The Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian the voice of the Jewish community of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Running title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Physical Description:
4 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 8, no. 41 (Dec. 24, 1982)-v. 11, no. 26 (Aug. 30, 1985).
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44606415
lccn - sn 00229548
ocm44606415
System ID:
AA00014310:00091

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
[THE VOICE OF
THE JEWISH
COMMUNITY OF
PALM BEACH
COUNTY
ewish f lor idian
VOLUME 11 NUMBER 4
PALM BEACH, FLORIDAFRIDAY. JANUARY 25,1985
PRICE 35 CENTS
I Yaacobi Sees Long and Painful Road to Israel's Economic Recovery
By YITZHAK RABI
JEW YORK (JTA)
lei's Minister of Economic
Inning, Gad Yaacobi, ex-
fsses optimism that Israel
eventually resolve its eco-
iic crisis, but he warns that
road to recovery is long
I painful.
addressing a meeting of the
lference of Presidents of
ijor American Jewish
kani/ations, Yaacobi said
he believes that Israel
fin have a balanced
Inomy" two years from
,. He said that the process
[healing the economy has
jun. He noted that the
jernment has already taken
jterity measures in that di-
|ion, including a cut of
i million from the budget.
[We intend to cut the
|get even further, despite
the risks militarily and
tally,"* Yaacobi said. He
Jed, however, that
Hstions for a radical cut of
budget by some $3
}on are not acceptable.
hese suggestions are
lor rats and mice but not
for people," Yaacobi stated,
warning that a deep cut in the
budget will bring m#ss
unemployment, desertion of
development towns and
emigration of young Israelis.
He said that out of a yearly
budget of about $22 billion,
Israel repays at least half in
debts and interest. The budget
cut must come, therefore,
from the remaining $11
billion, half of which is for
defense, Yaacobi said.
Claiming that the present
government "inherited a very
deep economic crisis" the
minister said three major
factors contributed to the
grave situation: The cost of
the war in Lebanon, which
amounts so far to S3 billion
and continues to cost $200
million a year; the cost of the
Camp David accords, about
$6 billion, including the Sinai
oil fields returned to Egypt
and the redeployment of the
Israeli forces in the Negev; and
the 35 percent rise in personal
consumption in Israel in the
last five years compared to a
marginal growth in
production.
"The responsibility to solve
the crisis is the responsibility
of the State of Israel,"
Yaacobi declared. But he
added, "We are expecting the
help of world Jewry and the
government of the United
States."
Yaacobi said that one of the
burdens Israel's economy is
afflicted with is the burden of
the tremendous foreign debts
of $15.5 billion. But he said
that despite the difficulties, Is-
rael is going to pay all its
debts. "We are convinced we
will pay everything on time,
including the interest."
Yaacobi noted that Israel
exports goods for the yearly
sum of over $11 billion. He
predicted that Israel will reach
"a zero deficit" in its balance
of trade in four to five years.
The minister said that Israel
is looking now for "a new
membership" with world
Jewry, with emphasis on
increased investments by Jews
in Israel's economy. He called
on American Jews to "invest,
trade and aid Israel," adding,
"This > ny scal* of
priorities."
YWeSfRDrAABOVe
(^Mirade of miracles?
I rt couldn't happen in
v. oor/rfetime
immunity Invited To 'An Evening In The City Of Gold*
[arole and Joel Koeppel
Helen and Lester
lowick have been named to
y\ the Gala Community
icr-Dance given on behalf
|he 1985 Jewish Federation
alm Beach County-United
lish Appeal campaign,
lounced Arnold L.
pert, general campaign
\x. The event, billed as "An
ling in the City of Gold,"
be held on Saturday, Feb.
7:30 p.m. at the Hyatt
Beaches. This $1200
limum gift dinner-dance
| be staged by Bruce Sutka,
-known party planner,
will be building the "Old
of Jerusalem in the
Id ballroom of the Hyatt.
accepting their position,
Ico-chairs noted that this
Ibe an evening to remem-
I Koeppel said, "We are
ting to attract new people
pis exciting event as well as
those who have supported the
community in the past. Every
effort will be made to make
this evening an unqualified
success."
Carole Koeppel served as
the first secretary on the board
of the Jewish Community
Center when the beneficiary
agency of the Jewish Federa-
tion was founded. As well as
having taught at the Jewish
Community Day School, she
chaired their dinner dance for
two years. Mrs. Koeppel has
also been active with the
Federation's Young Leader-
ship program and with
Women's Division. She is a
past president of the West
Palm Beach Guild of Planned
Parenthood.
Joel Koeppel, a practicing
attorney in West Palm Beach,
is also chairman of the board
of PGA Savings and Loan
Association in Palm Beach
Gardens. H is a past board
Joel Koeppel
Carole Koeppel
Lester Sodowick
Helen Sodowick
member of the Jewish Federa-
tion of Palm Beach County
and the Jewish Community
Day School where he served as
executive vice president.
Helen and Lester Sodowick
have been active for the last
three years in the community's
Federation-UJA campaign,
having chaired the drive at
Eastpointe. Sodowick is a
member of the Campaign
Cabinet of the Jewish Federa-
tion. They have both been
active in Israel Bonds and have
been to Israel several times.
The Sodowicks volunteer
their time to assist the
residents of the Joseph L.
Morse Geriatric Center. Mrs.
Sodowick is chair of the
membership committee of the
center's women's auxiliary.
For more information
contact Douglas Kleiner,
campaign director, at the
Federation office, 832-2120.
Inside
participation urged
[or Community Plea
for Soviet Jewry
page 4.
Communities held
vents on behalf of
N1985 Jewish Fed-
eration of Palm
wach County
WA campaign...
tee photo displays
f n pages 3 and 5.
Optimism About IsraelJordanian Talks
NEW YORK (JTA) The
chances that Israel and Jordan
will break the deadlock
between them and embark on
peace negotiations are greater
today than they have been in
many months, according to an
Israeli expert on the Mideast.
Prof. Amnon Cohen of the
Mideast Department of the
Hebrew University of Jeru-
salem said in an interview in
New York that the prospects
for negotiations between Jeru-
salem and Amman are due to a
number of developments in
the area.
"First," Cohen said, "the
new Israeli government of
Premier Shimon Peres is more
willing than the previous
Likud government to enter
into negotiations with King
Hussein. Second, the Palestine
Liberation Organization,
which always pressured
Jordan to shun negotiations
with Israel, has lost its lever-
age over Hussein, as a result of
its defeat in Lebanon.
"And third, Jordan and
Egypt are getting closer to
each other, now that has
Jordan resumed its diplomatic
ties with Cairo. The peaceful
relations between Egypt and
Israel can encourage the king
to follow the Egyptian
example."
ACCORDING TO Cohen,
the United States can play a
major role in bringing Jordan
to negotiate with Israel. He
noted that Jordan "has deep
ties in Washington and is
dependent in many ways on
the United States." Jordan's
army, he pointed out, receives
most of its weapons from
Continued on Page 12-


Plfctl The Jewish Floridian 6f Palm Beach County/ Friday, Januaiy 26, I960
Women from F.astpointe tour the agencies
A second busload of Eastpolnte women participate ia their own mini-mission.
More and more residents of the Palm Beaches are boarding the bus to psr-
"*.".- a mini mission sponsored by the Jewish Federation of P.|ra Beach
County and the Women's Division of the Jewish Federation. They have the
oDDortunity to tour Federation's four beneficiary agencies the Jewish
Commuri y D> School, the Jewish Community Center, the Jewish Family and
ChiXn's Service, and theJoseph L. Morse Geriatric Center. They learn about
the programs and services being offered well a. discover the challenges that
must be met to improve the quality of life for the local Jewish community. For
more information about future mini-missions, contact Jack Karako, campaign
associate, or Faye Stoller, Women's Division assistant director, at the
Federation office, 832-2120.
[teft to right] Shown with guest speaker Marva Perrln are
Dorothy Ludwig and Helen Sodowick, co-chairs of the East-
polnte mini-mission.
Mini-Missions
Eastpolnte women enjoy lunch at the Joseph L. Morse Geriatric Center.
Milton Gold (right], chair of the Royal Palm Beach Federation-l'JA i
paign, accompanies the second bus from Royal Palm Beach.
Larry Ochstein [kneeling, left] led this Royal Palm Beach mini-mission.
Old Nazi Escapes 09 Net;
Judge Rules Insufficient Evidence'
assailed the
"IN SUM, we find insufficient
evidence to support deter-
mination that the government
established by clear, convincing
and unequivocal evidence that
Laipenieks assisted or parti-
cipated in the persecution of
persons because of their political
By KEVIN FREEMAN
NEW YORK (JTA)
An appeals court in San
Francisco has ruled that
there exists "insufficient
J evidence" to support the
J Justice Department's con- beliefs"'
I tention that alleged Nazi He addedf ..^^ we euMal
war criminal Edgars Lai- do not condone the treatment
penieks was personally res- that prisoners apparently
ponsible for the deaths of received at the (Riga) prison, we
200 prisoners at the central fi"d Laipenieks' admission
prison in Riga during b^nt
World War II.
to support deporta-
The Department's Office of
Special Investigations filed a
deportation complaint against
him in June, 1981. An official of
the Immigrtion and Natural-
ization Service said, after the
. ruling was handed down, that he
I expected the Justice Department
g to pursue the case to the Supreme
| Court.
Judge Thomas Tang, writing
on behalf of the majority opinion
of the three-member panel,
stated:
THE 71 -YEAR-OLD former
Latvian police official, born in the
Latvian town of Rucava, gained
entry to the U.S. in March, 1960.
He had previously been in Chile,
presumably since the end of
World War II. In Chile, he was a
track coach for the team that
entered the 1952 and 1956
Olympic Games. He also coached
the Mexican track team for the
1964 Olympics.
The Simon Wiesenthal Center
of Los Angeles immediately
court's decision.
Rabbi Marvin Hier, dean of the
center, said. "This is a classic
example that the only winners of
the cold war between the Soviet
Union and the United States are
Nazi war criminals. Laipenieks
gained entry into this country as
a CIA informer and anti-Com-
munist when the U.S. was willing
to overlook his previous crimes."
Laipenieks claimed to have
joined the Nazis after the
Russians killed his parents and
father-in-law. Between 1941 and
1943, he is reported to have
worked for the Latvian Security
Police, an organization assigned
to duty at the Riga prison. He
was charged by surviving wit-
nesses who still live in Latvia
with participating in the beating
and killings of unarmed inmates,
including Jewish prisoners.
Laipenieks currently lives in
La Jolla, Calif., where he is
employed as a security guard at a
construction site. He admitted in
past testimony that he had been
employed bv the CIA in the
1960's in efforts to get visiting
Soviet athletes to defect.
MINI-MISSION TOUR
FOR
PALM BEACH RESIDENTS
FEBRUARY 7
See the Local Beneficiary Agencies of
The Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
Registration: 8:30 a.m.
Bus will depart promptly at
8:45 a.m. Irom Bryant Park
(Lake Worth Bridge,
mainland side)
Bus will return to Bryant Park
alter lunch at the Joseph L.
Morse Geriatric Center
For more information call Karl Bower, campaign atwciin.
at the Federation olflce, 832-2120.
Bus Stops Include:
1) Jewish Community Day ScMM
2) Jewish Community Cent*
3) Jewish Family*
Children's Service
4) Joseph L. Morse
Geriatric Center
URGENT
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED
to cover solicitation of
Century Village Areas
For
1985 UJA/FEDERATION CAMPAIGN
"It'saMitzvah"
Hank Grossman ^ ***3
686-2295 683-924


Friday, January 26,1986 / The Jewish Floridign of Palm Beach County Page 3
Poinciana Golf & Racquet Club
-
p. Senator Arlen Specter of Pennsylvania recently addressed more than 300
sidenis of the Poinciana Golf and Racquet Club on behalf of the 1985 Jewish
deration of Palm Beach County-United Jewish Appeal campaign where he
take of his own personal commitment to Federation-UJA fundrabing drives.
peeler stressed the importance of Israel as a strategic ally of the United States.
addition he noted the necessity of holding rallies in support of Soviet Jewry to
ing their plight to the public's attention. He also was the guest of honor at a
cktail reception held prior to his keynote address.
Sen. Specter and his wife, Joan, are shown with the co-chairs of the Poinciana-
Federatlon campaign [left to right] Sid Karp, Jules Klevan and John I. Moss,
chair.
Volunteers Needed
Phonathon To Reach Out
To Century Village Women
(Campaign '85 Update]
lEsther Molat and Blossom
)hen, co-chairs of the first
ntury Village phonathon to
held on behalf of the
lomen's Division 1985
rish Federation of Palm
Jach County-United Jewish
)peal campaign, are con-
sent that their neighbors will
receptive to helping their
llow Jews. Mrs. Molat
[ted, "Women who live here
le from all walks of life. It
like a small town where
sryone knows their neigh-
?rs. When something
?pens, people help one
jther. I know that our
kmen will respond to the
needs of the 1985 Federation-
UJA campaign once they are
contacted. We feel that this
phonathon (to be held on Feb.
10, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.) is the best
way to approach as many
women as we can."
Mrs. Cohen also stressed the
importance of supporting the
Women's Division's efforts to
reach out to all the women in
Century Village. "We are one.
As Jews we must do every-
thing we can to help our
people in the Palm Beaches, in
Israel and throughout the
world. As long as there is one
Jew in need, we must continue
OOPS!
The correct date for the upcoming mini-mission for
[West Palm Beach-Palm Beach women sponsored by the
JWomen's Division of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
ICounty is Wednesday, January 30. The wrong date was
[inadvertently printed in the last issue of the Jewish
"loridian.
our tradition of tzedakah in-
herent in our Jewish values,"
she said.
The co-chairs are asking for
volunteers to help with the sol-
icitation who will gather at the
Federation office, 501 So.
Flagler Dr., Suite 305, West
Palm Beach, to call as many
women as possible. Four shifts
are planned: 9-11 a.m., 11
a.m.-l p.m., 1-3 p.m., and 3-5
p.m. The co-chairs are looking
to enlist the aid of ten women
per shift to make the pho-
nathon a success. Bus service
will be provided with pickup at
Century Village Clubhouse
one-half hour prior to each
shift.
In addition to married
Continued on Page 4
The following events top the
1985 Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County-United
Jewish Appeal campaign
calendar:
WELLINGTON DINNER:
Sen. Bob Packwood of
Oregon will be the keynote
speaker at the Wellington
Country Club on Feb. 10, 6:30
p.m. Chairing the event and
the campaign are Leah and
Phillip Siskin.
WOMEN'S DIVISION
CENTURY VILLAGE
PHONATHON: Feb. 10 is the
date for the inaugural
Women's Division phonathon
in Century Village. (See
related article, Pagej.)
WOMEN'S DIVISION
PACESETTERS LUN-
CHEON: The $1000 minimum
event will be held on Wednes-
day, Feb. 13, 11 a.m., at the
Garden Club, Palm Beach.
Sen. Packwood will be the
guest speaker at the luncheon
chaired by Penny Beers and
Zelda Pincourt.
BOYNTON BEACH
COMMUNITIES LUN-
CHEON: All the Boynton
Beach communities, with the
exception of Indian Spring,
Hunters Run and Village
Royale on the Green, which
hold their separate events,
have been invited to attend a
luncheon on Feb. 20, 12 noon,
at the Indian Spring Country
Club. Chairing the event is
Joseph Linsenberg. Watch for
more information in up-
coming issues of the Jewish
Floridian.
COMMUNITY DINNER
DANCE: Rounding out the
scheduled events for February
is the annual Community
Dinner on Feb. 23. (See
related article, Page 1.)
COMING EVENT: Indian
Spring dinner-dance, Mar. 3.
Shultz Railed Issue of Soviet Jews
In Talks With Gromyko
WE'VE COT YOUR NUMBER
SOUTH FLORIDA
By HUGH ORGEL
rEL AVIV (JTA)
tretary of State George
Jiltz raised the issue of
>iet Jewry several times
In Soviet Foreign Minister
Tdrei Gromyko during their
Os control talks in Geneva,
Iprding to Mark Palmer, a
Tor State Department offi-
1 Shultz sent to Israel as a
cial envoy to brief Israeli
cials on the Geneva talks.
falmer is deputy assistant
secretary of State for
European and Canadian
Affairs. He reported to
Deputy Premier and Foreign
Minister Yitzhak Shamir that
Shultz dwelt especially on the
plight of Jewish refuseniks
such as imprisoned Anatoly
Shcharansky and Yosef Begun
in the course of his two days of
talks with Gromyko, and that
he urged the Soviet Union to
halt its persecution of those
activists and of other Jews in
the USSR who study Hebrew.
Help Wanted
Volunteers To Cover
Covered Bridge
For
Solitication of Its Residents
For
1985 FEDERATION/UJA CAMPAIGN
Please Call:
Federation Office
832-2120
Dr. Lester Silverman

SuperSunqV^
( ) Please include me as a volunteer for "Super Sunday" on March 17
at the Hyatt Hotel, West Palm Beach.
Name.
'(PteaaePrlnTT
Address.
City____
Telephone (Home)
.(Business)
Organization Affiliation
I will be happy to work from:
( ) 8:45 A.M. to 11:30 A.M. ( ) 2:45 P.M. to 5:30 P.M.
( ) 10:45 A.M. to 1:30 P.M. ( ) 4:45 P.M. to 7:30 P.M.
( ) 12:45 P.M. to 3:30 P.M. ( ) 6:45 P.M. to 9:30 P.M.
( ) I will be happy to work at any time. Please let me know when you
need me.
* Volunteers will be asked to make their 1965
campaign gifts prior to helping on "Super
Sunday", if they have not already done so.
Send To:
SUPER SUNDAY'85
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
501 So. Flagler Drive, Suite 305
West Palm Beach, FL 33401


Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, January 26,1986
Community Urged To Rally On Behalf Of Soviet Jewry
Stressing the importance of
community support in helping
to free Soviet Jewry, Shirlee
Blonder, chair of the Soviet
Jewry Task Force of the Com-
munity Relations Council of
the Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County, has urged the
Jewish community to become
educated and active in this
effort. To This end the task
force is sponsoring a Com-
munity Plea for Soviet Jewry
on Sunday, Jan. 27, 7:30
p.m., at Temple Emanu-El,
Palm Beach. Guest speaker wil
be Lynn Singer, national past
president of the Union of
Councils for Soviet Jews and
executive director of the Long
Island Committee for Soviet
Jewry.
Mrs. Blonder noted that it is
imperative that everyone
knows of the difficulties that
Jews in the Soviet Union who
wish to emigrate must endure,
saying, "Please share the
evening with us and hear Mrs.
Singer update the existing
situation. With your involve-
ment, we can raise the com-
munity's and the world's con-
sciousness on behalf of those
who strive to reach freedom."
In addition to Mrs. Singer
the program will include a
reading on Soviet Jewry by
Marshall Brozost. Marshall is
a senior at Midrasha Judaica
High School and the Benjamin
School. He has studied in
Israel, has spoken about his
experiences before many
organizations, and is also the
recipient of the first place
award in the senior division of
the "Israel is Love" essay
contest inaugurated last year.
Also on the program will be
Cantor David Dardashti of
Temple Emanu-El who will
sing songs of freedom appro-
priate to the evening's theme.
Rabbi Joel Chazin, spiritual
leader of Temple Emanu-El,
will give the invocation and
Rabbi Alan Sherman, director
of the Community Relations
Council, will give the bene-
diction.
Several sub-committees of
the task force have been
preparing for months to make
the rally a success. The letter
writing committee, headed by
Lillian Kudisch, will have
postcards and other infor-
mation available so people will
be able to get involved in
helping Soviet Jewry in a very
tangible way. Members who
will be assisting her are Mary
Bachrach, Sylvia Berger,
Robert Gladnick, Jeanne
Glasser, Jack Karako, Helen
Nussbaum, Jake Orenstein,
teTJi
Sam Roskin, Nettie Stein and
Toby W ilk.
Toby Wilk wil also be chair-
the hostess committee.
ing
Serving with her are Mary
Bachrach, Blossom Cohen,
Rose Freed, Jeanne Glasser,
Irene Greenbaum, Betty
Levitt. Sarah Pfeffer, Rebecca
Pokras and Nettie Stein.
The third sub-committee,
which is responsible for
telephone calls to reinforce
attendance, is led by Sylvia
Berger. Her committee
consists of the following
people: Dorothy Brill, Robert
Cahn, Rose F. Freed, Sarah
Pfeffer, Rebecca Pokras,
Moishe Stein and Lillian G.
Wreschner.
'Asaresultofthediligence
and concern of the S,
working on the rally'st Z
committees, we anticipate
huge success. By gathering fc
gether, our community willZ
doing its part to hasten 2
time when Soviet Jewry will Z
allowed to emigrate t2
The more attention we drawm
their plight, the better are their
chances for survival," stated
Mrs. Blonder. m
For more information
contact Rabbi Alan She,
at the Federation's annex, 655-
77fX.
Survivors Will Try' Mengele
As They March to Birkenau
By SIMON GRIVER
Ur. Yosef Mengele, who
achieved notoriety as the
chief doctor of the Ausch-
witz concentration camp,
sent an estimated one mil-
lion people to their deaths
in the Nazi gas chambers.
But those million were the
more fortunate of
Mengele's victims.
Thousands of others were used
as live guinea pigs in his
gruesome experiments, and
during months of injections,
dissections and sadistic surgery,
usually performed without
anaesthetic, they could only
dream of the peace and pain-
lessness of death.
Mengele's particular obsession
was twins. He kept them caged
up like rats in a laboratory so
that he could scrutinize their
genetic composition and perhaps
discover a magical formula to
better multiply the master Ger-
man race. It is estimated that
between 1943 and 1945 he
conducted barbaric research on
more than l .500 sets of twins, of
whom only some 180 survived.
OVER 100 of these sets of
twins have formed an organi-
zation called CANDLES (Chil-
dren of Auschwitz Nazi's Deadly
Lab Experiments Survivors),
whose aim is to reveal to the
world the chilling cruelty of
Mengele's crimes. With this in
mind, a series of events is
planned for 1985 which marks 40
years since the liberation of the
camps.
On Jan. 27, representatives of
the survivors will march the two
miles that separated the main
Auschwitz camp from Birkenau,
where Mengele performed his
experiments. On Feb. 3, the twins
will hold a four-day convention at
the Yad VaShem Holocaust
complex in Jerusalem at which
Simone Veil, former president of
the European Parliament and
herself a concentration camp
survivor, will dedicate a new
Camp Liberation Memorial
designed by Israeli sculptress
KlsePolack.
At the same time, a public
hearing will be held to expose the
crimes of Mengele, and an in-
vestigating committee is to be
headed by Gideon Hausner. who
served as prosecutor at the Kich-
mann trial. These events are
entitled J'accuse, and the cost of
the project is an estimated
$230,000 raised from charitable
contributions a worthwhile
investment in the opinion of the
organizers, for revealing the
deeds of a man who remains at
large in Latin America.
MOST OF the surviving twins,
such as Vera Kriegel, today live
in Israel, though there are also
many in America and Europe
Vera and her twin sister, Olga.
were five when they arrived at
Auschwitz and for almost two
years were forced to endure
Mengele's experiments. "He
injected us with chemicals,
viruses and hormones and I' ve no
idea what," recalls Vera.
"To this day, I don't know that
he put inside of us. That's the
worst of it. I don't know what
I 've passed on to my children and
grandchildren. None of us came
out of the camp normal.
"He was especially interested
In Olga and me because he
wanted to know why our eyes
were brown while our mother's
were blue. He did experiments
I've never talked about. Unlike
me, my sister Olga is not in-
volved with CANDLES. The
thought of discussing her ex-
perience is too much for her."
Mengele is today 73 years old
Black-Jewish Dialogue Committee Condemns Apartheid
Twenty-three members of the Black-Jewish Dialogue committee
gathered on the birthday of the late Martin Luther King Jr. at
the West Palm Beach City Hall to issue a statement in op-
position to the "abominable practice of apartheid in South
Africa." The statement, read by member Eva Mack, was co-
signed by Samuel T. Thomas, chair, and Rabbi Alan R. Sher-
man, co-chair. Rev. Frank Satchel [left to right) of Payne
Chapel and Rabbi Howard Shapiro, spiritual leader of Temple
Israel, read a portion of King's "Free At Last" speech. The
ceremony also included the "Song of Freedom" by Cantor
David Dardashti of Temple Emanu-El and "One Day at a
Time" by Minnie Anderson of Riviera Beach. This was the first
event sponsored by the Black-Jewish Dialogue committee which
was established in the spring of 1984 with the intent of fur-
thering positive relationships between the local Black and Jew-
ish communities. The Community Relations Council of the
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County, chaired by Dr. Helen
Hoffman [left], initiated the dialogue. Other individuals from
the Jewish community at large are also involved.
the
Jewish floridian
ol Palm Beach County
USPS 069030
Oomhining 'Out Voice and "Federation Reporter'
FREDK SHOCHET SUZANNE SMOCMET RONNI EPSTEIN LOUISE ROSS
Editor and Publisher Executive Editor News Coordinator Assistant News Coordinator
PuolisheJ Weekly Oclooer through Mid May Bi Weekly balance ol year
Second Class Postage Paid at Boca Raton, Fla
PALM BEACH OFFICE
501 S Flagler Or West Palm Beach. Fla 33401 Phone 832 2120
Main Ollice & Plant: 120 N E 6th St.. Miami. FL 33101 Phone l 373 4605
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Jewish Floridian,
P.O. Box 012973, Miami, Fla. 33101
Ad.ert I si nfl Director Stsci LMaer, Phone SM 1652
Combined Jewish Appeal-Jewish Federation ol Palm Beach County, Inc., Ollicers President
Myron J Nickrnan. Vice Presidents. Peter Cummings, Alec Engelstein, Arnold Lamport, Barbara
Tanen and Alvin Wilensky. Secretary. Or Elizabeth S Stiulman. Treasurer, Barry Berg Submit
material to Ronni Epstein. Director ol Public Relations. 501 South Flagler Dr. West Palm Beach
FL 33401
Jewish Floridian does not guarantee Kashruth ol Merchandise Advertised
SUB?CPIPTION RATES Locel Area *4 Annual (2 Year Minimum $7 SO), or by membership Jewish
Fade ation ol Palm Beach County. 501 S Flagler Dr. West Palm Beach, Fla 33401 Phone 832 2120
Out Of Town Upon Request
-*.
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED
Friday, January 25, 1985
Volume 11
3SHEVAT5745
Number 4
Continued from Page 3-
women, there are many single
women living here who are
independent, making their
own financial decisions, and
who also have the respon-
sibility to help their fellow
Jews," stated Mrs. Cohen and
Mrs. Molat.
"Help us put the women of
Century Village on the
campaign map. Be home when
we call and respond gener-
ously to the needs of our
fellow Jews. If we don't reach
you, please call us at 832-2120
and make your commitment to
the 1985 campaign," the co-
chairs added.
To volunteer as a telephone
solicitor, contact Faye Stoller,
assistant Women's Division
director at the Federation
office, 832-2120.
and has been on the run for over
30 years. Born in Gueruberg
Germany, in 1911, he graduated
as a doctor, though he has since
been stripped of the degrees he
attained. Declared medically
unfit to serve at the front is
World War II, he was appointed
as doctor of Auschwitz and gives
special responsibilities for
research into genetic deformitiee
that were blemishing the Aryan
race. Fleeing Germany in 1963,
he lived in Argentina for a while
and is now believed to be in
Paraguay.
DR. GISELLA PERL, now i
gynecologist at Sha'are Zedek
Hospital in Jerusalem, was
transported to Auschwitz and
was for several years compelled
to work in the clinic with
Mengele. Perl stresses that
history has constructed myths
about Mengele. Those who sa
American actor Gregory Peck
portaying Mengele in the film.
"The Boys from Brazil." maybe
forgiven for thinking that the
Nazi sprang from the
imagination of a talented script
writer.
"His cruelty is a fact, but his
powers as a doctor have been
exaggerated," says Dr. Perl. "He
was no genius, just a dangerou5
but very average doctor. He
behaved like a beast, yet he was a
human being. This is why it is
important to tell the world what
he did, so we should all recognize
how ugly man can be to his fellow
man."
Perl recalls that he was a good-
looking man in his mid-thirties, i
He would strut around with a*
gun in one hand and a whip in the
other, and would not hesitate to
use either. He had a vicious
temper which was at its worst
when his experiments produced
no results. Perl speculates that
his tantrums were provoked by
his own mediocrity as a doctor
and the fact that in all his
research he never gleaned any
knowledge or achieved signifi-
cant strides in the world 9
genetics.
WHEN HIS temper was at its
worst, Mengele became a brutal
sadist. "Once he called my friend,
Ibi, a dirty Jew and started
battering her poor unprotected
head," recalls Dr. Perl. As 1
watched her two eyes disappf"
under a layer of blood je
nose become a broken, bleeding
mass, I had to close my eye*
When I opened them Dr. Meng*
had stopped hitting her. *
instead of a human head, Idi
body carried a round.
unrecognizable blood red object
on its bony shoulders"
It is no surprise that Mengelet
victims demand he be brought w
justice. However, it ia not
much that they want revengem
to expose to the world the extern
of Mengele's crime. Like m
Eichmann trial, the aun of m
trial would not be to determm
guilt or innocence but to ediKj*
the younger generation about w
crimes of the Nazis.


