The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian the voice of the Jewish community of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Running title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Physical Description:
4 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 8, no. 41 (Dec. 24, 1982)-v. 11, no. 26 (Aug. 30, 1985).
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44606415
lccn - sn 00229548
ocm44606415
System ID:
AA00014310:00090

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
THE VOICE OF
THE JEWISH
COMMUNITY Or
PALM BEACH
COUNTY
"Jewish florid ian
VOLUME 11NUMBER 3
PALM BEACH, FLORIDAFRIDAY, JANUARY 18,1986
PRICE 35 CENTS
.V
i -2S1
Federation /UJA Campaign
Reaches $2.5 Million
KOTEL IN THE RAIN. Clear skies arc common over Je-
rusalem, but even when it djes rain the Kotel [Western
Wall] has an allure. On a recent rainy day in Israel's
capital, a photographer captured the Kotel's charm with
her camera, as water washed the Western Wall.
Pledges to the 1985 Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County-United Jewish Appeal
campaign have reached $2.5
million, announced Arnold L.
Lampert, general chair of the
fund-raising drive. "This
represents a 30 percent in-
crease over this time last year
and has been accomplished
through better organization,
increased staff and, above all,
the community's response to
the growing needs of our local
Jewish population, our fellow
Jews in Israel and throughout
the world," Lampert said.
Lampert noted that several
events will be held during the
latter part of January. The
functions are as follows:
Mayfair House Cocktail
Reception:Mayfair House will
hold 'their cocktail reception
on Tuesday, Jan. 22, 4:30
p.m., in the building's
Gazebo. Israel's Minister of
Tourism, Avram Sharir, will
be the guest speaker. Chairs of
the event and of the Mayfair
House campaign are Leonard
Kahn, Murray Kern and
George Howard.
Eastpointe Dinner: Guest
speaker Howard Stone will
address the residents of
Eastpointe at their dinner to
be held on Thursday, Jan. 24,
6:30 p.m., at the Eastpointe
Golf and Racquet Club. Helen
and Lester Sodowick are the
co-chairs.
Royal Palm Beach Cocktail
Party: This Western com-
munity will be attending a
cocktail party on Thursday,
Jan. 24, 4 p.m., at the
Indian Trail Country Club.
They will hear Holocaust sur-
vivor Dora Roth speak.
Milton Gold is the chair.
Committee members not pre-
viously mentioned include
Clifton Einhorn and George
Michaels.
Federation Shabbat at
Century Village: Jerry Gleekel
is the guest speaker at
Congregation Anshei Sholom
on Friday evening, Jan. 25
(See related article page 2)
The Fountains Golf
Tournament: Residents of The
Fountains will be participating
in the Sam and Phyllis Youner
Memorial Golf Tournament
on Sunday, Jan. 27, at The
Fountains Country Club. Bill
Schlossberg is chairing the
event.
Hunters Run Pacesetters
Cocktail Supper: Linda and
Benjamin Frankel will be
hosting the cocktail supper in
their home in Boynton Beach
on Thursday, Jan. 31.
Economic Crisis Begins To Affect Israelis
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Is-
rael's economic crisis is begin-
ning to have an impact on the
daily lives of citizens with
threats of large scale un-
employment and the abandon-
ment of vital public services.
Government hospitals may
close down in a few days for
lack of funds. The govern-
ment-owned Israel Shipyards
on Haifa Bay face imminent
collapse for lack of orders.
Hie Union of Hospital
Directors said that they were
short of heating fuel, blood
plasma and food because they
cannot pay their debts. The
hospitals owe some 3.7 billion
shekels ($6 million).
The Magen David Adorn,
Israel's Red Cross, has already
cut off supplies of whole
blood and plasma to the hos-
pitals because their bills are
long overdue. MDA director
Amitzur Kfir said his agency is
owed $1 million and cannot
meet its own payroll.
The hospital directors
complained that the
Histadrut's Kupat Holim, the
country's largest health fund,
is behind in its payments for
hospital services to its
members. Histadrut denies
this, claiming it has paid its
share but that the government
has delayed remittance to the
hospitals.
Health Minister Mordechai
Gur is reportedly urging the
Finance Ministry to provide
the hospitals with money to
pay their bills. The Treasury
has been accused of deliber-
ately withholding funds from
the Health Ministry as a means
of pressure to agree to budget
cuts.
Meanwhile, the outlook for
workers in the Haifa area is
grim. The giant Ata textile
combine, the largest single
employer there, won a one-
month reprieve from bank-
ruptcy just before the new year
when the district court post-
poned its Dec. 31 shut-down
order until Feb. 3.
But there may be no breath-
ing spell for most of the 600
employees of the Haifa Ship-
vards. They face immediate
Continued on Page 12
Inside
Federations Report Growth In Endowment Fund Assets
Grants From Local Program Aid Many Philanthropic Causes
SuperSuncjW^
Volunteers asked to
sign up for Super
Sunday...page 3
U.S. Sephardic Jews
urged to remember
their roots... page 4
Chairs for Century
Village Women's
Division phonathon
named... page 2
Endowment funds continue
to increase substantially and
are a resouice for many
Federation and Jewish com-
munity needs. These are
among the conclusions based
on the results of the latest
annual survey conducted by
the Endowment Department
of the Council of Jewish
Federations.
The 1983-84 fiscal year
report discloses total assets in
all components of endowment
programs in Jewish Federa-
tions are at a new high of
$912,000,000, a gain of nearly
$200,000,000 over the pre-
vious year and does not in-
clude $127,000 in grants from
the various funds during that
period. Since the release of the
survey, it is estimated that at
year end 1984 the total assets
exceeded the one billion dollar
mark.
Implicit in the growing
interest in endowment funds is
that more and more donors
view them as a means of main-
taining and perpetuating their
philanthropic commitment
and to assure the future of the
Jewish community. Such
funds also offer tax benefits
under federal legislation
designed to encourage charit-
able giving.
The importance of en-
dowment funds to the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County and the Jewish com-
munity was most evident in the
Endowment Fund Com-
mittee's recent report to the
Federation Board. Stanley B.
Brenner, committee chair,
advised that assets in the
various philanthropic funds,
charitable trusts, unrestricted
funds and supporting founda-
tions are now over $4,000,000.
During the 1983-84 fiscal
year the committee approved
124 grants from the philan-
thropic fund in the amount of
$1,165,000. Of this amount,
$740,000 was allocated to
UJ A-Federation campaigns,
$283,000 to Federation bene-
ficiary agencies, $127,000 to
other Jewish causes and
$39,000 to non-Jewish chari-
ties. From the unrestricted
funds the committee approved
grants of $49,795 for a com-
puter classroom at the Jewish
Community Day School,
Continued on Page 10


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, January 18,1965
"
Campaign 85-Century Village
Anshei Sholom To Hold
Federation Shabbat
During Shabbat evening
services on Friday, Jan. 25,
8:15 p.m., Congregation
Anshei Sholom of Century
Village will host Federation
Shabbat. Rabbi Isaac Vander
Walde, spiritual leader of the
congregation, will introduce
guest speaker Jerry Gleekel, a
businessman and Zionist who
speaks on behalf of Israel.
The temple is inviting its
members and residents of the
community to learn more
about the programs and
services of the Jewish Federa-
tion of Palm Beach County.
Through contributions to the
1985 Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County-United
Jewish Appeal campaign, the
Federation strives to meet the
needs of Jews locally, in Israel
and throughout the world.
Jerry Gleekel, who travels to
Israel regularly and meets with
that country's top leaders, will
give an updated, firsthand
account of the situation in
Israel and how the Jews of the
diaspora can help insure
Israel's survival.
Henry Grossman and Sam
Wadler, co-chairs of the 1985
Jewish Federation-UJA cam-
paign in Century Village, were
pleased that Rabbi Vander
Walde, President H. Bei
Pulda, and board member
Victor Duke (who aided in
making the arrangement-
and the board of Congrega-
tion Anshei Sholom under-
scored the importance of the
fund-raising drive by giving
their congregations an oppor-
tunity to learn more about
Federation and UJA. "Being
Shabbat, this is strictly an
education forum," stated
Grossman and Wadler.
"Many people are not aware
of the work of the Jewish
Federation and are also inter-
ested in learning as much as
they can about the current
economic crisis in Israel and
what is being accomplished in
the area of absorption and
immigration. We look for-
ward to greeting all our friends
and neighbors."
In addition to Pulda and
Duke, members of the com-
mittee are Charles Benblit,
Henrietta Benblit, Jack
Bockneck, Carrie Chiat, Jack
Chiat, Joe Dorf, Saul
Ganelas, Sophie Menschen-
freund, Esther Molat, Irving
Perlman, Lou Perlman, Al
Radonsky, Aaron Rose,
Bernard Simon, Oscar Slutsky
and Rose Slutsky.
An Oneg Shabbat spon-
sored by the Jewish Federation
will follow at the conclusion of
the service. For more informa-
tion contact Dr. Lester
Silverman, campaign
associate, at the Federation
office 832-2120.
SJKnSiCentury Villagephonathon on Feb. 10.
Women's Division Phonathon
Two Named To Chair
Blosson Cohen and Esther
Molat have been appointed to
chair the first Women's Divi-
sion phonathon at Century
Village, announced Julie
Cummings, Women's Division
campaign vice president. The
phonathon will be held on
Sunday, Feb. 10, 9 a.m.-5
p.m. on behalf of the
Women's Division 1985
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County-UJA campaign.
"We will be attempting to
reach out to all the women in
Century Village to acquaint
them with the needs of Jewry
locally, in Israel and world-
wide and ask them to make a
contribution to the 1985
Women's Division Federation-
UJA campaign in their own
name," stated Mrs. Cohen.
Mrs. Molat added, "Many
women in Century Village are
widowed and must continue or
initiate the tradition of giving.
We encourage every woman
who is contacted on Feb. 10 to
respond generously."
Mrs. Cohen, who has
resided in this area for the past
13 years, is an active member
of the Jewish community. She
is a past president of
More than 800 residents of Century Village
recently attended a morning of education and
entertainment sponsored by the Jewish Fed-
eration of Palm Beach County. They were
informed of the needs of Jews locally, in Is-
rael and worldwide. An audio-visual
presentation, "Reaching Out Building a
Community," was shown to highlight the
local needs.
--
I
1
| l Left to right] Arnold L. Lam pert, general chair of the 1985
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County-United Jewish Appeal
campaign, and Hank Grossman and Sam Wadler, co-chairs of
the campaign at Century Village, also talked to the residents
about the needs of the local Jewish population.
Congregation Anshei Sholom
Sisterhood, having served!
that capacity for four year.
Currently Mrs. Cohen U.
board member of the JevU
Community Center, co-chS
of Soviet Jewry Relations for
Yovel Hadassah, and an active
participant on behalf of Israel
Bonds and the Jewish Federa
tion of Palm Beach County.
Mrs. Molat has devoted
much of her time to helpinn
others through her participa
tion in mcfre than 45 organic.
tions. She has been active in
Israel Bonds, receiving many
awards and recognitions over
the years. She is a board
member of the Century Village
Yiddish Culture Group and a
life member of Congregation
Anshei Sholom Sisterhood
and Hadassah. She and her
late husband, Joe, founded a
special program to assist
Medicare recipients in receiv-
ing their full benefits. Some of
the organizations in which
Mrs. Molat is active are the
Joseph L. Morse Geriatric
Center, the Ladies Auxiliary
of the Jewish War Veterans,
Congregation Aitz Chaim and
the Jewish National Fund.
Volunteers are now being
recruited to serve as telephone
solicitors in two-hour shifts.
For more information contact
Faye St oiler, assistant
Women's Divission director,
at the Federation office 832-
2120.
Jews Deny Alcohol
and Drug Addiction
(JTA) The biggest
problem regarding addiction
to alcohol and drugs among
Jews is the denial by the Jew-
ish community that the
problem exists, according to
Jewish leaders who met
recently at Fort Lauderdale to
establish a task force to act on
the problem.
The Jewish representatives
from Dade, Broward and
Palm Beach counties included
rabbis and Jewish social
service group experts, and rep-
resentatives from the medical
field.
Al Golden, president of the
Riverside Memorial Chapels,
was quoted as saying that "no
one would believe the number
of Jewish youths I have buried
in the last ten years because of
drug overdose."
Ivan Goldberg, ad-
ministrator of the Center for
Recovery at the JFK Memorial
Hospital in Atlantis, declared
Continued on Page 6
Rabbi Howard J. Hirsch,
spiritual leader of Temple
Beth El, was the keynote
speaker who explained why
Palm Beach County must
stand behind their fellow Jews
in Israel and throughout the
world. He emphasized the
pledge of responsibility for the
absorption of Ethiopian Jews
from the ravages of star-1
vation.
