The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian the voice of the Jewish community of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Running title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Physical Description:
4 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 8, no. 41 (Dec. 24, 1982)-v. 11, no. 26 (Aug. 30, 1985).
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44606415
lccn - sn 00229548
ocm44606415
System ID:
AA00014310:00084

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
THE VOICE OF
THE JEWISH
COMMUNITY OF
PALM BEACH
COUNTV
ewish floridian
VOLUME 10-NUMBER 40
PALM BEACH, FLORIDA FRIDAY, DECEMBER 7,1984
PRICE 35 CENTS
Inflation Threatens Israel's Security
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
(WASHINGTON (JTA) -
lad's economic crisis "could
bse as serious a threat to the
curity of Israel as any hostile
ighbor in the region" unless
iift, effective measures are
ken, a Senate Foreign
Unions Committee report
arned.
"American foreign
sistance can help Israel cope
its difficulties and can
itigate but cannot by itself
(rest Israel's problems of
Wr-inflation, labor unrest,
productivity, declining
venues, growing unem-
loyment and sluggish ex-
brts," the report said. It
died for "major domestic
bonomic reforms" and the
|.5 billion budget cut now
being applied by Israel's unity
government led by Premier
Shimon Peres.
The report was prepared by
two staff members of the
Senate committee, Michael
Kraft, a Near East subcomm-
ittee specialist, and Gerald
Connolly, who specializes in
economic aid issues, after
visiting Israel and interviewing
United States and Israeli
officials in Israel and
Washington.
Coincidentally, it was
released shortly after two
teams of Israeli officials
completed two days of talks at
the State Department on
increased U.S. aid to Israel.
One team, led by Emanuel
Sharon, director general of the
Finance Ministry, discussed
with a U.S. group led by W.
Allen Wallis, undersecretary
of State for Economic Affairs,
the preliminary plans for the
joint U.S.-Israeli economic
group which will work out
how the U.S. can best help Is-
rael's economic recovery
program.
The joint group, which was
established during the meeting
between. Peres and President
Reagan at the White House in
October, is expected to have
its first meeting here this
month.
The other discussion at the
State Department was on
security assistance and was led
by Gen. Menachem Meron,
Director General of the Israel
Defense Ministry, and William
Schneider Jr., Undersecretary
of State for Security
Assistance.
Israel is receiving $2.6
billion in military and
economic aid, all of it a grant,
in the current fiscal year.
While the Israeli government
has not yet worked out its
specific request for the 1986
fiscal year, the Senate report
notes that during his visit to
Washington, Peres said Israel
will need another Sl.S billion
in economic aid for its
recovery program.
Kraft and Connolly go over
the background of Israel's
difficulties in their report.
"Israel's economic problems
did not develop overnight and
cannot be cured quickly," the
report notes. "They can be
traced to a number of factors,
including the costs of
developing a new country in
three decades and the heavy
defense and debt burden
resulting from military aid
loans since the October, 1973
war.
"Defense spending, while a
major element, is not by any
means the only important
reason for Israel's economic
problems. Israel's economic
difficulties are also deeply
rooted in an elaborate system
of indexed wages, subsidies,
and social welfare programs.
Israel's political system of
proportional parliamentary
representation also has
contributed to the problem by
enabling small political parties
Continued on Page 6-A
Soviet Jewry Task Force
To Hold Fast On Human Rights Day

VM**.

ibers of the Soviet Jewry Task Force formulate plans for
kcir upcoming hunger strike in support of Soviet Jewry.
In conjunction with the
nationwide Human Rights
Day, Dec. 10, the Soviet Jewry
Task Force of the Community
Relations Council of the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County will participate
in a day of fast, announced
Shirlee Blonder, task force
chair. The fast will attempt to
strengthen the bonds of
brotherhood for those Jews in
the Soviet Union who have
suffered and continue to
suffer for having declared
their allegiance to their her-
itage.
The press has been invited
to the 11 a.m. gathering in
support of Human Rights Day
at the office of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County where the United
Nation's Universal Declara-
tion of Human Rights will be
read. They will have an oppor-
tunity to ask questions regard-
ing the recognition of that day
by the Soviet Jewry Task
Force. "By joining together
we will acknowledge the fate
of Soviet Jewry in an op-
pressed society. Our strength
to participate in this fast will
emanate from the knowledge
of the determination of these
activists and refuseniks to
emigrate and live in a free
world," stated Mrs. Blonder.
Hunger strikes are being
held throughout the United
States in solidarity with more
than 100 Jews in the Soviet
Union who have begun a series
of round-robin hunger strikes.
They are being held in
response to intensified Soviet
anti-Semitism and persecu-
tions reminiscent of the
Stalinist era. Recent arrests of
Hebrew teachers and Jewish
cultural activists, and allega-
tions that link Judaism with
drug rituals, seem aimed at
eradicating the practice of the
Jewish religion in the Soviet
Union, according to the
National Conference on Soviet
Jewry.
The facts are as follows:
Aleksandr Kholmiansky,
charged with alleged "mailbox
tampering" and establishing a
nationwide ulpan system,
began a hunger strike after
being beaten in Pronza Prison.
His trial, which was scheduled
Continued on Page 7
Inside
federation's Lead-
ership Development
Committee and
Participants high-
lighted ... Page 2
Local student
studies law in Israel
Page 4
Sodowicks To Chair Eastpointe Campaign
Newmans To Co-Chair
Basic questions on
Judaism in the Soviet
union answered...
e7
Arnold L. Lampert, general
chairman of the 1985 Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County-United Jewish Appeal
campaign, recently announced
the reappointment of Helen
and Lester Sodowick to chair
the campaign at Eastpointe for
the third consecutive year.
Alvin and Frances Newman
have accepted the position ot
co-chair. The Eastpointe
campaign encompasses tne
residents in Eastpointe and
Eastlakes in Palm Beach
Gardens and the Eastpointe
Towers on Singer Island.
The Sodowicks and
Newmans began recruitment
of their campaign committee
with a meeting on Nov. 8 at
the Sodowick home in Palm
Beach Gardens. Dora Roth, a
survivor of the Holocaust, was
the featured speaker. In addi-
tion the videotape, "Reaching
Out Building a Com-
munity," produced by the
public relations department of
the Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County, was viewed by
the committee.
In commenting about the
audio-visual presentation, the
Sodowicks stated, "We have
been active in Jewish com-
munity affairs for many years
and are well aware of our
commitment to Israel and
worldwide Jewry. However,
by viewing this film about our
Federation's four local bene-
Continued on Page 1*
Helen Sodowick
Lester Sodowick
i


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, December 7,1984
Jim Kay
Program Co-chair
Sent Kay
Program Co-chair

David Schwarti
Program Co-chair
Oail Schwarti
Program Co-chair
JEWISH
FEDERATION
OF B\LM BEACH
COUNTY
Mara Adlcr
Linda Cohan
Jeffrey Frank
Allen Karmelin
Marilyn LeRoy
Introducing Members of the
1984-85 Leadership Development Program
flin
Or.Moshe Adler
Michael Cohen
Larry Gerson
Mira Karmelin
Jay Logoe
/
Laura Balas
Philip Balas
Janice Berk
* Howard Berman Ellen Bovarnlck Kari Bower
$f
Leslie Efros
Carol Erenrich
Dr. Norman Erenrich Bobbie Fink
Richard Flah
TrishFlah
/
Gloria Gold
Marc Gold
Cynthia Gross
Judge Robert Gross
I I
Marshall Isaacson
Irene Kati
Claire Kaxinec Jamie
Dreyfus Lander man
Norman Landerman Dr Jay Lerner
Or. Alan LeRoy
Mindy Logoe
Larry Match** JLori* Mesches Dr. Mark Rattinger Tarry Retk
Hinda Rosenbaum
Jack Rosanbaum Dr. Robert Rubin Barry Russal
Phyllis Russal
Michelle Sandberg Steven Sandberg DrTayldSaragT .David Schimmal Judy Schlmm.l
Carol Shubt Rava Steinberg Of. David Stern Debbie Stern
Not Pictured:
Linda August
Jarry August
Sandi Heilbron
Committe*
Susan Wol
Schwarti
Or. Steven Schwarti Or. Eric Welner Michael Zlmmar-


___________Friday, December 7,1984 / The Jewiah Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 3
South Ocean Boulevard Council-
Cocktail Reception Slated
Mortimer Weiss, South
locean Boulevard Council
Lhair Fred Greenberg and|
iFmanuel Goldberg, chairs ofi
lihe "2600" building, and
lloseph Stein, chair of Beach
Ipnnte. will host a cocktail
C$01. for "2600,"
Kiratford and Beach Pointe on
Say. Dec. 18, 4:30 p.m.,
In kick off the 1985 Jewish
"federation of Palm Beach
ICountv-Uniied Jewish Appeal
campaign- Zelig Chinitz,
Ejrector of 'he United Israel
Appeal in Jerusalem, will be
[he teatured speaker.
Weiss said, "We invite all
Indents of these buildings
along South Ocean Boulevard
to attend the cocktail recep-
tion and hear about the needs
of the 1985 Jewish Federation-
UJA campaign. I am pleased
to have these chairmen, who
bring with them experience in
Jewish communal involve-
ment, serve with me as
members of the South Ocean
Boulevard Council."
Fred Greenberg, a
manufacturer of women's
wear in New Jersey, served as
chair for eight years of the
cloak and suit industry in New
York City. He is a founder of
Albert Einstein College of
Medicine and a board member
of the Menorah Home Hos-
pital in Brooklyn. He was
active in the Anti-Defamation
League and the American
Jewish Committee. Greenberg
is an accredited Chinese artist
and sculptor.
Emanuel Goldberg, a
member of the boards of
Federation and the Jewish
Community Center, is a
member of the executive com-
mittee of the Joint Distribu-
tion Committee and a past
member of the Jewish Agency
executive committee. He
served as president of the
Jewish Home for the Aged in
Rochester, New York.
Rogers To Head Federation's
Jewish Agency Committee
Myron J. Nickman,
president of the Jewish
federation of Palm Beach
founty, has announced the
ppointment of Berenice
ogers to chair the newly-
brmed Jewish Agency com-
litiee. Similar committees
la\c been established in
federations to review the
lusting governance of the
kiih Agency, which is
sponsible for distributing all
unds raised throughout the
piaspora.
In making the appointment
[iickman praised, "Berenice's
jxperience, both locally and
i a national level, which will
vide an excellent founda-
on for the formation of the
*ish Agency committee. I
pleased that she accepted
his position."
[Mrs. Rogers attended the
louncil of Jewish
Jtderation's quarterly meeting
September and the annual
pF General Assembly
Inhering recently in Toronto
Berenice Rogers
where she met with other com-
munity leaders concerning the
Jewish Agency committee.
"We will all be working toge-
ther to educate our communi-
ties about the Jewish Agency
and to explore possible
changes in how the Agency
functions in Israel," Mrs.
Rogers said.
For the past several years
Mrs. Rogers has served on the
UJA Florida Region Cam-
paign Cabinet where she
currently is an associate chair.
She previously was a campaign
coordinator for UJA National
Women's Division, founded
the local office in Palm Beach,
and sits on the UJA National
Women's Division Campaign
Cabinet. She is the founding
chair of the Women's Division
of the Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County's Lion of
Judah event and is a campaign
associate this year with
Women's Division.
Mrs. Rogers has served as a
member of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County's board of directors
and was the first co-chair of
Federation's Council on the
Aged. She presently is a
member of Federation's
Campaign Cabinet, a member
of the board of the Joseph L.
Morse Geriatric Center and of
HIAS.
Royal Palm Beach
CjCt.
I Gold [standing, fifth from left), chair
hi 1 Jewlsh FedenUton of Palm Beach
''y-lnited Jewish Appeal Royal Palm
" .l'mpaign, and members of his
W'gn Cabinet met recently to formulate
Wtif lhat community's 1985 drive.
l"n to right] arc Rozalind Freedman,
"" and Morris Well. Standing [left
to right] are Harry Lerner, Dr. Joseph
Goodfriend, Harry Seidman, Nathan Super,
Gold, Karl Kalman, Bernard Berk, Henry
Kaufman and Leon Fichman. Not pictured
are Morrie Boehm, Samuel Cohen, Mischa
Davidson. Dr. Jack Gindes, Mel Her-
shenson, Dan Jatlow, Jack Ruby, Samuel
Stein and Howard Weiss.
Goldberg is a member of the
board of trustees of the
University of Rochester and a
past president of the Jewish
Community Federation of
Rochester.
Joseph Stein was active with
UJA in his former home of
Short Hills, N.J. He chaired
the campaign there as well as
in the Greenbrook Country
Club where he also was in
charge of the Israel Bond
drive. He was an officer of the
Country Club and on the
board of Congregation Beth
El. Stein is a former president
of the YM-YWHA of Essex
County, N.J.
Events are being planned
for the other buildings which
comprise the South Ocean
Boulevard Council. For more
information contact Kari
Bower, campaign associate, at
the Federation office 832-
2120.
Public Relations Awards