Button wood Communities
.-.-. ...-. .
Residents of Buttonwood and Buttonwood West recently
gathered for a breakfast educational meeting given on behalf of
the 1985 Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County-United
Jewish Appeal campaign. Jerry Gleekel, a businessman and avid
Zionist, brought the residents the latest information on Israel's
economic crisis and the situation in Lebanon. He emphasized
the need to increase financial support to Israel's social and
welfare programs through UJ A pledges.
Pioneer Women/
Na'amat To Honor
Woman Of The Year'
Greeting guest speaker Jerry Gleekel [second from left] are [left
to right] Harold Rose, co-chair of Buttonwood West; Dr.
Howard Woocher, chair of Buttonwood, and Seymour Rosen,
co-chair of Buttonwood West.
Begin Reported To Be Renewing
Interest In Political Developments
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Former Premier Menachem
Begin, who has lived in virtual
seclusion since his surprise
resignation more than a year
ago, has begun to show inter-
est in political developments
and has had a number of
meetings recently with several
of his former colleagues.
According to Yediot
Achronot, Begin met last week
with former Finance Minister
Yoram Aridor and with Min-
ister of Commerce and In-
dustry Ariel Sharon. His
discussion with Sharon cen-
tered on the latter's $50 mil-
lion libel suit against Time
magazine, the newspaper
reported.
Begin reportedly had a
lengthy telephone con-
ff The GUARDIAN PLAN program is
also an expression of love."
Jerry Bynder
Yahrzcit is one of the most meaningful traditioas til
lows. Yahneitalso reminds us of the reallUCN ol'life. It
helps us recognize the need to plan for the protection of
our families.
Now, Riverside sponsors a unique program or fam
ily protection, the Gl IARDIAN PLAN. insurance funded
prearranged funeral program It's a sensible idea. \ou get
what you want at a price you can afford. That amount is
guaranteed never to increase. And it can be paid over a
numberofyears.
But most of all, just as Yahrzeit is a symbol of our love
of family, the GUARDIAN PLAN program is an expression of
our concern that the people we worry about have less to
worry about And what could be more in the .Jewish tradition
than that?
Learn more about the GUARDIAN PLAN program Call
toll free 1 CM3KlflB3 fhrynurropvof Funeral Arramte
* "Tents in Advance Anri with ymir ropy ymi will get an emer-
gency telephone number stick-on for your telephone receiver.
"1
I want ampy
ufyiMV booklet and t*imiNetK>'
iriqihc mi number stick on nw.
Nairn-________________________
Addnwt.
City___
Stall'.
jap.
I Ionic I'Imhm'
Mail to Guardian llans, Inc.
IK >. Box Mi
WinUTl'ark.Pkirida
:K7W)
Orcall toll free
1800-432 0863
JFPB128
The GUARDIAN PLANCtt program is sponsored by RIVERSIDE
So the people you worry about will have leas to worry about
'AiilNSITMM >:H NlltI)pfriTf()fun^',-^><',Pn,v1*^',yl^rtinl'Uu..ll (PVind l ln< muuralMin willi Kami) Suvkv Ijfc-
UurnrrC.inVv(K.)OT*N' H/7 HI I HI UMUnviWUlUI IWUIM Imnd prtioi>J)nK KI<>n versation a few days ago with
Deputy Premier Yitzhak
Shamir who replaced him as
the leader of Likud. Begin was
said to have expressed great
interest in the party's internal
developments, particularly the
touchy relations between its
Herut and Liberal Party
wings.
The newspaper quoted
intimates of Begin as saying he
spends most of his time
reading and watching tele-
vision and that he keeps up to
date with current affairs.
Yehiel Kadishai, Begin's long-
time personal aide, said re-
cently that the former premier
would soon begin writing his
memoirs.
But another associate of
Begin was quoted to the effect
that the former leader has no
intention of returning to poli-
tics or of trying to exert his
influence on the political
scene.
Shirley Fayne, president of
Palm Beach Council, Pioneer
Women-Na'amat, a national
organization dedicated to
helping women, youth and
children in the United States
and Israel, will gift Ann Lynn
Lipton [above] with honorary
membership at their tribute to
Life Members luncheon on
Jan. 31. Ms. Lipton was
selected locally because of her
devotion and varied interests
in feminine and Jewish issues
and causes. Ms. Lipton is the
director of Jewish education
of the Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County and
brings to the position much
experience in education and in
Jewish community work. She
holds a BA degree in history
and an MA degree in Amer-
ican Jewish history, and is
presently a PhD candidate in
the field of Jewish education.
Ms. Lipton was a high school
history teacher and admin-
istrator for 12 years prior to
becoming Jewish education
director.
SHIP
YOUR CAR
HOME
r
i
i
i
i
i
L.
AUTOLOG, the leading transporter of privately-
owned automobiles is the easiest way to ship your
car home. Drop off your car at any Florida Autoiog
terminal and our Free Shuttle Service wil bring you
to your plane. >bu can receive up to $105 in Dis-
counts off our fares, lb get all the facts, cal our tol-
free number, or send coupon for our Fare Schedule
and Brochure.
(800) 526-6078
AUTOLOG CORP. 56 Maritime St.. Port Newark, NJ 07114
Please send me an Autoiog Fare Schedule A Brochure
Name_
Address
City------
Phone(.
Origin__
State
Zip
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
Destination.
JF


age yj
Hie ootisii i lunuiaii ui i aiui ueom (ail
Random Thoughts
By MURIEL LEVITT
I remember reading some-
where that the way to end war
forever would be to distribute
Jewish food to all people,
throughout the world. I'll buy
that. Could anyone harbor
hostility after eating roast
kishka or succulent cholent?
Maybe the road to interna-
tional understanding lies
through the kitchen after all.
I can still recall the mar-
velous Yiddish specialties my
mother prepared. Her
Shabbos meals especially were
real belt busters with one deli-
cious course following another
in rich delight. My favorite
was the marvelous chicken
soup laced with home made
noodles plus a dollop of
golden unborn eggs. Whatever
happened to those eggs? I
haven't seen them around for
years and years.
My roast chickens are not
bad and my family seems to
approve, but somehow
something is missing. The
pullets and capons that
emerged form my mother's
oven were always crisp and
crackling. Every bite was pure
joy. Although I try to imitate
her cooking style, it's just not
the same. Many moons ago I
used to go to the chicken
market with mother. On a
long gray zinc counter were a
bunch of fully feathered
ritually slain birds. She would
pick them up one by one, blow
on the chicken, and then part
the feathers. When I asked
why, she replied, "I really
don't know why, but grandma
used to do this all the time."
Most probably she did it to
make certain that the skin was
firm and unblemished. But let
met tell you, those were some
chickens!
Whether it's called kigel,
kugel, or pudging, we all seem
to relish noodle pudding.
Opinion has always been
divided as to flavoring. Some
prefer the sweet fruit or cheesy
kind while traditionalists insist -
on simple salt and pepper. I
will not take sides both
are absolutely terrific.
About chopped liver, the
jury is still out. Some use
mayonnaise, some use oil,
while others opt for
margarine. To me they are all
pale imitations of the real
thing. I am a purist and
maintain that fried onions,
hard cooked eggs and sch-
maltz is the only way to go. A
little heartburn is a small price
to pay for such happiness.
New England has its Yankee
pot roast and the South brags
about barbecued beef, but
neither can hold a candle to
gedempteh fleisch. Surely you
have feasted on thick slices of
tender brisket that have
cooked for hours, swimming
in tangy oniony gravy. That's
what I call pot roast and it's
really a meichle to boast
about.
Let's consider soup. Hearty
mushroom and barley is a
perennial favorite while
cabbage soup with flank r
runs a close second. Vegetabi
soup is best when the coo!
throws in everything found in
the refrigerator ... the more
leftovers, the better. Last and
by no means least is split pea
soup. It must be hot and
gedicht enough so that the
spoon stands upright. What
does Campbell know from
soup compared to these old
world delicacies?
Even commercial foods can
be a tribute to the high
gustatory standards of your
average Jewish consumer. Any
appetizing store features
goodies such as dried fruits,
nuts, and imported candies.
No customer can resist a hefty
wedge of halvah from the
mammoth block that rests on
top of the counter. Behind
that same counter one sees an
incredible assortment of lox,
white fish, sturgeon, carp, and
salmon, to mention a few. Oh,
those Sunday mornings with
bagels, cheese, and smoked
fishes for breakfast!
Now, just pause and think.
If Jewish foods could be
catered to foreign nations .
hot pastrami to Uganda and
tsimmis to Syria, for instance,
armed conflict might become a
thing of the past. Who would
want to fight when they were
"zot" with corned beef and
knishes? Not a living soul
could feel hostile under the
spell of kasha varnishkes. Yes,
indeed, whoever thought up
the plan of feeding the world
Jewish food was a true genius.
I'm only sorry it wasn't I!
The Regency Room of the Hyatt Hotel was the setting where 70
ZZXn of* the Business and Professional Wom.'.Grog.of
the Women's Division of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County met recently for their January meeting. Co-chaini for
the evening were [left to right] Ruth Berman and Dr. Horeoce
Kaslow. Dr. Kaslow was the featured speaker and addressed the
topic "Superwoman, Stress and Sexuality For Everything
There is a Season."
B&P Women's Group
Included among the women
were some of the participants
in the first community
sponsored Women's Division
B&P mission to Israel who
took this opportunity to
gather for a reunion. Seated
[left to right] are Freida
Shefter, Doris Shaw, Estri
Tannenbaum and Leslie
Adams. Standing [third from
left to right] are Susan Wolf-
Schwartz and Dr. Elizabeth S.
Shulman. Also shown, but not
participants in the mission, art
[standing, left to right] Nini
Krever, member of the B&P
networking group, and Lynne
Ehrlich, Women's Division di-
rector.
where shopping Is a pleasure 7days o week
Publtx Bakeries open at 8:00 A.M.
AvUrofali Pubix Storoo with
Frooh DonWi Bakeries Onry.
Baked Freeh Dairy
Rye Bread
-69*
Available at Publix Storoo with
Frooh Danish Bokortoo Only.
Make Meals End with a SmUo
Apple Pie
$149
ooch
Topped wtth Creamy Chocolate
MM
FREE!
ooch
(Whon you buy ono eclair for 6CK)
(Urnit4P1eeee)
Available at All Publix Storoo
and Danish Bakeries.
Light and Tempting
Angel Food Cake.........each$139
Cinnamon
Raisin Rolls................... J 159
Deockxjs
Rum Rings.......................ch$129
Just Right for the Children
CupCakes.................6 $159
Available at Publix Stores with Freeh
Danish Bakeries Only.
Wholesome and Nutritious
Egg Bagels................6 99*
Prices Effective
Jan. 24th thru 30th, 1985



>unty Page'
f% Radio /TV Highlights ,!J
MOSAIC Sunday, Jan. 27, 9 a.m. WPTV Channel
5 with host Barbara Gordon Interview with U.S. Sen.
Arlen Specter of Pennsylvania.
L'CHAYIM Sunday, Jan. 27, 7:30 a.m. WPBR
1340-AM with host Rabbi Mark S. Golub The Jewish
Listener's Digest, a radio magazine.
SHALOM Sunday, Jan. 27, 10 a.m. WPEC
Channel 12 (11:30 a.m. WDZL-TV 39) with host
Richard Peritz.
Sponsored by the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County.
Community Calendar
January 25
Jewish Federation Shabbat at Congregation Anshei
Sholom 8:15 p.m. Women's American ORT West
Palm Beach board 9:30 a.m. Hadassah-Rishona 12
noon
January 26
Women's American ORT Okeechobee traveling dinner
party
January 27
Jewish Theological Seminary reception at The Breakers 4
p.m. Jewish Federation Community Relations Council
Community Plea for Soviet Jewry at Temple Emanu-EI -
7:30 p.m. Congregation Aitz Chaim 10 a.m. Golden
Lakes Temple Sisterhood 10 a.m. Temple B'nai Jacob
Men's Club 9 a.m. Jewish Community Day School -
Board Planning Session 9 a.m.-12 noon Jewish
Federation Fountains Golf Tournament
January 28
B'nai B'rith Women Menorah board 10 a.m.
Women's American ORT Mid Palm 1 p.m. Temple
B'nai Jacob Sisterhood 10 a.m. Hadassah Z'Hava -
board 10 a.m. Jewish Federation Catholic-Jewish
Dialogue noon
January 29
B'nai B'rith Women Masada donor luncheon at The
Breakers Women's American ORT Evening "Evening
at Loehmann's" 6-9 p.m. Jewish Federation Business
and Professional Women's Division Briefing 7 p.m.
January 30
Jewish Federation Women's Division Mini-Mission 9
a.m. Jewish Federation Men's Business and Professional
Meeting noon Jewish Federation Board of Governance
Sub-Committee Long Range Planning Committee 7:30
p.m. Jewish Federation Board of Directors meeting 8
p.m. Yiddish Culture Group Cresthaven 1 p.m.
January 31
Jewish Federation Long Range Planning Committee -
Human Resources Sub-Committee 12 noon Hadassah -
Golda Meir youth aliyah noon Jewish Community
Day School Education Committee 8 p.m. Temple Beth
El Israeli Folkdance 7:30 p.m. Jewish Federation -
Long Range Planning Committee Campaign Sub-
Committee-4 p.m.
An Elegant Concept in Kosher Catering
Exclusive Kosher Caterer of the Hyatt Palm Beaches.
Quality Kosher Catering in all
Temples, Halls & Homes
Banquet Facilities Available for
Private & Organizational Functions
tlniter Superi iw.'i of
Pulm Hroch County Board ../ Rahou
582-1786
HXl DAW/$ worn
SDAVSMMCMTS
~*599 L*369
won occ. mm. BOOM MMB MMNOD
All rooms feature color TV., stereo & refrigerator
Sandy beach Night club Olympic size pool Tea
room Seder services by Cantor 3 meals daily
Synagogue services
This Passover enjoy a traditional atmosphere
that can only be found in a completely Sabbath and
Yom Tov observing hotel. That hotel is the luxurious
HOTEL
SANS SOUCI
KOSHER GIATT
US) aCoMmAv*
MIAMI itACH
TOtlWK1-i0-325-1M7'MIAMI(305)S3t-42t3
Berry To Receive
Jewish Seminary Award
Vivian Berry of Detroit and
Palm Beach will receive the
Solomon Schechter Medal,
one of the highest awards of
the Jewish Theological
Seminary of America, at a
luncheon in her honor spon-
sored by the National
Women's Patron's Society,
Wednesday, Feb. 6, at the
Henry Flagler Museum, Palm
Beach.
The announcement was
made by Evelyn Henkind,
chair, who noted that Mrs.
Berry "is a pathfinder who has
consistently striven to promote
the highest ideals of Jewish
culture in her philanthropic
career. We proudly honor her
leadership for all she has done
to serve Jewish education and
the betterment of the entire
Jewish community."
fumne
Dr. Gerson D. Cohen,
chancellor of the seminary,
will be guest speaker at the
luncheon, to be attended by
leaders of Women's League
for Conservative Judaism
including Selma Weintraub,
president, and Evelyn Auer-
bach, chair, of the Torah
Fund-Residence Halls Camp-
aign on behalf of the
seminary.
A leader of the Detroit Jew-
ish community, Mrs. Berry is a
founder and past chair of the
Michigan Branch of Women's
League.
Currently she is active as
chair. National Palm Beach
Women's Division of United
Jewish Appeal, as well as on
the Detroit executive com-
mittee and the national ad-
visory council of American
Friends of Weizmann Institute
of Science.
Vice President of Yachad Unit
of B'nai B'rith Muriel Malkin
receives a bouquet from Presi-
dent Sol Herman for her
continued dedication and ef-
forts in helping Jewry during a
membership breakfast held re-
cently.
I
Manischewitz.
1985 PASSOVER RECIPE GUIDE
,

zzss as- i, w
Jaggs ~
:?-"""*-._--;.- '"
' ".-' ... 'SSVf-"
'-''______I i I -
WTUXugTn*'
i ...
__
Han mm
55- SET -----

fll2r5^ *->-? ;*^ic!

Includes 400 in coupons!
Our new 1985 Passover Recipe Guide is more beautiful than ever! And we at
Manischewitz hope it will make your holiday celebration more beautiful than ever,
too Our Guide features two menu suggestions plus special recipes for dishes like
Honeyed Chicken, Carrot Pudding, and Banana Nut Sponge Cake.
You ll also find a 15c coupon for delicious Manischewitz Matzo Balls and
roth and a 25c coupon for any Manischewitz Cake Mix. Send for yours now
and have a very happy and Kosher Passover'
COUPONS EXPIRE APRIL 11 1985-
Mail coupon to: RECIPE GUIDE, P.O. BOX 484A, JERSEY CITY, N J. 07303
Please send the Manischewitz Passover Recipe Guide to:
Name
Address
City
State.
Z'P-
One Recipe Guide Per Request
Request will not be processed without zip code
Offer good while supply lasts
PLEASE PRINT CLEARLY
._


Itaoul Wallenberg Day Commemorated
Thursday, Jan. 17, was pro-
claimed Raoul Wallenberg
Day by the Palm Beach
County Commission and
Commission Chairman Ken
Spillias. He chaired the tribute
ceremony held in the lobby of
the new Government Center,
South Olive Avenue at First
Street, marking the 40th anni-
versary of Wallenberg's arrest
and imprisonment by the
Soviets in 1945.
Sponsored by the local
Raoul Wallenberg Committee,
chaired by Dennis Willinger,
and the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith, the
tribute paid homage to the
'righteous Gentile' who saved
one hundred thousand Jews in
Hungary from the Nazis'
death camps.
Raoul Wallenberg was the
Swedish ambassador to
Hungary and arranged
through his office to supply
safe passage for Jews in the
face of mass Nazi round-ups.
Arrested and imprisoned as a
spy by the advancing Rus-
sians, Wallenberg may still be
alive. He was last seen in 1972
For Jewish Singles-No Debate
in a Soviet prison.
In 1981 President Ronald
Reagan made Raoul
Wallenberg an honorary
citizen of the United States,
and the United States con-
tinues to press the Soviets for
his release.
Communities around the
world joined in tribute to
Wallenberg at 12 noon. Many
cities rang 40 bells or blew one
blast on the shofar.
This is the fifth year that the
Palm Beach County Commis-
sion has remembered the
bravery of Raoul Wallenberg.
NEW YORK (JTA)
As the number of Jewish
singles men and women
grows steadily in urban Amer-
ica, there is a continuing
debate among Jewish social
work professionals as to
whether socializing events for
singles should or should not be
arranged on a for-singles-only
basis.
But this debate, for
example, on whether
Federations should set up a
separate singles division, or
whether synagogues should
provide special services for the
singles, is one on which the
single Jews have no problems,
according to a recent analysis.
That's what the Jewish singles
want.
THE ANALYSIS appeared
in a recent issue of the News-
letter of the William Petschek
Jewish Family Center of the
American Jewish Committee.
Social worker Marcie
Linkoff is quoted as asserting
that separate programming
"sustains the all too common
and insidious attitude of
competition among singles,
and the feeling among married
individuals that their marital
security can be threatened by
the company of singles."
But, according to the anal-
ysis, Jewish singles prefer their
own company, "and they
offer some persuasive
reasons." One is that "an
unmarried person looking for
a date wants to meet other
singles, and this is easier in a
group composed of singles."
Also, a single parent who
wants to discuss the problem
of raising children "without a
spouse is undoubtedly better
off talking to other single
parents than to parents in
conventional families."
SINGLES "also point out
that their desire to socialize
with their own kind is paral-
leled by other Jewish sub-
groups. Little objection is
raised when synagogues spon-
sor father and son brunches,
sisterhoods, special classes to
prepare for Bar and Bat
Mitzvah, and youth services."
Some singles charge they
must band together because
the institutions of the com-
munity are at best indifferent
[:] HOWARD
[JAPER a
[JACKAGING
FREE DELIVERY FLORIDA
PALM BEACH 832-0211
0ROWARD
IJAPER 4
PACKAGING
and at worst hostile. Lillian
Sherman, a widow who ini-
tiated the (Conservative)
United Synagogue 35-pIus
singles group in New York,
complains that synagogues are
run like Noah's Ark two by
two, while Rabbi Avraham
Weiss of the Hebrew Institute
of Riverdale claims that 90
percent of Jewish agencies
have no singles on their
Boards.
The analysts argue that
under such circumstances,
"Programs targeted to the
unmarried are a kind of
'affirmative action' to wel-
come the alienated." Accord-
ing to the analysis, the best
Continued on Page 11
Organizations in
________the News
AMERICAN MIZRACHI WOMEN
Rishona Chapter is having a mini luncheon and card
party on Sunday, Jan. 27, 11:30 a.m. at the clubhouse.
A paid-up membership luncheon will be held at their
regular meeting on Wednesday, Feb. 13, 11:30 a.m., at the
American Savings Bank, Westgate Century Village.
B'NAI B'RITH
Haifa Lodge's regular meeting will be held on Sunday,
Jan. 27, 9:30 a.m. at the Royal Palm Clubhouse, 22nd
Avenue and North Federal Highway. The program is an
installation of officers, trustees and directors for members
only.
Lucherne Lakes Lodge No. 3132 will hold its regular
monthly breakfast meeting on Feb. 3, 9:30 a.m. at the
Lake Worth Senior Citizens Center, Dixie Highway and
Second Street.
Sam Roskin will present a play, "The Three Sons."
There will be a question and answer session during and
after the play.
The lodge, in cooperation with Project HOPE, asks
each brother to bring a can of food as their admission.
B'NAI B'RITH WOMEN
Masada Chapter's general meeting will be held on Feb.
12, 6:45 p.m. at the Chase Bank in the Jefferson Mall.
February is Brotherhood Month and the program will be
presented by Harriette S. Glasner.
Masada Chapter will hold a lunch and card party on
Continued on Page 10
chair of laeltooBlw^Jte;
committee of Palm b*2
Couiity, with the R0U| Jg
lenberg proclamation.
NOW OPEN
Another
Able to serve you better
with two convenient locations.
SPECTRUM CENTER
2311 10th Ave., North, Suite 2
(just west of I-95)
586-5660
and
107 So. Dixie, Lake Worth
586-6220
S4.25 for 8 V, x11 or 8 V, x14 20 lb. white per 100
"WE MAKE YOU LOOK GOOD"
PALM BEACH EYE ASSOCIATES
Richard G. Shugarman, M.D.
Emanuel Newmark, M.D.
Professional Association
Proudly Announce the relocation of
their Atlantis office to
140 J.F.K. Circle
Atlantis, Fla.
433-5200
for the practice of
Diseases and
Surgery of the Eye
West Palm Beach Office remains open at
1500 N. DIXIE HWY.
659-7277
Medicare Aaaifnment Accepted
Announcing El Al's Sunsation Plus Vacation to Israel.
Imagine netting six sunrises, and five sunsets, in
Israel for only S836.
Including round-trip airfare A superior hotel in
Jerusalem or Tel Aviv, including breakfast.
And a complimentary Hertz Rent A Car. yours for
five days.
Who can do this for you? Only El Al. the Airline of
Israel.
Throw in an extra SI00. and you'll get our deluxe
packageaccommodations at Jerusalem's Hilton or
I-aromme Hotel, or the Tel Aviv Hilton.
And if six days just aren't enough, and you want
to extend your stay (who wouldn't?), we can arrange
that too.
See your travel agent, or call El Al at
1-800-223-6700 and ask about our exclusive
Sunsalional Plus Tour. But hurry, this package is
available until February 28. 1985.
Price per person/double occupancy One Heru cr per double
'"' K. mileage. nd insurance chargn not included. If
named hotels unavailable, comparable accommodations will be
substituted
Package price based on Miami Tel Aviv round trip only For
prices from your area, contact a travel agent or El Al.
l"hc Airline of Israel.


Members of the Chaplain Aid program of the Jewish Federation
of Palm Beach County attend a seminar meeting to learn more
about helping others.
[Standing] Social worker Ned
Goldberg of the Jewish Family
and Children's Service ad-
dresses the Chaplain Aides as
chair Nathan Allweiss listens.
Questions Fly At Ned Goldberg
At Chaplain Aide Seminar
By MURRAY J. KERN -
Are Medicare benefits for
[hospital care forfeited if one is
fa member of an HMO? Upon
{leaving the hospital, what are
the options for the frail older
person with or without
dependents? How do private
and voluntary nursing homes
handle residents who have
exhausted their private funds?
What community resources
are available at this time for a
disabled older person upon
I leaving the hospital?
These are some of the ques-
tions that flew thick and fast
at Ned Goldberg as he con-
cluded his address as guest at
the Jewish Federation
|Chaplain Aide Seminar meet-
ing, Tuesday, Jan. 8.
Goldberg drew upon his
I experiences with the problems
of the elderly in Palm Beach
County as manager of the
Jewish Family and Children's
Service "Quick Response
Program" to answer the ques-
tions with authority and
I candor. For instance, he said
t joining an HMO does not
lecessarily mean the loss of
I Medicare benefits at a hos-
pital, but he suggested that
one look carefully at an HMO
agreement to determine what
the hospital benefits are and
the restrictions, if any, as to
choice of hospital. He noted
that the disabled older person
who elects to stay at home may
be eligible for some health care
provided by the Jewish Family
I and Children's Service or may
employ the services of the
srapidly-growing private
companies in the community.
The JF&CS also provides
"friendly visitors" to the
elderly in their homes.
Responding to questions
about the increasing needs of
the community, Goldberg said
that plans for the expansion of
community resources for the
elderly are in the works
through the efforts of the
Hewish Federation of Palm
Beach County, its beneficiary
agencies and private sources.
As an example, he told of the
plans for the Joseph L. Morse
Geriatric Center to increase its
present capacity of 120 beds
and to create a day care center
designed to keep the frail
elderly living in their own
homes for as long as possible.
He said that Morse is also
considering a congregate living
facility for those who need
some assistance care but do
not require skilled nursing
care.
Chaplain Aides were given
the benefit of Goldberg's
views on a volunteer aide's
relationships with nursing
home residents and their
family members and with staff
at the institutions. He cau-
tioned the Chaplain Aides,
"Know your role and be con-
sistent in your role," but
"Don't make promises you
can't keep." Rabbi Alan R.
Sherman, Federation
Chaplain, entered the discus-
sion to explain that the
condition of an elderly resi-
dent at an institution is not al-
ways what it seems to be.
Goldberg revealed that there
are about 35 boarding homes
and a few large retirement
institutions in the Palm Beach
community. For persons at
home there are some county
chore services available under
certain circumstances.
Ned Goldberg holds a
master's degree in social
service and has been at JF&CS
for four and a half years.
Besides managing the Quick
Response Program, he super-
vises the friendly visitor
program, and does personal
and group counseling.
He also administers the
Home Health Program and
consults with families of
clients.
Nat Allweiss, chair of the
Chaplain Aide program,
presided at the meeting. It was
announced that a new edition
of the Sabbath Prayer Book
was donated by Jeanne
Glasser, co-chair of the
program. Mrs. Glasser and her
family donated the funds for
the original edition in memory
of her husband Louis Glasser
who had conducted services
with her in nursing homes.
The book is used for Friday
and Saturday services at
Burrows To Address BBW Lunchoon
Your presence is requested
by Captain Frances Gewirz
and her officers Bettye
Shapiro, Doris Starr and
Henny Stern for B'nai B'rith
Women's Masada Chapter
Queen for a Day" Smooth
, Milmg luncheon at The
Breakers Hotel on Tuesday,
Jan. 29 at 12 noon.
The donor luncheon is not
only a tribute in recognition
and appreciation to those
members who raise the esta-
blished quota but also serves
an important social purpose,
engaging B'nai B'rith Women
in cooperative ventures, for
the good of the organization
and the community, according
to Mrs. Gewirz.
The guest speaker will be
Michael Burrows, newly-
elected chair of the Palm
Beach County Regional
Board.
For reservations call
Rosalind Ornstein.
nursing homes and retirement
centers.
Persons desiring to join the
Jewish Federation Chaplain
Aide Program for friendly
visiting at hospitals, nursing
homes, and retirement centers,
or to assist in religious services
at these institutions, may call
the office of the chaplain,
Rabbi Alan R. Sherman, 655-
7706.
JCC News
MIDNITE MADNESS
Tweens, 7th and 8th graders, are invited to the Jewish
Community Center's 3rd Annual Midnite Madness which
will be held Saturday, Jan. 26 through Sunday, Jan. 27.
Tweens will be going to the South Florida Fair and in
addition will enjoy a bonfire at Camp Shalom, silk-
screening T-shirts, a Trivial Pursuit game and much more.
The evening will start at 8 p.m. at Camp Shalom
(Belvedere Road, one mile west of the turnpike). Pick up is
at 9:30 a.m. Sunday at the center, 2415 Okeechobee Blvd.,
West Palm Beach.
The fee for the entire program is $14 for center members
and S16 for non-members. Space is limited! RSVP with
check by Thursday, Jan. 24. For additional information
please call Terrie at 689-7700.
BARGAINS GALORE
The Jewish Community Center's "One More Time
Warehouse" is conducting a giant clearance Cash and
Carry Sale. Now is the time to get a real bargain.
Items such as furniture, bedding, small and large ap-
pliances, TV's, bric-a-brac and much more are available
for immediate purchase. The Warehouse is located at 3420,
West' 45th St .(Adams Mercedes-Benz) and open Monday
through Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Donations of merchandise to the Warehouse are tax
deductible and will be picked up. For additional infor-
mation please call 471-1077.
Enter the
Maxwell House Coifee
Israel Sweepstakes
This could be your year in Jerusalem.
:. TO LONDON OR ROME.
CONNECTING JET TO ISRAEL.
PLUS 51,000 CASH.
Maxwell House Coffee, a tradition in
Jewish homes for over a half a cen-
tury, is offering you a chance to win
a trip to Israel, the cradle of Jewish
history.
Win our Sweepstakes and we'll
give you $1,000 in cash, fry you and
Maxwell House.* It's always "Good to the last drop:'
your spouse or a companion on a Pan
Am 747 to London or Rome, and then
to Israel for the most glorious, emo-
tion-packed and history-filled time of
your life. It can happen to you this
year. Bui first you have to complete
the entry form and send it in.
I
OFFICIAL RULES
1. Each entry must be accompanied by the innerseal from any sue tar of MAXWELL
HOUSf" InsUnt Cottee or a2' square Irom the plastic lirj ol a can ol MAXWELL
HOUSE* Ground Cottee or MAXWELL HOUSE' Ground Decaffeinated Cottee OR
the words MAXWELL HOUSE printed in block letters on a 3" S- card Entries
must be on the Official Entry Blank or a 3 > 5' card and mailed to Israel
Sweepstakes General foods Corporation P0 3660 Grand Central Station
New York. N Y 10163
1. NO PURCHASE RE0UIRED TO ENTER SWEEPSTAKES
J. Entries must be first-class marl one entry per envelope postmarked no later
man June 1 1965
*. Winner win be selected in a random drawing on June 22 1985 from all entries
received prior to the deadline The drawing will be conducted by Joseph Jacobs
Organization Inc an independent organization whose decision is final In the
event the winner declines the prize or if lor any reason the prize cannot be
awarded after the initial drawing a supplemental drawing(s) will be held to
award the prize Winner will be notified by mail Taxes on the prize are the sole
responsibility of the winner The odds of winning depend on the number of
entries received
5. Prize consists of round trip airfare tor two via Pan Am to London or Rome and
connecting ret to lei Avn Israel plus St .000 in cash Retail value is S2 200 00
Prizes are not substitulabie transferable or exchangeable
6. This sweepstakes is open to all residents of the United States who are 11 years ol
age or outer eicapt employees (and their lamiiies) of General Foods Corpora
turn its advertising agencies subsidiaries or affiliates or Joseph Jacobs Orga
rwabon. Inc Sweepstakes subtect to all federal State and local regulations
Void where prohibited by law
7. lo' the name of the winner send a sell-addressed postage-paid envelope to
Winners Name P0 Box 3990 Grand Central Station New York N V 10163
Maxwd u
'/** IB?
^-^TflilT'i' ^
OFFICIAL ENTRY FORM
Name
Address-
City____
,
.
-Z.P-
State______________
MAIL TO: lrael Sweepstake*
P.O Box 3660
Grand Central Station,
New York. N.Y. 10163
_


Organizations
Continued from Page 8
Friday, Mar. 22, at the JDM Country Club. The bene-
ficiary will be the Children's Home in Israel.
The chapter is sponsoring a four day, three night
Regency Spa vacation on April 12-15. Included are daily
massages, food, entertainment with a dance band and
transportation.
HADASSAH
The board of Lake Worth Chapter will meet on Wed-
nesday, Feb. 6, 10 a.m., in the Sunrise Savings and Loan
on Military Trail.
Plans will be formulated for Hadassah Sabbath and
Oneg Shabbat to be held on Friday, March 8, in Temple
Beth Sholom in Lake Worth. The entire service will be
performed by board members.
On March 27, the four groups that comprise the chapter
will hold their Annual Donor Luncheon at the Breakers
Hotel.
On Feb. 5, Ida Goldstein, membership V.P. of Shalom
West Palm Beach Chapter, will hold a tea in her home
(Stratford L 156) for prospective members. Contact Ida
for reservations.
Study Group continues on Feb. 12 with discussions of
Abba Eban's Heritage Series, at Bertha Rubin's home
(Dover A 320). Reservation required.
The eleventh annual Pledge luncheon in support of
Hadassah Medical Organization will be held on Feb. 21 at
The Breakers. Call Sylvia Citron or Estelle Kashdan for
reservations.
Tikvah Chapter is having Education Day at Florida
Atlantic University on Feb. 7. The speaker is Dr. Miriam
Freund Rosenthal who will present a program on "Women
in Jewish History."
An evening at the Musicana is planned for Feb. 12.
"New York,. New York" is the presentation. Tran-
sportation and dinner are included.
CIVIL SERVICE
Sid Levine, president of the South Florida Jewish Civil
Service Employees is inviting everyone to attend the
Sunday, Feb. 3, 1 p.m. meeting at the Florida Gardens
Civic Association Center, 134 Ohio Road, Lake Worth,
(one eighth mile east of the Florida Turnpike off Lake
Worth Road going south).
The guest speaker will be Jerry Holcomb of Prudential-
Bache Securities who will be conducting a financial
planning seminar on the topic "Economy and the Times."
The chapter is sponsoring a deli luncheon on Sunday,
Feb. 17, at Stu's Deli in the Mil-Lake Shopping Plaza (next
to Scotty's) on Lake Worth Road between Military Trail
and Jog Road. For information on this luncheon and the
forthcoming trip to the Keys and Marco Polo Dinner and
Show on May 17-19, contact JeanetteS. Levine.
LABOR ZIONIST ALLIANCE
The alliance will meet on Wednesday, Feb. 6, 1 p.m. at
the American Savings Bank, Century Village.
Dr. Simon Silverman, former director of the WHRS
Jewish Hour, will present a program of Jewish music.
PIONEER WOMEN NA'AMAT
A regular meeting of the Theodore Herzl Club will be
held on Feb. 13, 1 p.m., at the Lake Worth Shuffleboard
Courts, 1121 Lucerne Ave. Entertainment will be
provided. Sharon Reidy of the Palm Beach Health Dept.
will lecture on nutrition.
WOMEN'S AMERICAN ORT
On Monday, Jan. 28, 1 p.m., the Lake Worth West
Chapter of Women's American ORT will hold their
monthly meeting at the Central Library, 3650 Summit
Blvd., east of Military Trail, West Palm Beach. The guest
speaker will be Dr. Ben Seidler, retired professor at Emory
University Dental School, who will present his own film
with narration and music of his three and a half month
stay in Israel.
WOMEN'S LEAGUE FOR ISRAEL
Lorraine D. Frost, president of the Florida Region
announces a regional meeting to be held on Friday, Jan.
25, 10 a.m., at the Sunrise Savings and Loan, 4524 Gun
Club Road, West Palm Beach.
The meeting will be hosted by Hana Srebro, president of
the Sabra Chapter of Women's League in Lake Worth.
The meeting will be open to all chapter members in the
Florida region, as well as the officers and delegates. An
informative program is planned and will be given by the
regional education chair, Ethel Binder of Margate.
YIDDISH CULTURE GROUP
On Tuesday, Feb. 5, 10 a.m. the Century Village Group
presents Pauline Edelson, pianist.
The Ru'h Hyde Group will present a Rogers and
Hammers/wrt musical. The vocalists will be Ann March
and Jack Zsickerman, narration will be by Lee Duchin and
musical directress Ruth Hyde will be at the piano.
Hawkins and Rinaldo Propose
Broadcasts for Soviet Jews
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
In an effort to prevent the
isolation of Soviet Jews from
the West, legislation was
introduced in Congress last
week to establish a program
called Radio Maccabee which
would broadcast Russian-
language programs to Jews in
the USSR.
Sen. Paula Hawkins (R.,
Fla.) and Rep. Matthew
Rinaldo (R-, N.J.) introduced
concurrent bills in the Senate
and House during the opening
session of the 99th Congress to
provide $3 million for setting
up Radio Maccabee as a
separate arm of Radio Liberty
which broadcasts into the
Soviet Union.
The special program would
include items of general
cultural, intellectual, political
and religious interest to Soviet
Jews as well as provide
Hebrew education courses. It
woulJ particularly serve the
needs of refuseniks and ac-
tivists.
Hawkins and Rinaldo
stressed at a press conference,
the increased harassment of
Soviet Jews and the decrease
in emigration which totalled
less than 1,000 in 1984. "The
plight of Soviet Jews has
rarely been worse," Hawkins
said.
Hawkins said Soviet Jews
are fighting to make their
voices heard. "Their courage,
their organization, and their
contacts in the West have al-
lowed them to retain some
visibility despite overwhelming
Soviet pressures," the senator
said.
Hawkins stressed that the
Soviet government knows that
the Jewish activists need in-
formation to survive, "in-
formation flowing in from the
West, flowing out with the
news of their plight We
are here to keep the lines of
communication open with the
Jews of the Soviet Union."
Rinaldo noted that Radio
Maccabee is needed at a time
hcn "Soviet authorities, in
violation of the Helsinki
accords, are interfering with
both postal and telephone
communications and seek
increasingly to isolate their
Jewish population from
contact with the West.
He stressed the news service
would "supplement and not
replace" Radio Liberty s
existing programs to the
USSR. He said that presently
Radio Liberty devotes a halt
hour a week to a program for
Soviet Jews and, rather than
take the time away from its
existing programs, the new
service is needed. He said it is
hoped that Radio Maccabee
could be on the air for up to
six hours a day.
fi BLUE RIDGE ft
r/fl CAMP and RESORT FOR BOYS & GIRLS 6-16 11 \l
1 YOUR MOUNTAIN OF FUN Where Spring
Comes A Spends the Summer
ONLY 2 HOURS NORTH OF ATLANTA
MOUNTAIN CITY c
All Water Sports in Ojr Own Twin Spring Fed Lakes
White Water Canoeing Mt Trail Hikes Tennis
Arts & Crafts Sailing Skiing Gymnastics and
Dance Go Carts Computers Roller Skating
Rock Climbing Basketball Soccer Softball
Hockey Zoological & Science Program
Dietary Laws Observed Shabbat Services
Medical Staff Available at All Times
Accredited Member American Camping Association
Your Camp Directors
COACH J.I. MONTGOMERY
MORRIS & SHEILA WAL0MAN
STAN* BARBARA M1NTZ
Miami Beach Phone 305-538-3434 or Write
P.O. Box 2888. Miami Beach. Fla. 33140
LIMITED ENROLLMENT
tonlnrfi
V
IN A GRANIT MANNER
Summer time is lun time at the beautiful Gnnrt
Our policy of catering exclusively to mature singles
and couples ossares that your stay will he an
enjoyable and relaxing experience.
Come to the beautiful Granit this
summer. Where enery day Is fantastic.
SISSEI IATEI
juie 30 tin r
IKlllill H IIUI1M
. Hnm ? Ml AWIlllWH
n>, la I Ml
SEEKEID SPECIAL
Fll-lll I MTI! IfTII
*68-7B
mEEI ECHtST SPECIAL
I ll'l i H'll INI
$57-'65
EEUT SPECIAL
340-370
II FLISIM MIL:
IIEX MTCMU
7M-MM
' tjtp*
hUmPiMIMiInn ftJj]\A\ J\l
ii m. tii ii iw. """.-% 9*V, Rfia
m mm tak mm oh.....mi *~^f /T *" ,
mm, I.......I lam mum | __/ / (' i l
ram *' -----
N C OlMCT 01*1 OUTOIOI N_r TOUfOM
iiUEiH- //(< 212-56*1181 800-431-7681
-uimmTJSiSmmJ ft' \g) KSHM0NK8OW. M V 1244 914-6283M1]
ssv$s?g-
,1* o( the att
Discowe' -taw ed
pa^^HWrth massage-
Endearing staM m
whirlpool sauna. wm,s
Have ^^ classes
SpaVacat.onPacWgeiascnin9
plwate.tranq^ 6minutcs
ToSaC^-^
SELF-
SB****
a tort It****


The Taba Tumult
Why Is a Tiny Beach Important?
S
*fe By PHILIP GILLON
London Chronicle Syndicate
Every Israeli who has ever
joyed a vacation in Taba
acted with considerable anxiety
_ the announcement that Presi-
ient Hosni Mubarak of Egypt
ill agree to turn the cold peace
ito a hot one if three conditions
re fulfilled, one of which is the
urender to Egypt of the Taba
;rip.
Just before Mubarak made this
r, I happened to spend four
s at a tennis clinic organized
the Israel Tennis Centre at the
iya Sonesta Hotel in Taba and
lit- home convinced that Taba
at be saved for Israel.
ENERALLY, I am one of the
t reasonable of men, and I
nk that we should jump at
g Hussein's suggestion that
Arabs should trade us peace
territories. Hussein did not
fine exactly what territories he
id in mind, but I presume he is
inking of the West Bank. I
cept the argument that peace is
re valuable than real estate.
ut Taba is different.
It is perhaps advisable to get
e record straight and to define
hat is meant by "Taba." People
ho studied history at school are
iliar with hotly contested
order arguments names like
lsace-Lorraine, Schleswig-
osltein, Danzig and Trieste
rigger associations with grounds
or war.
But these names symbolize
towns or territories inhabited by
large nubmers of people whose
oyalty and identification may be
given to one of two mighty
neighbors.
Taba is completely different.
Prior to 1967, it was a strip of
empty desert on the Red Sea, just
south of Eilat's Coral Beach and
Marine Observatory. The total
area involved comprises a few
acres. Carl Lewis could cover the
total width in less than ten
seconds flat.
THE ARGUMENT between
Israel and Egypt is whether the
international line between the
Sinai desert and the Negev
desert, drawn before 1918 and
long before Eilat was even a
twinkle in David Ben-Gurion's
eye, ran north or south of Taba.
On any map, even one on a sclae
of an inch to 500 yeards, the strip
would be about the width of the
line. So who can tell where it ran?
The Egyptians have never
questioned that there was a part
' of the Red Sea coastline that waa
the Negev, where Eilat came into
existence. But how far south did
Eilat stretch?
There are only two sites in
Taba the Aviya Sonesta Hotel
and Rafi Nelson's village. The
Aviya Sonesta is a five-star
resort hotel built by Eli
Papoushado. The hotel boats
that, although it is just minutes
-from the center of Eilat, it is still
a million miles away from the rest
of Israel. I found this to be a
valid claim: this was the nearest
approach to a one-hotel resort
such as I knew in South Africa
many years ago. The stresses of
Israel are as remote as the moon.
The decor and interior
decorating, gentle and
unassuming, are different from
anything in any other Israeli
botel. They were planned by
Aviya Papoushado, the wife of
the owner. She and her sister
were shot by her brother-in-law,
who then shot himself, some
years ago.
Ran Nelson's village consists
some palm-fronded huts under
a hillock on which Nelson has
Placed his sculpture versions of
u?ug0lden c*" Moses,
ooking at each other. Nelson, a
ramer sailor who was captured in
">e Suez Canal by the Egyptians
* very badly treated by them.
looks like Robinson Crusoe. His
restaurant serves excellent fish,
but it is a faux pas to ask for
knives and forks you must use
your fingers.
I PERSONALLY would be
thrilled if that affair became as
hot as Mark Antony's
relationship with Cleopatra. But
there are limits to the sacrifices
we can make for love. I urge
Prime Minister Shimon Peres
give Mubarak a chunk of the
West Bank, but not Taba. Taba
must be saved.
Eilat's Mayor Rafi Hochman
has charged the prime minister
with "weakness and lack of faith
in the justice of Israel's case"
with regard to the Taba dispute.
Hochman, formerly a Labor
politician though elected last
year as an independent, said that
he did not believe the Egyptian
contention that the resolution of
the Taba conflict would lead to an
overall thaw in Egypt-Israel
relations. "Taba will be given to
Egypt, and the peace will remain
cold," he warned.
1 SO THE whole argument is
about these two places. Con-
sidering all that we gave back to
Mubarak's predecessor, Anwar
Sadat that magnificent Red
Sea coastline where hundreds of
thousands of Israelis used to
camp, and the entire Yamit
region, not to mention airfields,
Santa Caterina and the rest of
Sinai Mubarak should be a
sport and should let us keep this
tiny piece of territory. After all,
the Egyptians owe something to
Nelson for ill-treating him while
he was in their hands.
Of course, Mubarak may argue
that we can still go to the Sonesta
and to Nelson's village after they
pass into Egyptian hands,
provided we do not submit them
to the same treatment as we
accorded to Yamit. But this just
hasn't worked with regard to the
Red Sea sites that the Egyptians
took over.
We all prefer a warm peace to a
cold one, and are dying to resume
the tentative love affair with
Egypt that was under way when
Sadat was alive.
Haifa-bora pianist Daniel
dni will perform in the
sanctuary of Temple F.manu-
El Sunday, Feb. 3, at 3 p.m.
This is the third monthly
concert of a four part "Musk
For A Sunday Afternoon"
series. "Music For A Sunday
Afternoon" is sponsored by
the temple's Adult Education
Committee through its cul-
tural sub-committee chaired
by Toby Susskind. The
concert is open to the public
and tickets may be purchased
at the door of the Temple at $8
leach.
Temple Emanu-EI is located
at 190 No. County Road,
Palm Beach. For any further
information call the office or
Toby Susskind.

Jewish Singles
'argument for separate Jewish
singles activities is that, when
they are well planned, "they
attract large numbers" of
Jews who would not otherwise
attend "any Jewish event."
THE ANALYSIS cites two
"notable" examples. Rabbi
Stephen Listfeld's singles
service in the Conservative
Adas Israel Congregation in
Washington, D.C., draws
Continued from Page 8
about 800 Jews each week.
In suburban New Jersey, 35
Reform and Conservative
synagogues "have combined
forces to sponsor an equally
successful series of Friday
evening services for singles
that rotates between the
congregations. A different age
group (18-35, 30-55, 50-69 and
a special 30s group) is targeted
each week."
Eat In Good Health
With Fleischmann's Margarine
Fleischmann^
7,SJOO%cornoil
Margarine
'jSweetllNSM.Tffl
^leischmann
-KXftcomo.
Margarine
Its easy to eat healthful, tow cholesterol food
when delicious Flerachmann's Margarine is
part of the meal. Fleischmanns is made from
100% com ofl. has 0% cholesterol and is tow in
saturated fat. So, if you want to enjoy good
eating and good health, one thing's for certain
There's never been a better time for the great
taste of Reischmann's.
I
Fleischmann'
/mandel brodt\
M Matpoon griMd tomon pe
2*4 cups all-purpose Hour
4 teaspoons oHung powder
Vi teaspoon salt
V> cup PLANTERS. Savered
Almonds, toasted and chopped
V OW FLEISCHMANN S.
Margarine, softened
1 cup sugar
V. cup EGG BEATERS.
Cholesterol-rre* 99\ Real Egg
Product
I teaspoon almond extract
larlo*.*tOoa.HEISCHIr!ANNSMaro* UP tGGUTlRSCWri
ZSSmm%tmS!r!tm aanondertreaend Wnon p "" blended n
Cm* oo.gr. ha* M "oured mod* shade each *to> ot dough mo an 3
w-mch H on a greased Uaung natt
BaM a) 3Wf K 35 mmuies (h unw goMen tram What -arm cut into ***
it oev.M return shced Man*! Brodl to own lo toast unei ughey 6roned Mean 30
ruff men shoes
SAVE15*
WHEN 00 BUY ANY ONE KXINO Of
FLEISCHMANN S. MARGARINE
a


Senior News
FROM THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
TRANSPORTATION
Transportation is available
in our designated area for
persons 60 years of age or over
who do not use public tran-
sportation. We take people to
treatment centers, doctors'
offices, to hospitals, nursing
homes to visit spouses, to
social service agencies and
nutrition centers. There is no
fee for this service, but parti-
cipants are encouraged to
contribute their fair share.
There is a great demand for
this service, so please make
your reservations in advance.
For information or reserva-
tions, call 689-7703 Monday
through Friday.
HOT KOSHER LUNCH
CONNECTION
Many elements combine to
make the Hot Kosher Lunch
Program at the Jewish Com-
munity Center a success. Fore-
most among these is the
opportunity to form new and
lasting friendships.
Each weekday, seniors
gather for intimate talk,
educational discussions, game
playing, leisure and song.
These activities are followed
by a hot, kosher, nutritious
lunch served with warmth and
hospitality by our dedicated
volunteers. There is no set fee,
but persons are asked to make
a contribution each meal.
MENU FOR THE WEEK
Menu for the week of Jan.
28 through Feb. I
Monday Grapefruit
juice, gefilte fish with hor-
seradish, rice, peas and
carrots, peaches and pum-
pernickel bread.
Tuesday Apple juice,
meat balls with tomato gravy,
parsley potatoes, peas and
carrots, pineapple tidbits and
Italian bread.
Wednesday Orange juice,
stuffed peppers, mashed
potatoes, glazed carrots,
cookies and Italian bread.
Thursday Pineapple
juice, beef with cabbage sauce,
mashed potatoes, squash, pear
halves and whole wheat bread.
Friday Orange juice,
baked chicken with tomato
sauce, glazed carrots, sweet
potatoes, mixed fruit and
Challah bread.
Please come and join us.
For information and reser-
vations [which must be made
in advance] call Carol or
Lillian at 689-7703 in West
Palm Beach.
HOME
DELIVERED MEALS
Persons who are
homebound and need a
Kosher meal please call for
information. Call Carol in
West Palm Beach at 689-7703.
FIRST ANNUAL SENIOR
ACTIVITIES FESTIVAL
Jan. 30, 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. at
West Palm Beach Auditorium
Gulf stream Area Agency on
Aging and Florida Power &
Light Co. are providing a day
filled with information about
senior activities. Various acti-
vities and demonstrations will
take place throughout the day.
An HMO P'panel discussion
will take place in the after-
noon. The JCC will have an
exhibit along with all the com-
munity agencies that serve
seniors throughout the county.
There is no fee. Transporta-
tion will be available. Call
Helen or Goldie at the JCC for
information, 689-7703.
VOLUNTEERS
VOLUNTEERS
The Jewish Community
Center is pleased to welcome
Ruth Horen as our volunteer
coordinator. Our volunteers
are our dream machine and
help to make the wheels turn
throughout the JCC. Ruth will
be at the JCC Tuesday 1-4,
Wednesday 10-4, Thursday
10-4. If you wish to become
involved and part of our JCC
family, call Ruth for an ap-
pointment 689-7703. Ruth
wants to know all of our
volunteers so stop in at the
volunteer office and say
"Hello."
= Optimism
America. He dismissed recent
reports that Jordan is to buy
Soviet arms as "insigni-
ficant."
Cohen was in the U.S. for a
short visit lor the publication
of two new books he wrote,
"Jewish Life Under Islam"
and "Egypt and Palestine."
Asked to assess the present
relations between Israel and
Egypt, Cohen said: "The
peace between the two coun-
tries is very precise from the
formal point of view, but it is
rather ambiguous and unclear
in its substantive aspects. The
Egyptians adhere to the letter,
but there is a great deal of ero-
sion in the spirit of the
treaty."
EGYPT, however, claims
that as long as Israel is in
Lebanon and the issue of Taba
in the Sinai is not resolved it
cannot keep as warm relations
with Israel as it would like to
have, Cohen noted. "The real
test for Egypt will come,
therefore, soon, when Israel
will finally be out of Lebanon
and the Taba issue is re-
solved," hesfeid.
Turning to the issue of the
PLO, Cohen said that Yasir
Arafat was recognized anew as
the leader of the PLO during
the recent meeting of the
Palestinian National Council
in Amman.
But he said that he believes
that it's too early to assess the
PLO as becoming more
moderate. He said that there
are many Israelis who believe
that the PLO is moderating its
policies in view of its decision
to "consider" at a later date
Hussein's call, during the
Amman meeting, to seek a
political solution to the con-
flict with Israel.
"THE FACT that they are
willing to consider Hussein's
suggestions is some progress
from their point of view, but
this by itself is not enough to
brand the PLO moderate.
After all, there is no change in
the PLO's terrorist activities,
there is no change in its tie
with the Soviet Union, and
most of all there is no change
in the Palestinian National
Charter that calls for the
Help Wanted
Sexton Ritual Director
Conservative/Traditional synagogue in So. Fla.
Usual duties. Must have excellent references.
Retiree acceptable. Call Broward 981-6112 or
Dade 949-0501. Do not call collect.
Continued from Page 1
destruction of Israel," Cohen
said.
The 48-year-old Israeli-born
scholar said that the only mili-
tary threat to Israel in the near
future is from Syria. He con-
tended that Syria, as a result
of the war in Lebanon, is more
dependent now on the Soviet
Union and has "more self-
confidence" than it had before
the war.
Cohen said that as long as
Israel is in Lebanon he does
not think a war will erupt
between Israel and Syria. But
once Israel is out of Lebanon,
Syria and Israel might be
drawn into a war because of
terrorist activities against
Israel from Syria or Lebanon,
or because of Syria's attempt
to invade Jordan, Cohen said.
v
Senate Majority LeT.
Robert Dole [R., K.n.1 ,j
the Anti-Defamation Leiw^
1985 Inaugural DiB,
honoring Madame Bui
Alexander on the occasion of I
her 90th birthday. Some 1
Jewish community leaden
from all parts of the coimin
are expected to attend the tah
testimonial which will ||UICJ
the ADL National Appeil
Thursday, Feb. 7, at T1
Breakers Hotel.
M&
KOSHER
CATERING
Hyatt Palm Beaches
833-1234
,
2250 Palm Beach Lakes Boulevard Suite 104
West Palm Beach, Florida 33409
JEWISH FAMILY AND CHILDREN'S SERVICE
An outstanding professional and counseling agency serving tht
Jewish community ot Palm Beach County. Protesslonal ano
confidential help is available tor
Problems ol the aging
Consultation and
evaluation services
1Bi
Marital counseling
Parent-child contacts
Persona' problems
684-1991
Moderate Imi are charged In tamlly and Individual counseling to
those who can pay (Fees are baaed on Income and tamlly alze)
The Jewish Family and Children's Services la a beneficiary agency ol
the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County.
laromme Jerusalem hotel
See your travel agent or call toll-
free: 800-223-0888 (in New York
Slate. 800-522-5455 or 212-841-1111).
* P.P-,0.0., Dally
On room only. From 1/1 'til 2/28.
Subject to 15% service charge.
Not available to tours and groups;
payment must be made directly to
the hotel.
( \K1 l()\ HOIII.
Right now is the ideal time, for
planning a trip to Israel. The weather's
perfect; the season's in full swing;
and the rates are so low! Israel's
two leading 5-Star luxury hotels,
the elegant Laromme Jerusalem.
overlooking the Old City, and
the smart beachfront
Tel Aviv Carlton offer you the
incredible buy of the year
Stay at one hotel. Stay at
both. Come for a minimum
of 5 nights or as long as
you like. And one child (no age limit)
stays absolutely free in the same room with
you. Both hotels are fully kosher and have
complete Sabbath facilities.
Laromme eiiat hotel
For only $20 per p.p.do., daily, soak up Israel's
mntcr sun at Laromme Eilat right on the Red
Sea, with its own pool and secluded beach.
Swim, scuba dive, windsurf. Marvelous way to
top off the perfect Israeli vacation.
y taromme hotels (mti) Up^


Friday, January 25, 1985 /The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 13
lorida Leads South With 51
Anti-Semitic Vandalism Was Up in '85
ig
NEW YORK Anti-
emitic vandalism and other
ssaults or threats against
lews, Jewish institutions or
Iroperty increased moderately
1984 after having declined
[ two years in a row, accord-
to the annual audit con-
lucted by the Anti-
)efamation League of B'nai
rith. The audit revealed a
ticeable increase in such
erious crimes as arson and
bombings.
ADL national director
Jathan Perlmutter said the
lurvey based on data sup-
plied by the League's 30
fegional offices across the
j_s. revealed a total of 715
iciaents of vandalism, an in-
crease of 6.7 percent over the
1983 total of 670.
OF THE 715, there were 32
kerious crimes as compared to
h in 1983. The 32 included 17
Eases of arson and attempted
trson, compared to 13 the pre-
vious year; three bombings as
against none in 1983; one at-
tempted bombing the same
s in 1983 and 11 cemetery
lesecrations, compared to 9
|Tor the previous year.
In the category of other
assaults or threats, which were
tabulated separately, the
survey revealed 369 incidents
an increase of 5.4 percent
jverthe 1983 figure of 350.
The 1984 audit showed that
Ithe following five states had
the most vandalism episodes:
iNew York, 237; California,
|99: Maryland, 69; New Jersey,
i and Florida, 51. Overall,
32 states and the District of
Columbia were involved in the
incidents.
PERLMUTTER said that
the 1984 figures are "dis-
turbing because they reverse a
[two-year decline." He pointed
lout, however, that the 6.7
percent figure was far smaller
than the 192 and 158 percent
increases in 1980 and 1981 and
added that the 1985 totals will
be carefully watched for signs
of any new trend.
The survey, prepared by the
Research Department of
ADL's Civil Rights Division,
noted that law enforcement
authorities arrested 84 persons
on 1984 in connection with 51
incidents, compared to the
1983 total of 115 persons ar-
rested in 55 incidents.
Perlmutter called for
stepped-up counteraction
efforts and for heightened
public concern to combat anti-
Semitic incidents. He said that
measures taken thus far
including stricter law enforce-
ment, local security confer-
ences and educational
programs had helped bring
about the 1982 and 1983
declines from the peak of 974
vandalism incidents reported
in 1981.
KEY FINDINGS of the
1984 audit included:
In 1984, as in past years,
the overwhelming majority of
those arrested were age 20 or
younger. In only five of the
thousands of anti-Semitic inci-
dents during the last six years
was there any reported evid-
ence of organized hate group
involvement the last in
,1981.
While the total number of
assaults, threats and harass-
ment directed against Jews or
Jewish-owned properties
remained practically un-
changed 369 in 1984 com-
pared to 350 in 1983 there
was a reversal of the statistical
breakdown.
The number of episodes in
which Jewish institutions were
the targets of mail or
telephone threats and other
means of harassment in-
creased markedly from 39 in
1983 to 106 in 1984. At the
same time, however, the total
of incidents in which indi-
vidual Jews were the targets
dropped by 48 from 311 in
1983 to 263 in 1984.
SEVERAL of the incidents
reported in the 1984 audit at-
tracted considerable media
attention. These included the
vandalizing and defacing of a
newly-opened synagogue in
Manalapan, N.J., in October;
the bombing of a synagogue in
Boise, Idaho, in April; and
vandalisms on 17 separate
days from April through Nov-
ember in the Co-Op City
housing project in the Bronx,
N.Y. The Boise and Co-Op
City incidents remain un-
solved.
In the New Jersey incident,
the survey noted that three
teenagers were arrested and
charged with the vandalism
two of whom were also
charged in connection with an
earlier vandalism and at-
tempted arson of another
Manalapan synagogue.
Perlmutter said the com-
munity response to the
Manalapan incident was a
"model" of how such inci-
dents should be dealt with:
New Jersey Gov. Thomas H.
Kean and U.S. Sen. Frank
1. an ten berg joined some 3,000
local and community officials
and religious leaders in a "day
of solidarity" to repudiate the
anti-Jewish act; those arrested
have been indicted and face
trial.
IN ASSESSING the fin-
dings of the audit, Perlmutter
said the statistics provide only
one barometer for measuring
anti-Jewish bigotry in this
country.
Others, he said, include
anti-Semitic rhetoric in
election campaigns; anti-Israel
and anti-Zionist propaganda
disseminated in this country
and in the United Nations by
Arab and pro-PLO groups;
the propaganda activities of
organized right-wing anti-
Jewish hate groups such as the
Ku Klux Klan, neo-Nazi
groups and such organizations
as Willis Carto's Liberty
Lobby and Lyndon
LaRouche's operations, and
activities of radical leftist
organizations such as the
Communist Party, U.S.A.
The ADL survey provided
this geographical breakdown
of the incidents of anti-Semitic
vandalism:
The Northeastern region,
comprising seven states and
the District of Columbia, ac-
counted for roughly 60 percent
of the 715 reported. In 1983",
these states accounted for 58
percent of the total. The 1984
totals are: Massachusetts, 20
incidents; Rhode Island,
seven; Connecticut, five; New
York, 237; New Jersey, 56;
Pennsylvania, 28; Maryland,
69, and the District of
Columbia, 10.
In nine Southern states, 98
vandalism incidents were
reported 13.7 percent of the
1984 total compared to 73
such incidents which formed
10.9 percent of the 1983 total.
The 1984 totals are: Florida,
51; Georgia, 15; Louisiana,
nine; Virginia, nine; Missis-
sippi, five; Texas, five;
Arkansas, three; Tennessee,
three; and North Carolina,
one.
The Midwest states which
had incidents Illinois, 19;
Minnesota, 15; Michigan,
seven; Ohio, six; Indiana,
four; Missouri, two; Iowa,
one; Nebraska, one, and
Wisconsin, one showed a
noticeable decline in 1984
compared to 1983. Fifty-six
anti-Semitic vandalisms were
reported in the area during
1984 compared to 80 in 1983.
The Midwest accounted for
7.8 percent of the total
number of such incidents in
1984 compared to 11.9 percent
in 1983.
The Western region of the
country showed practically no
change compared to 1983. The
seven states of the region
California, 99; Arizona, 10;
Washington, seven; Colorado,
six; Oregon, two; Idaho, one,
and New Mexico, one, had 126
incidents of anti-Semitic
vandalism which comprised
17.6 percent of the total. In
1983, there were 127 such inci-
dents 19 percent of the
total.
AS PART of its counter-
action and educational efforts
against incidents involving
overt bigotry, ADL published
and distributed last fall a
handbook titled "Security for
Community Institutions,"
prepared in cooperation with
the New York City Police
Department.
The handbook is based on
the League's experience in
working with law enforcement
officials, educators and reli-
gious and community leaders
to combat bigotry. The hand-
book outlines proper security
measures and procedures for
community institutions,
proper reaction when incidents
occur and provides details of
security programs carried out
by the New York City Police
Department's crime preven-
tion section and bias incidents
investigating unit.
Included in it is the text of a
model statute developed by
ADL as a means of assisting
law enforcement agencies to
cope with vandalism against
religious and ethnic groups.

FOR INVESTMENT RESEARCH
Regarding:
The Flagler Bank Corporation
and
Seacoast Banking Corporation of Florida
Call WILLIAM DUGAN
or
GARY CAMARANO
1-800-621-0686
The Chicago Corporation
208 LA SALLE STREET, CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60604
(312)855-7600
COLUMBUS. OHIO OEERFIELD, ILLINOIS
MEMBERS NEW YORK AND OTHER PRINCIPAL STOCK EXCHANGES
CHICAGO BOARD OPTIONS EXCHANGE CHICAGO BOARO OF TRADE
AND
BE WELL
tfU
The most impor-
tant part of living
well is being well.
Because The Court
at Palm-Airc recog-
nizes this, there are
la? "Hrf; if
\ ital differences
between us and our many neighbors.
A difference that enhances the atmos-
phere of warmth and security that makes
The Court at Palm-Airc Florida's most
unique residential retirement community
exclusively for people 62 and over.
And a difference
that presents you
with a freedom to
choose a Life I imc
Lease through a Re-
fundable Investment Program or Monthly
Rental.
To learn more about our many attractive
differences, you are invited to telephone
The Court at Palm-Airc at (305>975-89UO,
or fill out and return the attached coupon.
May you live and be well.
%cQurt
at 'fladn-Aire
zz
E2
Another community by Life Can Communitiw Corporation
Spacious studio, one-bedroom, two
bedroom and deluxe apartments
Elegant dining
Bus service
Nurses available 24 hours-a-day
Maid, linen and concierge service
24 hour security
Pool, health spa and exercise rooms
Library, card room, art studio,
music room and auditorium
And much more
.1 would like more information about
"1
The Court at Palm- Aire
Name ______________
Address--------------------
City-------------------------
State -------------
Zip
Phone
' I'JMV l'*t <-*% "n-HtHlKl rfM.TAIHH
2701 North Course Drive
Pompano Beach, FL 330(99
(305)975-8900
_PBF 1/25/BS __.__


rfgeT4
l he Jewish Honditn 6T Palm
y,January
Israel Consul General To Keynote
Temple Beth Torah Presents
First Annual Israeli Festival
"A whole night of constant
motion revolving around an
Israeli theme" is the way co-
chairs Seymour Moritz, Elaine
Schimek and Sander Spero
describe Temple Beth Torah's
First Annual Israeli Festival.
The gala evening will be held
on Saturday, March 2, 7 p.m.,
at the Flagler Museum in Palm
Beach and is open to the entire
community.
The evening will feature a
keynote address by Yehoshua
Trigor, consul general, of
Israel for Florida and Puerto
Rico. He has had a long and
distinguished career in Israel's
foreign service and has held
posts on several continents. In
the United States, he has
served as vice consul in
Atlanta and consul in Los
Angeles.
An authentic* Israeli buffet
dinner will be served. Con-
tinuous entertainment will
include comedian Danny
Tadmore, a singing and danc-
ing team, the Kol Golan Duo,
and a travelogue presentation
byElAL.
Door prizes will be an-
nounced throughout tht
evening. In addition the
temple is sponsoring a raffle
which will culminate at the Is-
raeli Festival. The winner will
be presented with a seven-day
trip for two to Israel via El AL
Airlines and will stay at the
Five-star Dan Hotel.
Donation for the gala
evening is $20 per person. For
tickets or more information
Consul
Trigor
General Yehoshua
Boston
University
*
Ben Gurion
University
of the Negev
Master of Science In Management
Full time degree studies in Israel
One Year Program Taught in English
Joint Degree Full Campus Facilities
Mail Inquiry to
Director. MSM Program in Israel
Boston University Metropolitan College
"55 Commonwealth Avenue
Boston. MA 02215
Tel (617) 355-2987
Please send information
about the MSM program
in Israel
Israel
Tricphunr
Boston I'nrversity is an Equal Opportunity Institution
contact Sylvia Lipkin, 854
Lantern Tree Lane, Welling-
ton. FL 33414.
Bar Mitzvah
STEPHEN HASNER
Stephen Rory Hasner, son
of Marilyn and Lloyd Hasner
of North Palm Beach, will
become a Bar Mitzvah on
Friday evening, Jan. 25, at
Temple Judea. Rabbi Joel
Levine and Cantor Anne
Newman will officiate.
Stephen will share his Bar
Mitzvah with "twin" Igor
Stanislavsky of Kishinev,
USSR, to highlight the plight
of Soviet Jewry. He will be
presented his twinning certi-
ficate by Douglas Kleiner,
social action chair.
Stephen, an eighth grader at
Howell Watkins Junior High
School, enjoys working with
computers. His sports interests
include basketball, baseball,
skateboarding and, especially,
, surfing.
BUYING GOLD & SILVER
Buying...
Scrap Cold
in any form, any condition
Buying...
Coins-Cold & Silver
Collections & Accumulations
U.S. & Foreign
NORTH AMERICAN
RARE COINS,
INC
2550 OKEECHOBEE BLVD.. W. PALM BEACH. FL.
684-1771
HOURS: 9:30 o.m.-4:00 p.m.
Member ana & Oamhe' Commerce
Candle lighting Time
Fri. Jan. 255:39 pm
Religious Directory
Conservative
CONGREGATION ANSHEI SHOLOM: 6348 Grove Street
West Palm Beach 33409. PHone 684-3212. Rabbi Isaac
Vander Walde. Cantor Mordecai Spektor. Daily: 8:30 a.m.
and 5:30 p.m. Friday: 8:30 a.m., 5 p.m. and a late service at 8:15
p.m. followed by Oneg Shabbat. Saturday: 8:30 a.m., 6 pun.,
Mincha followed by Shotosh Suedoa.
CONGREGATION BETH KODESH OF BOYNTON BEACH:
501 N.E. 26 Avenue, Boynton Beach 33436. Phone 586-9428.
Rabbi Avrom L. Drazin, Cantor Arthur R. Roeenwaastr.
Monday 8:30 am.; Thursday 8:30 ajn. Sabbath servkat,
Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9a.m.
GOLDEN LAKES TEMPLE: 1470 Golden Lakes Blvd.,
West Palm Beach 33411. Phone 689-9430. Rabbi Joseph
Speiser. Daily Services 8:15 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. Sabbath
services Friday 815 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m., 5 p.m., Mincha
followed by Sholosh Suedos.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID: 4657 Hood Road, Palm Beach
Gardens 33410. Phone 694-2350. Rabbi William Marder,
Cantor Earl J. Rackoff. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m.
Saturday 10 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 2815 No. Flagler Dr., West Pate
Beach 33407. Phone 833-0339. Rabbi Howard J. Hirsch,
Cantor Elaine Shapiro. Sabbath services Friday 8:15 p.m.,
Saturday 9:30 a.m. Daily Minyan 8:15 a.m., Sunday and
Legal Holidays 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 315 N. "A" Street, Lake Worth
33460. 'Phone 585-5020. Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg, Cantor
Jacob Elman. Services Monday and Thursday 8:15 a.m.,
Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 224 N.W. Avenue G. Belle
Glade 33430. Sabbath services Friday, 8:30 p.m. Phone 996
3886.
TEMPLE BETH ZION: Lions Club, 700 Camelia Dr., Royal
Palm Beach. Mailing Address: POBox 104, 660 Royal Palm
Blvd., Royal Palm Beach, FL 33411. Sabbath Services Friday 8
.p.m., Saturday 8:46 a.m. Rabbi Nathan Zelizer. Phone 793-
9122.
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB: 2177 So. Congress Ave>, West Palm
Beach 33406. Phone 433-5967. Rabbi Dr. Morris Silberman.
Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m., Saturday and Holidays 9a.m.,
Monday and Thursday 9 a.m.
TEMPLE EMANUEL: 190 North County Road, Palm Beach
33480. Phone 832-0804. Rabbi Joel Chazin. Cantor David
Dardashti. Sabbath services, Friday 8:30 p.m.; Saturday 9 a.m.
THE TREASURE COAST JEWISH CENTER Ben
Abraham: 3257 S.E. Salerno Road, Port Salerno. Rabbi
Abraham Rose. 1-287-8833. Services Friday evenings 8 p.m.
LAKE WORTH JEWISH CENTER: St. Luke's United
Methodist Chapel. 166 Ohio Road, Lake Worth. Phone 433-
1869. Friday night serivcee 8:15 p.m., Saturday, 9 a.m.
Orthodox
CONGREGATION AITZ CHAIM: Century Village, West
Palm Beach. Phone 689-4675. Sabbath services 9 a.m. and 5
p.m. Daily services 8:15 a.m. and 6:30 p.m.
Reform
CONGREGATION BETH ISRAEL: 1692 Florasta, P.O. Box
857146, Port St. Lucie, FL 33462. Friday night services 8 p.m.
Saturday morning 10:30 a.m. Phone 466-6977.
THE REFORM TEMPLE OF JUPITER TEOWKSTAi at
Jupiter High SchooL Military Trail, Jupiter. Mailing address:
Plaza 222, U.S. No. 1, Tequesta 33468. Phone. 747-4236. Rabbi
Alfred L. Friedman. Services Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 4600 Oleander Avenue, Fort Pierce, FL
33450. Phone 461-7428.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM: St. Helena Pariah Hall, 20tb
Avenue and Victory Blvd., Vero Beach 32960, mailing address:
P.O. Box 2113. Vero Batch, FL 32981-2113. Rabbi Richard D.
Messing. Phone 1-569-0180.
TEMPLE BETH TORAH: at Wellington Elementary School,
13000 Paddock Dr., West Palm Beach. Mailing address: P.O.
Box 17008, West Palm Beach, FL 33408. Friday services 8:16
p.m. Rabbi Steven R. Weatman. Phone 793-2700.
TEMPLE ISRAEL: 1901 No. Flagler Dr., West Palm Beach
33407. Phone 833-8421. Rabbi Howard Shapiro, Cantorial
Soloist Susan Weiss. Sabbath servicea, Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE JUDEA: at St. Catharine's Greek Orthodox Church
Social Hall, 4000 Washington Rd., at Southern Boulevard.
Kabbi Joel L. Levine. Cantor Anne Newman. Mailing address:
5154 Okeechobee Blvd., West-Palm Beach. FL 33409. Phone
471-1626.


[Friday, January 26,1986 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 16
III
e News
CONGREGATION
ANSHEI SHOLOM
The Sisterhood wil hold its
Lard meeting on Monday,
Feb. 4, 9:45 a.m., and its
legular meeting on Tuesday,
feb. 19, 1 pm., when Ger-
Irude and Irving Kupfer will
present piano duets featuring
opular and turn-of-the-
fcentury tunes.
TEMPLE BETH EL
. On Jan. 14, the second
lemester of Adult Education
began. Courses, which will
tontinue through Feb. 25, are
'Intermediate Siddur,"
Beginning and Intermediate
Jlpan, Israeli Dancing with
faakov Sassi, and lunch with
.Rabbi Hirsch. All these classes
bre offered to everyone at a
Jiominal fee. Call the temple
office for more information.
The Sisterhood is spon-
soring an "Education Day"
3n Monday, Jan. 28, begin-
ning at 8:45 a.m. The theme is
Proudly Presenting Being
Jewish." The morning will
begin with religious services in
-read Sanctuary. Sisterhood
lembers will participate in the
services and Torah readings
with Cantor Elaine Shapiro
presiding.
Two workshops will be
offered afterwards. The
featured guest lecturers are
Ann Lynn Lipton, Jewish
Education director of the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County, and Dr. Linda
Werner, psychologist. Lunch
will be served in Senter Hall.
Donation is $6.50 for Sister-
hood members and $8 for non-
members. For more informa-
tion contact Selma Legman,
chair for Education Day, or
the temple office.
CONGREGATION
BETH KODESH
The Sisterhood will hold a
meeting on Tuesday, Feb. 12,
12:30 p.m., at Congregation
Beth Kodesh. The guest
speaker will be Jack Salz, who
will talk on "Judaism In The
Building Of America."
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
The Sisterhood will hold
their monthly meeting on
Wednesday, Feb. 6 at 12:30
p.m. Dr. Watson B. Duncan
III will give a book review.
ike Worth Jewish Center
Installs Officers
A new slate of officers for
line Lake Worth Jewish Center
[was installed at induction
[ceremonies On Wednesday,
|Jan.9.
Murray Milrod succeeded
[Janet Schwartz as president of
[the one-year-old conservative
congregation now numbering
I about 500 members.
Mrs. Schwartz, founder of
I the center, was elected to the
post of honorary president
and also as a member of the
board of trustees.
Judge Michael Shalloway
performed the duties of instal-
ling officer in the St. Luke's
United Methodist Church
Chapel, 165 Ohio Road, Lake
iWorth, the interim home of
the synagogue. Refreshments
were served later in the
church's social hall.
The complete list of officers
for the 1985 year is as follows.
President, Murray Milrod;
vicepresidents, Stanley Auster,
Sol Freedberg, Harry
Sneiderman, Murray Strier;
treasurer, Harold Gordon;
financial secretary, Cynthia
Mashioff; recording secretary,
David Trachtenberg;
corresponding secretary,
Sylvia Mendlowitz; trustees,
josiah Donner, Dr. Martin
Greenberg, Louis Mashioff,
Martha Freedberg, Seymour
Gruber, Sylvia Luckom,
Alfred Mendlowitz, Frank
Shapiro, Clifford Storch,
Martin Weiss; honorary
president, Janet Schwartz.
Gratch-Mandel
Hartman-Miller
Ongma
Wll\STIl\i
and
Sons
Working together
to serve better,..
For generations, the most trusted names among
Jewish funeral directors in Chicago: Piser, Original
Weinstein & Sons, Gratch-Mandel and Hartman-Miller.
Now offering the same compassionate guidance,
concern and dedication to families in South Florida.
AS MENORAH CHAPELS IN:
North Miami Beach, Fort Lauderdale (Sunrise),
Margate & Deerfield Beach
AS MENORAH GARDENS & FUNERAL CHAPEL IN:
West Palm Beach
Funeral Chapvls Cemeteries Mausoleum Pre-Need Planning
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB
The Sisterhood is having a
dessert and card party on
Monday, Jan. 28 at 12:30 p.m.
Donation is SI.50.
Tickets are available by
calling Gladys Elkin or
Florence Miller, or at the door
of the temple.
TEMPLE ISRAEL
On Friday evening, Jan. 25,
the Adult Education com-
mittee will initiate a new
concept in continuing Jewish
education. It is called "The
Shabbat University."
The Shabbat University will
be held on the last Friday of
January, February, March
and April. During these even-
ings, the Shabbat service will
be devoted to a particular
theme both in liturgy and
ritual.
These services, which will be
abbreviated, will conclude
with the showing of a trigger
film on the theme of the even-
ing. After the film, discussions
and seminars will be held in
various parts of the building.
The first Shabbat University
is devoted to the theme,
"America, I Love You."
Rabbi Howard Shapiro, spir-
itual leader of Temple Israel,
and Ann Lynn Lipton, Jewish
Education director for the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County, will lead the
seminars.
TEMPLE JUDEA
Rabbi Joel Levine will
review "Loving Each Other,"
Leo Buscaglia's best-selling
book, at Temple Judea
Sabbath services, Friday, Jan.
25. Cantor Anne Newman will,
chant the music.
"Loving Each Other,"
according to Rabbi Levine, is
one of the most important
books on human relationships
ever published. Buscaglia is a
master teacher in the art of
effective human communica-
tion. Rabbi Levine will stress
that Buscaglia has a keen
insight into not only the great
wisdom of the sages of Jewish
tradition but into what great
thinkers of every age have
written about loving and
caring human relationships.
The junior oneg shabbat
under the direction of Miriam
Ruiz will be held during the
service. The congregation is
invited to the oneg shabbat
following services, sponsored
by Lloyd and Marilyn Hasner
in honor of Stephen's Bar
Mitzvah. For more informa-
tion, call the temple office.
LAKE WORTH
JEWISH CENTER
Three teenagers will address
the congregation at Friday
evening services on Jan. 25.
Marshall Brozost, Jeff
Tochner and Gary Lesser,
students at the Midrasha
Judaica High School in West
Palm Beach, recently returned
from a stay in Israel. Each will
speak on the timely subject,
"My Trip to Israel."
Hazzan Howard Dardashti,
of the family Dardashti, will
serve as guest cantor.
The 31-year-old Iranian-
born cantor has composed
Sabbath services with guitar
accompaniment which have
been used in congregations in
California and Florida. He
comes from a musical family
who immigrated to the United
.States in 1971.
Area Deaths
BLOM
Curtla 3 West Palm Beach.
Riverside Guardian Plan Chapel,
Weat Palm Beach.
GOLDSTEIN
Max. 75. of 3800 N. Flagler Drive.
Weat Palm Beach. Levltt-
Welnateln Guaranteed Security
Plan Chapel. Weat Palm Beach.
KNIAZER
Vera. 74. Century Village. Weat
Palm Beach. Menorah Gardem
and Funeral Chapels, West Palm
Beach.
PLOTCH
Ruth A.. 00. West Palm Beach.
Riverside Guardian Plan Chapel.
West Palm Beach.
ROSEN
Jean. 74. Weat Palm Beach.
Menorah Gardens and Funeral
Chapels, West Palm Beach.
SOHN
Nathan, 74. of 439 Lake Francis
Drive. West Palm BEach. Levltt-
Welnsteln Guaranteed Security
Plan Chapel. Weat Palm Beach.
iHiiiHiiTiiiiiimininHmHiiiiiinTiiim
&
A-AAbor AnswerFone
A Division of
A RING-A-DING" ANSWERING SERVICE
Computerized Switchboard Live Operators
WE ANSWER FAST!
4390700
213 No. Dixie Highway. Lake Worth, FL 33460
!L&M-wmMn
JACK WEISS
Manager
Memorial Chapels
W.st Palm Beach
5411 OkaachobM Blvd.
689-8700
Delray
278-7600
Hollywood
921-7200
No. Miami Beach
949-6315
Pompano Boca
427-6500
CHARLES D. SEGAL
PREPAID FUNERALS AVAILABLE THROUGH
OUR "GUARANTEED SECURITY PLAN"
JMentrthm
Check why it makes sense to pre-arrange
your funeral now.
Pre-arranging the
details now means
your spouse and/or
your children never
nave to be burdened
later...because the grief
is enough to handle.
The GUARANTEED
SECURITY PLANSM allows you to make your choices
now. It's a loving thing to do for your family.
I ft.**
0
0
/, (or my spouse) won 7 have to make
decisions under stress or sorrow.
Neither will my children.
Everything is covered, no matter how
much costs go up. The price is guaranteed
-at today's cost.
A service of
MEMORIAL CHAPELS
0
0
0
*
Everythin
by Levitt-
will be taken care of
instein.
We can pay now with extended
payments, without interest.
All of the above.
It really makes sense.
"GUARANTEED
SECURITY PLAN
I N00 -343 3400
r
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
Levitt Weinstein Memorial Chapels
18840 W. Dixie Highway
North Miami Beach. FL 33180
Please send me a FREE brochure on your
GUARANTEED SECURITY PLAN.*"
Nam.
Address.
m
City-
StatC-
Zip-
Apt No.
Tel No..
Cupels


Page 16 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, January 25,1985
NORTON
TIRE CO.
1985 SAVINGS KICK-OFF
OVER
60
YEARS
SATISFYING
THE
DRIVING
NEEDS OF
FLORIDA
IFGoodrich
I FLORIDA'S LARGEST AUTHORIZED DISTRIBUTOR
CLMSIZE
P155 80B13
BELTED CLM
P METRIC, POLYESTER
CORD, FIBERGLASS
BUY DIRECT FROM
THE FACTORY AUTH-
ORIZED DISTRIBUTOR
BFGOODRICH
WE MAKE CARS PERFORM
P16580B13
P17580B13
P185 80B13
P175 75B14
P185 75D14
P19575B14
P205 75B14
P215 75B14
P225 75B14
P15580B15
P165 80B15
P205 75B15
P215 75B15
P225 75B15
P235 75B15
19.95
21.95
22.95
22.95
24.95
25.95
26.95
27.95
29.95
21.95
21.95
27.95
28.95
29.95
32.95
XLM SIZE
P16580R13
P175 80R13
P185 80R13
P195 70R13
P175 75R14
P185 75R14
P195 75R14
P205 75R14
P215 75R14
P195 75R15
P205 75R15
P215 75R15
P225 75R15
P235 75R15
22.95
26.95
28.95
31.95
26.95
27.95
30.95
34.95
38.95
38.95
34.95
35.95
37.95
39.95
FREE 14 POINT
SAFETY CHECK
TIRES- BALANCE
BRAKES* HOSES
BELTS* BATTERY
SHOCKS & MORE
P155 80R13
LIFESAVER XLM
STEEL BELTED
RADIAL WHITES
YYOKOHAMA
40,000 MILE WRITTEN
UMrTEOWMMANTY...'^
Y865 STEEL BELT RADIAL
10%
DISCOUNT COUPON
i r -
i
I I II lo< any reason you ire nol completely satisfied with any new patsenQer car lirt you buy Irem
m fir
MONEY-BACK GUARANTEE
WrlTHTHIS COUPON ON ANY TIRES IN THIS AD Norton lire Co return it along with your original miroice within 30 days ol the date ol purchase I
SORRY, NO DEALERS. OFFER EXIPRES 1 20 85. your money will be refunded in hill Road hazards and commercial vehicles eitluded
MODERN, FULLY EQUIPPED BAYS
CLEAN. AIR-CONDITIONED WATTING ROOMS
BECAUSE SO MUCH IS RIDING ON YOUR TIRES
NEW CAR CHANGEOVERS
X WHITEWAUS
BRAND NEW
205 75-14 XZ4
55
24
95
SPECIAL
PURCHASE
SUPPLIES
LIMITED
95
135 13
XZXBIK
P-MFTRIC
'X' WHITEWALLS
SIZE PRICE
PI85 80-13 47 95
P185 75-14 52.95
P195 75-14 5395
P20575-14 P215 75-14 57.95 63.95
P225 75-14 69.95
P205 75-15 59.95
P21575-15 82.95
P225/75-15 64.95
P23S75-15 67.95
xzx
TUBELESS BLACK
SIZE
155 '2
145-13 MX
155-13
165-13 MX
175 13
155-14
165 14
1?5-14
185 14
165 15
165 70-13 MXL
175 70-13 MXL
185 70-13 MXL
185 70-14 MXL
185 65-15 MXL
PRICE
33 95
3095
34 95
39 95
4195
3995
4195
47 95
54 95
44 95
38 95
41 95
4895
49.95
79 95
XZX TUBELESS WHITE
SIZE \ PRICE
P155 80 13 36 95
P'65 80 13 43.95
P175 75 14 52.95
LIGHT TRUCK TIRES
XCT 185x14 6 ply 64.23
700-15 XCAT 6 Ply 79 95
750-16 XCAT B Ply 106 95
PMU XCAT ply 111.M
950-16 5 XCAT I ply 171 5
IRELLI
ALL SEASON RADIAL
SIZC i i. ,
P175 80R13 6195
P185 75RI4 64.95
P195 75R14 68.95
P20S 70R 14 76.95
P205 75R15 75.95
P215 70R1S 77.95
P215 75R15 78.95
P225 75R15 '. 81.95
P235 75RI5 87.95
mx
moanu
18065-390 78.95
220 55-390 nt qc
WHITE **.}fD
VIP SHOCKS
SPECIAL
plus
installation
IMPORTANT
NORTON USES ONLY
MAJOR BRAND PARTS'
Monroe. Raybestos. Gales.
Remco. Moog
40 MONTH
BATTERY
GROUP 24. 24F. 74
Powerful 320
cold-cranking AMPS
EACH
INSTALLED FREE
PIRELLI
P3-STEEL RADIALS
SIZE
155SR12
155SR13
175SR14
185SR14
165SR15
PRICE
20.95
23.95
32.95
38.95
30.95
HO EXTRA C(T
40,000 MILE WRITTEN
LIMITED WAIW.mri 7*
P3 70 DUAL STEEL BELTS
SIZE PRICE
165 70SR13 28.95
175 70SR13 29.95
185 70SR14 37.95
195 70SR14 38.95 P77 ALL SEASON RADIAL SIZE PRICE
195 70HR14 205 70HR14" 50.95 54.95
HIGH PERFORMANCE
STEEL BELTED RADIALS________
SIZE* TYPE PRICE SIZE 4 TYPE PRICE
205 70VR15 P5 115.95 205 55VR16 P7 162.95
205 60HR13P6^ 82.95 225 50VR16 P7 | 179.96
205 60HR15P6 94.95
SIZE ,| PRICE
155SR12 32.40
145SR13 33.17
155SR13 35.29
165SR13 37.54
175SR14 43.63
185SR14 46.02
165SR15 42.91
Y885 STEEL RADIAL SMALi
SIZE PRICE TDIiri
17570SR13 43.10 ^Jr1
185 70SR13^46.36 ^^
185 70SR14 49.09 NtiMtft
195 70SR14 52.42
205 70SR14* 55.70
38*
>
4
good/year
CUSTOM
POLYSTEEL
SIZE I PRICE
155/80-13 27.95
185/80-13 35.95
185^75-14 40.95
195/75-14 41.95
205/75-15 47.95
215/75-15 48.95
225/75-15 50.95
235/75-15 54.95
SAFETY SERVICE
CERTIFIED MECHANICS IN EVERY STORE
Sorvu^fW2? THn,CS have b*en TESTED and CERTIFIED by the National Insirtule tor
Service Excellence They are available at any ol our stores listed below
Kendall
*>torOi
12
95
BULK
OIL CHANGE.
FILTER and
LUBE
UP TO 5 OTS OF
PREMIUM OIL FOR
GAS OR DIESEL ENG
NEW FILTER COMP
LUBE
FOR MOST US PAS-
SENGER CARS AND
LIGHT TRUCKS
BRAKE
SPECIAL
2 Front Disc or
2 Wheel Drum
24
Install new linings or pads
Check. Need 4. refill hydrau-
lic system
Semi-metallic pads or add
parts 4 labor extra il needed
Repack wheel beanngs
extra, if needed
Most Cart ALqiit Trucks
CORAL GABLES ...............Bud 4 Douglas Road 446-8101
NORTH MIAMI ...................13360 NW 7th Ave 681 8541
N. MIAMI BEACH .................1700 N.E. 163rd St. 945-7454
MIAMI BEACH......................1454 Alton Road 672-5353
SOUTH OADE.....................9001 S. Dixie Hwy 667-7575
CUTLER RIDGE .................20390 S Dixie Hwy 233-5241
HIALEAH/RALM SPRINGS MILE.........1275 49th St 822-2500
MIAMI AIRPORT ........NW. 25 St. 4 Milam Dairy Rd. 593-1191
WEST MIAMI ...................Bird 4 Galloway Rds 552-6656
KENDALL DR./HIGATE SQUARE ... 13872 SW 88th St 387 0128
W. TAMIAMI TRAIL.................12520 SW 8th St 551 -1141
HOMESTEAD..................30100 S Federal Hwy 247-1622
WHOLLYWOOD .......:" W S. State Rd. 7 967-0450
FT. LAUDERDALi'...... d M.lu.Sl west V 473-4700
PLANwSv* ..............?E Sunnae Blvd. 463-7588
PEMBROKE MNPii'' 'm'h^ houL; M1 n State Rd. 7 587-2186
TAMARAC VW d BlVd |usl ol Un.v Dr 435-1383
TAMARAC a Un'V Dr McNab Rd 721-4700
POMPANO BEACH.........441 4 W Commercial Blvd. 735-2772
0RFIeId BEA^H...........^l^uEfiS! &* 943-4200
DELRAY BEACH ...........2265 W H,l|sb<* Blvd. 427-8800
GREENACRES ......................' Llnlon Brvd 272-1022
3838 Jog Rd 968-1014
AIR CONDTTrONING CHECK-UP
AIR, well gladly check your tire*!
mmmmmSSr
ALSO STORES IN
WUTMLMMACH
THMKSB
FtRWB
VBVKACH
muma
OAITTOMKAGH
IMTUS
FtirfHif


Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID E1LYZ7VDN_03H7W2 INGEST_TIME 2013-06-11T04:57:07Z PACKAGE AA00014310_00091
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES