life.
Just as we began our year learning about women and how they
acknowledged their impact as a major political force in 1984, we
concluded our year at our Annual Meeting Awards Ceremony with
an address from Mayor Carol Roberts of West Palm Beach who
spoke about "Women in Politics-Power."
As president of Women's Division for the last two years, I have
watched with pride as our Women's Division has acknowledged its
own impact as an increasingly important arm of the Jewish
Federation. The dollars it raises, as well as its many educational and
outreach programs, have played a tremendous role in shaping the
future of our Jewish community. Because Women s Division
recognizes that "Woman Power" is "People Power, our greatest
resource has been the hundreds of volunteers who have given their
time, energy and commitment to the Jewish people.
These women have personally touched my life. Moreover, they
have enriched the Women's Division through their creativity and
involvement. That involvement, a traditional one, has made a
remarkable difference in the life of this Federation and in the lives of
the people who are touched by the services we provide.
We Do Make A Difference!
Julie Cummings, Lynne EhrUch,
Women's Division Campaign Vice President Director
In this "The Year of the Woman" more than ever a gift.to
Women's Division was a viable force through which all Jewn
women "acknowledged their impact" by becoming a voice for the
Jewish people.
This year's third annual Lion of Judah Advanced Gift Minimum
$5,000 Event was held on December 6. This event, attended by 41
women raised over $790,000.1ts success helped this year s campaign
soar to phenomenal new heights. Professor Irwin Cotler was our
speaker at the gala cocktail reception held to honor the Lion
recipients. Harriet Zimmerman, National UJA Women s D|>n
campaign chair, made a special presentation that day in order k>
share with us the miracle of "Operation Moses." Women s Division
in response to that cause pledged $60,340 that day.
Historically, our annual minimum $l,000-$4,999 Pacesetter Event
sets the pace which helps us to reach our yearly ^pa'ffB1"'
Once again, this luncheon, held at the Garden Club in Palm Beach on
February 13, was a tremendous success. The Honorable Senator Bob
Packwood of Oregon addressed 72 women who contributed over
$79,600 that day.
This year, on Sunday. February 10, Women's Dfrfataj.htld *
first Phonathon for women in Century Village. ^ejJ? rficS
carrying out the tradition of tzedakah staffed*our Federat^nofnce
phones that day raising a total of over $9,000 for Jews in neea in
Palm Beach County, inlsrael and throughout the world.
Once again, the Women's Division campaign in the Lands of the
President responded to the need for increased dollars. The Lands of
the President committee, as always, proved the effectiveness of
personal solicitation by closing their campaign 35 percent ahead of
last year's totals.
On March 17, Women's Division organized their own woman-to-
woman telephone solicitation on Super Sunday. That campaign
totaled over $87,000. Because this year Women s Division chose as
its theme "Jewish and Female Acknowledge Your Impact, we
appropriately closed out our campaign year by inviting women to
participate in a newly-created $125-$999 campaign event in support
of local needs as well as the needs of worldwide Jewry. This event,
which was highlighted by a lovely fashion show presented by Saks
Fifth Avenue, featured as its guest speaker author and lecturer
Danny Siegel, who spoke to over 119 women about the Everyday
Miracles of Tzedakah." This event provided a first-time opportunity
for our Business and Professional Networking Group to attend an
evening campaign event.
Because of the outstanding commitment and dedication of our
Women's Division campaign contributors and volunteers, this year's
campaign as of April raised $1,476 260 which was a card-for-card
increase of over 43 percent. In addition Women s Division m
response to the "Operation Moses" special campaign, contributed
$128 103 Women's Division volunteers performing everyday
miracles of their own raised 24 percent of the total Federation
campaign. Furthermore, through their participation they added to
the communal spirit and cohesiveness of the Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County. Indeed, their efforts showed that a woman can
"make a difference'* in the future of our Jewish community.


Jewish Federation Of
Palm Beach County
Organizational Structure
MISSIONS
WOMEN'S
DIVISION
COMMUNITY
PLANNING
CAPITAL FUNDING
MULTIPLE APPEALS
CAMPAIGN
PUBLIC
RELATIONS
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
CAMPAIGN
LEADERSHIP
DEVELOPMENT!
BYLAWS
CAMPAIGN
CABINET
PROJECT
RENEWAL
OUTREACH
JEWISH
EDUCATION


JEWISH COMMUNITY
OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
MEMBERSHIP OF FEDERATION
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
PERSONNEL
CHAPLAINCY
SERVICE
LEADERSHIP
[DEVELOPMENT
CASH
COLLECTIONS
COMMUNITY
RELATIONS
COUNCIL
ISRAEL
TASK
FORCE
LOCAL
CONCERNS
TASK FORCE
SOVIET
JEWRY
TASK FORCE
HOLOCAUST
COMMEMORATION
COMMITTEE
1
ENDOWMENT
STEERING
COMMITTEE
LEGALAND
TAX
COMMITTEE
FINANCIAL AND
INVESTMENT
COMMITTEE
LETTER OF INTENT
COMMITTEE
BUDGET
AND
ALLOCATIONS


Board of Directors
Officers
President, Myron J. Nickman
Vice Presidents,
Peter Cummings
Alec Engelstein
Arnold J. Lampert
Barbara Tanen
Alvin Wilensky
Treasurer, Barry Berg
Secretory,Dr. Elizabeths. Shulman
Immediate Past President,
Jeanne Levy
Past President, Alan L. Shulman
Women s Division President,
Sheila Engelstein
1984-85
Board of Directors
Bennett Berman
Erwin H. Blonder
Michael Burrows
Bruce J. Daniels
Heinz Eppler
Ruthe Eppler
M. Kalman Gitomer
Arthur Gladstone
Milton Gold
Emanuel Goldberg
Harvey Goldberg
Murray Goodman
Carol Greenbaum
Lionel Greenbaum
Henry Grossman
Arnold J. Hoffman
Charles Jacobson
Sidney Kohl


-utive Staff
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County / Page 9
irtrative Staff
_iJ.Schunelman,
utive Director
ne Rachles,
nistrative Assistant
torip
Women's Division
Lynne Ehrlich,
Director
Faye Stoller,
Assistant Director
PubUc Relations-Leadership Development
Community Relations Council Chaplaincy
Rabbi Alan Sherman,
Director
Jewish Education
Ann Lynn Lipton,
Director
uglas Kleiner,
ttctor
ri Bower
iKarako
|via Lewis
[Mendel
rSchafler
rSilverman,
npaign Associates
Ronni Epstein,
Director
Nettie Berk,
Public Relations Coordinator
Louise Ross,
Assistant News Coordinator
Finance
I. Edward Adler,
Endowment Director
Paul Chrystal,
Comptroller
-
Nathan Kosowski
Marilyn Lampert
Gerald Lesher
Staci Lesser
Elsie Leviton
H. Irwin Levy
Robert S. Levy
Cynnie List
. Robert E. List
Samuel K. Mittleman
John I. Moss
Larry Ochstein
Marva Perrin
Bernard Plisskin
Berenice Rogers
. Samuel Schutzer
Paul Shapiro
Dr. Richard G. Shugarman
Leah Siskin
Phillip Siskin
Harold Streem
Jerome H. Tishman
Mortimer Weiss
Dr. Peter Wunsh
Michael Zimmerman
* Past Presidents
Honorary Board Member
(Deceased)


StnUfuangea* in &i*a*/ jVon. '84 jVationad'ge**iJi We^a** 9Boau/ ^Up ';
Budget and Allocations
Responsibility, Accountability Keys To Budgeting
Barry Berg,
Chair
Norman Schim elm an,
Executive Director
The Federation Budget and Allocations Committee is responsible
to insure that all funds raised and distributed by the Federation are
used for the approved purposes, that efficiency and economy prevail
insofar as this is possible, and that service is rendered in an ap-
propriate and sound manner.
This past year, the Budget and Allocations Committee was
restructured to provide improved knowledge and scrutiny over til
local, national and overseas agencies which request support from our
annual Federation campaign.
I wish to express my sincere appreciation to all members of the
Budget and Allocations Committee for their extensive time and
efforts which they expended in deliberations to recommend fair and
equitable distribution of the limited funds available
Where The Dollar Goes
DISTRIBUTION OF FUNDS
FROM 1964 CAMPAIGN
Organization
United Jewish Appeal............. ai77in
Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society............. o'rAX
American-Israel Cultural Foundation............ okn
Federated Council of Israeli Institutes .'.'.'.'.'. YYY.Y. 300
Total $3,180,660
Here At Home ...
LOCAL AGENCIES
Jewish Family & Children's Service..........$ 258 000
Jewish Community Day School.......... 200500
Jewish Community Center...................' .'239'500
Joseph L. Morse Geriatric Center................ 90000
Total |!'788,000
JEWISH FEDERATION
Administration................ oog fi
CamPain ......................'..'.'.'........656:565
___ Total 61,043,120
JEWISH FEDERATION SERVICES
1. Community Relations Council........ a n ion
2. Floridian Newspaper................ gg'^
3. River Garden Home for the Aged (Jacksonville).. 4,'000
4. Jewish Education Service............... 26 500
6. Leadership Development......... iu'onn
6. Chaplaincy Program.............. ......S 6TO
7. Mosaic TV Program........... ............ 7%K
8. Endowment Fund............... '"i-Jqnri
9. Single Parent Famfly Program...... oon
10. CRC State Coordinator ....... a'
11. Women's Division Education Program YYYYY i'mo
12. Israel High School Scholarship......... 50OO
13. Community High School (Mkfroha).......... 61.W0
14. Radio Program LChayim............... 4 000
Total I 3i6|260
In America
NATIONAL HUMAN RELATIONS AGENCIES
American Jewish Committee.................$ 250
American Jewish Congress........................500
B'nai B'rith Anti-Defamation League ..... ........1 500
Jewish Labor Committee....... '600
Jewish War Veterans......... .............1 000
National Conference on Soviet Jewry Y.YY.Y.Y.YY..' L00O
National Jewish Community Relations
Advisory Council............................3 500
American Academic Association for Peace
in the Middle East...................... 1 500
Total" '$"4860
NATIONAL CULTURAL, EDUCATIONAL AGEN-
Joint Cultural Appeal........ a 500
Jewish Education Service of North America'.".".'.'.... 2,300
American Jewish Archives..... ^^ 150
Dropsie University......... 150
Jewish Chautauqua Society ..." 200
Jewish Theological Seminary....'.'.'"' 600
Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute'
of Religion............... caq
Yeshiva University .. .............500
Jewish Telegraphic Agency' YYYYYYYYYYYYYYYY.YYY.Y.m
National JewisK Resource Center..................500
National Tay Sachs and Allied Diseases.............800
NATIONAL SOCIAL SERVICE AGENCIES
National Jewish Welfare Board I fi fi56
B'n^B'rith Youth Ser^T ;.;;:..........* *g
wS^*6^ Jewish Students Appeal'.'.'.' YYY.. 600
JewishBraule Institute..... 'W"
gfoc^n of Jewish Family & Chfldrens Agencies .'. 300
llZS^ZLtZZ^ 9?munal Service .\TT^ .. 200
National Association of Jewish Vocational Services... 100
REGIONAL SERVICES ^ $ ^
BnaiBrkhHaWFwndatioBofFlorida......$ J8.600
Grand Total 65,381,286


Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County/Page 11
Jt 7} |^
Jewish Education
Now A Total Community Concern
2W. fc#
.. Ann Lynn Lipton,
Nathan Kosowski, Director
CbWThe vear started out with a Midrasha enrollment of 95, the
hiehest in our history, and a Senior class of 16 who will graduate this
inne In addition, three local synagogues, addressing themselves to
the nroblems of post Bat and Bar Mitzvah eighth graders, united to
form a community eighth grade program Machon (entryway).
While not a formal part of the Midrasha, the Machon program ran
narallel to it and met at the Day School as does Midrasha. The
success of this program was evident and the coordinators have gone
through tin necessary process to have the Machon program become
a formal pan of the Midrasha. This increases the Midrasha program
from grades 9-12 to grades 8-12 for the 1985-1986 school year. This
development is indicative of the national trend to communalize
programs that can benefit individual schools-institutions whose
programs are too small to run individually.
Midrasha's activities this year included a Succoth barbecue a
Purim Ball, a Yom Ha'Atzmaut celebration with a visit from the
Israel Scout Friendship Caravan and a production of Highlights
from Fiddler on the Roof" at graduation.
The Jewish Education Committee, in cooperation with the
Educators Council, sponsored teacher training programs including a
Fall Conference held at Temple Beth David. Sixty teachers par-
ticipated in workshops on discussion techniques, early childhood
music, and the Jewish credibility gap. The Spruig Teachers Con-
ference held Feb. 17, had tzedakah as its theme and nationally known
lecturer. Danny Siegel, spent the day with 50 teachers and prin-
cipals.
Two major communitywide religious school events were held
this year. Both were met with enthusiasm. Our first community-
wide Zimriah was held on the second night of Chanukkah in the
Merkaz of the Jewish Community Day School. This event, attended
by 500 students, parents, teachers and friends was a festive evening
of song and celebration. We plan to continue to hold this Chanukkah
event in years to come. Our second parade for Yom Ha'Atzmaut
took place on Sunday. April 21. Children from ten area schools mar-
ched from Temple Israel to Temple Beth El along Flagler Drive.
Waving Israeli flags and singing, they showed their support for
Israel in a spirited way.
Our teachers were especially honored by being recognized at the
Jewish Federation's Annual Meeting. Three outstanding educators
received $500 incentive grants to study here and in Israel this
summer. These teachers will bring back new ideas and skills to share
with our community next fall.
Finally, several teenagers received scholarships from both our
Midrasha and general Federation scholarship funds, to attend high
school programs in Israel this spring and summer. These youngsters
gain a great deal and bring much to our community, as they lecture
throughout Palm Beach county to adult and youth groups.
Overall, the Jewish Education Committee has made progress in
the scope and number of its programs. We look forward to increasing
our activities in reaching more of the youth of our community in the
year to come.
Community Planning
Agenda Grows With Community
BarrvBere Norman J. Schimelman,
Chair Executive Director
The Community Planning Committee, along with its sub-
committees, identifies the Jewish community s needs, formulates
programs and services to meet these needs, looks into sources oi
financing and selects or designs delivery systems to provide
programs and services.
During the past year, our Council on the Aging continued its
assessment of the unmet needs of the Jewish aged and determined
that housing alternatives for the well and frail elderly be explored^
The task force on the single parent family reported on a variety- oi
programs which were established this past year, including tne
"Chaverim," a big friend, little friend program patterned after the
Bik Brother programs. This service is being offered as a pilot
program by the Jewish Community Center.
The Community Planning Committee approved the establish-
ment of a permanent service for vocational counseling programs to
be administered by the Jewish Family and Children s Service.
The above projects were but a few of the important issues
deliberated befoS the Community Planning 0"* *J gg
year. Our agenda continues to expand as the needs of our local
Jewish community continue to grow.
Wnp/e 0k*m& 9>M*i&a4ty
0c.
ygowncdd on. tne*>tinp
0W. '84


k I
Leadership Development
lAia*. '85
> (fc^Ufm io t^Mae/
&*. >85
Educating Tomorrow's Leaders Today
Chair L*Vy' Ronni Epstein,
The following report is my evaluation, as chairman of the
Leadership Development Committee, of the program that our
committee organized this year.
We started our Leadership Development program this year with
a new recruitment procedure for program participants. In the past,
we have relied on committee members to personally recruit program
participants. This year, we made initial contact with candidates
through committee members, but combined that with parlor
meetings where we told each and every candidate exactly what we
expected of them in return for the program we are offering. What we
expected was a commitment to attend the program meetings and to
get involved in the community upon the program's conclusion.
Overall, attendance was by far and away the best we had ever
achieved for Palm Beach County Leadership Development.
The Leadership Development Committee organized a top
quality program for this year's Leadership Development group.
Meeting on a monthly basis, the participants dealt with issues
ranging from political awareness and involvement, to planning and
budgeting. Topics included An Historical Perspective on Israel
Jews in Peril, and Jewish Involvement Theatre, which gave our
participants an opportunity to deal with current issues facing
today s Jewish community.
The most successful aspect of Leadership Development this
year was the tremendous attendance and success of our mission to
Israel in February. With 23 program participants and committee
members joining the National Young Leadership Mission, we now
have a hard-core crop of dedicated young people. Our further success
was indicated by the commitment of 25 of our participants attending
the Regional Young Leadership Retreat in Grenelefe, near Haines
City, Florida. The above numbers dwarf the previous attendance
from Palm Beach County at similar events. Both missions and
retreats go a long way toward creating aj spirit of dedication to
Jewish causes.
I believe that Leadership Development this year has taken a
major role in developing future leaders for Palm Beach County. In
my previous experience with Leadership Development, I have never
been associated with a more conscientious, dedicated and intelligent
group of people than this year's committee and program par-
ticipants. I believe Leadership Development is a tool tor developing
leaders among people of diverse backgrounds and ages, and should
not be relegated to developing only young leaders. However, the
most important aspect of Leadership Development is how the
community utilizes the talent and dedication of the program
graduates. In previous years, the program participants were allowed
to drift away without integrating them into the Jewish community.
The program participants have shown great interest in involving
themselves in the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County and its
agencies, and it is up to the Federation and its agencies to make the
1984-85 Leadership Development program a success.
Endowment
Reactivated Program Foresees Growth
Stanley B. Brenner
Chair
I. Edward Adler
Director
After a period of limited activity while operating without
professional staffing, the Endowment Fund Committee this year was
reorganized and reactivated under the chairmanship of Stanley B
Brenner and with I. Edward Adler, former executive director of
Federation, serving as endowment director-administrator on a part-
time basis. With reactivation the endowment program has been
successful in creating several new philanthropic funds and opened
several charitable remainder trusts. Together with proceeds from
bequests and outright gifts more than $1,000,000 in new assets have
been added to the program during the 1984-85 administrative year.
Now in its seventh year, the Endowment Fund program currentlv
has total assets of $4,600,000 in all of its various BXSSS8S
f!lLfcTgZl aPProved and P"* ^t more than $3,800 000
SKmsfarihn<>,M ofaencie8- organizations, institutions and
programs for charitable purposes.
v.El^Ura^dby tne renewed interest in endowments and aware of
j*g5R fcflS fundS in the ^ area- the committee has
recommended that Federation restore the program to full status The
federation personnel committee is now in search of a full-time en
dowment director to provide the guidance, promotion and continuity
of service necessary for the growth of the program. y
The Endowment Fund program was created to help assure the
continuity of vital Federation and community services in the event of
periods of economic downturn and for unexpected situations and
emergencies. It also offers grants for studies and research that
budSts SeT^?..by- *"**-" **""** from ** """lal
Seativt iftSS m avaalable for new projects that offer
dZ thZinJ? *tWe lut*>Da to communal problems. For
SSS^'SS^iSSSB? an opportunity to perpetuate and/or
SrSnk rivina k cha"tab,e commitment. To encourage philan-
subrntiTnnlnc^ ZfSSS&J^"* ^^ "
proved^*aJLSJSS! ^^rative year, the committee ap-
KSTSafX- ttaUing .350.000 from personal philanthropic
deration IliA-UpeTV,810n- The buUc <* these were to the
53PSSfbTu caumpaign and local beneficiary agencies,
education*? S' JeW,9h S* non-Jewish, included hospitals,
relationship tutions, social service, health, civic, immunity
endowment sS^Land ^^ Pro- Special grante from other
wffiFh!^23E*&. ? Projort* foTwhich funds were not
re?ommendSSnV Ration resources. Most recent was a
perimeS1 tSmif ^ to Gn> Together, Inc., a local ex-
WSSi&!SS Preventi0n W- for drug and alcohol
paSpresldent'of piw8"* *"* **&** with Mr Brenner, a
Abe SSSTSSSSSi K&E ?*rg' Richard S- Bernstein,
Gruber ^old Hoffl /' Hem? E.ppler' ^^^ Fitterman, Alex
Jeanne LeW^blrf^Tn'ATKMar^ ?aufman, Shepard Lesser,
Nickman Myron I Niolf y' %** E" List- Anold Mullen, Eileen
BereS'rSg^ TheSoT^^ D* ^ Richard RamPeU'
Weingard Sd SEEL ThoiM Silverman, Joseph E.
SchinSeknan Fedetion executive director, Normal J.


Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County / Page 13
Community Relations Council
JT*. '85
3&UocU4> *i@n
^fyiA. '85
Building Bridges
Dr Helen Hoffman, Rabbi Alan Sherman,
Chair Director
During the past year, the Community Relations Council (CRC)
has succeeded in mjJaag a significant impact upon the community,
both Jewish and non-Jewish. Under the leadership of Helen Hoff-
man chair, and Rabbi Alan Sherman, director, four major com-
mittees sponsor innovative programs and general CRC meetings
involving representative community leaders are held.
The Local Concerns Taak Force, chaired by Barbra Kaplan,
provided leadership to the community in response to a challenge to
the Palm Beach County's School System's use of Values
Clarification, a teaching technique used in conjunction with books
which include chapters on sex education. Arising from the threat to
the integrity of the school system by Christian fundamentalists, a
committee entitled a Coalition for Quality Education, chaired by
leading moderate Christian clergy, was formed. The committee, a
broad cross section of the community, effectively spoke at school
board meetings and was successful in maintaining the current
programs.
A Holocaust Seminar for teachers in Palm Beach County
Secondary Schools was held in September and their teaching about
the Holocaust continues.
A Black-Jewish Dialogue begun last year has continued and this
year culminated in a special demonstration with Black elected of-
ficials and leaders on Martin Luther King's birthday. A statement of
opposition to apartheid in South Africa was publicly dehvered and
given wide media coverage.
A Holocaust Commemoration Observance in coordination with
the Holocaust Survivors of the Palm Beaches was held on April 18th
at the Jewish Community Day School.
The Ad Hoc Coalition of Human Service Agencies ia agn
active. Marc Tanenbaum spoke to the representatives of public and
private agencies in Palm Beach County about the problems involved
in the current projected Federal budget cuts. A hearing by the
Coalition is scheduled for June to determine the service cuts that will
be implemented if Congress adopts the administration's programs.
The Catholic-Jewish Dialogue, chaired by Elsie Leviton, began
in September of 1984, met twice monthly and culminated in a two-
day event held at the St. Ignatius Loyola Cathedral and the next day
at Temple Emanu-El. Father Pawukowski and Rabbi Rudin held
their first of many dialogues celebrating 20 years of Vatican II to be
held in the United States. The attendance at both events, phis press
publicity in the general community, was excellent.
Two Interfaith Programs were held: 1) a program with Calvary
Temple about the Festival of Succoth; and 2) our annual Interfaith
Breakfast honoring Israel on Independence Day with Tom Kelly,
editor of the Palm Beach Post, as the guest speaker.
The Soviet Jewry Task Force, chaired by Shirlee Blonder, held
extraordinarily large monthly meetings featuring speakers and
community outreach activities. Many letters and telegrams were
written on behalf of Soviet Jewry. A Soviet Jewry Rally was held
with Lynn Singer, past president of the Union of Councils For Soviet
Jews, as the speaker.
A Special Hunger Strike was observed on Human Rights Day in
support of RefuseniKs in the Soviet Union.
The Israel Task Force, chaired by Dr. Mark Rattinger, met
monthly and held two community events. The first, a Mideast
Conference held in November, featured Meir Rosenne, Israels
Ambassador to the United States, and Tom Dine, executive director
of American Israel Public Affairs Committee, as the speakers.
The second event, a first, was a meeting geared mainly to young
leaders, at which Tom Dine spoke on behalf of AIPAC to many who
had attended their first Jewish community event.
At CRC meetings, National Jewish Community Relations
I Advisory Council reports of the fall and winter meetings were
discussed and special information and materials were disseminated
to all interested community groups.
Chaplaincy
Showing That We Care
Nathan AUweiss,
Chair
Rabbi Alan Sherman,
Director
Reviewing the work of the volunteers in the Chaplain Aide
Program under the direction of Rabbi Alan Sherman, I ^over-
whelmed by -the dedication and selflessness of these wonderful
people. With more than twenty hospitals, nursing and retirement
homes to service, the more than seventy volunteers are ever ready to
serve.
Apparently the volunteers are accomplishing much port*""**"
steadily being asked to provide aides to service the new institutions
as soon as they have Jewish residents. We are now dom&tr^ "*
four newest nursing homes in our area: Sutton Terrace^ Ma*arCare
Ridge Terrace and the newest West Palm Beach'VillageiCarecenter
in Lake Worth. Our aides provide services for Sabbath and Hobdays.
With Rabbi Sherman leading, we bring ^Uday food and rebgious
services to Jewish prisoners m Lantana Correctional and Ulades
Prison, in Belle Glade. Haying been present myself, I can vouch for
the positive response from inmates.
Utilizing Siddurs donated by Jeanne Glasser, co-chair our ser-
vices bring solace, dignity and a feeling of not bei*gjorgotton Jand
belonging; to the aged and infirm. We are most fortunate having
among the aides talented singers, artists in many mediums, and
social service professionals who teach the residents in a positive way.
Our aides give countless hours visiting the sick and talking on a one
to one basis. Men and women help with letter-writing But. more
tar^rtantiy. just listen. Hundreds of Jewish hospital patients
anTnursing home residents have been visited by our Chaplain Aides.
The aides have a monthly workshop meeting, getting feedback,
receiving advice from prominent speakers, all experts in^ their
s^ialtils. There are many people who I am "idebtodIto.for Ihe
outstanding work they are doing. My admiration and gratitude is
undiminished. Todah Rubah.
W&nnedy. 3ot/u*U
&eA. '85
%m*em 3&U4'JVut&inp 3o>me
on. 84


Federation of Pahn Beech County

tAloteue ww/tuyuitn
85
Public Relations
A Golden Year
Leah Siskin,
Chair
Ronni Epstein,
Director
The 1984-85 season for the Public Relations Department proved
n w" Golden \^ nce again the Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County achieved excellence in the area of public relations by
receiving four national public relations awards given by the Council
of Jewish Federations at the General Assembly in Toronto The
most significant award a golden award for the best campaign
brochure, was given only to seven communities throughout the
country. These honors set the stage for a very productive year. I,
along with the Public Relations Director, Ronni Epstein, was
privileged to be asked to make a presentation to Public Relations
Liirectors from all across the country on the role of the lay commit-
tee within Federation public relations. We were also both privileged
FrTrY1^Sfttf U,nitod1 J?wi8h A^Peal P"0"0 Relations Task
wS S2?i tr'Veied t,l8rael this P881 February to explore ways in
mlEwi?. b3fa"? Prlofeu88Iona,l: couM help develop public relations
ESfSSnS^SS ^ b"ng ^ remarkab,e 8tory o' '-'-el to the
ANNUAL REPORT
During the past three years the Public Relations Department
FedLltSn f f TJ ^"W 5 5* development of the Jewish
HuHd .k ^ Beach CUnty 8 annual reDOrt- This Process
includes the documentation and production of V 15-minuto video
presentation of the years past achievements. These video report
have become the highlight of our annual meeting program and. Jerve
a, an educational tool throughout the year. In 1983 the annual video
n port received the National Public Relations Award.
1985 CAMPAIGN
ui!!hi8 ytar the. Publ!c Re'ations Department produced a campaign
lonn Aa|fef/ Volunteer8 *> hP them in their fund SSTg
torts. A 13-minute campaign film titled "Reaching Out Builchnea
hST"^' \*hlCih wa.Vhis year'8 ^Pa^ theme, proved to be
the key educational tool for the 1985 campaign. This fL heloed to
ZtVueJ^l ^L^Tf,8 f the Jewish community by aUowuS
them to see how then- dollars were helping to meet human needs i?
the local community. In addition, large charts were prcSfced
showing the distribution of dollars for tne vital programs Ind 2?
vices provided through the Jewish Agency to the people of Israel It
was ev,dent as the year progressed that tnese educaTna?toohTwere
SS- toDthe verwtelming success of this year's campaign. The
Public Relations Department also created other publk relation!
SKS?*? help supplement this year's campaiguPmc^Cve5
effective 30-second television commercials. In addition, ttePubS
Relations Department provided support material, brocK
pamphlets, flyers etc.; organized press conferences and wbmSS
press releases to all the local media. uomitted
MOSAIC
Mosaic, our half hour weekly television program shown at 9 a m
Sunday mornings on WPTV, Channel 5, hosted by BarbaniGorH^
cenn"*ol x?Unoe to ha,ve a? our quests such notables as the
Honorable Meir Rosenne, Israel's Ambassador to the United State?
HS AbZr^g' f0rmer Con8resswoman from New York -Senator Artn
ES?w ,mCra!*L P^n-yJv-ni*: Robert Klehi cVmedkr^and
Broadway star; and Theodore Bikel, actor-singer, jusi to nam?a S?
Supe? s"naaVWnrhon^/rUnaKte ? fe 2 ""^ dcts?forour
onfhat day phna-thon' wluch helped to raise additional dollars
LCHAYIM
hostoCdhhvi^nh0hirMeeft ^io Pyv*- which is developed and
*y bL Mar,k Go,ub- ^d aired on Sundays 7 30 a m in
cooperation with radio station WPBR 1340 AM contmued" to
provide quality programs for our listeners. This.year we werefor
Ke10^ **> Go^'in our community. As a^ulTof h"v t
SotJ^W? a series of interviews with the top
^Wa, P our- Federation committees in an effort to helo
educate our community about the work of Federation. P
JEWISH FLORIDIAN
prJvide^nTi^81101! f, Pahn Beach County continued to
through thTew sh Fin &? yfia?1 aad international events
eShshed FntnLl i nudian of Palm Beach County, the oldest
begun ,? pnSS'&Jew'8h new9PaPer our community. We have
weXe^toV^^^^^
SnWwfS^^
\ !&/*!* ZPuvulap on &Y
*Ja*. '85


Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County / Page 15
Joseph 1_ Morse Geriatric Center
Committed To The Highest
Standard of Care
Krwin H. Blonder, E. Drew Gackenheimer,
President Executive Director
It continues to be a busy and exciting time for the Morse Geriatric
Center although we are well beyond the hectic opening and post-
opening stages. As of January, 1984, we have maintained our
resident population at capacity and have developed an extensive
waiting list. We now have in place a full schedule of resident
programs and services, administered by a staff that is organized and
fully committed to a philosophy of providing the highest standard of
care to our residents.
Let me take this opportunity to highlight some of the
achievements of the past year, as well as bring to light some of the
challenges which lie ahead.
Our board of trustees took an important step toward fulfilling the
Center's goal of providing health care to those who cannot afford to
pay the full cost of such care by approving a Medicaid-private pay
mix for the next year or two, of 60 percent Medicaid ana 40 percent
private pay. Presently, 50 percent of our resident population is
Medicaia. This commitment presents a major challenge to our Center
as the level of reimbursement from Medicaid is less than the actual
cost of a resident's care. Yet, we must maintain our responsibility to
those who are indigent and cannot afford to pay.
The Center's Forward Planning Committee, chaired by Heinz
Eppler, has put forth a long range plan for the future development
andexpansion of the center facility and its program of geriatric care.
The plan takes into consideration the needs and priorities of our
elderly and the resources that we feel are available in the community.
It calls for the expansion of long term care beds as well as viable
alternatives to the institution such as specialized housing, adult day
care and home health service. Re-zoning of the property to ac-
commodate these necessary programs is in process, and application
to the state to obtain permission for additional beds has been
initiated.
In October of this past year, over 200 volunteers participated in a
special volunteer recognition day program. These men nd women
have played a key role in creating the "caring environment" which
is so important to the quality of life for our residents. As the Center
expands its program of activity, the need for more volunteers will
become critical. Our challenge will be to recruit and train a high
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SPe/d. '84
caliber of volunteers from throughout the community who will
provide the much needed assistance and support to our residents and
staff.
Recently, our Center, established two very important
organizations, the Women's Auxiliary and the Men's Associates.
These groups were formed in an effort to develop broad base interest
and support within the community on behalf of the Center. In ad-
dition, they will provide funds for the special needs of our residents
and their program of care. By interpreting the work and needs of the
Center, the Auxiliary and Associates serve as a vital link between
our facility and the community. In just a short period of time, over
1,000 members of the community have joined as either annual or
founding life members.
We are moving forward with a public relations campaign. Our
Center's newsletter, the Morse Code, is now being published on a bi-
monthly basis. The purpose of the Morse Code is two fold. First, to
inform the community of the many activities and developments
taking place at the Center. Second, to allow us to duly recognize
those in our community who generously contribute their funds and
their time.
The Morse Geriatric Center has established itself as a quality,
long term care facility. Our Center's program is becoming well
known to members of the community, to other health care facilities
and professional groups, and to those elderly and their families who
seek and require tne level of care we offer.
Our future as a strong responsive and responsible organization
depends upon the continued commitment and support of our
leadership and Jewish community. If we continue to build on that
which we have already accomplished, the success of our future is
secure.
Jewish Community Day School
Planning For The Future
Dean Rosen bach.
President
Barbara S.Steinberg
Director
Jewish Community Day School leadership made great strides
during 1984-85 in enhancing the school's educational program and in
demonstrating responsibility to the community of students,
parents, staff, and the larger Jewish community of Palm Beach
County.
The Day School curriculum was upgraded both in content and
methodology. New reading, launguage arts, and mathematics
programs established a firm foundation for students 3 K s basic
skills and for the 4th R: reasoning. A strong emphasis on providing
personal care for students was translated into the creation ot many
small groups in each grade level classroom, instructed on academic
levels appropriate to student needs.
The most intensive second language program in our community
was instituted in the Jewish studies department with the teaching 01
Hebrew as a living language. Utilizing the principles of the
"language immersion" approach, teachers used Hebrew as the
language of all instruction during the Jewish Studies Program,
providing opportunities for students to listen and speak MM
reading and writing. Achievement in Hebrew was at an all time hign.
Integrated programs those which encourage contact between
Jewish and general studies occupied an important place m the
Day School's academic accomplishments. The uniqueness of the Day
School's pervasively Jewish environment permits WWW"""'
plore all knowledge with the special lens of Jewish concerns and
values.
Caring for the needs of others became a major theme. Day School
students participated in co-operative projects with Jewum
Federation of Palm Beach County and the Jewish MV
Children's Service to give of themselves to those in need -
Ethiopia, in Israel, and here at home.
Excitement has surrounded the teaching of technology tatti WJ
School. Programs in our computer SSSHJL'K a faE
Federation's Endowment Committee in 1983-84), sUtted Dy;a ru
time coordinator, allow students from MndargTttnjtoMjgjg
grade to enrich their classroom learning f*J*2E^*
uistruction. Fifth through eighth graders ^.leadwS and
science, in courses which focus on learning about hardware ana
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gtvn. '85
software components and concepts, computer history and
capabilities, and the social and ethical implications of modern
technology.
Aspiration to maturity the demonstration of increasing skill
mastery and responsibility in behavior has marked this year as an
outstanding time in the life of the Benjamin S. Homstem
Elementary School and the Rapaport Junior High School. Staff
development has become a major focus: the development of staff
members' skills to meet the needs and goals of the school. Lay
leadership development activities were highlighted at the jcl&
Long Range Planning Kallah in January. The Day School is involved
in the challenging task of developing and adopting long range plans
for educational excellence.
The general goals of the JCDS during 1984-85 will serve as the
direction of the Day School into our Bar Mitzvah year and
beyond- to be the finest educational institution in our community,
the school of preference for Jewish parents in Palm Beach County.
The Jewish Community Day School sees itself as a partnership
which includes administration, staff, lay leadership, parents, and
community dedicated to one common objective: the creation of a
knowledgable, responsible generation that will lead the American
Jewish community into the 21st century.


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'85
Jewish Family and Children's Service
Requests For Services
Continue Sharp Rise
Nathan Kosowski, Stephen Levitt,
Kre",dent Executive Director
At the Jewish Family and Children's Service, 1984 continued a
trend of upwardly spiraling caseloads and service activity. The
number of telephone calls to the agency and the number of interviews
and client contacts increased by approximately 20 percent from the
someT? yTh ^re tha" 2,00 Peple Called the agency requesting
During the first seven months of 1984, JF and CS had
precedented waiting list, which in some instances was as
three months. This situation ended in July when the agency I
additional clinical staff therapist, with the help of increased
from the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County.
In 1984, the agency began its Career Guidance and Vo
Services tpilot program. Many individuals sought career
consultation on a short-term basis, while others completed ai
program on career assessment. In the first 18 months the
served 31 full career-guidance cases; 114 individuals called or I
"limited" amount of our staff professional's time- The
continued its Home Health Aide program that helps the elder
want to remain at home, growing with more than 36 clients i
The number of volunteers, or Friendly Visitors, for the
Response Program increased to 20.
The Caregivers Support Group met weekly at the JF a
office to help family members cope with the stresses of takinei
the chronically ill. K
Employment seminars were held weekly to help those I
for jobs.
Through Jewish Family Life Education many orgaruzj
temples and schools participated in discussions on "
parenting," "Jewish identity," "step-parenting," "learning L
with widowhood." Staff social workers also assisted the j]
Community Center with some of their special programs, such
Singles Group and their College Fair.
Many community residents toured the JF and CS facilit
1984, as part of Jewish Federation's "Mini-Missions.'' The
ticipants learned about the variety of services the agency of
the area.
In summary, the JF and CS continued to serve the
variety of individuals and families in the community. Help ra
from the newcomer in the area to the elderly, isolated indivi
who were malnourished. Some clients could not pay one pennl
services while others paid our entire fee. The agency began some!
programs, while improving and expanding others. We achi
greater recognition among professionals while continuing to
quality services to members of the community.
Jewish Community Center
Community Responding To
Campaign For New Facility
Dr. Paul Klein
President
Jerome Mehnan
Executive Director
The Jewish Community Center of the Palm Beaches entered into
its tenth year with optimism and hope. Our board of directors
secured a new 16-acre -site on HaverhUl Road, retained the ar-
chitectural firm of Oliver & Glidden and have approved their
schematic designs for the new facility. An Advisory Board of
I rustees comprised of outstanding leaders in the Jewish com-
munity, held two meetings in November and March of this past year
Pre-campaign pledges have brought in over $2 million and six co-
chairs have Wi chosen to lead the general campaign. They are Julie
Cummings, Peter Cummings, Murray Goodman, Alexander Gruber
Jeanne Levy and Robert A. Satter. In addition, hundreds of families
have agreed to serve on various campaign committees for the coming
o~T?8.Je!!; begau witrh 2E most successful Day Camp season
ever. A record number of children were enrolled and a new format
was initiated under the direction of Camp Committee Chair Dr. Fred
Simon and Camp Director Harreen Bertisch.
Dr. Jeffrey and Phyllis Penner again hosted our Second Annual
ZSL^^SU^ *" ^^ ** 5S
n, A^Vet lUuPTi0n of PriF8"1 Director Harreen Bertisch
our Annual Shabbat Dinner and Sukkot Program attracted many
new families.and the special Book and Toy Fair, held in conjunction
with Chanukah, received great support from the commumty. OuJ
M^K kfeibafTProgram,.held at the ^y'8 Club under the
leadership of Joel Levme, with approximately 46 men participate*
SSl& l 2 u^ined success as was the Fifth Annua!
Women s Day Program, with an attendance of 65 women.
Because of the demand for pre-school and day care Drosram-
2; "5,2!gM our present facility and moved the stiffInto a
trader. Nmety-five chddren presently attend this program at the
IJfwi40! n are enroUed inour Mother-Toddler P?Sramhel5
SITS? .sJ2y-J*n Berry, chair, and Gail Rressal pWschool
director, introduced a new and innovative format. ^
w A a?eci^1 Kopam, Chaverim, was developed this year to meet
O0JS?. ?! C^ldr?, hvM* m "k*" Parent family situations. It is
modeled after the Big Brother-Big Sister format*Bonnie AfcnW
12 faSes000 rePOrta Program presently services'
Under the direction of Joy,. Gales, chair, and Frances Witt
assistant executive director, our Shalom Newcomers Program
welcomes new people to the West Palm Beach area and has sue
cessfully held two get-togethers which attracted over 120 people who
have been area residents for less than one year.


iffyu/'85
nnJhlf^wS m recogmtion of the needs of the ever-increasuu
SteBlJl ni^LSE8 gopulation, prints a monthly news bulletin, Thel
S3^Si T^f11- SC,a] event8, triP8 to local theaters, restaurants!
thesJ i! forest as well as intellectual stimulation, highlight
we ZEE 2 -Z d8Cher' adult WOrker' reports that presently
we nave over 2,300 singles on our mailing list.
meetTahnriJr^h- Community Youth Council and the JCC continue to
SAT Prl r. at* citwlde act'vities for teens. Our ever-popular
Ow "nSSXTS jtf Teen Travel Programs are fully subscribed,
members w J?ISSK ,?ronun are in great demand by Center
sTrv^ces dSto/ ^ duIdr"11' aCCOrdin* Terrie Lubin. youth
JeaJiTRubfnViSi0,nmU!Jit2' Center's Senior Program, supervised by
SSLSPfe-y ."! a renewal of a goWnment grant to
^tSSSSSSSSi "tef to doctors, nursing homes and our
that tidSn8?- CanJJ Fox- nutrition site manager, reports
mu io uie many Jewish organizations within the community.
coor^ratkmw.TtheJCc'ha.T;^- M Cft EfttE ta
very enjoyable ^^iS^EESOS* B ^ '
wssass&isisssr^ B*B5 csmpmg
Palm StfKSASSnbf^*^ao of pal Beach County,
munity Chest. y Umted Wav and Palm Beach County Com-