^
\ I^Mfl
I wl^^ *"~ ^B| 1' n
1 wjM ^kf^i
t
Hap Levy of Miami [right], chair of the Council of Jewish
Federations Public Relations Award committee, presents four
public relations awards to the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County at the CJF General Assembly in Toronto. Accepting on
behalf of the Federation are [left to right] Norman Schimelman,
executive director; Leah Siskin, public relations committee
chair; and Ronni Epstein, public relations director. The Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach County was one of only eight
communities who received a top gold award, presented for their
campaign brochure, "Building A Community." In addition to
the gold award, the Federation received a bronze and two
honorable mentions for its "Share the Vision" television spots,
the 1984 Annual Report and the Super Sunday live broadcast on
the Federation-sponsored TV program "Mosaic."
Temple Beth Torah
Cantor Dies
Cantor Nicholas Fenakel of Temple Beth Torah, died in
West Palm Beach on November 28. A survivor of the
Holocaust, he came to Detroit, Michigan, from England
with his bride, Mollie. For 26 years he was cantor emeritus
of Adat Shalom in Farmington Hills, Michigan, until he
moved to Florida. During his many years of active
community service, he received two proclamation medals
from the city of Detroit as well as numerous honors from
the entire Jewish community.
Cantor Fenakel was most proud of founding the Golden
Age Senior Choir of the Jewish Community Center of
Detroit. For the past four years he was cantor and director
of music for Temple Beth Torah of Wellington. He had
served as a member of the Holocaust Commemoration
Committee of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County.
Cantor Fenakel is survived by his wife, Mollie, his
daughter, Judy (Mrs. Gene) Devore of West Palm Beach,
and his grandchildren, Jay and Jennifer. Services were
held at Menorah Gardens and Funeral Chapels.

Call For Volunteers
Be involved in building this community!
Reach out to Jews locally and worldwide and
Help secure Israel's future!
The Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
needs YOU to be a volunteer in its
1985 Annual Campaign.
Call Mark Mendel,
Staff Associate
At the Federation Office
To Volunteer your services:
832-2120
JEWISH
FEDERATION
OfBMMDEACH
COUNTY


Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, December 7,1964
No Question Where
Egypt's Mubarak Stands
Whether or not Anwar Sadat was an
opportunist turned martyr by circumstance
is a question that will never be decided.
When Sadat was assassinated, the answer
to this question went to his grave with him.
What can never be known among other
things, therefore, is just how Sadat would
have acted once the Sinai Peninsula was
returned to him. Would he have, as his
widow, Janine Sadat, these days continues
to insist, continued the struggle for a just
settlement of the Israeli-Arab dilemma?
Such speculation apart, there can be no
question about Sadat's successor, Hosni
Mubarak. In the case of Mubarak, the
evidence of his words and actions is clear.
And it is to this issue that a former
president of Israel who is deputy premier
today, Yitzhak Navon, addressed himself
at the recently-concluded General
Assembly of the Council of Jewish
Federations.
Peace Ended Little
Israel's economy appears to be coming
apart at the seams under the strains of
runaway inflation, among other reasons,
because its peace with Egypt has cost the
nation dearly. This includes the return to
Egypt of Jewish settlements in the Sinai,
military installations and oil fields there
captured during the 1967 Six-Day War
in the case of the oil fields, it was the
Israelis who drilled for them and caused
them to produce profitably.
For its part, under Hosni Mubarak, what
has Egypt done in the cause of peace with
Israel? To begin with, Mubarak called
home his Ambassador to Tel Aviv, in
contravention of the Camp David accord,
when Israel launched its Operation Peace
for Galilee in Lebanon in June, 1982. Since
that time, he has done nothing to send him
back.
At the same time, in the more than two
years since then, the media in Cairo have
whipped up anti-Jewish, anti-Israel and
anti-Zionist hysteria. Articles in the
newspapers say Israel is a cancer in the
Middle East that needs to be removed.
Other articles call the Israelis blood-thirsty
and characterize this as a traditional part of
Judaism.
Said Navon at the CJF Assembly,
"These things we were used to before the
peace, but we thought that peace would put
an end to it."
New Ties of Dissent
As Navon implied, and we agree, a cold
peace with Egypt is better than no peace at
all. Still, the Mubarak direction is clear.
Mainly, its goal is to reestablish Egypt as
leader of the Arab world so far as Western
political interests are concerned.
To achieve this aim, Mubarak now courts
a resumed Egyptian friendship with
Jordan's King Hussein, whose shallow,
gutless role in the Middle East is a prime
source of Arab discontent with Israel
rather than a force determined to bring
peace with Israel as Mubarak
presumably says he would like to achieve.
As Mubarak moves to mend his ties to
Amman, Baghdad and Beirut, there can be
little doubt of what is he has in mind. Seen
in these terms, the old guessing game
about what Anwar Sadat might have been
doing these days were he still alive ann^T
to be moot. "PPears
Except that today's RealpoUtik so faras
Israel is concerned steins from its ex
pectations when Sadat was still president
of Egypt. It is these frustrated ex-
pectations that have fired its economic
crisis and brought a freeze in relations with
Cairo that is not bound to get any better
the
Jewish floridian
ol P*lm Beach County
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Out Ol Town Upon Request
Friday, DecembBr 7,1984 13 KISLEV 6746
Volume 10 Number 40
Studying Law In Israel
Listening to Both Sides
By DORIS RACHLES
The study of law is an
exercise in learning how to
argue from both sides. To
study law in Israel is to learn
how to listen to both sides. It
is a process that involves
cutting through emotions and
prejudices in the hope of
understanding how the people
feel. It is not a simple task.
The people never seem to
listen to each other. Each side
has a story to tell and so they
talk about dusty village riots,
elections, inflation, west bank
settlements, Palestinian self-
determination, life and death.
During the Temple
Univeristy School of Law 1984
Summer Session in Tel Aviv,
the entire country of Israel was
our classroom. Classes met
five days a week. The program
offered three courses:
Comparative Family Law,
Legal Aspects of the Mid-East
Conflict and Comparative
U.S.-Israel Constitutional
Law. There were two profes-
sors from Temple University
and many lecturers from
Israel. As it is with every
summer intensive session, a
great deal of material was
covered in a short time and
many hours were spent in the
library. But there was one
advantage in traveling so far
to study that cannot be over-
looked. When the books were
closed and we ventured into
this incredible society, the
1 %t\W~~
- *lf^_ll a*"*
aw -'V^tfD
efaM BBnB LaV flfl
r > ^pi JV^ r^aaaaV Vfll aaaaU 1 !"' *^T '/d i aaaPCJ^ Er^S
R^l

Doris Rachles takes a moment to rest at the Mosque
Mohammed All in Cairo during her side trip to bgyp<- c *
the summer studying law in Israel.
involved in an emo|ionj
discussion with one oi o ,
students. He adm.tted thaiM
in Israel is complex an J
always just. He talked abo
his family being murded
the Holocaust andI wnyj
believes his counrr JJ
survive. We were left* tn^L
feeling that as long *J
fde is free to communal
is possible that someday a
solution can be found.
Continued on Pff5
worlds came alive and every-
one we met had a story to tell.
One day, a young, serious
professor from an Arab
university on the west bank
came to talk to us. He seemed
nervous and uncomfortable,
but he answered our questions
honestly and painted a not so
pretty picture of life for his
people in the occupied terri-
tories. In contrast to his story,
we visited the Attorney
General of Israel. He became