UJA
Young Leadership
Cabinet
Region V
Mission to Israel
February 24-March 5,1985
For more information contact Ronni Epstein.
director of Leadership Development, at the
Federation office 832-2120


'#
tlchard Bernsttln
nsurance
srl p
/
B&P Division Section Chairs Named
Alec Engelstein
Builders and
Developers
Larry Ochsteln
Retail and Com
mercial
Richard Rampell
Accountants
Paul Shapiro
Attorneys
Barry S. Berg, chair of the
Business and Professional
division of the 1985 Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County-United Jewish Appeal
campaign, has announced the
appointment of eight leaders
in the business and profes-
sional community to head the
various sections that comprise
the total division.
The Insurance section will
be chaired by Richard Ber-
nstein, president of Richards.
Bernstein Associates, West
Palm Beach. Bernstein, a
member of the Endowment
Committee of the Jewish
Federation, is an active
member of the secular as well
as the Jewish community.
Alec Engelstein, president
of Engle Homes Corporation,
began last year to reach out to
all the builders and developers
in the area to involve them in
the campaign and now will
Ihead that section. Engelstein is
'well known for his volunteer
activity in the community.
Financial Services chair
Lionel Greenbaum is manager
of the Palm Beach office of
Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner
and Smith. He has been active
in the Jewish Federation in
this community for years as
well as in his former home of
Cleveland.
Sidney Kulick will head the
Engineers section of the Busi-
ness and Professional division.
He is an engineer at Pratt and
Whitney and participated in
the men's B and P mission to
Israel last year. By establishing
this section, the Jewish
Federation will reach out to
the many Jewish employees at
P and W, many of whom are
engineers.
Martin List, vice president
of Robert E. List Real Estate
in Palm Beach, will head the
Realtors section. He has been
active in Super Sunday, the
communitywide phonathon,
and has been to Israel twice on
missions.
The Retail and Commercial
division will be chaired by
Larry Ochstein who has
devoted much time to the
Jewish Federation and the
Jewish Community Center
among others. He has long
been involved in the business
community and will be
contacting shop owners,
restaurateurs, businessmen
and distributors.
Richard Rampell, of
Rampell and Rampell in Palm
Beach, will lead the
Accountants section. Cur-
rently he is a member of the
board of the Jewish Com-
munity Center.
The Attorneys section chair.
Continued on Page 12
WPB/PB Women To
Participate In Mini-Mission
Marilyn Lampert, mini-
lission chair for the Jewish
federation of Palm Beach
bounty, has named Joan
frogel to head the upcoming
lini-mission for West Palm
(leach and Palm Beach women
|n Thursday, Jan. 31. The
ini-mission, sponsored by
Women's Division of the
lewish Federation of Palm
leach County, is a way of
iforming the women about
ie institutions, programs and
ervices that exist in this area
rhich serve the Jewish com-
nmiiy. Dora Roth, Holo-
iusi survivor and Israeli
mother, will be the guest
Deakcr.
The mini-mission will begin
|t 9:45 a.m. at the Palm Beach
[esidence Hotel, 100 Datura
It rect. West Palm Beach.
[tops will be made at the
lewish Community Center,
He Jewish Community Day
Ichool, the Jewish Family and
children's Service and the
loseph L. Morse Geriatric
Center. The directors of the
eneficiary agencies of the
lewish Federation will explain
leir programs and services
id will discuss future chal-
enges that must be met to en-
hance the quality of Jewish life
this community. There will
time for a question and
iswer session. The tour will
loncludeat 2 p.m.
?
Joan Frogel
Mrs. Frogel will be hosting a
luncheon for the women at the
Palm Beach Residence Hotel
during which Mrs. Roth will
tell what is like to be a mother
in Israel.
Joan Frogel is a real estate
broker who attended Juilliard
School of Music. In addition
to chairing the WPB-PB mini-
mission, she became active in
Women's Division this year as
recipient of the Lion of Judah
pin. She and her husband,
Arthur, live in West Palm
Beach.
For more information
contact Faye Stoller, Women's
Division assistant director, at
the Federation office 832-
2120.
SDDDDDQ
Federation Mini-Mission Tour
REMINDER!
Hunter's Run Residents
The Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
MINI-MISSION TOUR.
JANUARY 24,1985
Bus will depart
8:45 a.m. (harp
from Clubhouaa
panting lot.
For mora Information,
call Jack M. Karako,
at tha Fadoratlon off lc
832-2120
For more information call (the Federation office 832-2120.
WE'VE GOT YOUR NUMBER
SOUTH FLORIDA
SupERSuNC^^
Volunteer Recruitment Begins
For the fourth consecutive
year, the Jewish community of
the Palm Beaches will join to-
gether in a one-day phonathon
to raise funds for the 1985
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County-United Jewish
Appeal campaign on Super
Sunday '85 March 17 at the
Hyatt Hotel.
According to Super Sunday
co-chairs Stacey and Mark
Levy, the event is expected to
draw 500 volunteers, in six
two-hour sessions, who will
place phone calls to thousands
of people who, it is hoped, will
become new contributors to
the campaign. The phonathon
will also reach out to those
who have contributed in prior
years but, as yet, have not
made their 1985 commitment.
"We are encouraging .all
volunteers who helped last
year to participate once again
in contacting a greater number
of households," stated Levy.
"In addition members of our
recruitment committee will be
speaking at the Federation's
beneficiary agencies and area
synagogues in an effort to sti-
mulate more community
involvement."
Mrs. Levy noted that Super
Sunday, in addition to being a
major fund-raising event,
brings the entire Jewish com-
munity together in a unified
effort. "We welcome and en-
courage members of the com-
munity to join us in this effort.
We need office workers, hosts
and hostesses and youth parti-
cipation as well as telephone
solicitors. The excitement of
the day is contagious. It's a
thrill to see the total contri-
butions climbing steadily
upward on the tote board and
the balloons, designating spe-
cific dollar amounts, being
tied to the volunteers' chairs."
Letters and recruitment
forms will be sent in the
coming weeks to all Jewish
organizations. "We hope to
have representation from each
group to make Super Sunday
'85 truly a communitywide
event," stated Levy.
For more information call
Jack Karako, campaign asso-
ciate, at the Federation office
332-2120.
1985 -A*
Jewish Federation/U JA n
Campaign v*
Calendar of Events ^F JEWISH FEDERATION OFBUMDEACH COUNTY
?Mayfair House Cocktail Reception ?Eastpointe Country Club Dinner Royal Palm Beach Cocktail Party Federation Shabbat at Century Village Fountains Golf tournament Hunter's Run Pacesetters Cocktail Supper Wellington Dinner Women's Division Century Village Phonathon Women's Division Pacesetters Luncheon January 22 January 24 January 24 January 25 January 27 January 31 February 10 February 10 February 13
Community Dinner Dance February 23
Upcoming


rage 4 inejewma r luriumn oi raim oeacn county / rriaay, January if
U.S. Sephardic Jews Urged to Bevive Tradition
By JEAN WEISS
PHILADELPHIA (JTA)
Just as it is important for
the Ashkenazic Jewish com-
munity in the United States to
better understand Sephardic
Jews as they rise to positions
of influence in Israel, so too is
it important for Sephardim in
the U.S. to revive their tradi-
tions before they assimilate
into the larger, dominant U.S.
Ashkenazic community, said
the recently appointed execu-
tive director of the American
Sephardi Federation, Rabbi
Joshua Toledano.
"There is more than one
aspect to Judaism than the
norm accepted by the
Ashkenazic community," he
said. Since more than 60
percent of the Jews in Israel
are Sephardic, Toledano said
he predicts there will be a
Sephardic prime minister in
the not too distant future.
Because of the population
trend, Israel will become a
"Middle Eastern" country
instead of a "European"
county in the Middle East, the
rabbi said. Consequently,
U.S. Ashkenazic Jews should
be acquainted with the cus-
toms, traditions and heritage
of their Sephardic brethren so
they can interact better with
them, said Toledano, the spir-
itual leader of Congregation
Mikveh Israel in Philadelphia,
the city's oldest synagogue
(1740) and only Sephardic
one.
Originally "Sephardim"
were of Spanish and Portu-
guese descent. The term now
includes Jews from Arab
countries in the Middle East,
he said. Ashkenazim came
from Central and Eastern
Europe.
The 44-year-old Moroccan-
born rabbi said, "Nego-
tiations with the Arabs would
have had a different tone" if
Sephardim, accustomed to the
Arab mind, had played a
larger role. "A mistake was
made by the Israeli leadership
by not involving more Sephar-
dim and getting their input in
decisions regarding the peace
treaty with Egypt," Toledano
said.
"Sephardim could have
advised the leadership as to the
best way to negotiate with the
Arabs. Arabs don't sign
contracts. Contracts are basic-
ally a European mode. That is
why the Egyptians are carrying
out the minimum require-
ments of the treaty rather than
its spirit." The treaty with
Lebanon was broken because
of Arab disregard for con-
tracts, he added.
From the late 1940's to the
early 1960's, Sephardic im-
migrants arriving in Israel
were poor and uneducated.
They were considered the
underclass, Toledano said.
Only within the last decade has
a better educated, younger
generation started taking its
place in Israel's economic,
social and political spheres.
An example is David Levy, a
deputy prime minister,
Toledano pointed out.
The U.S. Ashkenazic com-
munity already is showing
greater interest in Sephardim
as a result of Israel's demo-
Pacesetters To Be Honored
|Left] Zeida Pincourt, co-chair of the Women's Division
Pacesetters Luncheon, has been meeting with various committee
members to finalize plans for the $1000 minimum gift event
given on behalf of the Women's Division 1985 Jewish Feder-
ation of Palm Beach County-United Jewish Appeal campaign.
Discussing plans with Ms. Pincourt are [left to right] Barbara
Tanen and Staci Lesser. The luncheon will be held on Wed-
nesday, Feb. 13, 11:30 a.m. at the Garden Club, Palm Beach.
For more information contact Lynne Ehrlich, Women's
Division director, at the Federation office 832-2120.
the
Jewish f lor idian
oi Palm Beach County
USPS 069030
Combining Our Voice" and "Federation Reporter"
FHEDK SHOCHET SUZANNE SHOCMET HONNI EPSTEIN LOUISE ROSS
Editor and Publisher Executive Editor News Coordinator Assistant News Coordinator
Published Weekly October through Mid-May Bi Weekly balance ol year
Second Class Postage Paid at Boca Raton, Fia
PALM BEACH OFFICE
501 S. Flagler Dr., West Palm Beach, Fla 33401 Phone: 832 2120.
Main Office S Plant 120 NE 8th St Miami, FL 33101 Phone 13734606
POSTMASTER: S*>nd address changes to The Jewish Florldlan,
P.O. Box 012973, Miami, Fla. 33101
Advertising Director Stacl Leaser, Phone See 1652
Combined Jewiah Appeal-Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County, Inc., Officers: President,
Myron J. Nickman; Vice Presidents, Peter Cummings, Alec Engelstein, Arnold Lampert, Barbara
Tanen and Alvin Wilenaky, Secretary, Dr. Elizabeth S. Shulman, Treasurer, Barry Berg. Submit
material to Ronni Epstein, Director ol Public Relations, 501 South Flagler Or, West Palm Beach
FL 33401
Jewish Flondian does not guarantee Kashruth of Merchandise Advertised.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: Local Area $4 Annual (2 Year Minimum 17 50). or by membership Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach County, 501 S Flagler Or, Weat Palm Beach, Fla 33401 Phone 832 2120
Out Of Town Upon Hequest
arrived from the
Turkey, Yugoslavia and
Greece. They settled in New
York and Philadelphia
a cultural and comta
organization designed "to
form Sephardic Jews 1^
their Sephardic heritage^
goals are to preserve Sephar
"To some extent they were culture, to promote program,
unwanted by local Jewish wel activities and institutions 3
fare boards because they were
less intellectual and less for-
than other new
Toledano said.
Ashkenazic co-
tunate
arrivals,
Their
graphic shift and because a Balkans,
growing number of Sephardic
Israelis now are living in the
U.S., he said.
Toledano, who comes from
an unbroken line of 45 genera-
tions of rabbis dating back to
pre-Inquisition Spain, recalled
the dominance that Sephardic
scholars had in teaching,
philosophy and writing, in- ^n^,,.., -
eluding biblical commentaries ", could not identify
and poetry, through he 15th jUgion ^
century. It was not until the ju Yiddish, he added.
16th century that Ashkenazic gejk .^ thercfore>
schoars started coming to the hom^ P^ and ,ed .
^ :u H.h,?.OM0 Seattle. Today Seattle has the established a speakers bure?
The rabbi urged the 250,000 sccond ,argest Sephardic com- said Toledano, who is i2
to 300,000 Sephardim in the munity jn the U.S. after New
York.
"For immigrants in the
United States less than 100
years, spread around the
country and busy trying to
make a living, they could
never get organized," he said.
Discussing the role of the
ASF, Toledano described it as
U.S. to remember their past
and to keep alive their customs
and traditions. Sephardim
were the first Jewish settlers in
the U.S., but were soon out-
numbered by Ashkenazim.
The largest immigration of
Sephardim began at the end of
the 1800s and continued until
1924. About 50.000 people
Rabbis Reveal Plan
To Resist
Intermarriage Requests
Friday, January 18,1966
Volume 11
26 TEVETH 6746
Number 3
ByBENGALLOB
NEW YORK (JTA) A
group of Reform rabbis, con-
vened on an ad hoc basis by an
official of the Central Con-
ference of American Rabbis,
the association of American
Reform rabbis, has prepared
what the official called an
"additional tool" to help Re-
form rabbis resist a steadily
growing number of requests to
officiate at mixed marriages.
The tool is a 12-page
pamphlet, "Reform Rabbis
and Mixed Marriage," which
declares that, "when officiat-
ing at a marriage ceremony,
the rabbi acts as representative
of the Jewish people and the
Jewish heritage."
THE PAMPHLET declares
that if one of the marriage
partners is not a Jew "and not
heir to the heritage of Moses
and Israel, what purpose is
served by using these time-
hallowed words?" and how
can that ceremony "sanctify
our people Israel"?
In a covering letter, Rabbi
Simeon Maslin, rabbi of
Keneseth Israel of Elkins
Park, Pa., stated that the pur-
pose of the pamphlet "is to
correct the common miscon-
ception that, while Orthodox
and Conservative rabbis do
not officiate at mixed mar-
riage ceremonies, Reform
rabbis do." He added that "a
minority of Reform rabbis do
so officiate under certain
conditions, but they do so
contrary to the guidelines" of
theCCAR.
Maslin, who has been active
in the CCAR as chairman of
the CCAR Committee on Re-
form Jewish practices and
other CCAR activities, clari-
fied the project in an exchange
of correspondence with the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency.
HE REPORTED that the
pamphlet was the idea of a
group of about 30 rabbis from
large Reform congregations
whom he had convened to
"discuss the problem and
formulate the pamphlet" a?
one response to it.
Maslin declared that about
115 Reform rabbis were ap-
proached to sign the document
and 108 replied affirmatively
in time to have their names
included in the document
which was published last
November 25.
Maslin was asked by the
JTA why the CCAR, which
has warned members repeat-
edly, particularly at its annual
conventions, against such
officiating, did not deal
directly anil forcefully with the
problem of "the minority" of
members who do so, by ap-
proving a ban on CCAR mem-
bers performing such mar-
riages, on pain of loss of
CCAR membership.
Replying that "one of the
principles of Reform Judaism
is freedom of conscience,"
Maslin declared that while
neither he nor any of the other
signers officiate at such mar-
Continued on Page 14
. and
Sephardic interest and wortl
hand in hand with g]
Federations in support 0fS
Jewish community in gtn*A
and Israel in particular U
said the ASF is non-pofofi
and does not support 3
Israeli political party.
The ASF sponsors seminj
conferences and hai|
>eakers bun
, who is a v
ing professor of Sephardi-I
studies at Yeshiva Universirv
Besides publishing books, the I
ASF provides needy Sephardic
writers with scholarships foil
work relating to the Sephardkl
community. A young leader-l
ship program has been etol
blished.
Toledano stressed that thcl
ASF "is not in competition!
with other Jewish Federation!
and is not trying to takeawaJ
from other fundraising efforts!
nor fragment the Jewish com|
munity.'
"Many Sephardic Jews are!
now unknown to local Federal
tions," he said. In an effort to
reach Sephardim alienate
from the Jewish community)
large, a "Sephardic desk"
been established at loc
Jewish Federations whe
there is a sizeable Sephardic]
community, Toledano sail
"This will provide support fa
fund-raising activities and
bring to attention the needs oi
the Sephardic community'
that city."
The 15-year-old ASF "h
had its ups and downs in ten
of organization' and is tryin
to get cohesive," Toledau
said. "As the (Sephardic;
community became meal
organized nationwide, th
need for a headquarters \
came more apparent.
Toledano commutes froi
Philadelphia weekly to th
ASF's New York
quarters.
Wellington To Hold Federation/
UJA Dinner Feb. 10
!
""^^^BIHaaaaaaHaH ^^^^^^^^
Members of the Wellington 1985 Jewish Federation of P
Beach County-United Jewish Appeal campaign committee'
recently at the home of the co-chairs, Leah and Phillip -
Arnold L. Lampert [standing, right], general campus* ""i
addressed the meeting. Plans for the upcoming dinner oat
10 at the Wellington Club, given on behalf of the FedenU
UJA campaign, were discussed. Comprising the committee
Ronni and Jay Epstein, Dinnne and Alnn Frank, UjKj
? 25?% SoMl Lawrence Greenherg, BfJ
Kornfeld, Nancy and Preston Mighdoll, Lnha and Dr. W
Reiner, Sandra and Marvin Rosen, Snsnn and Dr. M**
Rosen, Rachel and Aaron Rubinstein, Jndy "
scnimmel, and Saerri and Rabbi Steven Wernmnn.


Friday, January 18, 1986 / The Jewish Floridian of Pa
junty
f\ Radio /TV Highlights ,V
. MOSAIC Sunday, Jan. 20, 9 a.m. WPTV Channel
< with host Barbara Gordon Interview with Dora
Roth, Israeli mother and Holocaust survivor.
L'CHAYIM Sunday, Jan. 20, 7:30 a.m. WPBR
1340-AM with host Rabbi Mark S. Golub The Jewish
Listener's Digest, a radio magazine.
SHALOM Sunday, Jan. 20, 10 a.m. WPEC
Channel 12 (11:30 a.m. WDZL TV Channel 39) with
host Richard Peritz Interview with Robert L. Schwartz,
Southeast district director of American Red Magen David
for Israel.
Sponsored by the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County.
Community Calendar
January 18
B'nai B'rith Women Mitzvah Council Sabbath at
Temple Israel Temple Emanu-El Scholar's weekend
through Jan. 20
January 19
Jewish Community Day School Parent-Teacher Organi-
zation Las Vegas Night
January 20
Jewish Federation Parenting Workshop at Temple Israel -
10 a.m. Congregation Anshei Sholom Israel Bonds
reception Congregation Aitz Chaim board 10 a.m.
Women's American ORT Royal art auction 6:30 p.m.
Temple Beth Sholom Men's Club 9:30 a.m. Temple Is-
rael Sisterhood -10 a.m.
January 21
Jewish Communal Workers Seminar Meeting 8:30 a.m.
Hadassah Cypress Lakes board 9:30 a.m. Jewish
Familv and Children's Service board 7:30 p.m.
American Jewish Congress 12:30 p.m. Hadassah -
Z'Hava-Youth Aliyah Luncheon noon Women's
American ORT Palm Beach Mother to Another
luncheon at Breakers Temple Emanu-El Sisterhood -
12:30 p.m.
January 22
Jewish Federation Super Sunday Meeting noon
Congregation Anshei Sholom 1 p.m. Hadassah Lee
Vassil 12:30 p.m. Women's American ORT Boynton
Beach board 12:30 p.m. Jewish Federation Com-
munity Planning Meeting 4 p.m. Jewish Federation
Budget and Allocations Meeting 7 p.m. Temple Beth
David Sisterhood adult education B'nai B'rith Women -
Masada board 7 p.m.
January 23
Yiddish Culture Group Cresthaven 1 p.m. Jewish Fed-
eration Women's Division Worker Training at Shirley
Dellerson's home 11 a.m. Jewish Federation Kashruth
Committee noon Women's American ORT North
Palm Beach County Region 9:30 a.m. Hadassah -
Shalom luncheon National Council of Jewish Women -
Palm Beach donor luncheon at Breakers American Red
Magen David for Israel 1 p.m. B'nai B'rith No. 31% -
board 7 p.m. Jewish Federation Jewish Agency
Meeting -4 p.m.
January 24
United Jewish Appeal National Women's Division $10,000
Event Jewish Federation Mini-Mission Hunter's Run-
Boynton Beach 9 a.m. Women's American ORT -
Haverhill noon Hadassah Bat Gurion youth aliyah
luncheon noon Hadassah Aliya 1 p.m. Hadassah -
Rishona Jewish Federation Council on Aging 4 p.m.*
Women's American ORT West Palm Beach board
Jewish Federation Eastpointe Racquet and Golf Club -
6:30 p.m. Jewish Federation Royal Palm Beach
Cocktail Reception 4 p.m.
Community Plea For Soviet Jewry To Be Held Jan. 271
Underlining the importance placed on rescuing Soviet Jewry, the attendance at the Soviet
Jewry Task Force of the Community Relations Council [CRC] of the Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County is always large, according to chair Shirlee Blonder [standing]. She and
her committee, shown above, assisted by Rabbi Alan Sherman [standing], director
of the CRC, have been working diligently to make the upcoming Community Plea for
Soviet Jewry the most effective ever. The rally will be held on Jan. 27, 7:30 p.m., at Temple
Emanu-El, 190 North County Road, Palm Beach, with Lynn Singer, past president and
currently executive director of the Long Island Committee for Soviet Jewry, as the guest
speaker. For more information contact Rabbi Sherman at the Federation's additional
office, 655-7706.
Burrows
Alexander
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Hockey e Zoological & Science Program
Dietary Laws Observed Shabbat Services
Medical Staff Available at All Times
Accredited Member American Camping Association
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LIMITED ENROLL**NT
ADL To Honor
Madame Alexander
Madame Bea Alexander of
Palm Beach and New York,
founder and president of the
Alexander Doll Company, will
be honored on the occasion of
her 90th birthday by the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith. The testimonial will
highlight the 1985 Inaugural
Dinner of the ADL National
Appeal, Thursday, Feb. 7, at
the Breakers Hotel. Some 800
Jewish community leaders
from all parts of the country
are expected to participate in
the gala event.
Palm Beach builder Michael
Burrows is chairing the dinner.
Madame Alexander, who
will be honored by ADL for
"a lifetime of achievement in
advancing democratic ideals in
higher education and human
rights," is known to genera-
tions of children and collectors
as "the doll lady."
Long involved in philan-
thropic, Madame Alexander
has taken active roles in
numerous organizations,
including ADL.
Michael Burrows, who is
presently the chair of ADL's
Palm Beach Regional Board,
has lived in Palm Beach for
some 30 years. An active
participant in community
affairs involving both Jewish
and civic organizations, he is
also a member of the board of
directors of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach. He
is chair of the Major Gifts
Dinner held on Jan. 17 to
benefit the 1985 Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County-UJA campaign.
57th Year Of Quality Camping
FLORIDA OPEN HOUSE January 19
Saturday. 1:30 P.M.-4:30 P.M.
Don Carters Bowling Lanes
13600 N. Kendall Drive. Miami
CAMP WOHELO for Girls
CAMP COMET for Boys
COMET TRAILS for Teenage Boys
12811 OLD RT. 16. WAYNESBORO, PA. 17268
CALL MORGAN LEVY (305) 591-3339

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This message bfffligtB to you
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..


Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, January 18,1965
JCC News
SEX-EXTRA DISCUSSION
The Single Pursuits Group (35-55) of the Jewish
Community Center has arranged for Dr. Gert Werner to
lead a discussion on sex and the single person Tuesday,
Jan. 29, 8 p.m., at the Center, 2415 Okeechobee Blvd.,
West Palm Beach.
This open and informative evening is a must for all who
want to expand their experiences. Refreshments will be
served. Donation, $2 per person. Hosts: Murry Sherwood
495-1719 or Phyllis Siegelman 689-9032 in the evening.
CHAVERIM
The Jewish Community Center's Big Friend program,
Chaverim, funded through the Single Parents Committee
of Jewish Federation, is a special program designed to
meet some of the needs of Jewish single-parent families in
Palm Beach County. Chaverim will help children of single-
parent families by providing another supportive Jewish
adult role model to share activities and to spend quality
time. Chaverim will offer caring Jewish adults the oppor-
tunity to form quality relationships with special children.
Interested "Big Friends" as well as single parent families
are invited to call Bonnie Altman at 689-7700.
TO WIN A "GEM"
The Jewish Community Center is offering the public its
January "Gems," the opportunity to win a seven-day, six-
night lntracoastal Cruise for two or a signed Edna Hibel
poster entitled "Hadassah" or a portrait by the Palm
Beach photographer Mort Kaye.
All proceeds will go to purchase Pre-School equipment
and for Center programs. The donation for each chance is
$5 or six for $25. Books of six are available at the JCC
office, 2415 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach or please
call 689-7700 to receive it in the mail.
MOTHERS AND TODDLERS PLAY
The Jewish Community Center's Early Childhood
Department now offers parents and their toddlers three
programs especially designed for their enjoyment together
and for the toddlers' development and growth under
professional leadership.
Creeper Caravan for ages six to 12 months. Maximum
12 children. To be held Tuesdays from 1-2 p.m. for 13
sessions. This is a place for exploratory play for parent and
child. Fee: JCC members $35 non-members $45.
Playland for ages 12-18 months. Maximum 12 children.
To be held Tuesdays and Thursdays for 13 weeks. A place
to socialize, experience with art, creative movement,
music, physical and dramatic play. Fee: JCC members $60
non-members $70.
Potpourri for ages 18 to 24 months. To be held Tuesdays
and Thursdays 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. for 13 weeks. A
creative time for parent and toddler with music, art,
cooking, creative movement, physical and dramatic play.
Fee: JCC members $85, non-members $95.
All programs take place at Camp Shalom (Belvedere
Rd., one mile west of the Turnpike). For additional in-
formation please call 689-7700.
STATE OF
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Midrasha Starts New Semester Feb. 8
On Wednesday evening,
Feb. 6, the Midrasha-Judaica
High School will open its
doors for the second semester
of the 1984-85 school year.
The school's population is
presently 94 students in grades
9-12 with a senior graduating
class of 16 the larget in its
five-year history.
The courses offered this
semester include basics that
are offered regularly such as
Hebrew, Holocaust Studies,
Bible and Drama, as well as
some that are offered at ir-
Jews Deny
that the problem appears in all
age and income groups. He
said, "There are even rabbis
and airline pilots who are
alcohol and drug dependent."
Goldberg added that about
30 percent of a group aged 18
to 30, at a drug treatment
center which he knew about,
"were Jewish. We probably
have a higher rate of drug
dependency among Jews than
any other group in the world."
Rabbi Joel Chazin of
Temple Emanu-El of Palm
Beach stressed that it was
"important that both
professional and lay people
should be aware of the
facilities available" to help
Jewish addicts. Several rabbis
at the meeting, which was
organized by Rabbi Albert
Schwartz, director of the Fort
Lauderdale Jewish Federation
Chaplain Commission and
coordinator of the task force,
said they had been unaware of
the extent of the problem nor
of the help available.
There are 300 Alcoholics
Anonymous meetings in
Broward County each week,
said Sherwin Rosenstein, exec-
utive director of the Jewish
Family Service of Broward
County, "but none are held in
Jewish places."
Goldberg, noting the
reluctance of some Jews to
join in AA meetings because
they think such groups are
Christian-oriented, said syna-
gogues should undertake
sponsorship of AA groups. He
NAbO
Conquistador
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regular intervals such as
Jewish and Amrican Civil
Law, Famous Jewish Trials,
How to Cope With Cults and
Missionaries, Jewish Values,
and others. In addition, some
very new courses are being
offered for the first time this
semester. They include "To
Give and Receive" a course
which will explore the con-
cepts related to community
leadership and Tzedakah.
Another will be a special
course for seniors entitled "Is
There Jewish Life After High
Continued from Page 2
also proposed that retreats
should be planned for addicts
and their families, such as
those held twice a year by the
New York-based Jewish
Alcoholics, Chemically-
Dependent Persons and
Significant Others, which grew
out of a task force of the Fed-
eration of Jewish Philan-
thropies of New York.
Barbara Goldberg, director
of education and information
services at the Center for
Recovery, said a wealth of
speakers, many of them
recovered addicts, is available
to provide expert information
to Jewish groups.
School?" This course
by Dr. Norma SlSK
practicing clinical psycL8
logist. willf explore issues ad
problems facing Jewish tea.
as they eave home and beg
their college careers.
"We are looking forward to
increased registration as Weh
as an excellent semester which
will be highlighted by a special
Purim Ball and of course our
biggest graduation ever"
stated Ann Lynn Lipton, dir-
ector.
The Midrasha-Judaica High'
School is sponsored by tht
Jewish Federation in coopera-
tion with local synagogues and
the Jewish Community Day
School. It is open to all Jewish
teens in grades 9-12. Registra-
tion for the spring semester
will take place on Jan. 30 at
the school, which meets at the
Jewish Community Day
School, 5801 Parker Avenue
West Palm Beach, at 6 p.m!
"We encourage those Jewish
teens in our community who
have not yet experienced
Midrasha to join us and share
in the excitement that per-
meates Wednesday nights at
the school," stated Dr. Paul
Klein, chair of the Midrasha
committee of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County.
Tuition is $50 per semester
or $75 for the year. For
further information call the
Jewish Education Department
at 655-7706.
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A Major Contribution To A Complex Issue
By CHARLES ALLEN, JR.
On Nazi war criminals living
among us: there's good news
__ and there's not-so-good
news. First, the good news.
Allan Ryan, Jr., former head
of the Justice Department's
Office of Special
Investigations (OSI), which
prosecutes suspected Nazi war
criminals, has checked in with
a useful book that without
question makes a major
contribution to this complex
issue.
"Quiet Neighbors"
(Harcourt, Bruce Jovanovich,.
New York, 1984) tells an
ofien-gripping story of how he
and his young OSI team
pursued, prosecuted,
denaturalized and, in some
instances, deported actual
Nazi war criminals living in
the United States.
The book focuses on several
key trials which were by no
means ever quiet affairs but
which have made important,
historic contributions at
several levels immigration,
naturalization of our law.
They were told of course from
Ryan's perspective as the
nation's chief prosecutor of
individuals who embody
literally unresolved remnants
of the Holocaust itself.
Ryan takes the reader step-
by-step through the massive,
complex attempts to fix the
guilt of such cases as Arch-
bishop Valerian Trifa, the
Rumanian fascist, self-
admitted pogromist who sat
on the governing board of the
prestigious National Council
of Churches of Christ in
America; John Demjanjuk,
known as "Ivan the Terrible"
when he kicked off the diesel
engines of the gas chambers of
I rcblinka before making his
way to Cleveland, Ohio;
Andrija Artukovic, the single
greatest genocidist in our
midst, former Interior
Minister of Nazi-occupied
Yugoslavia who has been here
since 1948.
The major cases are told
with invaluable instruction by
the author. When "Quiet
Neighbors" sticks to its legal
last, as it were, the results, the
insights are of a high order.
Ryan rejects (as has this
reviewer) the "great con-
spiracies" approach wherein
"Odessa" operations deep
within the government are
portrayed as "smuggling"
genocidists en bloc into the
United States.
He properly underscores a
fundamental reality: "Nazi
war criminals came here .
through the openly-
deliberated public policy of
this country, formulated by
Congress (in the 1948
Displaced Persons Act) and
administered by accountable
officials. And it is the more
disturbing because the proof
(of how they got here) is
abundant."
The argument is not novel
of course and Ryan
acknowledges some of the
writings which have made it.
He cites the well-known but
fulsome remark by one of the
"fathers" of the Displaced
Persons Act, the then-
powerful West Virginia
Senator William "Chappy"
Revercomb: "We could solve
this DP problem all right if we
could work out some bill that
would keep out the Jews." Of
course that was precisely what
the first DP Act did.
All too gently, Ryan points
out how certain "major" Jew-
ish leaders created a public
relations front the Citizens
Committee for Displaced
Persons (CCDP) to
propagandize the DP Act to
passage. Their effort produced
"a roaring backfire," Ryan
correctly notes, in which 40
percent of the DP Act visas
were set aside for the Baltic
countries (from which a
disproportionate number of
war criminals came to the
U.S.) and "left most Jewish
DPs ineligible."
The peculiar mentality that
contributed to this bitter irony
is revealed in an American
Jewish Congress memo
secretly circulated inside the
CCDP: 'a calculated risk
should be taken' that Nazi
collaborators would receive
some of those (DP Act) visas.
This is 'unavoidable (the
AJCongress memo said) if a
haven were to be found in this
country for any really
significant number of
displaced Jews.' "
At this point, however,
Ryan conspicuously fails to
consider the implications of
such cynical, unprincipled
opportunism within its
broader context. Such an act
was not random but rather
consistent with that
"leadership" before, during
and even after the Holocaust.
Indeed, only the Jewish War
Veterans among the "major"
organizations took an open,
active and unequivocal
position against the presence
of Nazi war criminals in
America.
Regrettably, "Quiet Neigh-
bors" is elsewhere marked by
parallel limitations, contextual
weaknesses and curious
omissions that make for some
problems. Herein lies the not-
so-good news about Ryan's
efforts. Whenever he tries to
go beyond the trial lawyer's
story he tells so well, he
quickly encounters materials
that prove too much for him.
Even while attempting to
sketch historical or political
contexts for his cases, there is
a paucity of historical com-
mand of the materials or naive
generalizations that do not for
a moment stand up to
scrutiny.
Time and again, in making
his cast against Trifa or the
Arrow Cross criminal of
Hungary, he resorts to con-
trasting the "moderates" of
Marshal Ion Antonescu's
Rumania and of Admiral
Nicholas Horthy's Hungary.
Other than for tactical
moments, these forces of
fascist nationalism were in
continuous collusion with the
openly avowed Hitlerites to
the very end of the war. To
characterize successive prime
ministers of wartime Hungary
as "moderate" and to call that
author of Hungary's
"neutralism" (meaning
capitulation to Hitler Ger-
many), Count Bela Teleki,
"an anti-Nazi" is bizarre
nonsense.
Ryan's limited grasp of the
times leads him into such
flagrant errors as putting the
Dora-Nordhausen slave
tunnels (for V-l and V-2
rocket production) in Austria
when of course they were
located in eastern Germany.
He states that Latvia is
"largely Catholic" and
Lithuania "largely
Protestant" when in fact their
respective religions are
precisely the opposite.
His otherwise useful chapter
on Artukovic is woefully
incomplete and misleading.
One would not know from it
that both this mass murderer
and his terrorist Ustashi
enjoyed the support of the
Roman Catholic Church; that
Cardinal Spellman was among
Artukovic's petitioners for
congressional relief; that the
Croatian Catholic Union
spearheaded a national
defense campaign for
Artukovic. One might also
conclude that Cardinal
Stepinak, primate of Croatia
(as an archbishop), was a stout
companion of Yugoslavia's
doomed Jews and an anti-Nazi
when in fact he was neither.
Ryan is never reluctant to
take credit; even sometimes
when credit is not quite due.
He rightly underscores the
importance of the U.S.
Supreme Court's sustaining
the reversal of the trial judge's
original finding in behalf of
the Treblinka death camp
guard, Feodor Fedorenko.
Thus the OSI case was vin-
dicated. He neglects to relate
that the aide to the U.S.
Solicitor General who
originally recommended that
the Fedorenko loss at the trial
level not be appealed was then-
Deputy Solicitor General
Allan Ryan, Jr. This prom-
pted ironic comment by law
journals at that time.
Ryan makes a great to-do
about protecting a Hungarian
criminal who came to the U.S.
He gives him the pseudonym,
"Count Josep Magyar," while
reciting his case as an example
of the "humane" con-
siderations that often enter
into such prosecutions. Ryan's
"Magyar" was in fact a
violently provocative fascist
by the name of Count Miklos
Serenyi who was exposed by
the anti-Nazi Hungarian press
in the 1950's, some of whose
exposures are cited by Ryan.
The former OSI chief also
defends his decision not to re-
try the case of one Frank
Walus, originally ordered
denaturalzied in 1978 for
allegedly having concealed his
past as a Gestapo agent. On
appeal, the case was sent back
to test purportedly new
evidence claimed by Walus.
Ryan admits that the appeals
court "did not reverse (the
Continued on Page 13-
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Flagler Federal Opens 37th
President Herschel Rosenthal,
Chairman Seymour B. Keith
Lead Board of Directors
President of Flagler Federal
since 1976, Herschel
Rosenthal has been associated
with the dynamic savings and
loan association for the past
28 years.
Active in the South Florida
Jewish community since
graduating from Miami Senior
High School and the Univer-
sity of Miami, Rosenthal was
chairman of the 50th anni-
versary dinner-dance of the
Jewish Community Centers of
South Florida.
He was selected for that key
position because of his service
as president of the YM-
YWHA of Greater Miami and
his leadership roles for the
Greater Miami Jewish
Federation. He is a Pacesetter
of the annual CJA-IEF cam-
paign and was honored by
State of Israel Bonds for his
long service to Beth David
Congregation.
After receiving a BBA
degree from the U-M, where
he majored in accounting,
Rosenthal practiced public
accounting for seven years
before joining Flagler Federal
during its second year of
expansion. He was a partner
in a CPA firm until 1963 and
is a member of the American
and Florida Institutes of
Certified Public Accountants.
Rosenthal has been honored
Keith
by his colleagues through
election as chairman of the
Florida Savings and Loan
League. He also has served as
National League Representa-
tive of the Florida League and
was director of District 6 of
the statewide association.
Now a member of the
United States League of
Savings Institutions Com-
mittee on Industry Re-
structuring, he is a member of
the U.S. League's executive
committee, a director of the
University of Miami's School
of Business Administration
Alumni Association and
countless other civic and busi-
ness associations.
Rosenthal long has been
committed to the role of
Flagler Federal in the tri-
county area of Palm Beach,
Broward and Dade. He has
participated in the growth of
the association to six offices in
Palm Beach County, 11 in
Broward and 20 in Dade with
the greatest expansion follow-
ing the population trends of
Pd. Adv.
Rosenthal
the Florida Gold Coast.
Herschel Rosenthal, his six
children and three grand-
children have witnessed the
explosive growth of South
Florida, and played a major
part in its community and
professional history.
Seymour B. Keith, a Flori-
dian since 1941 when he was
graduated from New York
University, has served with
distinction as chairman of the
board of Flagler Federal
Savings and Loan Association
since 1977.
After serving for four years
in the United States Army
during World War II, Keith
was separated as a captain
and was graduated from the
University of Miami School of
Law. He has practiced law in
South Florida since 1947, and
is senior partner in the firm of
Keith, Mack, Lewis and
Allison.
A founding director and
general counsel for Flagler
Federal at the time of its
inception in 1955, he has
guided its steady progress
over the past three decades.
Keith was senior vice pre-
sident from 1970 until 1977,
when he was unanimously
elected chairman of the board.
His knowledge of the financial
and housing needs of Palm
Beach, Broward and Dade
counties has been a key factor
in the growth of Flagler
Federal throughout the state's
fastest growing region.
A Pacesetter of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation
since 1979, Keith was the
honoree of the Builders,
Bankers and Allied Trades
division of Federation in 1977
for his dedicated service on
behalf of his profession, the
financial industry, the Jewish
people and the State of Israel.
Active in Temple Judea in
Coral Gables since 1960, he is
a director of such community
organizations as Goodwill
Industries and the Hope
School.
New Branch Office Opens In Village
of Golf, West Boynton Beach
Opening of Flagler
Federal's newest Palm Beach
county office in the Village of
Golf in December, 1984, set
the stage for the start of
Flagler Federal's year-long
observance of its 30th anni-
versary.
Located at 11082 South
Military Trail in West Boyn-
ton Beach, the new facility
joins offices in Delray Beach,
4767 West Atlantic Avenue;
Boynton Beach, 564 S.E. 15th
Avenue; Lantana, 1479 South
Dixie Highway; Lake Worth,
2575 North Dixie Highway;
and Palm Beach Lakes, 1700
Palm Beach Lakes Boulevard.
Flagler Federal's complete-
ly computerized services make
all savings services available
at each office, with customers
able to make deposits and
other transactions at the
closest branch.
In addition, Flagler
Federal's commitment to
Palm Beach County makes
home mortgage and other
financing available to resi-
dents throughout the fast-
growing area.
The association plans to
build a permanent, free-
standing branch office directly
across from the existing store-
front branch located in the
Publix shopping center. The
new office building, with com-
pletion due sometime in 1985,
will contain many services
that Palm Beach County resi-
dents have asked for.
of
son* I
Flagler Federal's Rapid Groi
The history of Flagler Federal coincides with th.
growth of South Florida during the past three decades
Founded in 1955 after the granting of a federal cl
savings and loan association an industry born in
Flagler Federal grew from one office in downtown II
some 37 branches throughout the tri-county area
Beach, Broward and Dade.
The founding directors, under the leadership of
Marks, led the association from initial deposits of
million to $1 billion prior to his death in 1983.
Named after Henry Flagler, the empire builder of rm
who brought the railroad to West Palm Beach, Miami and.
Key West, Flagler Federal has continued the pioneering,
Flagler Federal Board
Have Key Roles In All Soi
Flagler Federal's board of i
of chairman Seymour B. Keith and
comprised of individuals who have u.
for their communities throughout their j
Native Floridian Sam Seitlin, a
high schools, St. John's Collegi
University of Miami, is founder and i
Seitlin and Company, one of South I
insurance agencies.
Seitlin is a director of both
Trust Bank, N.A. and past presidenTi
Insurance Board.
Former president of the Jewish |
South Florida, Seitlin headed the Gr
during its period of greatest growth in l
He is a member of the Masons,:
Appeals Board of Dade County, We
member of the Board of Overseers of t
School of Medicine.
Albert J. Beer, a resident of Southl
a member of the first graduating
Elementary School in Miami Beach, i
the University of Florida in 1945
ministration degree. Two years later, I
Smith and became the youngest CPA in T
Past president of the Dade CounSyj
Public Accountants, he is a partner in I
stein, Covin, Beer and Company.
Beer has served as president of 1
is an active member of the board of I
Jewish Education and of the Federation1!
An active member of the Flagler Fa
finds time to visit Israel frequently
own an apartment in Jerusalem. They I
eluding daughter Shelley Beer Epsteinr
seven years, and son T.R. Beer,
developer.
Director Sy Reese moved to Flor
in 1952. He has served on the advisory
Bank of Palm Beach County, and has I
Palm Beach.
Reese, who studied industrial en
Institute, founded Allstate Gas
Lauderdale and Gas Service Corpon
time he developed, built and obtained a i
his vertical gas broiler, before selling tn
Now developing two shopping c
area, Reese is a prime mover in the ir
of Palm Beach county in Florida mau
Service as a member of the Florida. J
Council, as vice presdient of the soub
National Association of Industrial ana
leadership in two Palm Beach County."
combine to give Reese a keen per~
the county and all South Florida.
Reese
Beer
Babcock
Here Are Locations Of Flagler Federal
Offices Throughout Palm Beach County
DELRAY BEACH
4767 W. Atlantic Ave.
Delray Beach, FL 33445
498-7900
WEST PALM BEACH
1700 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd.
West Palm Beach, FL 33401
686-9400
LANTANA
1479 S. Dixie Hwy.
Lantana, FL 33462
586-8188
LAKE WORTH
2575 N. Dixie Hwy.
Lake Worth, FL 33460
582-6660
BOYNTON BEACH
564 S.E. 15th Ave.
Boynton Beach, FL 33435
734-8288
VILLAGE OF GOLF
11082 S. Military Trail
Boynton Beach, FL 33436
732-8880
Seitlin


6th in Palm Beach County
(Keeps Pace With South Florida And All Of Palm Beach County
of the man in whose memory it is known.
Flagler was a philanthropist who donated money for
schools, parks and houses of worship.
And Flagler Federal has maintained that tradition of
participation in every phase of community life wherever it
maintains offices.
Nathan Meltzer, a past president of Flagler Federal now
deceased, met Henry Flagler on the historic day of January 22,
1912 when the first train rolled into Key West. Although the
Labor Day hurricane of 1936 was to wipe out the railroad tracks
to the Keys, the vision of Flagler opened up all Florida, and
particularly the Gold Coast to today's role as one of the world's
most desirable places to live, work and play.
\bers
lorida
I the leadership
Rosenthal, is
I their concern
^al careers.
Dade County
fork and the
\[ the board of
ost successful
Lai and Royal
ireater Miami
Ity Centers of
YM-YWHA
Prevention
try Club and a
sity of Miami
ace 1935, was
[South Beach
raduated from
I business ad-
arried Lillian
first*
congregation,
U Agency for
ants division.
rd, Beer still
Je, where they
children, in-
in Israel for
real estate
iticello, N.Y.,
rst American
Be* in North
at Rensselaer
Irs in Fort
lami. At that
ptes patent on
panies.
i Lake Worth
prominent role
nerce.
[Development
fhapter of the
rks and active
] of commerce
olid future of
Guess how much money
you'll lose by not opening
a Flagler Federal IRA now?
A lot
As a matter of fact, the longer
you wait to open your individ-
ual retirement account the
more money you'll lose.lb
prove that point just look at
die chart.
At Flagler Federal it
doesn't take much to start
your future on the right road.
You can open your IRA for as
little as $100. And because we
don't charge administration
fees you actually wind up with
more money than with most
other IRA plans.
There's also another big
plus with a Flagler Federal IRA
You earn a Vi% cash bonus
on your IRA contributions
over $1,000. The larger your
contribution, the more bonus
you receive.
Whether you're single
or married', professional or
salaried, your future will be a
whole lot brighter with a tax-
deductible, tax-deferred
Flagler Federal IRA
So, don't put off the
decision for another year.
Come to Flagler Federal today
and plan for tomorrow.
MUMm*Mh tmmm 1 mi cwMwm 0aJM.lMdi|Mr tt t1% Interest compotM4o4t Qtwltfty
rr. M*
m SIMM SZ1.M Mi
* mm 1l.NI Cn.fM.41
* IMM IMM 444.177 75
mjm It.Mt J7JM13I
er Federal
Savings & Loan Association
It takes hometown
people to
understand
the needs of
ahometown.
FSLE
Pd. Adv.


Page 10 The Jewish Kloridian or Palm Beach County / Friday, January 18,1986
Organizations in
the News
AMERICAN RED MAGEN DAVID FOR ISRAEL
The 32 Florida Chapters of American Red Magen David
for Israel, the sole support wing in the United States for
Israel's Red Cross Service, the Magen David Adorn
(MDA), are scheduling canister days during the week of
Feb. 19 through the 23rd. (Each chapter is scheduling a
date in conformity with its particular municipality.)
The aim of these chapters is to provide Israel with the
funds to maintain the lifesaving services of MDA including
emergency medical, blood and ambulance services.
Pearl Stahl, national director of American Red Magen
David Adorn, will visit the new Boynton Beach Chapter,
which will hold a breakfast in Temple Beth Kodesh at 501
N.E. 26 Avenue on Sunday, Jan. 20 at 10 a.m. Mrs. Stahl
will be the guest speaker, acquainting the group with "The
Importance of Magen David Adorn to the People of
Israel."
For more information, contact Abe Semelmacher or
Temple Beth Kodesh.
B'NAIB'RITH
Century Lodge No. 2939will hold their Twelfth Annual
Dinner Dance on Sunday, March 10, 6 p.m., at the Airport
Hilton Hotel, Australian Avenue, West Palm Beach.
There will be music by Sammy Fields and entertainment by
Max Willner in "The Memories of the Yiddish Theatre."
Contact Harry Katz, Chatham T 396, for more in-
formation.
The next meeting of the Yachad Unit No. 5231 will be
held on Wednesday, Jan. 23, 7:30 p.m. at Temple Emeth,
Delray Beach. A panel discussion will address the subject
"Israel: A Varied Perspective." Chairs are Philip
Rosenthal, Joseph Berk and Arthur Slater.
HADASSAH
Aliya Group will hold their membership meeting on
Thursday, Jan. 24 at 1 p.m. in Temple Beth Sholom, 315 A
St., Lake Worth.
Helen Smith, program chair, announces that Gertrude
Lieberman, a member of Aliya, will review the book
"Haven" by Ruth Gruber.
The Lee Vassil Group will meet on Tuesday, Jan. 22, at
Temple Beth Sholom, 315 No. "A" St., Lake Worth, at 10
a.m.
This is Education Day for the group with special guests
Julie Feldman, anchorperson of Channel 5, and Jeanne
Glasser, Soviet Jewry Task Force of the Jewish Federation
of Palm Beach County, and also some of the group's
talent. A mini-lunch will be served.
Yovel invites the community to attend the annual
"Hadassah Education Day" sponsored by chapters in
Palm Beach, St. Lucie and Martin counties. It will beheld
on Thursday, Feb. 7, 9:30 a.m., at Florida Atlantic
University, Boca Raton. The theme of the day will be
Jewish Women Through the Years." Dr. Miriam Freund
Rosenthal, past national president of Hadassah, will be the
honored guest speaker.
Call Lee Goldberg or Sarah Kenvin for further informa-
tion and transportation.
Yovel has planned a Copacabana evening with a full
course dinner, Las Vegas show, strolling violins, and
dancing on Wednesday, Jan. 23 at Casino in the Sun,
Miami. Transportation is included in the price. The bus
leaves West Gate at 6 p.m. For reservations please call
Bernice Fink or Mary Rodd.
WOMEN'S AMERICAN ORT
Women's American Ort will present the award-winning
film, "L'Chaim" (To Life) featuring Eli Wallach, on
Saturday night Jan. 19, 7:30 p.m. at the Royal Palm Beach
Village Hall. Tickets are S3 in advance as seating is limited.
The next regular meeting of Mid-Palm Chapter will be
held on Monday, Jan. 28,1 p.m., at Temple Beth Sholom,
Lake Worth.
Guest speaker for the day will be Margaret Cummings of
the Private Industry Council. She will discuss "Job
Opportunities for the Senior Citizen."
Future special events will include a Chinese luncheon
and card party at Oriental Express at 11:30 a.m., S6.S0, on
Feb. 11, and "Shalom" at WPB Auditorium, $14 matinee
on Feb. 26. For information on any of the special events
call Lee Levine or Ruth Muckler.
YIDDISH CULTURE GROUP
On Jan. 22 the Century Village Group will present the
singing Merry Ministrels. Rose Denitz will read excerpts
from the famous Yiddish writer Sholem Aleichem. Violin
virtuosrr Marry Levine will conclude the program accom-
panied a piano by Dora Rosenbaum.
Endowment
Continued from Page 1
$31,000 for a series of inter-
faith missions to Israel, and
$30,000 for a Federation long-
range campaign study.
Brenner emphasized the
significance of the endowment
funds as a resource to meet
emergencies, seed money for
demonstration projects,
capital needs, and for pro-
grams and services not
provided in the Federation's
regular budget. Furthermore,
they enable donors to main-
tain and-or increase their
contribution to the Federa-
tion's annual campaign by
creating a philanthropic fund
with appreciated securities or
properties at a time when tax
benefits are most advan-
tageous.
The Endowment Fund
Program of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County is now in its fifth year
of operation. Serving with
Brenner on the Endowment
Fund committee are Federa-
tion President Myron Nick-
man, Federation Executive
Director Norman
Schimelman, Barry Berg, Abe
Bisgaier, Richard S. Bernstein,
Leonard Carter, Heinz
Eppler, Robert Fitterman,
Alexander Gruber, Arnold
Hoffman, Anne Marie
Kaufman, Shepard Lesser,
Robert S. Levy, Robert E.
List, Arnold Mullen, Eileen
Nickman, Robert D. Perrin,
Richard Rampell, Berenice
Rogers, Thomas N. Silverman
and Joseph E. Weingard.
Participation is available
through personal philan-
thropic funds, trusts,
bequests, outright gifts and
insurance policies. Persons
interested in any phase of the
program or for further in-
formation may contact
Endowment Director, I.
Edward Adler, at the Federa-
tion office, 832-2120.
Wedding
ROSENBERNSTEIN
Leonora Bernstein and Dr.
Jacob Rosen of Cresthaven
were married on Monday,
Dec. 31, at the home of the
groom's daughter and son-in-
law, Belle and Ralph Goldman
of Cresthaven.
PASSOVER 1985
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Synagogue services
This Passover enjoy a traditional atmosphere
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Doctor 4 R.N.'s at
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FOR INFORMATION CALL OR WRITE:
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YOU AND YOUR FAMILY ARE CORDIALLY
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TO BE HELD FOR YOU*) AREA ON
THURSDAY, JANUARY 24th, at 7:30 P.M.
WEST PALM BEACH JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
2415 OkewchobM Blvd.
Local Representative: Staci Laasar, 588-1652
TO SEE OUR CAMP FILM. TO MEET THE DIRECTOR.
TO ASK QUESTIONS. TO ENJOY REFRESHMENTS
-FORMER ANO PROSPECTIVE STAFF ARE ALSO INVITEO
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Background Report
FridBy, January 18,1985 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 11
The Brown fog Of The Greens
< i.
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) Green
Party officials here view the
latest trip of their delegation
o Israel as an enormous suc-
ess in gaining publicity for
the party's ideas. Never before
in its short history has the
Green Party had such favor-
able attention focused by the
media on its view that a Pales-
tinian state should be created
in ,he West Bank, and that
q what it terms "Israeli crimes"
in Lebanon should be den-
ounced by Bonn.
The six-member Green
Party delegation ended its
four-day iour of Israel and
admitted that they had come
to Israel with fixed ideas and
were returning home with
those same opinions un-
changed, it was reported by
' V\ugh Orgel, the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency's corresp-
ondent in Tel Aviv.
HE WROTE that Jurgen
Reents, the delegation's
spokesman and leader, told a
press conference in Tel Aviv
that the Greens still thought
that Israel should withdraw to
its pre-June 1967 borders and
recognize a Palestinian state in
the West Bank to afford the
Palestinians their "natural
right ol self-expression."
The West German media
.overage of the delegation
;oncentrated heavily on the
difference of opinion between
Israel and the Greens on the
Palestinian issue. It either left
unmentioned or strongly
downplayed other elements in
the present controversy over
the visit and over the party's
anti-Semitic tendencies.
The German media largely
ignored the fact that the
delegation had prepared its
itinerary in Lebanon, in Syria
and Jordan with the Palestine
Liberation Organization and
with the governments of these
countries. This happened,
according to well-informed
sources in the party, months
or weeks before the delegation
was slated to leave West Ger-
many.
MOST WEST German
newspapers failed to report, as
well, that the Greens had pre-
pared an anti-Israel strategy
paper before the delegation
began its trip. Nor did most
publications report that the
Israeli ambassador here
labelled the paper as anti-
Semitic.
The paper, published early
in December, denounced
Israel as "fascist and terror-
ist" and referred to "terrorist
policies" of Israel in south
Lebanon which allegedly
include random arrests and
tortures in specially designated
concentration camps.
. Most of the press also
ignored the fact that the
Greens had failed to contact
the Israeli embassy here, or the
foreign ministry in Jerusalem,
before they were forced to do
so when the strategy paper was
published by a local Bonn
newspaper and by the Israeli
media.
THE VISIT of the Greens*
delegation to Israel was pre-
sented in the media here as
something that puzzled Israeli
public opinion and disturbed
government of Premier
the
Shimon Peres. One radio
commentator, describing the
uec 26 Knesset incident in
JJ'nich members of the Tehiya
Kar.ty displayed a banner
'tying Braune Gruenne Raus
Browns Greens Out) during
he delegation's visit to the
,arliament, said:
"The Israeli nationalistic
Tehiya Party has adopted the
methods of our own national-
istic party, namely the
Greens." He was referring to
the Greens' established
practice in the Bundestag and
in the parliaments of federal
states of attracting attention to
their opinions by displaying
banners which in most cases
denounce America as an
aggressive and imperialist
power endangering world
peace.
The Tehiya banner was a
reference to the equation,
according to Tehiya, between
the Greens and the Nazi
stormtroopers who wore
brown uniforms.
Another point left almost
completely unmentioned in the
West German media is the dis-
turbing evidence accumulating
on the anti-Semitic tendencies
of the Greens an aspect
widely reported in Israel
but which some Green Party
leaders deny.
NO GERMAN newspaper
or radio station has mentioned
in recent days the circulation
of anti-Semitic calendars by
the Greens; the frequent equa-
tions made by them between
the Jews and the Nazis; or the
distinct anti-Jewish views of
their candidate for president,
author Luise Rinser.
No real attempt has been
made either in the press or
within the Green Party itself to
take issue with the accusations
that the Greens are engaged,
'directly or indirectly,
voluntarily or through ignor-
ance, lack of attention or
both in reviving notorious
anti-Semitic traditions har-
bored in the German national-
istic movement.
Reents, in an interview with
the JTA, brushed aside all
allegations in this respect, say-
E'ng simply that he did not
;now of anything like them.
When offered written evidence
or presented with facts, he
commented that he and his
(party could not be held
responsible for unfavorable
behavior of single individuals.
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For 27 years. AJCongress members
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LAUDERHILL
Thursday Jan 31 at 7:30 PM
Inverrary Country Club
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Temple Beth Sholom
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Tuesday Feh 5 at 7 30 PM
Marco Polo Hotel
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D We ptan to come to the Travel Presentation.
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aV


Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, January 18,1985

Senior News
FROM THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
TRANSPORTATION
Transportation is available
in our designated area for
persons 60 years of age or over
who do not use public tran-
sportation. We take people to
treatment centers, doctors'
offices, to hospitals, nursing
homes to visit spouses, to
social service agencies and
nutrition centers. There is no
lee for this service, but parti-
cipants are encouraged to
contribute their fair share.
There is a great demand for
this service, so please make
your reservations in advance.
For information and-or
reservations, call 689-7703
Monday through Friday.
HOT KOSHER LUNCH
CONNECTION
Many elements combine to
make the Hot Kosher Lunch
Program at the Jewish Com-
munity Center a success. Fore-
most among these is the
opportunity to form new and
lasting friendships.
Each weekday, seniors
gather for intimate talk,
educational discussions, game
playing, leisure and song.
These activities are followed
by a hot, kosher, nutritious
lunch served with warmth and
hospitality by our dedicated
volunteers. There is no set fee,
but persons are asked to make
a contribution each meal.
MENU FOR THE WEEK
Monday Games
pineapple juice, baked
chicken, succotash, apples, rye
bread.
Tuesday Fitness over 50
orange juice, meat loaf w-
brown gravy, parsley potato,
squash, oranges, whole wheat
bread.
Wednesday Grapefruit
B&P Division
Continued from Page 3
Paul Shapiro, is a managing
partner in the West Palm
Beach office of Wolf, Block,
Schorr and Solis-Cohen. He
was active in Young Leader-
ship in his former home of
Philadelphia and is becoming
an involved member of this
community.
The eight sections have been
meeting with their cabinets
during the month and their
work will culminate in a lunch
meeting on Jan. 30. For more
information contact Mark
Mendel, staff associate, at the
Federation office 832-2120.
Economic
Continued from Page 1
dismissal because the Defense
Ministry has cancelled orders
for two large landing craft for
the navy, citing budget cuts.
The shipyards were hit
earlier by cancellations from
local commercial shipowners.
Only two tugs for the govern-
ment Ports Authority remain
in its order books and these
will require only a small work-
force.
Two Zim Lines contain r
ships are being "stretched" -
they are cut in half and new
midsections added to increase
capacity but when that job
is completed the yards will be
left with repair and main-
tenance work which will
require no more than 200
workers.
juice, fish fillets, zuccini,
apples, pumpernickle bread.
Thursday Pineapple
juice, spaghetti w-meat sauce,
sliced carrots, spinach,
orange, whole wheat bread.
Friday Orange juice,
boiled chicken w-tomato
sauce, glazed carrots, oven
browned potatoes, peaches,
challah bread.
Please come and join us.
For information and reserva-
tions (which must be made in
advance) call Carol or Lillian
at 689-7703 in West Palm
Beach.
HOME
DELIVERED MEALS
Persons who are
homebound and need a
Kosher meal please call for
information. Call Carol in
West Palm Beach at 689-7703.
FOR THE FINEST IN
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an innovative and
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The Hornstein Jewish
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students ol every race,
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a kosher cafeteria
facility athletic tieias
basketball tennis
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administrative offices
A Biblical garden
enhances the natural
Deputy of the site and
promotes living
Judaism
A BENEFICIARY AGENCY OF THE JEWISH FEDERATION OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
Available at PubMx Stores with
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Jan. 17th thru 23rd. 1985
. !


Major Contribution To A Comples Issue
Continued from Pag* 7
/alus decision) outright" but
as chief prosecutor,
termined that Walus was
(accent. Notwithstanding
Kis exoneration, the fact
Sains that the "new"
vidence was never examined
It trial.
During his OSI days, Ryan
forcefully (and properly)
cautioned agaisnt throwing
around fanciful numbers in
considering just how many
Nazi war criminals found
haven in the U.S. "No one will
cused of a Nazi past in the OSI
files. He also (properly)
pointed out that "fully one-
third are deceased."
The OSI figures happened
ever know," he told me during to tally with the hard data I
a 1981 interview in which he have used over the years. I
would not venture beyond the always have shared Ryan's
"some 480" individuals ac- (admonitions. But now, in
*Quie\ Neighbors," Ryan
Peres Supports Shultz
w Critical of Economy
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Iremier Shimon Peres
klared here that Secretary of
fate George Shultz is one of
sraePs best friends in
Washington, and it was quite
[roper for him to offer advice
In how Israel should handle
Is economic problems.
Peres, addressing a Labor
arty group here, was refer-
png to a letter he received
rom Shultz two weeks ago
fciggesting that the Israeli
lovernment must take tougher
conomic measures before the
).S. considers its request for
icreased economic aid.
The letter, leaked to the
kress, drew a sharp response
from Gad Yaacobi, Minister
if Economics and Planning,
vho said the government
tnows what has to be done
Ind does not need "lec-
jring." Peres, however,
lefended Shultz. His advice,
Je said was "truly that of a
friend, without pressure or
nsults."
The Premier added that it
ivas natural and proper for
Washington to carefully
tcrutinize Israel's economic
ilans when it was being asked
lor increased aid. He said
fehultz's letter was not critical
jut in fact praised the
f'gcneral direction" of the
government's economic
policies. He simply urged
greater urgency and deter-
mination to implement those
policies, Peres said.
The Finance Ministry was
reported meanwhile to be
working on a one-year wage-
price stabilization plan to take
effect when the three-month
wage-price freeze ends in
January. Some elements of the
plan, leaked to the media,
indicated that the Ministry
seeks to hold down real wages.
While workers will receive
their regular monthly cost-of-
living increments, there will be
no wage hikes during the year
the plan is in effect.
Peres was probably alluding
to this last night when he said
real wages would be held to
their 1982 levels during a one-
year recovery plan.
According to unofficial
reports, the Finance Ministry
will not impose another
blanket freeze on the price of
staple goods but would try to
control and moderate price
rises. Government price sub-
sidies would continue but at a
relatively low level. The price
of imports are expected to soar
after the current freeze ex-
pires. Thereafter, they would
be allowed to rise in tandem
with the price of the dollar in
Israeli currency.
suddenly bursts forth with the
assertion that "nearly 10,000
Nazi war criminals came into
America" after the war. How
does he make a quantum jump
from a solid 480 "substantial
suspects" to nearly 23 times
that number? He gets the
10,000 figure by "estimating"
at least two-and-a-half percent
of the nearly 400,000 persons
who came in under the DP
Act. While doing this, he
condedes "such estimates are
hardly scientific." Indeed!
Yet today, Ryan and his
publishers do not hesitate to
state as fact that "10,000 Nazi
war criminals entered the U.S.
after the war." Ryan's most
curious position is his attitudes
toward U.S. intelligence
agencies and their use of Nazi
war criminals. Knowledgeable
critics find his steadfast
denials of such usage strange
in the face of the developed
evidence. "Quiet Neighbors"
reflects these often fiercely
held anomalies of the author.
He told The New York
Times (July 16,1983) that with
"maybe" one exception
"back in the 50's" there were
"no cases at all" of war
criminals knowingly allowed
into the country for in-
telligence reasons. That denial
is all the more striking because
exactly one month later, Ryan
issued his worthy report on
Klaus Barbie and his use by
U.S. Army's Counter-intelli-
gence Corps (CIC).
Immigration records show
that Barbie entered the U.S.
on several occasions in the
1960's and 1970's. He did so
Papers Show Britain
Eyed Invasion of Israel
By
MAURICE SAMUKl SON
LONDON (JTA) The
I British army had a plan to in-
|vade Israel 30 years ago in de-
fense of Jordan, but Prime
Minister Winston Churchill
insisted it be kept secret. This
emerged from British Cabinet
| papers of 1954 released last
j week for scrutiny by journal-
ists and historians.
British chiefs of staff also
had plans to invade Egypt and
Iraq in 1954, a year dominated
by discussions on the future of
the 80,000 British troops in the
Suez Canal zone. At the time,
Britain also had troops
stationed in Cyprus, Libya,
Jordan, Iraq, Kuwait and the
Trucial sheikdoms on the
Persian Gulf.
On March 31, 1954, Lord
Alexander of Tunis, the
defense minister, told the
cabinet that the chiefs of staff
had prepared a plan for
military action, which in-
volved the invasion of Israel
by British forces from the
south if i8rael attacked
Jordan.
Churchill's only comment
*as that he was much relieved
hear that the chiefs of staff
*ere not in favor of disclosing
to the Jordanians a plan in-
volving British invasion of Is-
rael. Leakage of such a plan
would have had very grave
consequences.
Discussion of the invasion
plan in the cabinet followed an
earlier decision that Anthony
Eden, then foreign secretary,
should act as secret mediator
between Jordan and Israel
over border clashes.
The plan to invade Israel
has to be seen in the light of
Britain's contractual
obligations to defend members
of the Arab League and that
Israel's borders were then the
scene of frequent attacks by
Arab infiltrators and Israeli
retaliation raids.
In his memoirs describing
the background to the 1956
tripartite attack on Egypt, the
late Mcshe Dayan, then Isra-
el's chief of staff, showed that
Israel fully recognized the
possibility of a clash with
British forces if there had been
a major war with Jordan.
At that time, Britain also
remained committed to the
tripartite pact of 1950 in
which, together with France
and the U.S., it guaranteed the
integrity of Israel and its Arab
neighbors.
lusing an alias and enjoying a
preferential visa of a Bolivian
diplomat. The State Depar-
tment knew this. Evidence
gathered by this writer and
others indicate Bolivian in-
telligence sources linking
Barbie to the CIA in Latin
America.
"Quiet Neighbors" also
touches on other cases in
which CIA, State Department
and FBI usage are indicated.
Take for example Ryan's
handling of the Latvian war
criminal, Edgars Laipenieks.
This alien resident of San
Diego, California, was sen-
tenced to death in absentia by
a 1962 Latvian war crimes
tribunal. Thanks to Ryan's
OSI, Laipenieks today faces
deportation after an appeals
board upheld the OSI's ex-
cellent case against him.
Ryan notes that Laipenieks
"volunteered his service to the
CIA" in 1960 "after" he
entered the country. He then
proceeds to aver that at the
bottom the Latvian was "not
amenable to deportation"
under 1976's existing laws,
and so the Immigration and
Naturalization Service (INS)
had to drop proceedings
regardless of allegations that
the CIA blocked them. The
author goes further to assert
that he did proceed in 1979
under the new provisions
affecting deportation through
the so-called Holtzman law.
There are some vital pieces
missing to this story which on
its face seems unexeptionable.
Investigator Bob Dorn of the
San Diego Evening Tribune
and 1 uncovered the fuller
CIA-Laipenieks connection.
These materials were widely
published, available to Ryan
who used only a selective
portion (and indeed without
proper credit). It was Dorn
who secured the CIA-
Laipenieks correspondence
dating back to 1975.
, Moreover, CIA director
William Colby told Dorn these
letters showed "that ap-
parently the CIA did intervene
on its former agent s
(Laipenieks) behalf."
I interviewed Laipenieks'
former secret police superior,
then living in the U.S. and a
self-described former CIA
agent. He told me that
Laipenieks entered the U.S.
first on a tourist visa in 1947.
He also said Laipenieks first
began working for the CIA in
the early 1950's after having
become a naturalized citizen
of Chile. Together and
separately, he told me, they
were used to run "disinfor-
mation" operations among
Latvian emigres in the U.S.,
Western Europe, Latin
America and the Far East.
Ryan knows full well the
evidence on Laipenieks and
the CIA. His failure to
examine it vis-a-vis OSI's own
prosecution of the Latvian
criminal is curious.
There is also the example of
Count Otto von Bolshwing,
the SD agent who worked with
Eichmann to implement the
Final Solution, who un-
doubtedly ran Trifa and other
Iron Guardists in Rumania
and who in California in 1982
died admitting his Nazi past.
Ryan admits that von Bolsh-
wing was "hired" by "U.S.
intelligence officials" in 1949;
i.e., five years before coming
here. Yet Ryan continues the
fiction that his entry and usage
had no relationship, one to the
other. Nor does he ever so
much as utter the name of the
agency which used him.
Before his death, von
Bolshwing was not so bashful,
boasting to the press (and to
the court in secret sessions)
that he had been employed by
the CIA. Ryan's curious
ambiguities on Nazi war
criminals and American in-
telligence seriously weaken his
otherwise important con-
tributions in "Quiet Neigh-
bors."
Get the book, read it, use it
but watch it!
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Rabbis Reveal Plan
Continued from Page 4
riages, "we would not want to
coerce colleagues who do so or
threaten them with expul-
sion." He added that he felt
the pamphlet "will strengthen
the inclination of rabbinic
students and younger col-
leagues not to officiate."
ONE OF the questions' in
the "Questions and Answers"
section of the pamphlet deals
with the issue of whether
refusal by a rabbi to officiate
at such a marriage alienates
people from Judaism.
The answer given, in part, is
that "rabbis who refuse to
officiate ... do not reject
couples. On the contrary, we
meet with couples, explain our
position and help them
identify the issues on which
they must seek agreements."
While the pamphlet does not
say so explicitly, it is clear
from the context that one of
those issues is agreement that
the non-Jewish partner
convert to Judaism.
Maslin reported that 9,000
copies of the pamphlet had
been printed and were being
circulated to CCAR members.
He added it was being made
available not only to them but
also to other rabbis "who need
this additional ammunition to
help convince their lay leaders
that rabbis should not be pres-
sured to officiate at mixed
marriages."
He added that "several" of
the signatory rabbis "have
already scheduled meetings in
their communities where the
pamphlet will be used." He
noted that the signatory rabbis
represent 22 states, the District
of Columbia and Canada.
THE SIGNERS include
three woman rabbis, plus
boxed statements of endorse-
ment from Rabbi Alfred Gott-
schalk, president of the
Hebrew Union College-Jewish
Institute of Religion, the Re-
form education institution and
rabbinical seminary; Rabbi W.
Gunther Plaut, CCAR presi-
dent; and Rabbi Alexander
Schindler, president of the
Union of American Hebrew
Congregations, the association
of Reform synagogues.
Maslin stressed that the
signatories included the seven
most recent past presidents of
the CCAR.
He conceded it was "ob-
vious" that the pamphlet "is
not going to stem the rate of
mixed marriage," but, Maslin
added, he felt it would "serve
as one more tool in the hands
of those who are attempting to
slow down that rate and to
preserve the integrity of the
rabbinate."
BONN (JTA) The
West Berlin branch of the
Green Party announced
Monday that it would dismiss
several of its members who are
believed to be neo-Nazi activ-
ists. Neo-Nazi activities are
forbidden in West Berlin by
order of the Allied occupying
powers.
Alfred Golden, president of
Riverside Memorial Chapels,
announces the appointment of
Henry [Hank] Grossman, an
active community member, as
Community Relations
Consultant for Palm Beach
County. Grossman will work
closely with William F.
Saulson, vice president, and
Julian Almeida, manager of
the Riverside West Palm
Beach Chapel.
Birth
Gail and David Schwartz of
West Palm Beach announce
the birth of their son, Samuel
Asher, on Jan. 8 at Good
Samaritan Hospital. Samuel,
22 inches long and 8 pounds, 4
ounces, is the brother of
Adam, 5.
Maternal grandparents are
Ruth and Max Shabashov of
Delray Beach. The Schwartzes
are active members of the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County where they
serve as program co-chairs for
Leadership Development.
David Schwartz is an attorney.
Norman Marcus will be the
honoree at a testimonial
breakfast on behalf of the
Cresthaven State of Israel
Bond Drive on Feb. 24 at
Temple Beth Sholom. Marcus
has the role of being both
chairman and honoree. The
co-chair for Cresthaven is
George Strassler. Special guest
speaker will be Jerome
Gleekel, noted authority on
Israel and the Middle East.
BUYING GOLD & SILVER
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Collections & Accumulations
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2550 OKEECHOBEE BLVD.. W. PALM BEACH. FL.
684-1771
MOIMSl 9:30 a.m.-6:00 p.m.
Member ANA & Chamber ol Commerce
Candle lighting Time
Fri. Jan. 185:34 pm
Religious Directory
Conservative
CONGREGATION ANSHEI SHOLOM: 5348 Grove Street
West Palm Beach 33409. PHone 684-3212. Rabbi Isa
Vander Walde. Cantor Mordecai Spektor. Daily: 8:30 a m
and 5:30 p.m. Friday: 8:30 a.m.. 5 p.m. and a late service at 8:15
p.m., followed by Oneg Shabbat. Saturday: 8:30 a.m., 6 p.m.,
Mincha followed by Sholosh Suedos.
CONGREGATION BETH KODESH OF BOYNTON BEACH
501 N.E. 26 Avenue, Boynton Beach 33435. Phone 586-9428.
Rabbi Avrom L. Drazin, Cantor Arthur R. Rosenwasaer.
Monday 8:30 a.m.. Thursday 8:30 a.m. Sabbath services,
Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.
GOLDEN LAKES TEMPLE: 1470 Golden Lakes Blvd
West Palm Beach 33411. Phone 689-9430. Rabbi Joseph
Speiser. Daily Services 8:15 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. Sabbath
services Friday 8:15 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m., 5 p.m., Mincha
followed by Sholosh Suedos.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID: 4657 Hood Road, Palm Beach
Gardens 33410. Phone 694-2350. Rabbi William Marder,
Cantor Earl J. Rackoff. Sabbath services, Friday 8 am.
Saturday 10 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 2815 No Flagler Dr., Wes.t Palm
Beach 33407. Phone 833-0339. Rabbi Howard J. Hirsch,
Cantor Elaine Shapiro. Sabbath services Friday 8:15 p.m.!
Saturday 9:30 a.m. Daily Minyan 8:15 a.m., Sunday and
Legal Holidays 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 315 N. A" Street, Lake Worth
33460. Phone 585-5020. Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg, Cantor
Jacob Elman. Services Monday and Thursday 8:15 a.m.,
Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 224 N.W. Avenue G, Belle
Glade 33430. Sabbath services Friday, 8:30 p.m. Phone 996-
3886.
TEMPLE BETH ZION: Lions Club, 700 Camelia Dr., Royil
Palm Beach. Mailing Address: POBox 104, 660 Royal Palm
Blvd., Royal Palm Beach, FL 33411. Sabbath Services Friday8
p.m., Saturday 8:45 a.m. Rabbi Nathan Zelizer. Phone 793-
9122.
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB: 2177 So. Congress Ave., West Palm
Beach 33406. Phone 433-5957. Rabbi Dr. Morris Silberman.
Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m., Saturday and Holidays 9 a.m.,
Monday and Thursday 9 a.m.
TEMPLE EMANUEL: 190 North County Road, Palm Beach
33480. Phone 832-0804. Rabbi Joel Chazin, Cantor David
Dardashti. Sabbath services, Friday 8:30 p.m.; Saturday 9 a.m.
THE TREASURE COAST JEWISH CENTER Ben
Abraham: 3257 S.E. Salerno Road, Port Salerno. Rabbi
Abraham Rose. 1-287-8833. Services Friday evenings 8 p.m.
hAIE., WORTH JEWISH CENTER: St. Lukes United
?S??2!?5 Chapel, 165 Ohio Road, Lake Worth. Phone 433-
1869. Friday night serivces 8:15 p.m., Saturday, 9 a.m.
Orthodox
CONGREGATION AITZ CHAIM: Century Village, West
Palm Beach. Phone 689-4675. Sabbath services 9 a.m. and 5
p.m. Daily services 8:15 a.m. and 6:30 p.m.
Reform
CONGREGATION BETH ISRAEL: 1592 Floresta. P.O. Box
857146, Port St. Lucie, FL 33452. Friday night services 8 p.m.
Saturday morning 10:30 a.m. Phone 465-6977.
THE REFORM TEMPLE OF JUPITER-TEQUESTA: at
Jupiter High School. Military Trail, Jupiter. Mailing address.
Plaza 222, U.S. No. 1, TequesU 33458. Phone 747-4235. Rabbi
Alfred L. Friedman. Services Friday 8 p.m.
EMPkE BETH EL: 460 Oleander Avenue, Fort Pierce, FL
33450. Phone 461-7428.
Iv~PLEJ,STH 8HAL<>M: St. Helen's Pariah Hall, 20th
PO ?,V,,Cry Bivd Vero Beach 32960, mailing addresa:
Mi. oiL3, yKLftS?1' FL 32961-2113. Rabbi Richard D.
Messing. Phone 1-569-0180.
TSJTdEjBE?'H TO**": Wellington Elementary School,
13000 Paddock Dr., Weat Palm Beach. Mailing address: P.O.
iZSKr J1"1 Pahn BeBch. fL 33406. Friday services 8:15
p.m. Kabbi Steven R. Westman. Phone 793.2700.
TEMPLE ISRAEL: 1901 No. Flagler Dr., Weat Palm Beach
33407. Phone 833-8421. Rabbi Howard Shapiro, Cantorial
Soloist Susan Weiss. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE JUDEA: at St. Catharine's Greek Orthodox Church
KS ,"5"; ^ W^Wagton Rd., at Southern Boulevard.
a7V&* u *** c"*or Anne Newman. Mailing address:
SmiSiJ We8t-pBj,n *"** ^ 83409- PhoM


Friday. 'January 18,1986 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
iagogueNews
CONGREGATION
ANSHEI SHOLOM
fhe congregation is hosting
deration Shabbat on Friday
kning, Jan. 25, 8:15 p.m.
|bbi Isaac Vander Walde
\\ officiate and Cantor
Srdecai Spektor will chant
[liturgy.
Lrry Gleekel, businessman
H active Zionist, will be the
Jest speaker. The congrega-.
|n and the community will
le the opportunity to hear
kre about the current situa-
L in Israel and about the
hi programs and services of
Jewish Federation of Palm
ach County and its four
aeficiary agencies the
vish Community Center,
Jewish Community Day
hool. the Jewish Family and
lildrerfs Service and the
keph L. Morse Geriatric
Inter.
ITEMPLE BETH DAVID
The fifth grade class of the
nple's Hebrew school will
_ featured at a family service,
lidav, Jan. 18. The students
lead both the readings and
chanting of the service.
under the direction of Rabbi
William Marder and Cantor
Earl Rackoff. They will be
assisted by teachers Ruth Wall
and Mimi Marder.
CONGREGATION
BETH KODESH
Due to outside cir-
cumstances, the Siyum
Ha'Torah (Torah Dedication),
scheduled for Sunday, Jan. 6,
has been rescheduled for
Sunday, Jan. 27.
Two Torahs donated by
Mrs. Libbie Kaplan and the
late Max Kaplan and
Sisterhood Beth Kodesh will
be dedicated. It is expected
that many religious dignitaries
will join in the celebration.
Ceremonies will begin at
1:30 p.m. and services will be
conducted by Rabbi Avrom L.
Drazin and Cantor Arthur B.
Rosenwasser.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
The temple will start the
New Year with a gala lun-
cheon honoring Rabbi
Emanuel Eisenberg on his 20th
anniversary as spiritual leader;
retiring President Edward J.
mijmkmn
Feb. 17, Temple B'nai Jacob will be the honoree at a
ktimonial breakfast at the temple. The temple will receive the
Jerusalem Award" commemorating the first Israel Bond cam-
iien to be held at the Temple as a congregation. Jerome
Eckel, noted authority on Israel and the Middle East, will be
he guest speaker. In 1975 Temple B'nai Jacob was founded by
Members of the communities surrounding the area of Palm
brings. In Spring, 1983, the temple officially opened its doors
kver 280 members belong to the actively growing temple.
Area Deaths
Charal
aanne. 85, of 2601 S. Ocean Blvd..
Nm Beach Riverside Guardian Plan
Tiapel, West Palm Beach.
fACKTOR
lacob. 80. of 3500 Sprlngdale Blvd..
Palm Springs. Levltt-Welnsteln
Guaranteed Security Plan Chapel. West
Palm Beach.
FOX
Edward H 90. 2880 Emory Drive E.
*'st Palm Beach. Riverside Guardian
fanChapel. West Palm Beach.
3ARBER
J^lng. 78. of 1861 61st Ave. 8.. West
^alm Beach. Levitt Weln.iteln
guaranteed Security Plan Chapel. West
Palm Beach.
HELP WANTED
Computer terminal operator for social service agency.
Some accounting background. Excellent benefit package.
Start immediately. Call Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County, 832-2120.
Passman; and the 1985 slate of
officers and board of direc-
tors. The luncheon will be held
on Sunday, Jan. 20, 1 p.m., at
the Royce Hotel.
TEMPLE JUDEA
Ruth Karden and Nancy
Mighdoll will celebrate their
adult Bat Mitzvah ceremonies
at the temple Friday evening,
Jan. 18, at 8 p.m. Rabbi Joel
Levine and Cantor Anne
Newman will officiate.
Both Ruth and Nancy are
founding members of Temple
Judea. Ruth has served on the
Sisterhood executive board
and Nancy has served as a
member of the temple's board
of trustees. Ruth and Nancy
are graduates of the adult Bar-
Bat Mitzvah class under the
direction of Rabbi Levine.
Nancy is currently chairing the
nursery school committee.
Douglas H. Kleiner, social
action chair of Temple Judea,
will present Ruth and Nancy
with their Soviet twinning
certificates. Ruth will be
twinned with Paulina
Khodorovskaya of Leningrad.
Nancy will be twinned with
Diana Zak of Kiev. Two chairs
will be draped with a Talit
symbolizing the absence of
Paulina and Diana from the
pulpit.
Ruth and her husband
Stuart are parents of Rachel.
Nancy and Preston are parents
of Emily, Diana, and
Samantha. Rachel, Diana, and
Samantha were named at
Temple Judea.
The Kardens and Mighdolls
will sponsor the oneg shabbat
following services. The junior
oneg under the direction of
Miriam Ruiz will be held for
children.
nTIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIinilUIIHTfl
&
AAAboT ANSWERfONC
A Division of
' A-RING- A-DING" ANSWERING SERVICE
Computerized Switchboard Live Operators
WE ANSWER FAST!
439 0700
I 213 No. Dixie Highway, Lake Worth, FL 33460
UM""""""""
OJLIJLfcJL|JULMltMlil PALM BEACH EYE ASSOCIATES
Richard G. Shugarman, M.D.
Emanuel Newmark, M.D.
Professional Association
Proudly Announce the relocation of
their Atlantis office to
140 J.F.K. Circle
Atlantis, Fla.
433-5200
for the practice of
Diseases and
Surgery of the Eye
West Palm Beach Office remains open at
1500 N. DIXIE HWY.
659-7277
Medicare Assignment Accepted
K LI OMAN
Eve. 76, of 2584 Emory Drive E.. West
Palm Beach. Riverside Guardian Plan
Chapel. West Palm Beach.
LEVENTHAL
Morris. 77, of Century Village, West
Palm Beach. Menorah Gardens and
Funeral Chapels, West Palm Beach.
MITTELDORF
Marvin Mandel, 4B. of Palm Beach
Gardens. Levitt-Welnsteln Chapel, West
Palm Beach.
RESSEN
Nettle. 78, of Somerset F, Century
Village, West Palm Beach. Levltt-
Weinsteln Guaranteed Security Plan
Chapel, West Palm Beach.
SEIDLER
Aaron, 6B. of West Palm Beach.
Riverside Memorial Chapel Guardian
Funeral Home, West Palm Beach.
SENTINEL PLAN
4ii
JACK WEISS
Manager
Memorial Chapels
West Palm Beach
5411 OkMChobM Blvd.
609-6700
Delray
278-7600
Hollywood
921-7200
No. Miami Beach
949-6315
Pompano Boca
427-6500
CHARLES D. SEQAL
PREPAID FUNERALS AVAILABLE THROUGH
OUR QUARANTEED SECURITY PLAN"
A strong plan for a difficult time.
Uniortunately. funerals are inevitable
However, it makes sense to plan tor them like any other mapr
decision like making out a will or taking out a lile insurance policy
In tact, pre-planning your tuneral might even make more sense
than planning many other things, because when you plan your
tuneral, you're relieving your loved ones trom making decisions
at a very difficult time
That's why Gutterman-Warheit Memorial Chapel has something
called the Sentinel Plan. It's a program where you pre-arrange
and prepay in installments for your funeral You pre-arrange to
save your family from diflicult decision making, you prepay to
freeze your pnee
We know its dilficult. but please come in to talk with us We're
Gutterman-Warheit
We've been serving ^^
Gutterman
the Jewish commu-
nity for nearly one
hundred years and we
understand
Wartieit
MEMORIAL
CHAPEL
ru##NAi c*f< TO"^s Boca Delray 997-9900
7240 North Federal Highway, Boca/Delray Florida 33431
Broward 742-4933 Boynton/Late Worth/W.P. Beach 683-4141
The People Who Understand


Page 16 The Jewiah Floridian of Pahn Beach County / FrkUy. January 18,Jgg6_
NOOTrfR
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Until February 28,1985 El Al Israel Airlines gives you its
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