Friday, December 7,1984 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 5

law
Continued from Page 4
,n the bus stopped at Kafr
he" an Ab village in the
. 0ur hostess served us
C'thick black Arab coffee,
1 her cigarette and began
K "I am an Israeli, but
,D J ot Jewish. I am an
Lab but I am not Muslim. I
involved in politics in a
n-s world and I am a
";n- she talked about
ling to make things work as
t mayor of the Christian
Cnage she was born in. She
, patriotic towards her
Cn,y, Israel, but hurt by the
dualities her people suf-
fered "1 am a mother and I
L my son, but he should be
Cafted into the army, "she
Li "He is an Israeli and he
Cust feel as if he belongs and
serve his country. She
toman.
talked and smoked and then
we all went walking through
the ancient streets of Akko, an
old crusader village, where
barefoot children ran down
stone alleyways and it seemed
as if nothing had changed
since Biblical times.
Another woman, miles
away from Akko, invited us
into a court room in the Israeli
Supreme Court House in Jeru-
salem. She is Miriam Ben-
Porat, the first woman
supreme court justice in Israel.
She talked about struggling in
a man's world and chatting
with Sandra Day O'Conner
about the many cases they
hear.
There were many other
trips, including the Knesset
(Israeli Parliament). Yad
Radio /TV Highlights J
MOSAIC Sunday, Dec. 9, 9 a.m. WPTV Channel
? with host Barbara Gordon Pre-empted.
L'CHAYIM Sunday, Dec. 9, 7:30 a.m. WPBR
1340-AM with host Rabbi Mark S. Golub The Jewish
Listener's Digest, a radio magazine.
SHALOM Sunday, Dec. 9, 10 a.m. WPEC
Channel 12 (8:30 a.m. ON TV Channel 51) with host
Richard Peritz.
. Sponsored by the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County.
Community Calendar
December 9
Hadassah Yovel "Hello Hadassah Sunday"
Congregation Anshei Sholom Sisterhood Chanukah
Concert 8 p.m. Hadassah Shalom Mexican cruise
through Dec. 14 Congregation Anshei Sholom Men's
Club 9:30 a.m. Women's American ORT Okeechobee
Rummage Sale.
December 10
Jewish Federation Soviet Jewry Task Force 11 a.m.
Jewish Federation Calholic-Jewish Dialogue noon
Hadassah Cypress Lakes I p.m. Women's American
ORT Royal paid-up membership 12:30 p.m. Temple
Israel executive committee 8 p.m. Jewish War
Veterans Auxiliary No. 408 9:30 a.m. United Order of
True Sisters No. 61 board -10 a.m. and regular meeting 1
p.m. American Red Magen David for Israel board 1
p.m. Brandeis University Women Lake Worth study
group 9:30 a.m. Jewish Community Day School board
8 p.m. Hadassah Rishona Youth Aliyah Luncheon at
The Royce Hotel Women's American ORT Palm Beach
board.
December 11
Jewish Federation Leadership Development Commilteee
tp.m. Jewish Federation Endowment Fund Committee -
1:30 a.m. Pioneer Women Ezrat 1 p.m. B'nai B'rith
Women Menorah noon Congregation Beth Kodesh
Sisterhood 12:30 p.m. Hadassah Lee Vassil board -
10 a.m. Pioneer Women Theodore Herzl board 10
m. B'nai B'rith No. 2939 7:30 p.m. Women s
American ORT West Palm Beach 12:30 p.m.
Hadassah Henrietta Szold board 1 p.m. Temple
B'nai Jacob Sisterhood board 10 a.m. B'nai B nth
Women Masada 7:30 p.m. Jewish Federation Agency
Executives -4 p.m.
. December 12
| Congregation Anshei Sholom board 1 p.m. Rishona
Chapter of Amit Women 12:30 p.m. Yiddish Culture
Group Cresthaven 1 p.m. Women's American ORT -
North Palm Beach Beach County Region board 9:30
l. Pioneer Women Cypress Lakes board -10 a.m.
Temple Israel Sisterhood executive board 7 p.m.
United Order of True Sisters No. 61 10th birthday lunch
Breakers Jewish Federation Business and Professional
Men's Division noon Jewish Federation Council on
APig 4:30 p.m. Lake Worth Jewish Center Sisterhood
' P-m. Jewish Federation Long Rnnge Planning
Governance Committee 8 p.m.
December 13
Hadassah Yovel board 9:30 a.m. B'nai B'rith No.
319 7 p.m. Women's American ORT Haverhill -
on Hadassah Sholom board 1 p.m. Hadassah -
Ahya board 10 a.m. B'nai B'rith Women Ohav-
toard 9:30 a.m. Temple B'nai Jacob Sisterhood board
' P-m. Jewish War Veterans No. 501 board -10 a.m.
f*bh Federation Community Relations Conncil noon*
N* Federation Long Range Planning Human Resource
^-Committee noon Temple Beth El Israeli Folk-
gjce 7:30 p.m. Jewish Federation Long Range
"lag Agency Committee-4 p.m.
VaShem (a memorial to the
Holocaust victims), Elon
Moreh (a west bank Israeli
settlement), the Weiner
Collection of anti-Semitic
literature, the Diaspora
Museum, Ceasarea (Roman
ruins), Masada and the Sea of
Galilee. The most remarkable
experience, where so may
things came together, was
during our five-day trip to
Egypt. Against the backdrop
of the Sphinx and the
Pyramids, we explored Cairo.
A shopkeeper said, "It is good
you study in Israel, we are all
cousins and everyone should
live together in peace." We
took a taxi to the "city of the
dead," a cemetery where poor
people have moved into
mausoleums. The Jewish
section had been wrecked. In
rage, men become strong and
heavy tombstones were over-
turned. Hebrew names were
violently hammered out.
Children came to stare and
beg. The next day we went into
the Egyptian Parliament.
Osama Al Baz, Mubarak's top
advisor, greeted us warmly.
Under the crystal chandeliers.
we listened as he talked about
the frustrated Camp David
Accords.
From Israel to Egypt, we
participated in a unique learn-
ing experience. Black is never
black and white is never white.
We read cases and compared
legal systems. We talked to
shopkeepers and diplomats.
The education and insight we
gained will leave its mark for a
long time to come.
Doris Rachles is a second
year law student at Nova
University.
What Every Good Santa
Should Know About
Distance Calling.
Finding the right gift for all those special people on your list
can take some effort. You might even have to make a trip of 50
But the wise Santa calls ahead before heading out. And that's
when Short Distance calling comes in handy
What's Short Distance calling? With Southern Bell, it s simpry
a call of 50 miles or so. And in Florida, a 5-minute Southern Bell
call on weekdays between 8 am. and 5 Ml .dialed direct without
thcopfffl^"Mte^mc"thwa^A^iW^J^awBy
using Short Distance on weekends until 5 pm. Sunday
That's Short Distance calling. This holiday season every
good Santa should take advantage of it
Southern Bel
Km tub** to ch.no. .** *^*TA long ctatonc. ofc on*



Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, December 7,1984
Inflation Threatens Israel
Continued from Page 1
to fight budget-cutting
measures affecting their
constituencies."
In addition to the $1.5
billion budget cut, the report
stresses the need for structural
reforms, especially "the
elaborate indexation
machinery," and "further
agreements on price and wage
controls."
The report notes that
"many experts also believe
change is needed in existing
law requiring the Bank of Is-
rael to print enough money to
cover the government's
spending deficits. Such
practices have proved highly
inflationary in the past seven
years." There have also been
suggestions that Israel either
introduce a new currency or
peg the shekel on a one-to-one
basis with the dollar, the
report points out.
But the report warns thai
"there will be a heavy cost to
the Israel social fabric and to
Israel's own security as some
of the needed reforms are
implemented. Reductions in
subsidies are likely to increase
inflation. Social service
cutbacks will hit hardest on
lower income groups,
especially Israelis from North
African and other Arab
countries. Arab workers from
the West Bank and the Gaza
Strip also will be affected by
an economic slowdown.
"Increased social tensions
are likely, along with rising
unemployment and emigration
of young Israelis, higher prices
and labor unrest and
decreased productivity. If the
situation continues to drift,
however, and an economic
collapse results, the ultimate
consequences for the country
and the individual Israeli
could be much worse."
The report also points out
that there "is a question of
how far and fast a vigorous
democracy can impose drastic
economic reforms. The
standard of living inevitably
will drop. Economic sacrifices
will have to be shared by all
segments of the society."
As for the U.S., the report
suggests that the practice
started this year of expediting
economic aid during the
beginning of the fiscal year,
rather than quarterly, may
have to be continued. An
emergency aid package, which
might include some relief for
Israel's $9.5 billion debt
burden to the U.S., one-third
of its foreign debt, "could
prove decisive in turning
around the Israel economy,"
the report says.
The report sees the Free
Trade Area(FTA) between the
U.S. and Israel as a more
favorable alternative to other
programs that now allow 90
percent of Israeli goods into
the U.S. duty free. The report
points out that economists
believe that it will not have any
significant short-term boost
for the Israeli economy. But
the report adds that the FTA
Paraguay Launches Mengele Hunt
By JTA Services
NEW YORK Paraguay
has begun what was described
here as a thorough nationwide
investigation to locate Josef
Mengele, the infamous war
criminal and chief doctor at
the Auschwitz concentration
camp responsible for the
murder of tens of thousands
of Jews during World War II.
The investigation will be
conducted by police
authorities in Paraguay under
the Ministry of Interior,
according to Elizabeth
Holtzman, Brooklyn District
Attorney, who just returned
from a three-day visit to
Paraguay as a member of a
delegation of four persons
who travelled there under the
sponsorship of the Inter-
national Network of Children
of Jewish Holocaust Sur-
vivors.
Furthermore, Holtzman
told reporters Paraguayan
officials have also agreed to
allow foreign observers to
monitor the investigation and
will allow for written
questions to be submitted to
the government about the
whereabouts of Mengele, who
is believed to be living in
Paraguay.
71 slice of lochs.
Was it really the game of golf that tempted Jewish immigrants to call
Scotland their home? Was it the taunting call of the little white hall? The
lure of those infernal sand traps? ferhaps some strange appeal in the
monstrous-ness of the lochs? And just what accounts for todays weekly
pilgrimage to the country cluh outside Glasgt w?
One thing we can account for. After an invigorating day chasing
divots those frazzled duffers are apt to require a neat shot of Scotch
whisky. For that is surely one of Scotland's more scx>thing pleasures. The
one preferred stateside is J&.B Rare Scotch. It is hlended from the hest
whiskies its native country has to offer. That makes for a scotch that is
sm 16 P-oo< B^mStO Scolcti WTy < 19W Th Pad*ngton CofpOfiHo". N Y
J&I3 Scotch
would "further symbolize
U.S. confidence in the long-
range resilience of the Israeli
economy, and its export in-
dustries."
The report also urges the
U.S. to take "additional
military trade and cooperation
measures which might lessen
U.S. defense expenditures in
the Mediterranean, while
utilizing Israel's maintenance
and production capabilities."
One recommendation
appears to be an indirect
warning against expected
Reagan administration
proposals to sell arms to Saudi
Arabia and Jordan. "In
considering proposed sales of
sophisticated weapons to Arab
countries, such as advanced
fighter planes and missiles, the
U.S. also should take into
greater account whether the
quality and quantities are such
that they might be ultimately
used against Israel, thus
prompting Israel to buvm I
equipment as a precai.i^i
the report warns. precaut'on."|
"A major factor in i
on the smaller Israeli CfS'!?
The report was submits. I
Sen. Charles Percy (R^
the outgoing chairman oft
Foreigr.Relations Comm
and Sen. Claiborne pViI
memberof the committee I
provide the committee ^ |
background enabling j. 51
consider Israel's situa.i
when requests are submitted, f
The outgoing Congress as
considered one of the mos
pro-Israel in history and the I
new Congress, including many
of the new senators and repre I
sentatives elected last month
is expected to be equally
sympathetic to Israel.
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Friday, December 7,1984 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 7
Basic Questions On Judaism In The USSR
0- How does Soviet policy A: The freedom to prac-
.ffect Jewish religious tice one's religion is strictly
1 t|ces? controlled, under the Council
prtc
Shirlee Blonder [left), Soviet Jewry Task Force chair, and Dr.
Helen Hoffman, Community Relations Council of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach County chair, lead a discussion on
Ihe recent plight of Jewish activists in the Soviet Union at a
planning session of the Soviet Jewry Task Force.
UNIVERSAL DECLARATION OF HUMAN RIGHTS
Preamble
Whereas recognition of the inherent dignity and of the
equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human
family is the foundation of freedom, justice and peace in
the world,
Whereas disregard and contempt for human rights have
resulted in barbarous acts which have outraged the con-
science of mankind, and the advent of a world in which
human beings shall enjoy freedom of speech and belief and
freedom from fear and want has been proclaimed as the
highest aspiration of the common people,
Whereas it is essential, if man is not to be compelled to
have recourse, as a last resort, to rebellion against tyranny
and oppression, that human rights should be protected by
the rule of law,
Whereas it is essential to promote the development of
friendly relations between nations,
Whereas the peoples of the United Nations have in the
Charter reaffirmed their faith in fundamental human
rights, in the dignity and worth of the human person and in
the equal rights of men and women and have determined to
promote social progress and better standards of life in
larger freedom,
Whereas Member States have pledged themselves to
achieve, in co-operation with the United Nations, the
promotion of universal respect for and observance of
human rights and fundamental freedoms,
Whereas a common understanding of these rights and
freedoms is of the greatest importance for the full
realization of this pledge,
Now, therefore,
The General Assembly
Proclaims this Universal Declaration of Human Rights as
a common standard of achievement for all peoples and all
nations, to the end that every individual and every organ of
society, keeping this Declaration constantly in mind, shall
strive by teaching and education to promote respect for
these rights and freedoms and by progressive measures,
national and international, to secure their universal and
effective recognition and observance, both among the
peoples of Member States themselves and among the
peoples of territories under their jurisdiction.
Human Rights Day
Continued from Page 1
for Oct. 25, has been post-
poned indefinitely.
Following his arrest,
Soviet authorities claimed Yuli
Edelshtein uses, possesses and
sells drugs, and that he is con-
nected with "foreigners who
corrupt Jewish youth with
mystical and medieval drug
rituals."
Yakov Levin of Odessa
was sentenced to three years in
a labor camp for allegedly
"defaming the Soviet state."
He was arrested five days
before he was to marry
another Odessa refusenik.
Mark Nepomniascshy, the
father of Levin's fiance,
Yehudit, was arrested on Oct.
12 and charged with allegedly.
"defaming the Soviet govern-
ment."
. Yakov Mesh, long-time
associate of Levin, was
arrested on Oct. 16 following
an intense Soviet investigation
in connection with Levins
case.
By their action the Soviet
Jewry Task Force is trying to
Each out to Hebrew teachers
and Jewish activists in the
Soviet Union. "We wan
tell the hunger strikers that
hey are not alone. We share in
heir deeply felt pain and
anguish. This fast will let he
Soviets know that Jews the
world over are inex ncably
bound together in a time Of
crisis." Mrs. Blonder
declared.
for Religious Affairs of the
Council of Ministers, and
teaching religion to minors
(persons under 18) is illegal.
There are no seminaries in the
USSR to train rabbis; the few
who wish to study have done
so outside the country in
Budapest, Hungary.
Jewish religious texts and
ritual objects are not produced
in the Soviet Union, despite
claims by officials that they
are available. Those brought
into the country by visitors are
often confiscated. In addition,
many Jewish cemeteries and
synagogues have been and
continue to be desecrated or
converted to other uses.
Because Jews are denied the
right to pass on their rituals
and traditions to younger gen-
erations, the Jewish religion
may well face extinction in the
Soviet Union.
Q: How many synagogues
are there in the Soviet Union?
A: According to a 1926
survey, over 1,000 synagogues
operated in the USSR. By
1960, that number had
dwindled to 467. In 1983, only
74 were known to have
remained. This means one
synagogue for roughly every
25,000 persons, if we use the
1979 census figures of 1.8
million Jews.
Unlike their Russian Ortho-
dox counterparts, no syna-
gogues have been permitted to
join with other synagogues in
regional or international asso-
ciations, thus cutting off any
spiritual or financial support
system. In response to these
strictures, private services (in
Hebrew, minyanim), sprang
up. In 1975, Soviet authorities
enacted a statute prohibiting
gatherings in buildings not
specified for religious activ-
ities.
Participation in the Jewish
religion is considered a
voluntary act. While no
formal Jewish religious
community has been per-
mitted, individual congrega-
tions can theoretically be
registered at the request of 20
persons. In the last 20 years,
however, no new congregation
is known to have been quali-
fied, although some Jews have
tried.
Q: What is the status of
Soviet rabbis?
A: The most prominent
rabbi today is Adolf A. Shay-
evich, who was designated
head of Moscow's Choral
Synagogue upon the death of
his predecessor, Yakov Fish-
man, in June 1983. Shayevich
was born in 1937 in Khabar-
ovsk, Birobidzhan. In 1975 he
went to Budapest site of the
only functioning rabbinical
seminary in the Soviet bloc
where he was ordained in
1981. One other Soviet Jew,
now practicing in Riga, was
ordained last year; two, from
Kiev and Odessa, are currently
studying in Budapest. One
man from Leningrad studied
there and left without being
ordained, in 1980.
The training of rabbinic
candidates in Budapest is
viewed as a response to
Western critics concerning the
lack of a functioning rabbin-
ical seminary in the USSR.
In Soviet Central Asia
where, according to local
tradition, formal ordination is
not required in order to
achieve the status of rabbi, a
handful of unofficial commu-
nity leaders, or chachamin, are
known to serve.
Q: How has Soviet policy
on nationality groups affected
Jews?
A: In the Soviet Union,
Jews are considered a national
minority. Soviet ideology and
law encourage nationalities to
perpetuate their group
existence through cultural and
educational institutions and
activities in their own lan-
guages. The lifeline to vir-
tually all facets of Jewish cul-
ture, however, is being severed
as authorities conduct a
campaign to prevent a
strengthening of Jewish lan-
guages and culture, and the
documentation of Jewish
history.
There are no Jewish
communal or social organiza-
tions in the USSR, nor are
there Jewish schools of any
kind. Other nationalities are
permitted to teach' their
history and culture in State-
run schools in their native lan-
guages. The unofficial Jewish
self-study groups, especially
those for Hebrew study
(ulpanim), organized to over-
come this disability, are
usually banned or forceably
dispersed.
Q: What is the status of
Hebrew?
A: Teaching Hebrew is not
recognized by the authorities
as a legitimate profession and
the language may not be
taught or studied by Jews.
Ironically, it is available to
non-Jewish foreign service
candidates, customs officials
and security police, or selected
students, in three institutions.
Q: What is the legal status
of the Jewish community in
the USSR?

A: In a formal sense, there
is no Jewish community in the
Soviet Union. In other East
and some West European
countries there do exist central
Jewish bodies responsible for
Jewish needs. In the USSR,
there is an area near the Chi-
nese border called the Jewish
Autonomous Region (Oblast)
of Birobidzhan. Only one-half
of one percent of the Jewish
population (or just over
10,000) lives there.


Page 8 The Jewiah Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, December 7,1964
Anti-Semitism Continues In Europe
By MAURICE SAMUELSON
LONDON (JTA) Anti-
Semitism in Europe nearly 40
years after the defeat of Hitler
was examined by representa-
tives of nine European Jewish
communities at a day-long
session here under the auspices
of the European Committee
on Anti-Semitism of the
World Jewish Congress.
The sober assessment was
that anti-Semitism still exists
to a degree that demands
constant vigilance and preven-
tive measures. The dis-
cussants, all specialists in the
field, agreed that the anti-
Chief Rabbi Of France
Receives Formal Invitation
To Visit The USSR
PARIS (JTA) Chief
Rabbi Rene Sirat of France
has received a formal invi-
tation to visit the Soviet Union
and plans to go next spring
if he gets a visa.
The invitation, which said it
was extended by "rabbis in the
Soviet Union," was delivered
to Sirat by a Soviet diplomat.
The diplomat told reporters
that the Soviet authorities
would do everything they can
to facilitate Sirat's trip and his
stay in the USSR.
Sirat was invited to the
Soviet Union by the Chief
Rabbi of Moscow in 1981,
shortly after his election as
Chief Rabbi of France. Sirat
told the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency at the time that he
planned to visit Moscow "as
soon as circumstances per-
mit," meaning as soon as he
received visas for himself and
his party. He has applied
several times during the last
three years for a Soviet visa,
without success.
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Semitic pressures which
European Jews have felt in
recent years have lessened
somewhat.
They noted that the strength
of neo-Nazi type organizations
has not increased and the
number of anti-Semitic incid-
ents has declined. But it takes
only a few extremists to
commit acts of terror and
vandalism and therefore
security measures must be kept
fully operative, the experts
concluded.
They found significant
danger signs for Jews in the
growing xenophobia in
Europe which has been
directed so far against foreign
workers by rightwing propa-
gandists. Jews are especially
disturbed by the electoral
successes in France of the far
right National Front, headed
by Jean Le Pen who insists he
is not anti-Semitic but has a
record of long association with
some of the worst anti-Semitic
elements.
The discussion, which was
chaired by Martin Savitt, vice
president of the Board of
Deputies of British Jews, also
emphasized that the anti-
Zionist propaganda, coming
mainly from the exteme left,
caused the greatest concern
because, whatever its motiva-
tion or purpose, it easily
produces anti-Semitic effects.
The meeting agreed that all
manifestations of anti-
Semitism are best fought by
legislative measures against
hate propaganda. The panel
urged that such legislation be
introduced or tightened in all
countries and called on Jewish
communities to establish or
strengthen relations with the
ethnic and religious minorities
in their respective countries.
JCC News
WINTER RECESS MEANS HOLIDAY PROGRAMS
The Jewish Community Center will be conducting I
School Holiday Program for the children tfXift
parents Monday, Dec. 24; Wednesday throueh Fr5 8
Dec. 26-28 plus Monday, Dec. 31 and Wednesday th n, \
Friday, Jan. 2-4 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The fee for P
program is $45 per week for JCC members and l f
non-members. J ,or
Reservations must be made in advance. Space is limits
Call Terrie Lubin at 689-7700 for additional inforrnaiion
SHOP, FLORIDA STYLE
An open air market will be held Sunday, Dec 9 at th
Jewish Community Center, 2415 Okeechobee Blvd w!
Palm Beach from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. esl
Many merchants and organizations will be offerinn a
variety of items for sale. This will be an opportunity for
ryone to do their holiday shopping in comfort
eve
For additional information, please call Carol at 6
( II AN IK All GET-TOGETHER FOR TEENS
The Jewish Youth Council and Midrasha cordially invite
all Jewish high school teens to a special get-together in
celebration of Chanukah Wednesday, Dec. 19, 8:30 p m
at the Jewish Community Day School, 5801 Parker Avc
West Palm Beach.
This is an opportunity for high school boys and girls to
get acquainted while enjoying an evening of music and
dancing. Plans are presently being made to insure that all
have a good time. There are surprises in store for all.
For any additional information please call Terrie Lubin
at 689-7700.
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Friday, December 7,1984 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 9
Cohen Cites Torah As 'Authority'
For Ordination Of Women Rabbis
iMESHA LAKE, N.Y.
AM d" Gerson Cohen
tiior of the Jewish
Gfcal Seminary of
feCcited the Torah.as
IShority" for ordaining
lau as Conservative
Dressing 2,000 delegates
"biennial national
ltion of the Women s
"for Conservative
sm here last week, Cohen
X scholar Saadia, who
that in every age the
'.drin or its equivalent
ies the role of Moses and
, and keeps the Torah
' wj,h blessings and
Ifically
the Torah did not
discuss rabbis,
"male, female, or neuter, it
recognized the role of
teacher," Cohen said.
"The Torah knew only such
titles as priests, prophets,
kings, judges," Cohen said.
"The very term 'rabbi' as a
teacher of scripture is post-
biblical and grows out of the
experience of the Diaspora
after the destruction of the
Temple. Thus I get the
authority to ordain women
from the same place I get the
authority to ordain men."
Cohen made his remarks
during his teaching session to
the convention on the theme,
"History as the source of
observance." Cohen said,
"History is not only a
catalogue of events. It is the
reasoned explanation of whv
we are a people and why we
behave the way we do."
Dr. Simon Greenberg, octo-
genarian scholar and seminary
vice chancellor, was presented
with the Mathilde Schecter
award from Selma Weintraub
of Hartsdale, N.Y., who was
installed here for her second
two-year term as president of
the Women's League.
Weintraub, in her address to
the delegates, pledged to seek
"innovative responses to the
pressing problems of our era."
She said the plight of battered
women, the terminally ill,
alcoholism, Jewish singles and
day care centers, were issues
that will be high on the agenda
for the Women's League for
the next two years.
Boston Professor Lectures
At Cracow University
Rose and Oscar Slutsky were recently announced as the
honorees for the State of Israel Bond-Congregation Anshei
Sholom event which will be held on Jan. 20. The Slutskys have
been active supporters of Congregation Anshei Sholom. The)
participated in the building of the synagogue and have been
active on several committees. Mr. and Mrs. Slutsky have been
involved in the Jewish community of New Rochelle, New York,
their former home, and in the Palm Beaches.

tsTON (JTA) Prof.
fl Levine, a Jewish histor-
Li the faculty of Boston
Imity, has been invited to
Leon Jewish history at the
Ionian University in
xw Poland during the
Ent academic year, Boston
[ersity has announced.
Jvine, who has accepted
Invitation, will deliver a
of lecturers entitled
Sociology of Hope:
lies in Jewish History," in
.. he will assess the fa-
ctual and social history of
l Jewry against the back-
ed of Polish history.
is also scheduled to
at the Pontifical Insti-
i Cracow on "The His-
lerSS Officer
May Get
Ight Sentence
NN A former SS
I accused of complicity
edeathsof at least 15,000
in the Polish city of Lodz
| World War II, may get
*iih a relatively light
Pice after a trial that
five-and-a-half years,
(he longest in post-war
any.
t State Prosecutor in
m demanded an eight-
half year prison sen-
ior Helmut-George
is. 68. who was com-
er of the guards posted
Lodz ghetto in 1942.
cording to the prosec-
krizons ordered at least
Jews deported to the
ranof concentration camp
knowledge that they
e killed in the gas
8s He personally
the victims for
aon and organized the
)rts. the prosecution
is expected
ution
onginal
n himself
of
bv
the trial, the
than 40 trips
1 id, Argentina
*ustrlia to interview
;jsei who could not or
"oi come to Germany
tory of Jewish Rituals" and,
during the spring semester,
will lecture at the Catholic
University in Lublin and act as
a consultant to the Jewish
Museum in Cracow.
Lcvine, a Harvard-educated
sociologist and historian,
noted that for the first time
since World War II, Polish
universities have begun to ac-
knowledge the subject of
Jewish history. During his stay
in Poland he will suggest ways
in which Judaic studies can be
integrated into different curri-
cula in that country.
"There is a small but
growing number of Poles,
particularly those of the post-
war generation, interested in
the history of Polish Jews who
once constituted 10 percent of
the Polish population,"
Levine said. "I am honored to
offer these courses and to be
able to restore to Polish his-
toriography some knowledge
of the Jewish past."
Levine has been a member
of the faculties of Harvard,
Yale and the Hebrew Univer-
sity in Jerusalem. He has
served as Deputy Director of
the United Holocaust
Memorial Council in Wash-
ington and organized the
Center for Judaic Studies at
Boston University.
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rtusv iu i be Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, December 7,1984

Organizations
in the News
B'NAI B'Rlf H
Aviv Lodge No. 3015 will hold its next membership
meeting on Wednesday, Dec. 12, 7:30 p.m. at the Kirklane
School, Purdy Lane and Kirk Road, West Palm Beach.
Reverend Ralph Helverson of the First Unitarian Church
will speak on church and state issues.
Century Lodge No. 2939 will meet on Tuesday, Dec. 11,
7:30 p.m. at Congregation Anshei Sholom. "A Musical
Tour of Israel," an original cantata written by Lee
Duchin, will be presented by the Ruth Hyde Group. A
membership drive is in progress and the public is invited to
join. For information contact Perry Friedman, Bernie
Simon or Herb Edelstein.
The Lodge recently held a testimonial luncheon to honor
Leon Colon for his many years of devoted work on behalf
of BBYO and Hillel Foundation.
B'NAI B'RITH WOMEN
Menorah Chapter No. 1496 meets Dec. 11, noon, at the
American Savings Bank. Ann Lynn Lipton, Jewish
education director of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County, will speak on "Choosing Judaism. What does it
mean to us?"
On Jan. 27 a trip is planned to the Royal Palm Dinner
Theatre for the "Merry Widow." On Feb. 2 a trip is
planned to Les Violins for dinner-show and violins en-
tertainment. For information call Ruth Rubin.
BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY
NATIONAL WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
BOYNTON BEACH CHAPTER
On Friday, Dec. 7, 1 p.m., Dorothy Krefetz will lecture
on the life of Verdi and the music from Rigoletto at the
home of Kay Schoenfeld, Building 14.
On Thursday, Dec. 13, 1 p.m., Lillian Frank will review
"1984" by George Orwell at the home of Bea Rauch-
warger, Building 5.
A. visit to the Norton Gallery will occur on Friday, Dec.
14.
The monthly general meeting will be held on Monday,
Dec. 17, 12:30 p.m., at the Royal Palm Clubhouse.
Program chair Janet Asher will introduce Tom Kelly,
editor of the Palm Beach Post, who will present current
issues. Cele Herman will light the Hanukkah Menorah
with appropriate prayer in song.
On Monday, Dec. 24, 1 p.m., at the Royal Palm
Clubhouse Ruth Kasdin will review "Death of Innocence"
by Zelda Popkin.
The Professors Luncheon will be held on Thursday, Jan.
10 at the new Airport Hilton Hotel. Professor Robert
Greenberg will speak on the "media as the new
philosophers." See building captains for tickets.
HADASSAH
Chai will hold its regular meeting on Wednesday, Dec. 19,
12 noon, in the Poinciana room of the Golf and Racquet
Club.
Esther Katz will present an original show of drama,
games and puppetry.
The Golda Meir-Boynton Beach Chapter will hold their
general membership meeting on Thursday, Dec. 20, 12:30
p.m. at Temple Beth Sholom, 315 North "A" St., Lake
Worth.
There will be a candle lighting ceremony conducted by
Estelle Schwartz to celebrate Hanukkah, the Festival of
Lights, followed by a sing-a-long, with Sylvia Weiss at the
piano.
The chapter will attend a dinner and show at Musicana
on Sunday evening, Dec. 16. For reservations, contact Eva
Moresque or Bea (Sacher) Schwartz.
Youth Aliyah luncheon will be held at the Royce Hotel
on Wednesday, Jan. 30. For reservations contact Estelle
Schwartz.
To reserve a place at the card party and luncheon at
Kristine's on Thursday, Feb. 14 call Lee Goldstein.
A-AAbot Answerf one
A Division of
"ARING-ADING" ANSWERING SERVICE
Computerized Switchboard Live Operators
WE ANSWER FAST!
4390700
213 No. Dixie Highway, Lake Worth, FL 33460
Henrietta Szold Group will hold their general meeting
on Tuesday, Dec. 18, 1 p.m., at the auditorium of
Lakeside Village, Lillian Road, west of Congress Ave., in
Palm Springs.
The children of the Benjamin S. Hornstein Jewish
Community Day School will entertain with a Chanukah
program.
The group is sponsoring a lunch and show at the
Sheraton Bal Harbour on Sunday, Dec. 16. The show is
"Carnavale." For reservations contact Anne Zolin. ,
NATIONAL COUNCIL OF JEWISH WOMEN
The Palm Beach Section will hold a monthly board
meeting on Wednesday, Dec. 5, 10 a.m., at the North
County Senior Citizen Center, 5217 West Lake Park Road
in Palm Beach Gardens. Eugenia Feldman, president, will
give a report on her recent trip to National Council's
fourth Summit Conference which she attended in Israel.
PIONEER WOMEN-NA'AMAT
Ezrat Club will hold their regular meeting on Tuesday
Dec. 11, 12:30 p.m., at Sunrise Bank, corner Military Trail
and Gun Club Rd. Ruth Turk, an author and lecturer who
has recently returned from Europe, will give her im-
pressions of "A Jewish couple in Europe."
WOMEN'S AMERICAN ORT
The Atlantis Chapter will host a petite luncheon to
honor its paid-up members on Tuesday, Dec. II, 11:30
a.m., at the home of Rhonda Paston.
Highlights of the afternoon will be a fashion show by
Stanley Nelson and a jewelry boutique by Florrie.
On Sunday, Dec. 16, Royal Chapter will hold a "Great
Escape Auction" at 7:30 p.m. at the Village Hall
Auditorium.
Among the many contributors, offering weekends in
their respective hotels, are the Lido Spa in Miami Beach,
The Fallsview in Ellenville, N.Y., Grossinger's in Fern-
dale, N.Y., and many other local hotels and country clubs.
In addition, many expensive gifts have been donated, and
will be auctioned off at the same time.
Admission is free and refreshments will be served.
West Palm Chapter will hold its monthly meeting on
Tuesday, Dec. II, 12:30 p.m., at Congregationn Anshei
Sholom. Alice and Charlie Kurland, "The Rockin' Chair
Melodeers" will present a Chanukah musical program.
There will be a candlelighting ceremony.
On Jan. 20, the chapter will sponsor a luncheon and
show at the Marco Polo in Miami Beach. Call Fran Atlas
for more information.
Feb. 23 is the date for Royal Palm Dinner Theatre's
luncheon and show, "The Merry Widow." Call Augusta
Dickstein for reservations.
YIDDISH CULTURE GROUP
The Dec. 11 program of the Century Village Group will
feature the soprano Ruth Wilkes. Ms. Wilkes has appeared
in concert through the U.S.A. and Europe. She will be
accompanied by Eida Switzer on the piano.
Betty Steinberg Tell, an English reader, will make her
first appearance of the season.
Women's Leaeu. i.
"ca;"',81*^.
t-nain of I if." -
Monday, Dec 10 |S
Sheraton Ba. fij
Miami Beach, tl,
speaker will be ."' I
Abelman, director of a!
n Israel Public ^
Committee |AI"j
Donation is $36'*'{
rffle books. ProceS
directed to suppor, B JJ
n educational and reij
SJ3. <"*r> *
Alice Golembo, actress
grandniece of the late Pri
Minister of Israel GoldiUM
will be the guest speaker]
State of Israel Bonds
men's Division Inlernali
Premier Luncheon
Fashion Show at the Bret
on Dec. 19 at noon.
r
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Friday, December 7,1984 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 11
Israel Aims j m~^=^
M m Senior News
At E quality FROM THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
Benjamin S. Hornstein Elementary School of the Jewish
piuniiy l,a> Scho0' simulated the first Thanksgiving by
Uine f'esl of tneir own- The ent,re meal' wiln ,ne exception
lihe turkey, was prepared by the students. Each grade was
Lnsible fo: making one course for everyone else. Dressed in
[pilgrim and Indian costumes they made to complete the
Lo of the first Thanksgiving, the children learned history
Lh their first hand experiences. Carole Klein, one of the
L parents who dressed up in costumes to help serve the
[si, passes cranberry relish to the delighted students.
*Sd* i
I Indian maiden [better known as teacher Esther Schwartz]
V her Pilgrims and Indians to find seats at the Thanksgiving
Printing Cantar
586-6220
107 So. Dixie, Lake Worth
"WE MAKE YOU LOOK GOOD"
J\KTJim(M
sponsored by
Temple Israel
1901 North Flagler Drive
West Palm Beach
December8,1984
Champagne & Wine Preview 7:00 p.m.
Auction 8:00 p.m.
Oils Graphics Water Colors Sculpture
Pottery Paper Construction
4 Collection includes works by Miro Dali
A9am Nieman Alvak Liberman Moulton
and outstanding new artists.
[Donation $2.50 per person DOOR PRIZES
N-8421
3 GALLERIES
SAKAL
OfSexes
In Work Skills

The Israeli Ministry of
Education, is now engaged in
a campaign to encourage
young women to enter techno-
logical fields such as elec-
tronics, computer skills, auto-
mation and control, robotics,
and data processing. A
competition in technical apti-
tude was held recently at
ORT's advanced Syngalowski
Center, near Tel Aviv. This
was announced by Gertrude S.
White, National President of
Women's American ORT, at
the organization's head-
quarters in New York City.
Mrs. White said that some
120 young women, from all
parts of Israel, competed in
eight technological subjects at
the Syngalowski Center under
the aegis of the Ministry of
Education's Department of
Technological Education.
Results of the testing gave high
positions to ORT students.
Mrs. White said that the
definition of a particular skill
as "mannish" or
"womanish" is based entirely
on such factors as society, era
and geographical location.
There is no reason why
women, as well as men, should
not enter technological fields.
This new, equalizing trend,
she observed, is increasing
rapidly in industrialized
countries, where many high
positions in technology are
now occupied by women.
Mrs. White said that
societal and familial attitudes
are often crucial in determin-
ing careers for young women.
There is a vital need, she
stated, to change many of the
prevailing attitudes that place
a gap between the sexes in
relation to work skills, since
the demand for workers with
sophisticated and advanced
technological knowledge is
becoming greater with every
passing day.
TRANSPORTATION
Transportation is available
in our designated area for per-
sons 60 years of age or over
who do not use public tran-
sportation. We take people to
treatment centers, doctors'
offices, to hospitals, nursing
homes to visit spouses, to
social service agencies and
nutrition centers. There is no
fee for this service, but parti-
cipants are encouraged to
contribute their fair share.
There is a great demand for
this service, so please make
your reservations in advance.
For information and-or
reservations, call 689-7703
Monday through Friday.
HOT KOSHER
LUNCH CONNECTION
Many elements combine to
make the Hot Kosher Lunch
Program at the Jewish Com-
munity Center a success. Fore-
most among theseis the op-
portunity to form new and
lasting friendships.
Each weekday, seniors
gather for intimate talk,
educational discussions, game
playing, leisure and song.
These activities are followed
by a hot, kosher, nutritious
lunch served with warmth and
hospitality by our dedicated
volunteers. There is no set fee,
but persons are asked to make
a contribution each meal.
Please come and join us.
For information and reserva-
tions (which must be made in
advance) call Carol or Lillian
at 689-7703 in West Palm
Beach.
HOME
DELIVERED MEALS
Persons who are
homebound and need a
Kosher meal please call for
information. Call Carol in
West Palm Beach at 689-7703.
TRIPS
Second Tuesday Activity is
sponsoring a trip to the Burt
Reynolds Theatre to see "The
Best Little Whorehouse in
Texas" on Jan. 3. Call Carol
Fox 689-7703 for further
information.
JCC Open Air Market
Sunday, Dec. 9, 10-4. Every-
one is invited to attend the
Open Air Market at the Jewish
Community Center, 2415
Okeechobee Blvd., on Dec. 9.
Appliances, furniture, house-
hold furnishings, bric-a-brac,
etc. will be sold by non-profit
organizations and commercial
enterprises. Food will be avail-
able.
REGISTERED REAL ESTATE BROKER
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Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, December 7,1984
Update-Opinion
By TOBY F. WILK
A climate of apathy prevails
on the American campus. To
combat this, 5000 pro-Israel
students across the country are
involved in AIPAC's student
leadership program. Using
facts and their brain power,
they are advancing the cause
of U.S.-Israel relations. They
have formed coalitions with
black and Christian groups.
These students are determined
to prevail in the battle for the
hearts and minds of America's
next generation of leaders.
More Israelis die from the
effects of smoking than are
killed in wars or road ac-
cidents. Joseph Shane, a
Jewish health activist from
Beverly Hills, Calif., has
underwritten an Israeli anti-
smoking campaign in the
amount of one million dollars
a year for the next five years.
The absence from the
world's largest Jewish Com-
munity of a public memorial
to the six million Jews who
perished in the Holocaust, has
ended. The Federal govern-
ment has announced that the
unused 77-year-old Custom
House in Manhattan will
become a Museum of the
Holocaust. It will include re-
search facilities and an audi-
torium for performances. It is
imperative we obey the
Biblical command of Zachor
Remember!
Israel leads the world in the
publication of books and in
reading of books. Last year in
Israel, 14 books were
published on each working
day. The voracious reading
habits of Israeli adults are
matched by the children, 90
percent of whom read a book
a month outside of school.
Israel's two Chief Rabbis
have ruled that those who
violate traffic laws are also
violating Halachah (Jewish
religious law) because traffic
regulations are designed to
protect human lives.
Israel Radio's Arabic
service has expanded its
"Doctor Behind the Micro-
phone" program. Thousands
of patients from Jordan,
Kuwait, Saudi Arabia,
Lebanon, Egypt and Syria
have come to Israel for
medical treatment under the
auspices of this unique radio
show. The heads of all
Hadassah Medical Center
Departments cooperate. Even
Arab heads of state have been
treated.
A Jerusalem company has
won e contract from the
Liberian government to log
and market timber from a 1.5
million-acre area in Liberia.
A weekly series of Hebrew
lessons being broadcast on
Israel's overseas Arabic
broadcasts has resulted in
thousands of requests from
Egyptians for copies of the ac-
companying text. Israeli
broadcasters have been com-
pelled to suspend further
distribution until new supplies
can be printed.
Spain, which has still not
extended formal recognition
to Israel, has recommended to
UNESCO that it initiate a
worldwide celebration of the
850th anniversary of the birth
of Maimonides. Spain claims
him as one of their own. Al-
though Maimonides was born
in Spain, because of religious
persecution he was forced to
flee from there at an early age.
All of the works of
Maimonides which are still
studied to this day, were
written in his view of the world
as a rabbi and Jewish scholar,
physician and philosopher.
Spain should acknowledge
these facts. It is as if Germany
today were to announce a
celebration in honor of Albert
Einstein without admitting
that Nazism drove him out of
Germany.
The postman in the U.S.
services an average of 1,710
persons; in Germany 1021;
Belgium 800; France 681;
Great Britain 556 and Israel
2948.
While the Kremlin insists
that Jews in the Soviet Union
do not wish to leave, the fact is
that an estimated 400,000
Russian Jews have begun the
emigration process because
they no longer wish to stifle
their Judaism and Jewish her-
itage. There are currently 100
Russian Jews on hunger
strikes in protest against harsh
Soviet repression of Judaism.
There must be no lapse in our
determination to aid our co-
religionists in the Soviet
Union.
Israeli High School students
are in our country participat-
ing in the America-Israel
Student Exchange program
which is affiliated with the
non-sectarian American-Israel
Friendship League. They will
learn about other cultures here
and American students visiting
Israel will learn about the
cultures in the Middle East.
The program promotes friend-
ship and understanding. The
New York City Board of
Education helps to coordinate
this program.
Queen Elizabeth has just
added to her stamp collection
a new issue bearing the port-
rait of General Orde Wingate,
the British soldier who organ-
ized the anti-Arab special
night squads in Palestine in the
1930's.
Clara Jusidman de
Bialostotsky is the first Jewish
woman to head a high post in
the Mexican government. Her
duties are to control prices and
services.
A recent Gallup poll shows
that Americans support Israel
over Us Arab enemies by a
five-to-one margin.
Cesar Milstein won the 1984
Nobel Prize in Medicine. Four
years ago, he received the
Wolf Prize in Medicine in
Israel. His family is active in
Jewish community life and
Jewish causes. Since 1963,
Milstein has b*>pn ,
with CanXridg? SH
andnowheads^a
Protem and Nucleic rlJ
*try Musein'sfaSrCX
{-^-migrant fl
Sponsored by thsFrf,,
and Culture DeaaS?*
examinations are oJrTi
children only Mm 2M
Israel will be awarded 0,hoi
winners. 0I1
Thanks to Israel, the pJ
infra-structure in Beirut J
destroyed. Beirut is no led
the center of world terrorist
and the northern border 1
Israel has been made safa
Israeli children will no l learn the value of freedom an
independence whilst living lib
moles in underground shelter]
Dolphinmania Tickets are Getting Scarce,
But There's Still Time to Win!
All Winning Tickets Must be Claimed
by December 31st. 1984.
Allow us to create for you a specialty dessert tray
for your Christmas Party or special meal. These
trays are made from a delicious assortment of fresh
Danish Bakery Delights Ask your bakery
salesperson for details_____________________
DOLPHINMANIA WINNERS!
$500 $1,000 $2,500
Thomas McQuoid
Miami Beach
Glenn Singer
W Palm Beacn
Nail Leibowilz
Ft leuOerdale
Latay Best
Lake Worth
Joseph Schnitzler
W Palm Beach
Akaby Variabedian
Miami Beach
Paul Hill
Wilton Manors
Muriel Northrup
Boynton Beacn
Stanley Afroimaky
Sunrise
Bobbin Pinaa
Davie
Maria Aliaa Aloma
Miami
Lillian Vellucci
Tamarac
Marjone Oe Veau
Miami
Michael Brodzinsky
Ft lauderdaie
Margaret Canlrell
W Palm Beach
Elizabeth Levy
Deeriieid
Pamela Hall
Palm Beach Gardens
Barbara Carter
Stuart
where shopping is a pleasure 7 days a week
Publu Bakeries open at 8:00 A.M.
r
Available at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Plain or Seeded
Rye Bread
.69
Available at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Greek Delights, Baklava,
Pecan Oueen or
Almond Log
JJ9
Available at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Spicy, Fresh Baked
Pumpkin Pie
$169
each
Available at All Pubkx Stores
and Danish Bakeries.
Butter Struesei
Coffee Cake............^$169
Blueberry
Muffins.................6 ^ $129
-Tie-aft
MiniDonuts............C 99
Gourmet
All Butter Cookies
pkT$2<9
&-
Deluxe Cookies.....i*379
Made with an Abundance of Fruit and Nuts
Fruit Stollen............ *249
(1.5*. Size ..................... each $3.55)
Prices Effective Dec. 6th thru 12th. 1984
^mwMmmiMimMMMMm H olidai;
8-inch 10-inch
Apple Crumb....... 1.89
Peach................... 2.09
Pumpkin.............. *1.69
Egg Custard......... 4.89
Pecan................... 2.89
Sweet Potato....... 1.89
^/,i,Miu.lUiiiiil..iiui,muiiiiilii.11.i)||
'3.39
3.99
3.29
*3.59
*4.99
*3.29
Available at Publix Stores with Fresh
Danish Bakeries Only.
Any Italian Delight
Cannolis...................ach 79*
(Sfogiiateia........................each 89c)
Gourmet
Fruit Cake Bar........ T$249
(Deluxe Fruit Cake Ring.....2-tb. $6.79)
(Deluxe Fruit Cake Ring ... 5-lb. $16.50)
Pfeffernuesse
Cookies..................'S^l39
Delicious, Plain
Ladyfingers............S? 99*
(Fled.......Z............................$1.29)
For Your Holiday Party, Bake and Serve
Gourmet _.
Hors d' Oeuvres.....jg*19
Pi cs MmmwmmmmmMWWw\
Apple....................
Cherry..................
Blueberry.............
Lemon Meringue.
Mince Meat..........
Coconut Custard.
Hlll..t.l...tell
8-inch 10-inch
1.89 3.39
2.79 4.69
2.49 4.49
1.89 3.29
2.19 4.09
1.89 3.59
Ulllllllllllllt"'"'""^


Friday, December 7,1984 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 13


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Choose from the Basel Group Hotels, or for an extra $100,.the
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thai L 5 $5.) The deluxe Sonesta Hotel is also available for $144.
$249* ISRAEL AND CAIRO.
An El Al exclusive thru March 15,1985. Now the airline of
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This package also includes being met at the airport by English
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Onlv Israel and El Al can make these offers, but only for a
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For more information call your travel agent or El Al toll free at
1-800-223-6700.
For a free, detailed color brochure on our packages, write El Al
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New York 11101.
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r^e i4 i he Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, December 7,1984
Music for A Sunday Afternoon
At Temple Emanu-EI
Candle Lighting Time
The first concert of the Cul-
tural Series of Temple Emanu-
EI Adult Education Com-
mittee, 190 N. County Road in
Palm Beach, will be held on
Dec. 16 at 3 p.m. The featured
artist will be Marya Martin,
flutist.
Born in New Zealand, Miss
Martin made her successful
debut in The Young Artists
Series in New York and Wash-
ington. Since then, her career
has blossomed. She has ap-
peared as a soloist in recitals,
as a chamber music artist and
in concert with James Galway
and Jaime Loredo. She
studied in Europe with Jean-
Pierre Rampal and James
Galway.
This concert is open to the
community. A set of tickets
for four varied concerts of the
Cultural Series is $25. Single
tickets are $8 each, which can
be purchased before or at the
door prior to the concerts. For
further information, call the
Temple office.
Eastpointe Campaign
Continued from Page 1
ficiary agencies the Jewish
Community Center, the
Jewish Community Day
School, the Jewish Family and
Children's Service and the
Joseph L. Morse Geriatric
Center we once again are
reminded of the importance of
supporting programs and
services for our local Jewish
population."
As a result of the interest
stimulated by the videotape,
the committee is planning a
mini-mission to the bene-
ficiary agencies for Eastpointe
residents. They also discussed
plans for the second annual
dinner celebration to be held
on Thursday, Jan. 24, at the
Golf and Racquet Club at
Eastpointe.
Over the past few years the
Eastpointe campaign has been
increasing steadily. Last year's
total of $102,183 contributed
was a 54 percent increase over
1982-83 and represented a 25
percent jump in the number of
contributors. "We are very
excited about the potential at
Eastpointe and about all the
new people who have become
involved in working on the
committee. As newly involved
volunteers ourselves, it is
BarMitzvah
DOUGLAS LEVENTHAL
Douglas Carter Leventhal,
son of Mr. and Mrs. Andrew
Leventhal of Palm Beach
Gardens, will be called to the
Torah on Saturday, Dec. 8, at
Temple Beth David. He will
also participate in the service
on Friday evening. Rabbi
William Marder and Cantor
Earl Rackoff will officiate.
Douglas, an eighth grader at
Howell Watkins Junior High
School, is president of his
school's chapter of the Na-
tional Junior Academy of
Science. He is a member of the
French Club and enjoys art as
well as playing golf and tennis.
To highlight the plight of
Soviet Jewry, Douglas will be
twinning his Bar Mitzvah with
Albert Katz of Kisninev,
Russia.
Ah in Newman
heartwarming to realize that
although people have an
attachment to their northern
communities, when they move
to this friendly Eastpointe
atmosphere they want to be-
come affiliated more and more
with Israel and the local
Jewish community," the
Newmans declared.
Lester and Helen Sodowick
have been active for the last
three years in this com-
munity's Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County-United
Jewish Appeal campaigns,
having chaired the drive at
Eastpointe. They have been to
Israel several times and are
supporters of Israel Bonds.
The Sodowicks also
volunteer their time to assist
the residents at the Joseph L.
Morse Geriatric Center. Mrs.
Sodowick is chair of the
membership committee of the
Center's women's auxiliary.
The Newmans moved to
Palm Beach County in 1982
from Great Neck, New York,
Frances Newman
where Newman was a founder
and president of Temple
Emanuel. He also was on the
board of directors and chair of
the house committee of
Temple Beth El in that city.
An attorney, Newman was in-
volved in industry campaigns
for UJA and was on the board
of directors of restaurant and
hotel associations. He was a
member of American Israel
Public Affairs Committee and
B'nai B'rith and currently is
active with Israel Bonds at
Eastpointe.
Mrs. Newman, actively
involved with UJA in Great
Neck, participated in two UJA
missions to Israel. She is a
member of B'nai B'rith and
served on the board of the
Anti-Defamation League in
Great Neck.
Volunteers are still being re-
cruited by the committee. For
more information contact
Mark Mendel, staff associate,
at the Federation office 832-
2120.
Fri. Dec. 75x10
pm
Members of the Eastpointe campaign committee met recently to
formulate plans for the 1985 Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County-United Jewish Appeal campagin at Eastpointe.
Religious Directory
Conservative
CONGREGATION ANSHEI SHOLOM: 5348 Grove f)t~
West Palm Beach 33409. PHone 684-3212. Rabbi I I
Vander Walde. Cantor Mordecai Spektor Dailv 8 V\ I
and 5:30 p.m. Friday: 8:30 a.m., 5 p.m. and a late service at Vk
p.m., followed by Oneg Shabbat. Saturday: 8:30 a.m., 5Dm
Mincha followed by Sholosh Suedos. v'
CONGREGATION BETH KODESH OF BOYNTON BEACH
501 N.E. 26 Avenue, Boynton Beach 33435. Phone 586-942"
Rabbi Avrom L. Drazin, Cantor Arthur R. Rosenwasser
Monday 8:30 a.m.; Thursday 8:30 a.m. Sabbath services'
Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.
GOLDEN LAKES TEMPLE: 1470 Golden Lakes Blvd
West Palm Beach 33411. Phone 689-9430. Rabbi Joseph
Speiser. Daily Services 8:15 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. Sabbath
services Friday 8:15 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m.. 5 p.m.. Mincha
followed by Sholosh Suedos.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID: 4657 Hood Road. Palm Beach
Gardens 33410. Phone 694-2350. Rabbi William Marder
Cantor Earl J. Rackoff. Sabbath services. Friday 8 pm
Saturday 10 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 2815 No. Flagler Dr.. West Palm
Beach 33407. Phone 833-0339. Rabbi Howard J. Hirsch,
Cantor' Elaine Shapiro. Sabbath services Friday 8:15 p.m',
Saturday 9:30 a.m. Daily Minyan 8:15 a.m.. Sunday and
Legal Holidays 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 315 N. "A" Street. Lake Worth
33460. I'hone 585-5020. Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg, Cantor
Jacob F^lman. Services Monday and Thursday 8:15 a.m.,
F'riday 8:15 p.m.. Saturday 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 224 N.W. Avenue G, Belle
Glade 33430. Sabbath services Friday, 8:30 p.m. Phone 996-
3886.
TEMPLE BETH ZION: Lions Club, 700 Camelia Dr., Royal
Palm Beach. Mailing Address: POBox 104, 650 Royal Palm
Blvd., Royal Palm Beach, FL 33411. Sabbath Services Fridays
p.m., Saturday 8:45 a.m. Rabbi Nathan Zelizer. Phone 793-
9122.
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB: 2177 So. Congress Ave.. West Palm
Beach 33406. Phone 433-5957. Rabbi Dr. Morris Silberman.
Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m., Saturday and Holidays 9a.m.,
Monday and Thursday 9 a.m.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL: 190 North County Road, Palm Beach
33480. Phone 832-0804. Rabbi Joel Chazin, Cantor David
Dardashti. Sabbath services, Friday 8:30 p.m.; Saturday 9a.m.
THE TREASURE COAST JEWISH CENTER Ben
Abraham: 3257 S.E. Salerno Road, Port Salerno. Rabbi
Abraham Rose. 1-287-8833. Services Friday evenings 8 p.m.
LAKE WORTH JEWISH CENTER: St Lukes United
Methodist Chapel, 165 Ohio Road, Lake Worth. Phone 433-
1869. Friday night serivces 8:15 p.m., Saturday. 9 a.m.
Orthodox
CONGREGATION AITZ CHAIM: Century Village. West
Palm Beach. Phone 689-4675. Sabbath services 9 a.m. and 5
p.m. Daily services 8:15 a.m. and 6:30 p.m.
Reform
CONGREGATION BETH ISRAEL: 1592 Floresta, P.O. Box
857146, Port St. Lucie, FL 33452. Friday night services 8pm.
Saturday morning 10:30 a.m. Phone 465-6977.
THE REFORM TEMPLE OF JUPITERTEQUESTA: at
Jupiter High School. Military Trail, Jupiter. Mailing address
Plaza 222, U.S. No. 1, Tequesta 33458. Phone 747-4235. Rabbi
Alfred L. Friedman. Services Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 4600 Oleander Avenue, Fort Pierce, FL
33450. Phone 461-7428.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM: St. Helen's Parish Hall, 20th
Avenue and Victory Blvd., Vero Beach 32960, mailing address
P.O. Box 2113, Vero Beach, FL 32961-2113. Rabbi Richard U.
Messing. Phone 1-569-0180.
TEMPLE BETH TORAH: at St. David's in the Pines
Episcopal Retreat, Forest Hill Blvd. and Wellington Tra
West Palm Beach. Mailing address: P.O. Box 17008. 'w
Palm Beach, FL 33416. Friday services 8:15 p.m. rUnni
Steven R. Westman, Cantor Nicholas Fenakel. Phone n
2700. ,
TEMPLE ISRAEL: 1901 No. Flagler Dr.. West Palm Wg
33407. Phone 833-8421. Rabbi Howard Shapiro. Cantor*
Soloist Susan Weiss. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE JUDEA: at St. Catharine's Greek Orthodox Church
Social Hall, 4000 Washington Rd., at Southern Boulevard
Rabbi Joel L. Levine. Cantor Anne Newman. MaUing "
6154 Okeechobee Blvd., West-Palm Beach. FL 33409. Phone
471-1526.


Friday, December 7,1984 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 15

iagogue News
AITZCHAIM
, sis,.rhod will hold a
L,y on Sunday, Dec. 9
party room. A mini-
on will be served.
I your dance tickets for
lanukah party on Dec.
fiOp.m. in party room.
"and drinks will be
MPLE BETH DAVID
[annual congregational
L of Temple Beth David
Vke place on Sunday,
9 7:30 p.m., at the
in Palm Beach Gar-
lEIeciioriN w ill be held at
le The 1985 Budget will
Uted and the following
1,1 be ^oicl upon: Belle
fpresident (co-founder of
le Beth David), Vicki
[em. administrative vice
Int. Marcy Marcus,
gliding secretary,
| Feuer, assistant
U, Laura and Barry
I, membership, Nat
Islci, education, Paul
adult education,
in Shore, facilities,
InKessel, building fund,
land Mark Stein, social,
Iwasman, publicity, Lois
communications;
at large are Toby
l Linda Manko, Joe
I, Russell Stoch, David
and Stephen Stolzer.
following officers and
en continue in office:
| Brown, Jody Farber,
[Barat, Elaine Sherman,
1 Snow and Lorraine
Dan.
elected officers and
I will be installed in Jan-
tONGREGATION
BETHKODESH
ICongregation invites all
Icongregants and friends
lebrate a Siyum Ha'
on Sunday, Jan. 6 at
Ip.m. at Congregation
|Kodesh, 501 NE 26th
Boynton Beach, Fla.
py religious and local
fries will join together in
dication of two Torahs
by Mrs. Libbie
and the late Max
and Sisterhood Beth
^monies will be con-
by Rabbi Avrum L.
and Cantor Arthur
asser and will begin at
lm.
MLEBETHTORAH
temple's monthly
[service will take place
Hay evening Shabbat
[this week, beginning at
ai St. David's-in-the-
Wellington. Rabbi
l"tman and students
F Religious School will
"[he service, and the
l*iU tell a special story.
U0'y congregational
Pnabbat, a new feature,
Pow the service.
Juke worth
PISH CENTER
[guest speaker for the
Lrnday services of the
Jl be Frank Shapiro.
I continue his popular
Pns of the Day" series
episode called "Strug-
WLEEMANU-EL
lJond presentation of
. Friday Evening
|>ies of the Adult
P?" Committee will be
Pec-14. 8:15 p.m.
The featured speaker will be
Dr. Samuel Portnoy, profes-
sor of history, Florida Atlantic
University. His topic will be
"Andrei Sakharov and the
Dissident Movement in
Russia."
I
Dr. Samuel Portnoy
Dr. Portnoy is former presi-
dent of the Florida Conference
of College Teachers of
History, and is a prominent
lecturer on subjects of current
and historic importance. He is
the author of articles in
English and in Yiddish, and is
actively involved in furthering
Yiddish culture.
The public is cordially in-
vited to attend this Forum,
which will be followed by an
Oneg Shabbat.
k L
Thomas Mills
TEMPLE ISRAEL
On Sunday, Dec. 9, at 10
a.m., Temple Israel "Brunch
of the Month" will welcome as
its guest speaker Thomas
Mills, superintendent of
schools of Palm Beach
County.
Mills will speak at 10 a.m.
on the subject of "Quality of
Education." It will be fol-
lowed by a question and
answer period and a brunch.
The cost for the brunch is $3
per person and reservations
may be made by calling the
temple office at 833-8421.
origin of prayer, ritual and
music. Participants study
essays and articles written by
some of the greatest thinkers
of Reform Judaism and learn
that prayer, ritual, and music
in Reform has always been an
-volving search for meaning.
These groups are open to
members of Temple Judea. A
five dollar-fee covers the cost
of the text. For more informa-
tion, call the temple office.
On Friday, Dec. 7, the
temple will celebrate Family
Night and will welcome to its
Bimah as a guest speaker
Reuven Lewis, who is the
"shaliach" (emissary) to the
Reform Movement from
Israel.
Lewis was born and raised
in Texas and as a student was
active in BBYO activities. At
UCLA he was very active with
Hillel and the Jewish Federa-
tion of Los Angeles. After
graduation he attended the
Hebrew Union College in
Jerusalem for one year and
decided to remain in Israel. He
is a member of Kibbutz Yot-
vata in the southern Negev
Desert. He is married and has
three children. On the kibbutz,
Reuven is a teacher at the Re-
gional School, including the
Reform Kibbutzim Yahel and
Lotan.
He has served in the Israeli
Defense Forces and fought in
the Yom Kippur War.
Lewis will speak to the con-
gregation and the young
people of the Religious School
on "Growing Up A Texan,
Growing Up A Kibbutznik."
During the Family Night
Service the Junior Choir,
under the direction of Betty
Robbins, will sing.
TEMPLEJUDEA
Rabbi Joel Levine will con-
clude his series on "How Re-
form Jews Differ" at Sabbath
services, Friday, Dec. 7.
Cantor Anne Newman will
chant the music.
Rabbi Levine will explore
the theme of authority in Re-
form Judaism and compare
the sources of authority in
Reform to the traditional
sources of authority which
guide Orthodox and Con-
servative Judaism.
During services, Eric Reiter
will observe his Bar Mitzvah.
The entire congregation is
warmly invited to the oneg
shabbat which follows. The
junior oneg shabbat under the
direction of Miriam Ruiz will
be held during the sermon
portion of the service.
Rabbi Levine will continue
his home study program on
"Gates of Understanding"
Dec. 10 and Dec. 11. Sarah
and Sam Levine will host the
study group on Dec. 10 at their
home in Lake Worth at 1 p.m.
Edythe and Bill Rothstein will
host the group on Dec. 11 at
their home in Golden Lakes at
10 a.m.
Rabbi Levine's adult educa-
tion home study program this
year involves research into thp
MEMORIAL CHAPELS
Serving the greater Florida area
In the finest of Jewish tradition.
WEST PALM BEACH 689-8700
DELRAY BEACH-278-7600
5411 Okeechobee Boulevard
Jack Weiss
Manager
PRE-ARRANGED FUNERALS AVAILABLE THRU
PBE^GUARANTEED SECURITY PLAN
Seymour and Pearl liberman were recently named the honorees
for a National Testimonial Reception on Dec. 12, on behalf of
the Eastpointe Israel Bond Committee. Seymour Liberman is a
life member of B'nai B'rith and served as vice president of the
Lakeville, New York, lodge for 10 years. He was chairman of
the Metro Dairy Industries for 20 years. Mrs. Liberman, a
violinist, was a member of the Queen's CoUege Orchestral
Society. She was active in a number of Jewish causes in New
York and headed the Women's Activity for Israel Bonds at
Eastpointe.
Substitute Grandma
Needed for a sweet, well behaved 15 month old.
Babysitting in my new home EVERY Saturday
night and various hours during the week.
Boca Raton Town Center Area.
If you love little children, want to earn extra
money and have the time Please call
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487-6819
rmDfi
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Another good reason
you should attend services
at temple or synagogue
this .weekend.
This message brought to you by:
MMaMME
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INGEST IEID EYB9CU1ZW_VO5Q17 INGEST_TIME 2013-06-11T00:48:03Z PACKAGE AA00014310_00084
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES