The Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian the voice of the Jewish community of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Running title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Physical Description:
4 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 8, no. 41 (Dec. 24, 1982)-v. 11, no. 26 (Aug. 30, 1985).
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44606415
lccn - sn 00229548
ocm44606415
System ID:
AA00014310:00082

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
THE VOICE OF
THE JEWISH
COMMUNITY OF
PALM BIACH
COUNTY
"-Jewish florid Jan

VOLUME 10 -NUMBER 38
rolunteers Needed
PALM BEACH, FLORIDA FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 23 194
PRir.FI'ir.FNTS
1985 Federation Campaign Opens With Leadership Conference
f*t)
nbhi Kloli, Kxeculive Committee member
' National United Jewish Appeal Women's
livhion. leads a presentation on the
Imerican Joint Distribution Committee at
the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
Campaign Leadership Conference
"Caravan."
More than one hundred 1985 Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County United Jewish Appeal campaign leaders met at
the Royce Hotel on Nov. 11 to learn that pressing needs in Israel
and here in the local community are such that a greatly increased
campaign is necessary in 1985. The leadership agreed that a goal
of 14,000 contributors is essential to the success of the 1985
campaign and set their sights to surpass the $7 million mark in
1985. The 1984 campaign raised just over $5.5 million.
The Campaign Leadership Conference "Caravan" was
chaired by Julie Cummings, Women's Division vice president
for campaign. Arnold L. Lampert, general campaign chairman,
joined Mrs. Cummings in presenting a new campaign film called
"Reaching Out Building a Community" which dramatically
illustrates the needs of our local Jewish community and the role
which newcomers have in building the campaign for needy Jews
worldwide. The film has been reproduced on VHS and Beta
videotapes and is available to be shown anywhere in the com-
munity. "Anyone with a VHS or Beta machine at home should
show this 13-minute presentation to their friends and neighbors
and urge them to become active supporters of the Jewish
Federation campaign," said Mrs. Cummings and Lampert.
"The 1985 campaign is underway and we are looking to re-
cruit as many volunteers as possible before we light the first
Hanukkah candle on Dec. 1.8," Lampert added.
"The community should be aware that we have a campaign
organization in every city and development in Palm Beach
Continued on Page 3-
'our Named To Chair JCC Advisory Board of Trustees
IFour co-chairpersons have
ten named lor the Jewish
Jommuniiy Center of the
felm Beaches' newly created
dvisory Board of Trustees.
[The board will assess tong-
pm policv and development
pals as the Center refines
ns lor construction of a
p 16.5-acre campus, ac-
brding to Dr. Paul Klein,
resident of the JCC.
[Co-chairpcrsons named to
ke board are Jeanne Levy of
aim Beach, Julie Cummings
JStuart, Jonas Barenholtz of
kveland and West Palm
leach and Joe Mandel of
Ifoeland and Palm Beach.
"The experience of the co-
chairpersons will be of inva-
luable aid as the JCC starts its
second decade," Dr. Klein
said. "In the past ten years,
our county's Jewish popula-
tion has increased from 4,000
to 45,000. Our goal is to
expand the JCC's services to
reach every age group with
social, cultural and educa-
tional programs."
At the first full Advisory
Board meeting later this
month, members will meet
with Esther Leah Ritz, pres-
ident of the National Jewish
Continued on Page 9
Jeanne Levy
Julie Cummings
Jonas Barenholtz Joe Mandel
Inside
Women's
Division
Campaign
Cabinet
|A photo display of the
11985 Jewish Federation
|ol Palm Beach County-
United Jewish Appeal
[Women's Division
[Campaign Cabinet intro-
duces the key leaders to
line community.
|See page 2.
Wife Abuse
>a special feature,
m Jewish Telegraphic
agency explores the
IJue of wife beating
lWl'nin the Jewish
reunify. See page 12
Federation Board Approves Allocations of
$5,381,286UJA Receives $3,177,610
The Board of Directors of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach County has
approved allocations from its record
breaking 1984 campaign totalling
$5,381,286. The United Jewish Appeal
and overseas agencies received 60%, or
the largest allocation of $3,180,660,
which goes directly to help the people
of Israel and Jewry worldwide. In ad-
dition to the Federation campaign, ex-
tra funds of $84,000 were made avail-
able to the Jewish Family and
Children's Service and the.Jewish
Community Center by the United Way
of Palm Beach County and the Palm
Beach Community Chest.
The Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach Countv also approved alloca-
tions totalling $788,000 to support its
beneficiary agencies the Jewish
Community Center, the Jewish Com-
munity Day School, the Jewish Family
and Children's Service and the Joseph
L. Morse Geriatric Center. Community
service programs such as the Mid-
rasha-Judaica High School, the Com-
munity Relations Council, Mosaic TV
Program, Single Parent Family
Program, Chaplaincy Program, etc.,
received a total allocation of $315,250.
In addition, $386,565 was allocated for
administration and $656,555 for cam-
paign programs of the Federation for
the 1985 campaign.
Alvin Wilensky, chairman of the
Continued on Page 9




Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, November 23,1964
Selmi Becker
Member at Large
Penny Beers
tl ,000-4,m Category
Co-Chairwoman

Carol Creenbaum
Campaign Associate
New Gilts Portfolio
Elhe Halperm
Member at Large
I

Eileen Nickman
Legacy and
Endowment Chair-
woman
Adele Simon
SI 25 Event Co-Chair-
woman
Marva Perrin
Lion olJudati Co-
Chairwoman
Barbara Tanen
Worker Training
Chairwoman
Margot Broiost
tlU Event Co-Chair-
woman
Melame Jacobs on
Business and
Professional
Campaign Chair
Zelda Pincourt
S1.000-4.VH Category
Co Chairwoman
Joan Tochner
Retention Co-Chair-
woman
......

Sheila Engelstein
President
Molhe FiMerman
Campaign Liaison to
Jewish Women's
Assembly
LethFs,
"mberitij,^
Julie Cummings
Campaign Vice President
Introducing
The
Carole Klein
Campaign Associate
Marilyn Lampert
Special Projects

H,
Cvrwrt List
"'tatit, e,.
cn*'neoaiai

1985
Campaign
Cabinet
Berenice Rogers
Campaign Associate
Marcia Shapiro Or. Eliza!**.$"
Women's Division Shuiman
Super Sunday Co-Chair LiaisonIVI
and Pretusaia"
Women sad ban]
JudehCtairwaaJ
Ruth Wilensky
Lands of the Presi
dent Chairwoman
Susan Wolf-
Schwarti
Women's Division
Super Sunday Co-
Chairwoman
Teacher Training Seminar Held At Temple Beth David
The newly constructed
Temple Beth David in nor-
thern Palm Beach County was
the site of the first in-service
teacher training seminar held
this school year. More than 60
educators from synagogue
religious schools, the Jewish
Community Day School and
other interested community
members heard national^
prominent educators conduct
workshops on discussion
techniques and early
childhood education. In
addition, a local psychologist
addressed the problems of the
Jewish credibility gap.
The seminar was sponsored
by the Jewish Education Com-
mittee of the Jewish Federa-
tion of Palm Beach County
and the Educators' Council of
fiction Award
NEW YORK (JTA) The
1984 Harold Ribalow Prize,
given annually for a book of
_ fiction on a Jewish theme, was
I awarded to Francine Prose for
= her novel, "Hungry Hearts,"
B and presented to her by Ruth
* Popkin, president of Hadas-
sah. The $500 award, named
for the late writer, anthologist
and literary critic, Harold
Ribalow, is administered by
Hadassah Magazine.
In accepting the award,
Prose said that, after consid-
erable research and writing
200 pages, she heard "the
voice" of the actress who
became the main character Of
icr novel.
Palm Beach County to help
teachers continue their
professional education. Ruth
Levow, chairman of the
Educators' Council, found the
atmosphere at Temple Beth
David to be very professional
and warm. "The teachers were
glad to see each other and
exchange ideas. The temple
was a beautiful setting and we
made use of the facilities both
indoors and out," she said.
During the workshop on
discussion techniques, guest
lecturer Samuel Steinberg took
the teachers through role
playing exercises to enhance
their skills, Milton Kurland.
who attended with his wife
Ruth, found the session to be
very helpful. Kurland, who
will be teaching beginning
Hebrew and conversational
Yiddish in Temple Beth
David's Adult Education
program, has taught at the
college level. "This was a
valuable refresher course for
me, particularly in the area of
getting students to participate
in group discussions. Mr.
Steinberg stressed the im-
portance of getting as many
students as possible involved.
These seminars also help my
wife, who taught on the
primary level, and I to meet
other people in our field and
exchange views with them,"
stated Kurland.
Sharon Friedman, a kinder-
garten teacher at Temple Beth
David who also serves as
coordinator of the school, is
teaching for the first time and
found Hannah Cidon's
workshop for primary
teachers most helpful. "Her
presentation was excellent and
I will be able to implement her
experimental approach to
learning through the use of
music with my kindergarten
students," she said.
A local psychologist, Dr.
Steve Roth, spoke about the
Jewish credibility gap.
Afterwards the group was
divided with Dr. Roth leading
one section of discussion.
Rabbi William Marder of
Temple Beth David and Ned
Goldberg, a social worker with
the Jewish Family and
Children's Service, served as
facilitators for the other
section.
The many exhibits of
educational materials and
books provided by the
Learning
Enterprises
House gave
opportunity
chase the
Plant, Judaic
and Behrman
the teachers the
to see and pur-
most current
materials available for the
Jewish classroom. They also
heard Ann Lynn Lipton, Jew-
ish education director of the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County, deliver the
keynote address about t
state of Jewish education
America today. In addhi
Eleanor New corn l
Shoshana Sharf. two teach
who were honored
"Outstanding Religi"
School Teachers of the Year
gave a report on the Coaliti
for Alternatives in Jewi
Education conference tl
attended this past summer
San Francisco.
The next in-service teic
training seminar will be
on Feb. 17. For more i
mation contact Ms. Lipton
the Federation's
office, 655-7706.
infor-J
LION OF JUDAH
A Symbol
Of Commitment
The Lion or Judoh pin. on original design 1** 0^
become an intemationaHy recognized svmbol of wCtver'r^
personal commitments to the annual United Jews" APp6
Federation campaign signifies a gift of $5,000 or more
We program was started in 1972 and by 1W ne^vrf5In!i
women were proudly wearing the* symbol of corrvTiitrr**
recognizable symbol of giving is now available to C0[""\L
throughout the United States In Florida Fort Lcxx^da*\\JJ^,
Boca Raton ana PineHas County have adopted theconcep^fj8|
r\ Palm Beach, are proud to be among those Florida cc^mJ^i
who hove chosen to odopt the Lion of Judoh as P*?*^-
Women's Division / United Jewish Appeal / Federaton v,ompov
The Lion of Jud.h Cocktail Reception fivea in PP0IJ1'[
the Women's Division of (he Jewish Federation ot r
Beach County-United Jewish Appeal campaign w m
held on Thursday, Dec. 6, 4 p.m., at tie ** 'ift|i
Max M. Fisher in Palm Beach. For more infomnw"
Lynne Khrlich. Women's Division director, at
Federation office 832-2120.


Friday, November 23,1984 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 3
Caravan'Reaching Out
Building A Community
p
Continued from Page 1
County," said Mrs. Cummings. "By calling Federation, people
can be immediately brought together with the leader for their
area." Federation also has divisions for attorneys, physicians
and other professionals.
Myron J. Nickman, president, remarked, "I guarantee that
all who join us in this great task of lifesaving will receive trem-
endous satisfaction in knowing that they are involved in
preserving Israel and building this wonderful Jewish community
of the Palm Beaches." See more photos on page 16
Y National vice chairman, discuss the Jewish ~ppef' Na ional Leadership Development, discusses
1 u d'e, lne cr*" in determining gift giving.
Berenice Rogers, Special Gifts Committee member,
leads a discussion with Marty Stein, United Jewish
Appeal National vice chairman.
HI
pictured are members of the South Ocean Boulevard Federation
Council meeting with the officers of the Jewish Federation.
Clockwise are: Murray Cohen, Barclay; Alvin Wilensky; vice
(resident. Alec Engelstein, vice president, Jonas Barenholtz,
board of Directors, Emanuel Goldberg, The 2600 Building and
iernard Weiil, La Palma.
Additional South Ocean Boulevard Federation Council
members pictured are [left to right] Kari Bower, Palm Beach Jacob Orenstein [left], co-
campaign staff; Fred Greenberg, The 2600 Building; Arnold
Lam pert, general campaign chairman; and Sam Mittleman,
High Ridge Country Club Golf Tournament chairman.
chairman, Golden Lakes, and
Irving Siegel, co-chairman,
Golden Lakes.
Left lo right] Emanuel Applebaum, Century Village
tommittee; Sam Wadler, co-chairman Century
|illage; and Victor Duke, Century Village Cora-
liltte.
[Left to right] Henry Kaufman, Royal Palm Beach;
Milton Gold, Royal Palm Beach chairman; and Mel
Hershenson, Royal Palm Beach.
[Left to right] Lillian Lenovits, Leisureville; Ida
Linsenberg, Leisureville; Nick Lenovits, Leisureville;
and Joe Linsenberg, Leisureville.
Ufl to right] Marshall Isaacson, Young Leadership; Ronni Epstein,
pin- Relations director; Tony Lampert, Insurance Professionals
PmPaign Committee: Martv List. Business and Professional
ampaiRn Committee; Marty' List, Business and Professional
l>*ision; Michael Lampert, Attorney's Division; Paul Shapiro,
|"iomeys Division Chairman; Henry Weinstein, Lands of the Presi-
Mi and Barry Berg, chairman, Business and Professional Division.
Dr. Norma Schulman, chairman, Medical
and Health Services Division, and Myron
J. Nickman, president, Jewish Federation
of Palm Beach County
Arnold L. Lampert, general campaign
chairman, and Julie Cummings, Confer-
ence chairperson and Women's Division
campaign vice president.
[Left to right] Nat Kosowski, president, Jewish [Lef| |0 r|fBt] iom Tochnt Women's Division vice
rioh ,_,h.irm, Family and Children's Service; Esther Kosowski, pre8ldent, Administration; Mollie Fitterman,
We v f!. rrrb ttSSS: rTJEiZu Women's Division; Carole Greeabaum Women's WoBie..; D|yWoB vlce 'ftukim, Leadership
** vttE ftKSi^S ,vWo" nm9l* ""ST' E.,ebteta, Development; and Adele Simon, Women's Division
5 Royalon'theG M Mlrm"' Women's Division president vke president, Edncadon.


Page 4 The Jewish Florkiian of Palm Beech County Friday. November 23 1964
Hitting Nail on Head;
Peace Is Prime Target
In these columns last week, we hit the
nail on the head. Why. we wondered, were
the Israelis entering into a new round of
talks with the Lebanese? They had after all
managed a peace arrangement of sorts with
the Lebanese in May, 1983. And then.
promptly, the whole thing was cancelled.
with the Syrians laughing especially hard
in Damascus.
In our view, we opined here, the same
thing would happen again assuming the
new of round talks, this time to negotiate
an Israeli withdrawal of its defense forces,
would last long enough to come to a
conclusion.
Well, last weekend, the Lebanese did it
again. They cancelled a second time, under
the flimsiest of pretexts, and this time well
before anything of substance was ever
permitted to be accomplished.
Why did the Israelis submit themselves
to more predictable humiliation0
The answer is simple: peace. In the name
of peace. Israel demonstrates once again
that it is willing to do anything reasonable
to achieve it. If some think this is a self-
defeating pattern of behavior, they miss
the more minor moves in the grand Middle
Eastern chess game.
Israel, apparently, considers no move as
minor in this game, not even those that
seem doomed to failure but that at least
show again and again the Israelis' profound
desire for peace.
Let Lebanese Mean It
It is on the basis of such motivations as
these that Israel holds on for dear life to the
fragile peace wrought with Egypt at Camp
David.
Camp David and the treaty that emerged
out of it are a monstrosity. The price Israel
has had to pay for it is one it will never be
able to afford: indeed, the price rises with
each passing day. The growing bellicosity
of President Hosni Mubarak, his
burgeoning arrogance in the manner in
which he has violated the letter and the
spirit of the treaty by recalling Egypt's
Ambassador to Israel when Israel launched
Operation Peace for Galilee in June. 1982.
are a case in point.
Israel has borne these and other
Mubarak humiliations with whatever
aplomb it can muster in so difficult a
diplomatic situation. It has done so just in
order to maintain peace with Egypt at any
cost.
The same holds true in Lebanon. Israel
has already threatened to embark upon
unilateral moves to assure its security in
Lebanon prior to the conditional with-
drawal of its forces should the Lebanese
continue to play their hide-and-seek. game.
We expect that the object here was to stir
the Lebanese sufficiently so that they
would return to the talks begun last week.
We do not doubt their intention of
carrying out their threats should the
Lebanese remain bellicose. But there can
also be no doubting Israel's preference:
that the Lebanese start talking again. And
mean it.
Chutzpah of Iraq's Tears About Bombing Reactors
Now that the United Nations is back in
session once more, suddenly the at-
mosphere around the East River, upon
which sits the magnificent splendor of that
"world peace organization.'' is ripe with
new third World slander directed against
Israel.
Last week, there was Iraq demanding for
the fourth time an inquiry into Israel's
bo mbing of its eentsy-weentsy atomic
reactor built courtesy of the French at
Osirak a military maneuver silently
praised and devotedly adored by most of
the nations in the West who were so vocal
in lambasting it publicly.
And. in this UN fountainhead of Third
World pompous self-adoration, rose Israel's
new envoy. Benjamin Natanyahu. to reveal
for all who would listen that among Iraq's
most recent depredations in its war with
Iran was a bombing sort i against the rising
spectre of a nuclear reactor in Iran, no
less.
The I raqi reason given? The threat that
those nasty Iranians posed to the region,
and to world peace, in their efforts to
emerge as a nuclear power.
Talk about chutzpah.
Leo Mindlin
Extreme Right Infects Us All

jewisn rioridian

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POSTMASTER: Send td*u cftanoas to The Mm%U* Flondan.
P.O Boi Oian. Miami. Fla. 33101
(MCM Hmm
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26 HESHVAN 5T46
PRESIDENT Reagan is
talking about appointing a
"czar" who will serve as liaison
on the highest level between the
United States and the Soviet
Union in the touchy matter of
getting the dormant arms control
talu back on track.
Some of the gossip suggests
that the Administration con-
sidered farmer Secretary of State
Henry Kissinger as its first
choice for the post of "czar." But
Kissinger, according to thia
gossip, did not satisfy the Presi-
dent s radical right-wing support,
which sees Kissinger's un-
pardonable so aa stemming from
bis days as the architect of
detente.
THIS SAYS, and quite
frankly, that detenu with the
Soviet Union not a desirable
'-king If there anything to the
gossip and the Adminietrauoc
knuckles under far thai reason
alone, then than is espacwOy
good cause for concern
Wch Jesse Hatms of North
tr apparent to th*
of the Senate
Committee, far
but federal
and more and
more arms a waste of
the future appears to be
It a
ihaaiiianahaj
Foragn "
perception of what lies ahead for
us and the atmosphere which it
breeds should add to the sense of
anxiety of the nation at large, so
many of whose crthena voted for
Mr. Reagan himself and not for
his policies. Nothing in my own
memory, and that includes
Watergate, has given rise to this
kind of fear since the days of Sen.
Joseph R. McCarthy of
Wisconsin
McCARTHYISM sent waves
of terror across the land because
k appeared to place in jeopardy
the very foimdatfonstonea of our
freedom. It may be argued that
the radical right hangers-on to
the Reagan fountainhead of
power, who now interpret the
President's victory as
justification for their claim to a
greater share of the fountainhead
itself, are a reincarnation of
McCarthy ism in our time.
Thesr pressure, for example, on
Sen Helms that he diaaow his
campaign promise not to take the
Senate Foreign Relations Com-
mittee chairmanship m the sank
that he won and the now lame
duck chairman. Charles Percy.
fast in his Ilhnoia r select ion bid
the Denw.itits' Paul
in point of the
arrogance.
fact that the
finally came
tumbling down is in itself *e
for national hope that the Reap"
radical right-wing wil 30 yM j
later do the same thing ooa t
too. b challenged by tbeniuonH
instinct for self-preservation.
Until that time, the Btt*J*]
encourages grows among **l
with a genuine concern for hum
rights and freedoms that att*
beyond the grubby mat*jH
that seems to have mfcctw
nation at large.
ALL OF this spt1****!]
the root of a letter I came *-
S other day from
ration calhng iB 3
Fellowship, with addresses "~i
mlJyn^NX.andUsA^
The letter ^^^l
of one. Andy Mager ^*Z\
thelTthper^ontoben^
refusing to register for a*>JT1
5^ indictment was J^J
sTl*4. and t <~*\
completed seojng J
fibauon wh tne r ^-|B
y. ..tobiograpW*


Friday, November 23,1984 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 5
Israel Economic Crisis Worsens;
Crucial Jewish Agency Programs Hit
American Jews can help
If the economic crisis in
fad by increasing contribu-
E io 'he Un,ted Jewish
Leal-Community Cam-
\ign. Here's how:
.Jewish Agency: Cam-
Un's main beneficiary, like
Israeli institutions, is hard-
|i( by economic pressures such
as staggering 800 percent
inflation rate. It costs more
daily to feed and train Youth
Ahyah youngsters, absorb im-
migrant families, aid settle-
ments, provide social welfare
benefits, assist Project Re-
newal residents, help young-
sters finance higher education.
Our dollars ease cutbacks,
help maintain service stan-
leaders Write
Raoul Wallenberg Remembered
peared before the County
Commission to express our
appreciation for the honorable
role the County Commission
played in the Wallenberg case.
We made a contribution in
honor of the County Commis-
sion to the United Way of
Palm Beach County in support
of its humanitarian programs.
The world must remember the
righteous gentile, a true hero
of this century and honorary
U.S. citizen.
Sincerely,
DENNIS WILLINGER
Chairman,
The Raoul Wallenberg
Committee
of Palm Beach County
i>ITOR,
I Jewish Floridian:
Tin Oct. 5 we celebrated the
jrd anniversary of the date
hi Raoul Wallenberg, a hero
fihe Holocaust who saved
0,000 lives from Nazi
Ctruction in Budapest in
H4 was granted United
lies Honorary Citizenship.
[oul Wallenberg, a Swedish
llomat, was arrested by the
hssians and may still be alive
Way somewhere inside a
tssian prison.
|on Tuesday, Oct. 2, on
lialf of the Raoul
fallenberg Committee of
11m Beach County, I ap-
[there is a place for you in
ISRXISL
For information and assistance about living, working,
or Studying in Israel, contact:
ISRAEL ALIYAH CENTER
4200Biscayne Blvd. Miami, Fla. 33137? (305)5732556
rmD
Another good reason
I you should attend services
at temple or synagogue
this weekend.
This message brought to you by.-
Memorial Chapel Inc.-Funeral Directors
|pALM BEACH
683-8676
DADE
531-1151
BROWARD
523-5801
dard.
Israeli Debt: New Bank of
Israel figures show debt in-
creased by $1.1 billion in first
half of 1984, to $23.8 billion.
Debt service now 33 percent of
national budget. Israel news-
papers increasingly report
bankruptcies and layoffs,
leading to Ryerida (emigra-
tion) of educated and skilled
Israelis, and unemployment
for many others, including
Renewal residents. Contri-
butions by American Jews for
social services will help the
people of Israel by relieving
pressure on severely reduced
domestic budget.
Trade Deficit: Still over $5
billion and, like debt, restrict-
ing economic growth. We can
help the people of Israel
restructure their economy and
compete in world markets by
providing funds for Agency to
build industry and high-tech
based settlements in Galilee.
Your contribution to the
1985 Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County-United
Jewish Appeal campaign can
make the difference. Contact
the Federation office, 832-
2120, for more information.
The Campaign Committee of the Business and Professional
Women's Group of the Women's Division of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach County met recently for a briefing
session which addressed the case for the 1985 Jewish Federation
of Palm Beach County-United Jewish Appeal campaign.
[Left to right] Dr. Elizabeth S. Shulman, liaison to Women's
Division Campaign Cabinet for the Business and Professional
Women's Group; Melanie Jacobson, campaign chairwoman for
B & P; and Penny Beers, Women's Division vice president for
B & P. were the speakers at the briefing session.

"The GUARDIAN PLAN program is
also an expression of love!'
-Jerry Bynder
r
ValtnsHl is mpif iIm* iimimI iimiiiinjtl'til tnnliiiat i
Jews Yalir/'il also reminds us'of tin- n-aliiu-s oflil'r. It
hclpMiMi-* Hiii/r lli<-iMM'd to |>lan Imi the piMi.i tii.n <>l
our families-
Now KiwiMde sponsor a uiiii|in-program ol lam
ilviMiiut lion. tlietil.Mil MAM'LW ImuiWNv AiimYil
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Page 6 The Jewish Fkridian of Pahn Beach County Friday. November 28,1964___________
Organizations
in the News
hV.NAI B RIT H
Haifa Lodge's regular meeting will be held on Sunday.
Nov. 25. 9:30 a.m. at the Royal Palm Clubhouse. 22nd
Ave. and North Federal Highway.
The guest speaker will be Ann Lynn Lipton. Jewish
education director. Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County. Her subject will be Conversion and Inter-
marriage.
North Lake's annual White Elephant Sale will be held
on Dec. 1. 8 p.m. S18 donation per couple will provide
food, drinks and fun.
B> reservation only. Call Sy Fine.
Yachad I ait No. 5231 will have its next monthly
meeting on Wednesday. Nov. 28. "*:30 p.m. at Temple
Emeth. 5"80 W. Atlantic Ave.. Delray Beach. FL.
The principal speaker. Rabbi Kasriel Brusen*ankin. will
talk on cult awareness. He ts director of Chabat House in
North Dade. as ell as director of the Florida Counter-
Action Division against cults and missionaries.
INAIBRITH WOMEN
Join Masada Chapter for a luncheon and card pa-.y at
the Wellington Country Club on Thursday. Nov. 29. The
cost isSlO.
The Chapter will host "La Cage Review" at Sunnse
Musical Theater at a Sunday matinee on Jan. 6. The cost
will include lunch and transportation. Contact Frances
Chodosh for reser-auons and additional information for
both ever.:>
HADASSAH
Aliva Groap. Lake Worth Chapter viB hold :rieir
Merrr^h.r: Mee. re :- Thursday Sov 29. 1 p.m H
Temp;; Beth Sholom. 315 N A" St.. lit.: v\ Xta Note
the change in this one meeting ca:e z.t g
Helen Smith, program chairman. *... prescai ^ paayta
i-:::.id "H orr.ar. Power" Exacted r- the M f* Pbyen
Preliminary paw will be made to Paha Beaca Cosnti
Hadassaa Education Day to be held at FAl r 3;:i Rr.cr
on Feb.".
Jean Schlenoff, Fuel rrr-| -; president, will pre
future tr.r-
Dec 16. a c= .-. \-.e E-:-giades. and Dec. 90, SI, Jar
I, New Year's Week fro 3ei;r. ana.
Chai *.". BoM a pa.-
Wecr.esca;.. Nov 2. 12 ::::P;::..-;:.iR.\--::
and Racqaci Clafe
'DaMHMMl 20."' a group of junior and
. --i-t-\ i : 'i~. ::' rg.-g ir.:
jar.ciaj Donations S3
Shalom W Pain Beaca Ml ttacdalrd a flea rr.a-i;
Sunday, Dec 9 i -. u 2 r : Ceai rears
parking :o: For in::'-- -i:' Ber.-j R.r_r ::
-
^ -.:- i-z :i-z ~-
Federal Bank. C Vi ;-. _>_
P-.x;;.:- i-i :- ':_-.- A.: :: For rcservadotB :i
- -;-i; ;- r .r-;r.;; > :;:
Taaiar Royal Palai Beaca Chapter aj i ^e-
r's Week< k 29-Jaa I t three .
he Maaaea hu Hovey-la-the-Hills. F ided an
;;.- ::.-!-;-: green- fees ig;
\-y.- :.; :iv :;: *-:':< ire i Ne- ^ nr
E-e Parrj Double rxc-r--a.nc> S2>: For reserva: rns .i
Floreacc Cooper.
Oa Saaday. Dec. 2. \o*ti West Palai Beach Chapter
-...-or.cr '.! .:; members and Hadassafe \>cs::a:es ::n a
rreaifist i". Ceaanreg.incn A---; S-.a.o= Hue;
-;- -1 Rer.oa dzsi. Reg.cn :
if-
tpeater
JEWISH WAR ETERA>S
The Ladies* Aaianarv P*t 4tg will hold its regular
reetaaj M T.-.rscav No- If, I SI i dat *.mer.can
Savings Bank. West Gate. Century Village. West Pain:
Beach Breakfast will be served.
The guest speaker will be Stephen Levitt, executive
director of the Jewish Faaul-y and Children's Semces
PWNEE* WOMEVNA AMAT
Thesaere Herat Oat i bold a paid-ap roecibersaap
kincheoo on Dec. 6. I p.m.. at the Lake Worth Shaf-
fkhoard Courts, 1121 Lucerne Ave. Ham Docjenberf
will present a musical program.
W OMEN > \MERIC \N ORT
A NwcV', for paid ap members of the Lake Hank
W eat Caaaaer wiQ be head at the Pahs Beach Ocean Hotei
oa A1A acar Lake Worth beach at 11:30 a.at. oa Monday.
Nov. 26 A special atasacal program fearunag the
Cresthav
Brody wuTne'
TAU To Establish First
Oncology Institute In Israel
Tel Aviv University wul
develop and extend its
research into cancer by-
establishing an Oncology
Institute.
It is expected that the new
institute will increase the cure
rate of cancer patients at least
five percent. With 8000 cases
of cancer a year, the addi-
tional number of Israelis saved
each year would amount to
four hundred. For Israel four
hundred cancer victims is a
vast figure, representing im-
measurable loss to the
country. and to families alike.
Rather than using the
cunent departmental ap-
proach to cancer treatment,
the new institute will coord-
inate, speciahze and do re-
search to ensure that all
patients receive the best pos-
sible results with currently
available modalities. Dr. Isaac
Djerassi. head of the facility,
explains that the multi-faceted
medical problems of cancer
patients are best treated by
physicians experienced in their
care.
Child Molestation
An Elegant Concept in Kosher Catering
Quality Kosher Catering in all.
Temples, HaDa Homes
Banquet Facilities Available for
Private at Organizational Functions
582-1786
In Israel
STATE OF
ISRAEL BONDS
BOUGHT AND SOLD
Invest in
Israel Securities

WERE SPECIALISTS IN
ISRAEL SECURITIES
JERUSALEM JTA) -
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Minister Mosac Katzav this
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Court will rule on h church-state
Friday, November 23,1984 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 7
luatafl the proper reUtbnship
'nme a central issue in the
" dential campaign, the new
*e Court term, which
.last month, will focus to an
7usual degree on church-state
linns The court has an-
S3 it would rule on at least
J major First Amendment
hurch-state cases.
The four cases already ac-
Vgj for argument involve
Cot facets of the continuing
ueele to maintain the con-
.imtional doctrine mandating
ESS of church and state. In
KSace vs. Jaffree, the court will
. on the constitutionality of an
.hama statute that allows
"hers to lead organized
lents of silent prayer in
blic school classrooms. Grand
pids vs. Ball asks if public
ool teachers should be permit-
to participate in a "shared
program in which they
in parochial schools,
nton vs. Caldor presents the
,ue of whether an employer can
arce a worker to work on his or
0 Sabbath, in violation of the
rker's religious beliefs. In
ard of Trustees vs. McCreary,
be court will decide whether a
, that chooses to bar a nativity
^ne from public property may
onetheless be required by the
stitution to permit one.
Wallace vs. Jaffree will be the
... school-prayer case that the
ourt has agreed to hear since the
...2-63 term, and only two
Justices from that era, Brennan
land White, are still sitting. The
lease arose after passage of an
Alabama law sanctioning
organized silent prayer. One
Iparent, an agnostic who was
I unhappy that his children were
I exposed to prayer in the public
Ischool classroom, brought suit to
stop the practice. He was joined
[by the American Jewish
| Congress and the American Civil
ILiberties Union in arguing that
I this forced exposure to prayer
I violated the First Amendment in
I that it was a government
I "establishment of religion."
The Alabama law provides
I that 'at the commencement of
I the first class each day in all
grades in all public schools, the
teacher in charge of the room in
which each such class is held may
announce that a period of silence
not to exceed one minute in
duration shall be observed for
meditation or voluntary prayer,
and during any such period, no
other activities shall be engaged
in." The outcome of this case will
affect similar laws in 22 other
states: Pennsylvania, New
Jersey, New York, Arizona,
Arkansas, Connecticut, Florida,
Georgia, Illinois, Indiana,
Kansas, Louisiana, Maine,
Maryland. Massachusetts,
Michigan, New Mexico, North
Dakota, Ohio, Rhode Island,
I Tennessee and Virginia.
The Grand Rapids vs. Ball case
cases
raises the issue of whether a local
public school board should
support non-religious educational
programs in parochial schools.
Under this "shared time"
system, non-religious courses are
aSrEEL Parochial school
children during school hours in
the school building, as part of the
general curriculum. In Grand
Rapids, the program was run
entirely by the religious school
with teachers hired by, paid by
and under the control of public
school officials.
In opposing the program,
AJCongress argued that the
school district's action "offends"
the Establishment Clause
because of the degree to which it
"assists and is integrated with
the program of religious in-
struction carried on by the
separate religious sector."
Thornton vs. Caldor wil allow
the court to consider a Con-
necticut law that protects
religious people from being
compelled to work on their
Sabbath. In this case, an em-
ployee of a department store
refused to work on his Sabbath,
which fell on Sunday, and was
told either to work at a store
located far from his home or to
accept a demotion. He refused
and sued, but lost when the
Connecticut Supreme Court
struck down the law, declaring it
unconstitutional in that it made
religious observance easier by
prefering religious reasons for a
weekend day off.
This case goes to the free-
exercise clause of the First
Amendment, and, interestingly,
two Jewish organizations, which
are more accustomed to arguing
the "establishment" side of
similar cases, have filed a friend-
of-the-court brief in support of
the struck-down law. Although
the individual in question is not
Jewish, the AJCongress and the
National Jewish Commission on
Law and Public Affairs have
argued that the Connecticut Law
was an anti-discrimination
measure, which represents
"legislative accommodation to
the conscientious needs of in-
dividuals," and thus serves a
"constitutionally acceptable
purpose by providing protection
to an individual in the free
exercise of religion."
Ironically, the Reagan ad-
ministration has also entered
these three cases. Only on the
free-excercise case (Thornton vs.
Caldor), have we found ourselves
on the same side of the issue as
the president.
The issue in Board of Trustees
vs. McCreary (the Scarsdale,
N.Y., creche case) is similar to
that presented in a decision
handed down in January about a
creche in Pawtucket, R.I. While
the Supreme Court ruled then, in
Lynch vs. Donnelly, that a
municipality may finance the
displaying of a nativity scene, it
is unclear whether the justices
Call For Volunteers
i
Be involved in building this community!
Reach out to Jews locally and worldwide and
Help secure Israel's future!
The Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
needs YOU to be a volunteer in its
1966 Annual Campaign.
Call Mark Mendel,
Campaign Associate
At the Federation Office
[T Volunteer your i
8322120
Supreme Court justices are (front, from left) Thurgood Marshall, William Brennan, Chief
Justice Warren Burger, Byron White and Harry Blackmun. Rear (from left) are John Paul
Stevens, Lewis Powell, William Rehnquist and Sandra Day O'Connor.
meant to sanction such a practice
in the face of a local government
having made the decision not to
use public land for that purpose
Although a lower court ruled in
favor of the town, the appeals
court has ruled that the town
must allow a creche to be erected,
citing not only Lynch vs.
Donnelly but also YVidmar vs.
Vincent, a decision that allowed
student religious clubs to meet at
those universities that have
established a "public forum."
Representing the Scarsdale
Village Board, Marvin E.
Frank el. a former federal district
judge, argues that the appeals
court had wrongly viewed "an
unattended symbol left standing
in the park for two weeks" as the
First Amendment equivalent of
the actual religious speech that
was at issue in Widmar vs.
Vincent.
Although the Supreme Court
normally does not hear cases in
which there is no "case in con-
troversy," this court may also
elect to review two appeals court
decisions in Pennsylvania and
Georgia that declared student-
initiated religious clubs meeting
in public schools to be an un-
constitutional establishment of
religion. This is the equal-access
question.
The stakes are especially high
this term. This past year, a shock
wave was felt as the court sought
to redefine the doctrine
established by previous terms of
the court beginning as far back as
1947.
We have witnessed a dramatic
turn to the political right by the
Supreme Court in recent years,
with the conservative majority
bringing new definitions to
"judicial activism." The con-
servative voting bloc White,
Lewis Powell, William H.
Rehnquist, Sandra Day
O'Connor and Chief Justice
Warren Burger has become
DON'T FORGET!
The Women's Division
of the
Jewish Federation
of Palm Beach County
Open Board Meeting
December 5-8KK)p.m.
at The Jewish Community
DaySchool
- OUE8T SPEAKER -
Norma J. Schnhnan, PkJ>.
RSVP
80-21M
*
the dominant force. The above
cases, which the court will hear
this term, along with nearly 150
others, are coming at a pivotal
time.
In addition to the controversial
substatntive issues, the court
also appears to be in the midst of
major changes in relation to its
operating methods. In an un-
precedented fashion, three sitting
justices recently went public with
their frustration over the manner
and direction in which cases are
being handled. Justice Harry
Blackmun told an audience that
sitting on the Supreme Court has
become "a rotten way to earn a
living." Justice John Paul
Stevens feels that "the court is
overstepping its judicial
authority." And Justice
Thurgood Marshall aruged that
"the court is eroding faith in the
nation's legal system." A
distinguished observer of the
court recently noted that the
critical comments, coming as
they do from sitting justices, are
"nothing short of ex-
traordinary."
The presidential campaign has
highlighted another issue
particularly with the recent
comments of Jerry Falwell
declaring that the reelection of
President Reagan will "give us at
least two seats in the Supreme
Court" the age of our sitting
justices. The average age of the
four "liberal" justices is over 73,
while the average age of the
"conservatives" is less than 67.
Whoever is president during the
next four years could appoint
upwards of half the members of
the court during this term in
office.
Therefore, whether the four
church-state issues before the
1984-85 term of the Supreme
Court settle or rupture our
constitutional framework, you
can be assured that we have yet
to see any finality regarding the
maintenance of the wall
separating church and state.
From the Philadelphia Jewish
Exponent.
Don't Get Left Behind
Mini-Mission Tour Is Open
To The Entire Community
Reserve Your Seat on Our Mission-Tour Now
But, Hurry! Seats Are Limited
Indicate Your Choice of Dates:
THURSDAv ^fWV^SjeR 29,1984
&
or
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6,1984
BUS STOPS INCLUDE:
1) Jewish Community Day School
2) Jewish Community Canter
3) Jewish Family a Children's
Service
4) Joseph L Morse
Oaftawto Canter
BUS WILL DEPART
tOO A.M. from
Moras Geriatric Center
W WILL RETURN
MOMLto
' Become aware of the rote the
beneficiary agencies play In the
lite ol our community.
Learn firsthand how your
Federation dollars are put to use
for the welfare of the young,
needy and the aged
B.S.V.F.-
JackM.Karako
(Oermral Campeipn)
FayeStoher
(Women's Dtwilon)
832-2120
tPsftn
. ,-,'.%/* *.''


Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, November 23,1984
In a moving ceremony at the French war cemetery in Douaumont, near Verdun, President Mitterrand of France (left) and Chancellor Kohl of Germany hold
hands in a gesture of Franco-German reconciliation.
Berlin Report: WEST
France, W. Germany In Act Of Reconciliation
By WOLFGANG WEBER
BONN (DAD| At war
memorials on the battlefields of
Verdun, where hundreds of
thousands of French and German
soldiers died in both world wars,
President Mitterrand of France
and Chancellor Helmut Kohl of
West Germany reaffirmed in a
moving ceremony last month the
reconciliation between their two
countries.
The ceremony was held to
smooth some ruffled feathers
when, in June, West Germany
was slighted as old Allies met at
Normandy Beach in France to
recall the D-Day World War II
landing on June 6, 1944, and no
invitation was sent down to Bonn
in an act of reconciliation to join
the observance.
AT VERDUN last month,
holding hands, the French and
German leaders listened as their
respective national anthems were
played to underscore the words of
their joint declaration of Verdun
that "France and the Federal
Republic of Germany have
learned their lesson from his-
tory European integration is
our joint objective. That is what
we are working for in a spirit
of fraternity."
Mitterrand and Kohl laid
wreaths at the German war
cemetery in Consevoye and the
French war cemetery in
Douaumont. They then each
planted a tree as a token of
Franco-German reconciliation.
The Verdun area in north-
eastern France was the scene of
what may well have been the
costliest battles in world history.
Between February and
November, 1916 nearly 700,000
French and German soldiers died
in bitter trench warfare. Helmut
Schimdt's father fought at
Verdun in 1916, while in 1940
Mitterrand was taken prisoner
there by the Germans.
French and German veterans
of both world wars took part in
the reconciliation ceremonies, as
did a large number of school-
children from both countries. For
them Franco-German reconcilia-
tion and friendship have long
been a matter of course.
A friendship pact signed by
Charles de Gaulle and Konrtd
Adenauer has existed since 1963,
and close everyday partnership in
the European Community
constantly underlines the fact
that, as Mitterrand and Kohl pot
it: "We have become friends."
ONLY MONTHS ago From
and the Federal Republic eased
customs checks at their borders.
Only random checks of road and
rail passengers are now takes.
And France recently demonstra-
tively voiced support for tic
Federal Republic's aim of Gtr-
Continued on Page IS
EAST
The Spectre of Reunification Teases A Waiting World
By HANS WERNER
KETTENBACH
Kolner Stadt Anzeiger
It is difficult to under
stand why the whole world
is suddenly talking about
German reunification as if
it has suddenly become a
realistic possibility.
There has been some ritual
reference on the matter by Bonn,
but despite this it has been a
dormant issue here for a long
time.
No one has ever seriously
The spectra
I land I rankfuncr Allgcmtint /titung.
talked about any practical pos-
sibility of uniting the Federal
Republic of Germany and the
German Democratic Republic to
form a new German nation-state.
DETENTE, the relaxing or
easing of tensions between
nations, would still appear to the
rest of the world to have the
character of a conspiracy if the
nations involved are German.
The whole thing began to
snowball after accusations by
Moscow that the Federal
Republic of Germany was steer-
ing a revanchist course. Warsaw
and Prague supported this line.
The primary motive behind the
Soviet moves soon became ap-
parent: Moscow is afraid that the
GDR might pay too much atten-
tion to its own interests and pull
out of the Warsaw Pact convoy.
THE ACCUSATION of
nchism, therefore, has also
irlj levelled albeit in-
directly against the comrades ,n
However, anyone who merely
rejects the accusation as utterly
unjustifiable is oversimpliflymg
the matter. Any form of coopera
tion between the two Germanies
arouses the suspicion in Eastern
Europe that the Germans could
once again become so strong that
they might contemplate pushing
through their own interests at the
expense of other nations.
Now the topic has also been
put on the agenda in the West.
A respected American news-
paper, the New York Times,
which in other cases usually
checks statements by Moscow to
separate the wheat from the
propaganda chaff, this time
recalled Hitler's demand for
Lebensraum and compared it
with the Spielraum, the room to
play, which both German states
are trying to establish, wedged as
they are between the two super-
powers.
ALTHOUGH GERMANS on
both sides realize that a "remar-
riage is impossible," many
succumb to the dream, or night-
mare, of a reunited Germany.
These Germans apparently
"feel that it was their fathers who
lost the Second World War. not
themselves."
The remark by the SPD's Hani
Apel that the German question i
"no longer an open issue" is tin
last thing we need.
After all. there was no real
need for such a comment It
cannot be assumed that Apel
wanted to allay fears of revao-
chism in the East or in the West
by stating that the Germs
question, that is reunification,
has been filed away and is void*
current relevance.
ANOTHER EFFECT
triggered by Apel's stataw*
has been to provoke the adamant
commitments to reuniTiatioaiW i
conservative hard-liners. AIM
Dregger (CDUI. for exu*
emphasized "that Germany
exists" and that there at
"German nationality.' namey
the Federal Republic of Off-
many, which also covers or
mans in the GDR
Continued on Page 1&
But Moscow puts damper
on talk of revanchism.


Friday, November 23,1984 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 9
Federation Board Approves Allocations
Continued from Page 1
1984 Federation's Budget and Allo-
cations Committee, noted that the
review process that determined where
the allocations should be made was in-
DISTRIBUTION OF 1984 ALLOCATIONS
fhe Board of Directors has approved the distribution of
532 000 from pledges raised in the 1984 campaign. The
deet and Allocations Committee reviewed the requests
the local, national and overseas agencies and submitted
Er recommendations to the Board for final review and
broval. A 3 percent shrinkage is allowed for uncollected
Hees. This is deducted from the gross figure leaving
881,286 for distribution.
kRSEAS
fced Jewish Appeal......................$3,177,610
Lew Immigrant Aid Society ..................2,500
Ljcan-Israel Cultural Foundation...............250
rated Council of Israeli Institutes...............300
Total $3,180,660
Jtional human relations agencies
[erican Jewish Committee.................$ 250
erican Jewish Congress........................500
ai B'rith Anti-Defamation League.............1,500
lish Labor Committee.........................600
|ish War Veterans...........................1,000
tonal Conference on Soviet Jewry.............1,000
Konal Jewish Community Relations
[Advisory Council..........................3,500
erican Academic Association for Peace
in the M iddle East..........................1,500
Total $ 9,850
ITIONAL CULTURAL, EDUCATIONAL AGEN-
It Cultural Appeal.......................$ 500
fish Education Service of N. America...........2,300
erican Jewish Archives........................150
|psie University...............................150
lish Chautauqua Society.......................200
fish Theological Seminary......................500
Irew Union College Jewish Institute
| of Religion.................................500
hiva University...............................500
fish Telegraphic Agency........................900
ional Jewish Resource Center...................500
tonal Tay Sachs and Allied Diseases.............800
Total $ 7,000
riONAL SOCIAL SERVICE AGENCIES
Ional Jewish Welfare Board...............$ 6,656
li B'rith Youth Service........................250
Ih American Jewish Students Appeal............600
(sh Braille Institute...........................750
ciation of Jewish Family & Children's Agencies .. 300
ference of Jewish Communal Service............200
onal Association of Jewish Vocational Services ... 100
Total $ 8,856
GIONAL SERVICES
ki B'rith Hillel Foundation of Florida......$ 28,600
CAL AGENCIES
kh Family & Children's Service...........$ 258,000
sh Community Day School................200,500
Sh Community Center....................239,500
ph L. Morse Geriatric Center................90,000
Total $ 788,000
[1SH FEDERATION
Ministration............................$ 386,565
paign..................................656,555
Total $1,043,120
[ISH FEDERATION SERVICES
lomrnunity Relations Council............$ 53,180
Boridian Newspaper.......................56,570
liver Garden Home for the Aged (Jacksonville) 4,000
fwish Education Service....................26,500
eadership Development....................24,200
[haplaincy Program.......................38,570
psaic TV Program:........................7,380
ndowment Fund..........................17,300
jngle Parent Family Program.................8,000
|RC State Co-ordinator.....................9,000
'omen's Division Education Program.........1.500
Nel High School Scholarship ...............5,000
[ommunity High School (Midrasha) .........61,550
[adio Program L'Chayim..................4.000
Total $ 315,250
Grand Total $5,381,286
Yaacov Sassi
Israeli Folk Singer
Hebrew Chassidic. English Yiddish
For All Occasions
Organizations Clubs Synagogues
Private Parties
For More Information, Call:
272-1287
tensive and involved. "We had over
thirty requests for funding and spent
countless hours and many evenings in
deliberation. Even though we had the
highest amount of dollars to allocate
this year, there are always more areas
that need to be funded than we have
resources for. The decisions are dif-
ficult ones that must be made by the
committee but it makes us realize how
vital the efforts of our community are
in perpetuating world Jewry. I am
greatly indebted to my committee for
their unceasing efforts and commit-
ment," Wilensky stated.
Members of the committee include:
Barry Berg, Stanley Brenner, Alec
Engelstein, Sheila Engelstein, Arthur
Gladstone, Harvey Goldberg, Rabbi
Howard J. Hirsch, Arnold Lampert,
Jeanne Levy, Myron J. Nickman,
Larry Ochstein, Marva Perrin,
Berenice Rogers, Rabbi Howard
Shapiro, Alan L. Shulman, Dr. Eliz-
abeth S. Shulman, Leah Siskin, Dr.
Peter Wunsh, Michael Zimmerman.
JCC Advisory Board of Trustees
Continued from Page 1
Welfare Board, who is travel-
ing from Milwaukee to Palm
Beach for the event. Prelim-
inary architectural plans for
the new campus will be re-
viewed at that meeting.
In August the JCC agreed to
purchase the $886,000 parcel
of land on Haverhill Road in
response to a needs assessment
study by the Center, the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County and many com-
munity groups. Partial pay-
ment has been made toward
purchase of the property,
through a loan from the Fed-
eration.
The Advisory Board of
Trustees will include civic,
professional and business
leaders from throughout the
Palm Beaches, Dr. Klein said.
Mrs. Levy has long been ac-
tive in regional and national
Jewish affairs, and is im-
mediate past president of the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County. She has served
as Women's Division pres-
ident and campaign chair-
person for the Jewish Federa-
tion, and has been chairperson
of the organization's Budget
and Allocations Committee.
She was campaign chair-
person for the National
Women's Division, Palm
Beach Campaign of the United
Jewish Appeal. Her husband,
developer H. Irwin Levy, is
UJA national vice chairman.
Mrs. Levy was a board mem-
ber of the Jewish Community
Day School, and is a past pres-
ident of Temple Beth El
Sisterhood and Tamar Hadas-
sah.
Mrs. Cummings' civic
involvement includes serving
on the Executive Committee
of the National United Jewish
Appeal Young Women's
Leadership Cabinet. She is
Women's Division campaign
vice president for the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County. She represented the
Federation at the Jewish
agency meetings in Israel this
year. Mrs. Cummings also
serves on the board of the
United Way of Martin
County, and has been a
member of the board of dir-
ectors of the Tri-County
Rehabilitation Center.
Barenholtz is a member of
the JCC's board of directors
and serves on the Board of
Governors of the Jewish
Theological Seminary in New
York City. He is president of
Walden Properties, a devel-
opment firm based m
Clevelanu He is also an active
member of Temple bmanu-el
in Palm Beach, and is on the
board ol directors of Temple
On The Heights in Cleveland.
Barenholtz was a member of
the board for the College of
Jewish Studies in Cleveland,
and served on the Review
Committee of that city's
Mandel is chairman of the
executive committee of
Premier Industrial Corpora-
tion in Cleveland, where he
has been active in Jewish
organizations for many years.
His work with that city's
Jewish Federation includes
serving on the board of
trustees and on the Endow-
ment Fund Foundation Ad-
visory Council. He is also a
member of the board of
trustees of the Cleveland Jew-
ish Community Center, and is
general co-chairman of the
Mount Sinai Living Heritage
Fund Campaign. He is past
general co-chairman of the
Jewish Welfare .Fund cam-
paign in Cleveland, and is the
founder and a trustee of the
Cleveland Jewish News.
f\ Radio /TV Highlights >V
MOSAIC Sunday, Nov. 25, 9 a.m. WPTV
Channel 5 with host Barbara Gordon An interview
with the Honorable Bella Abzug, former congresswoman
from New York.
* L'CHAYIM Sunday, Nov. 25, 7:30 a.m. WPBR
1340-AM with host Rabbi Mark S. Golub The Jewish
Listener's Digest, a radio magazine.
SHALOM Sunday, Nov. 25, 10 a.m. WPEC
Channel 12 (8:30 a.m. ON TV Channel 51) with host
Richard Peritz.
HERITAGE: CIVILIZATION AND THE JEWS
(Repeat from Nov. 19) Saturday, Nov. 24, 1:30 p.m.,
WHRS Channel 42 INTO THE FUTURE The final
program explores the rise of the State of Israel and its
relationship with Jews in other parts of the world, the
plight of Soviet Jewry and finally, the questions facing
world Jewry today.
Sponsored by the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County.
Community Calendar
November 23
Jewish Community Center no school program
November 25
Congregation Aitz Chaim 10 a.m. Women's American
ORT Mid Palm Royal Palm Theatre Golden Lakes
Temple Sisterhood 10 a.m. Temple B'nai Jacob Men's
Club-9 a.m.
November 26
B'nai B'rith No. 2939 trip to Harder Hall B'nai B'rith
Women Menorah board 10 a.m. Women's American
ORT Mid Palm -1 p.m. Temple B'nai Jacob Sisterhood
- 10 a.m. Hadassah Z'Hava board 10 a.m. B'nai
B'rith No. 3196 trip to Harder Hall Jewish Federation
Catholic-Jewish Dialogue noon Women's American
ORT Poinciana paid up luncheon Jewish Federation -
Community Planning Meeting 4 p.m. Synagogue-
Federation Commission Meeting at Temple Emanu-EI -
7:30 p.m.
November 27
Congregation Anshei Sholom 1 p.m. Hadassah Lee
Vassil paid up luncheon Women's American ORT -
Boynton Beach board 12:30 p.m. B'nai B'rith Women
- Masada board 7 p.m. Temple Beth David Sisterhood
- 8 p.m. Women's American ORT Poinciana Evening
at Loehmanns
November 28
Jewish Federation Board of Directors Meeting 8 p.m.
Yiddish Culture Group Cresthaven 1 p.m. Women's
American ORT North Palm Beach County Region -
board 9:30 a.m. American Red Magen David for Israel
1 p.m. B'nai B'rith No. 3196 board 7 p.m.
Hadassah Chai 12 noon
November 29
Hadassah Bat Gurion 10 a.m. Hadassah Aliya 1
p.m. Jewish Community Center Advisory Board
meeting at The Biltmore 3 p.m. Jewish Community Day
School Education Committee 8 p.m. Temple Beth El -
Israeli Folk Dance 7:30 p.m.


Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, November 23,1984

H.AGIVESYOU
WGfflONS
TOKVHiOVK.
*
$776
KVELL OVER
OUR FARE.
This is the year of El Al Israel Airlines fabulous low, low round trip fare.
Let the people of Israel take you to the land of Israel.
Your vacation begins when you step on board. Your fare includes a delicious
kosher menu featuring lox, bagels and cream cheese for breakfast. There are
even free drinks. And El Al is the onlv airline that flies direct from Miami
to Tel Aviv. This round trip fare effective November 12,1984.
$111
KVELL A LOT
IN EILAT.
Just $111 extra and we'll give you round trip airfare from Tel Aviv to the beautiful
Red Sea resort of Eilat.
Plus three nights at the fabulous Laromme Hotel. We also include two
sumptuous buffet breakfasts and one delicious continental breakfast. Plus a
complimentarv drink on arrival. This special package is available Monday to Thurs-
day, November 16,1984 thru March 15,1985. (Not available 12/24/84 thru 1/5/85.)
A^\ Jk ^\* -^n El Al exclusive between November 16,1984 and March 15,1985. Now the air-
^SM^^M 'me f 'srae' A'es vou round tnp from Tel Aviv to Cairo to spend three fabulous
^am ^ days in Egypt. This El Al exclusive includes Tel Aviv/Cairo round trip airfare
KVELL ALL THE and three nights at the beautiful Ramses Hilton for only $249.
WAY TO CAIRO. This includes being met at the airport by English speaking representatives,
transfer to and from the Ramses. Now you can have it all. Israel and Cairo in one magical trip.
A ^% 4% M^fc Between November 19,1984 and February 28,1985, El Al Israel Airlines gives
yi J -j t \ you its "Sunsarion" vacation package to Israel. Package price includes round
JweifiJ^ tnP airfare from Miami, five nights in a first class hotel, bed and breakfast
KVELL FOR and a Hertz Rent-A-Car for five days.
6 DAYS. Choose from the Basel Group Hotels, or for an extra sjfflfon i^^g^)
$100, the deluxe Laromme Jerusalem Hotel, the Tel Aviv or Jerusalem Hiltons. You ^ p%u^uUums/
can always add extra days. (Not available 12/14/84 thru 1/5/85.)
For more information call your travel agent or El Al toll free at 1-800-223-6700.
For a free, detailed color brochure on our packages, write El Al Israel Airlines,
Tour Brochure, PO. Box 10777, Long Island Gty, New York 11101.
'Package price based on purchase of round trip El Al ticket from U.S. to Tel Aviv. Price subject to change
without notice. Certain restrictions apply. Contact your travel agent or El Al for details and fares from your dry.
ELzi/a
The airline of Israel
Kvell/kvefc A Jewish expfwskm meaning to beam wi^


Friday, November 23,1984 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 11
and Ruthe F.ppler recently presented the Jewish
ition of Palm Beach County with a set of 12 lithographs
i the Hungarian Jewish community. The lithographs, which
I hinging in the Federation office, were acquired on the
biers' recent trip to Eastern Europe. They symbolically
Lent all the Jewish holidays. The frontispiece of the
Vgriphs is pictured above.
jraeli Privately-Owned Charter
Airline Declares Bankruptcy
ByHUGHORGEL
|EL AVIV (JTA) Maof,
's privately-owned
ner air line, declared
iruptcy this week,
tiding hundreds of Israeli
I foreign tourists here and
bad.
Civil Aviation Author-
[has arranged to fly the
tided passengers out of
i and European airports,
[it was uncertain whether
Hers of Maof tickets on
lire flights or would-be
fellers who have been
ling into the company's
ings scheme for vacations
year, will be able to
per their money.
llaof, which owns four
king aircraft, applied for
rivership Nov. 2. A Tel
iv district court appointed
Aviv University law
|fessor Yosef Gross tempo-
receiver. The company
fed a $500,000 bond to
l the receiver to charter
paft from El Al and Arkia
ferry stranded tourists
he.
pcompany, which began
Iraiion three years ago, was
second Israeli company to
no receivership that week,
'*ing the Ata textile com-
': Maof reportedly is $10
"in debt. 11 owes about
million to the Israeli
fnment and the balance to
Observers say Maof
extended itself by of-
t more charter flights
Israel to Europe than it
could handle with its limited
experience and financial re-
sources.
On December 19, the
Women's Division of the State
of Israel Bonds will be holding
their International Premier
Luncheon and Fashion Show
at the Breakers. This is the
Hth Fashion Show and the
eleventh year that Evelyn
Blum has chaired the event.
She has chaired Women's
Division since 1961. Actively
involved in numerous secular
and Jewish organizations
throughout the community,
Evelyn Blum received the
Eleanor Roosevelt Humanities
Award from the Palm Beach
County State of Israel Bonds
in 1983. She also was the
recipient of the outstanding
community service award
from the Human Relations
Counselors of the Palm Beach
County School System.
JCC News
YOUTH TO SEE THE SEA
The Jewish Community Center's Youth Department has
arranged for two separate age groups, 4th, Sth and 6th
graders and 7th, 8th and 9th graders, to visit Sea Camp
January 2, 3 and 4, Wednesday thru Friday, during the
school winter recess.
Sea Camp is located at Newfound Harbor at the Marine
Institute in Big Pine Key, Florida.
Both swimmers and non-swimmers are invited to
participate in this opportunity to explore and learn about
our marine ecosystem while developing new skills and
making new friends.
All activities will be under direct supervision of the Sea
Camp instructors. The wonders and beauty of the sea will
be viewed while snorkeling over multi-typed coral reefs as
well as tropical areas and the shorelines. All will have
access to the Laboratory-Library Complex and research
equipment. Other activities include boat trips, arts and
crafts and campfires.
Group size is limited. The cost including transportation
and food is $150 for JCC members and $175 for non-
members. A $50 deposit must accompany a reservation.
For additional information and brochure please call
Terri Lubin at 689-7700.
GIFTS, GIFTS, GIFTS!
The Jewish Community Center's Gift Shop is now filled
with an excellent selection of Chanukah gifts. Such items
as menorahs, wrapping paper, candles, dreidels, cookie
cutters, chocolate candy "gelt," banners, children's
books, games and various toys are available.
A Holiday Get Together
to Save and Savor
OO.ttW>
lion
t^>
1

-> i.NN."*, ,-
Si'"-'
Wedding
fEINBERG-EISENBERG
marriage of Gail Joy
foerg and Harry Eisenberg
I Place on Oct. 28 in
fklyn, N.Y. The groom is
|n of Rabbi and Mrs.
In"el Eisenberg of Lake
Rabbi Eisenberg, the
Ptual leader of Temple
1 inolom in Lake Worth,
formed the ceremony with
PDI Kalman Winter of the
P*ay Jewish Center.
F bride is the daughter of
and Mrs. Lawrence
wg of New York. She is
pduateof Queens College.
eisenberg, a graduate of
"mversity of Florida, is a
m.1 *nalVst for the
J Revenue Service in
from Fleischmann's* Margarine
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i r
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Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, November 23,1984
Jewish Community Urged To
Acknowledge, Deal With Wife Abuse
Senior News
FROM THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
By BARBARA TRAININ
NEW YORK (JTA) A
well-known rabbi recently an-
nounced from the pulpit that
all were welcome in his
congregation "except wife
beaters." A survey among
New York rabbis found that
while nearly all denied first-
hand knowledge of Jewish
domestic violence, and some
even claimed it never happens,
many agreed that shelters for
its victims should be estab-
lished.
One such shelter has already
housed nearly 400 women,
many of them Jewish, and re-
ceives 150 to 200 calls for help
a month. Two recent studies in
Los Angeles identified several
cases of spousal abuse among
Jews, and two major confer-
ences on the subject have been
held in as many years in the
New York area alone.
The latest of the two confer-
ences was last week. It was co-
sponsored by the American
Jewish Committee's New
York chapter, the National
Federation of Temple Sister-
hoods District 3, the Women's
League for conservative Juda-
ism, and the women's branch
of the Orthodox Union, and it
was attended by sisterhood
leaders from the three
branches of Judaism, accord-
ing to Betty Reiser, conference
coordinator and assistant
director of the AJCommittee's
New York chapter.
The objectives of the
conference were to determine
the severity of the problem
among American Jews and to
form a "national network for
change."
All the indications at the
conference were that one of
the most persistent myths
that Jewish men don't beat
their wives is being ex-
ploded. Reliable statistics are
hard to come by, but social
service agencies under both
Jewish and nonsectarian
auspices are increasingly
reporting that Jews are
following the lead of the
general society.
The lead is clear: approxim-
ately 10 million to 15 million
cases of wife abuse are record-
ed annually in the United
States. Many more cases go
unreported. Domestic violence
figures as a cause in about 60
percent of divorce cases, and
the Victim Services Agency in
New York City estimates that
almost half of all women will
experience violence from a
spouse or partner at some
point in their lives.
All the speakers at last
week's conference agreed that
wife abuse has always existed
among Jews as well as non-
Jews. It is not the problem but
the recognition that is grow-
ing. Jewish battering may be
more "insidious" than other
pathologic behaviors among
Jews, "because it has been s'
well-hidden," stated keyno
speaker Barbara Harris,
director of Transition Center.
(Sponsored by the Associated
YM-YWHAs of Greater New
York, Transition is the only
city-funded shelter in New
York City for abused women
and their children offering
kosher facilities.)
Moreover, Harris said,
there are reasons that abused
Jewish women may be at a
greater disadvantage than
their non-Jewish counterparts.
One is the historic reluctance
of Jews to turn to police or
civil courts to adjudicate their
disputes. When Jewish women
do file suits, they are often met
with such comments as:
"What's a nice Jewish woman
like you doing in court?"
Because of the sacrosant
position of the family within
Judaism, Jewish women have
been inculcated with the belief
that they should .acrifice
everything for their families.
"Battered women may go
home to their mothers and be
told that they were beaten by
the fathers and 'survived,' "
said Harris. "Or they may be
told that they made their bed
and must lie in it that the
family must be preserved at all
costs. An offer of help is the
least likely response."
The myth that Jews don't
beat their wives has led to
widespread denial even when
the facts are glaringly dif-
ferent. All battered women
suffer from society's tendency
to blame the victim, either for
allegedly provoking the attack
or for not walking away from
it. But Jewish women may
experience this to an even
greater degree. Since it is
assumed that wife abuse is rare
or even nonexistent among
Jews, any woman who gets
beaten is seen as deserving it,
speakers at the Conference
pointed out.
The centrality of the family
and the denial syndrome also
play a crucial role in what
speakers considered the inad-
equate response of most
rabbis. Previous reports had
indicated that it is rare for a
rabbi to have the opportunity
to intervene because the bat-
tered woman is too ashamed
to turn to him or her.
But according to Rachel
Klein, caseworker at Transi-
tion Center, many of the
women at the shelter had ap-
proached their rabbis for help
and been rebuffed. "They
were told, 'it's not so bad,'
and advised to go home and
preserve shalom bayit (dom-
estic peace)," she said.
"Since the batterer com-
monly isolates his wife, but he
himself remains visible and
even active in the community,
the rabbi will tend to believe
his story, and see the woman
as either hysterical or as a
nebichel the husband has to
put up with."
AN-NELL HOTEL
KOSHER
700 Euclid Ave., Miami Beach
531-1191
From $375 Month
On Yearly Lease
lr eludes 3 Meals Daily Maid Service
Eni-tainment Free Dancing Lesson*
Daily Services In Our Own Synagogue
24 Hour Security
Rabbi Gerald Skolnick,
spiritual leader of the Forest
Hills Jewish Center in New
York City, explained that
rabbis are particularly prone
to the internalization of
Jewish "self-serving myths"
and the subsequent denial.
"After all," he said "the job
of the rabbi is to perpetuate
myths, to teach Jewish
specialness."
Though effective interven-
tion may mean nothing more
than referral of the woman to
an appropriate social service
agency, the insufficient train-
ing most rabbis receive in
counseling and the resulting
ignorance about support
systems in their communities
further hampers their ability
to help even in this limited
way, it was observed.
Another myth that needs
exploding, commented Harris,
is that wife abuse occurs only
among the poor or uned-
ucated. Domestic violence
among Jews cuts across social
and economic lines. All the
women at Transition have
been wives of professionals,
and none required financial
help. Wife abuse is also an
across-the-board religious
phenomenon: similar expe-
riences are reported among
Orthodox, Conservative, and
Reform families, and batterers
and their wives often belong to
synagogues.
Klein recalled coming to
synagogue one Saturday
morning and being impressed
with a man she did not recog-^
nize who was leading the'
morning services beautifully.
"It turned out he was the
husband of one of the women
in our shelter. He had disco-
vered its location, and had
come to our community for
the Sabbath to try to influence
her caseworker myself. As
his wife had told us, he was a
leader in their community."
TRANSPORTATION
Transportation is available
in our designated area for
persons 60 years of age or over
who do not use public tran-
sportation. We take people to
treatment centers, doctors'
offices, to hospitals, nursing
homes to visit spouses, to
social service agencies and
nutrition centers. There is no
fee for this service, but parti-
cipants are encouraged to
contribute their fair share.
There is a great demand for
this service, so please make
your reservations in advance.
For information and-or
reservations, call 689-7703
Monday through Friday.
HOT KOSHER
LUNCH CONNECTION
Many elements combine to
make the Hot Kosher Lunch
Program at the Jewish Com-
munity Center a success. Fore-
most among these is the
opportunity to form new and
lasting friendships.
Each weekday, seniors
gather for intimate talk,
educational discussions, game
playing, leisure and song.
These activities are followed
by a hot, kosher, nutritious
lunch served with warmth and
hospitality by our dedicated
volunteers. There U *
but persons a! asffie,f
a contribution eachmeal""
Please come and join i
For information and J
yions (which must be 2
in advance) call Ca 0u
Lillian at 689-7703 il]
Palm Beach. w'
HOME DELIVERED
MEALS
Persons who ,i
homebound and need!
Kosher meal please call J
information. Call Carol 1
West Palm Beach at 689-77o]
A TOUCH OF CLASS
Elderhostel, in cooperatio
with Israel Study Tours offo
two and three week nroin
in ISRAEL. A variety
courses is offered at seve
distinguished institutions i
higher education. For mo
information call Sippiatfd
7703. w nm
SAFETY FOR HOLIDAYS
CRIME PREVENTION
A special program present!
at the Florida Power & Lid,
Bldg. Tuesday, Nov. 27,9-jj
a.m. and Wednesday Noj
28, 9:30 a.m. The JCC j|
provide transportation if po
sible. Call Sarah or Rose;
689-7703 if you wish to attend
^m
MOVING
STORAGE
State Moving
Licensed & Insured
West Palm Beach
659-2222
Gtt%:
Boca
428-8144
Ft. Lauderdale
563-5680
BUYING COLD & SILVER
Buying...
Scrap Gold
in anv form, any condition
Buying...
Coins-cold & Silver
Collections & Accumulations
U.S. 8, Foreign
B
NORTH AMERICAN
RARE COINS, K
2550 OKEECHOBEE BLVD.. W. PALM BEACH. FL.
684-1771
HOUIS: 9:30 a.m.-6:O0 p.m.
Member ANA & Chamber ol Commerce


Friday, November 23,1984 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page u
DOM*
Lt
POUMOI
:^
Daily News
[indlin: Extreme Right
Intimidates Us All
Continued from Page 4-
attached to the Peace
Kship letter, Golan details
s his religious up-
his Jewish cultural
ound and why he is willing
five years in prison "for
to sign my name to a
paper." The statement
hollow, if only because a
card is hardly another
eof paper."
RECALL many marginal
(involved with peace organi-
bns going back to World War
i before who, in the later era
[McCarthy's depredations,
claimed religious and
j'ties to Judaism which, in
rtime, they had spurned or,
, made great sport of.
|ith some sadness and
fusion, I relive the memory of
| Rosenbergs. I will probably
knowing whether or not
were genuinely guilty of
atomic secrets to the
ana. To my end, their fate
Inever give up disturbing me.
1 will always be annoyed,
angry, that Julius Rosen-
body was laid out in
nulka and talis. Sometimes, I
| him, his tziuis all aflutter
nd him, running his many
i to the anti-Semitic music
I dialogue between two Jews
llussorgsky's "Pictures at an
ubition."
SO I reread Andy
ker's statement which, for all
(ally know, is genuine rather
i a chameleon's color-change
fiide a subcutaneous political
nance. I stare at the printed
Fellowship statement of
ion with the Fellowship of
|bnciiiation neither of which
lave ever heard before, and
Iher of which, suddenly,
s kosher.
ticularly, 1 study the list of
rs of the Peace Foundation.
bottom of the page,
those appended post
) to the list as if to help the
ihip to bask in their glory,
I names of Rabbis Leo
ft Abaham Cronbach and
pam Heschel. These names,
mize. I know their work.
of them, Rabbi Heschel, I
on at least a half-dozen
ions during his distin-
ked lifetime. I do not know
or the other two rabbis
I names have meaning to me
' there, and the Peace
) is careful not to say.
I rest of the page-long list of
" affiliation, replete with
rabbis, is unfamiliar. I
ever seen a single one of
!*d names before in any
t. save for a handful -
Evans, Howard Fast,
f KurzweU, Leo Pfeffer,
|l Sally Priesand. Only a few
along with the others,
ever identified with the
of traditional
can Jewish organizations.
J the feeling of suspicion I
>uerly unfounded, perhaps
Pranoid, encourages a
1 of resentment in me that
ifwonto the draft evasion
y Mager himself. It is the
Pgg of resentment I fait
]mm Rosenberg was laid
""tofcandyomulfca.
IF MAGER has chosen not to
register, that is his decision: wise
or foolish, brave or cowardly,
genuinely patriotic or genuinely
Thoreau. Or, perhaps as in the
case of the Rosenbergs, I will
never know which one of these.
And if it is Mager's choice,
why must my championing of it,
and therefore of him, now be
solicited? Why, in fact, do he and
the sundry Fellowships that have
taken up his cause wind up
making it a Jewish cause at all,
when it is not a Jewish cause?
In the end, Andy Mager and
his Fellowships, after all, have a
perfect right to solicit my
sympathies. But the fact is that I
am already a victim of the
Reagan victory. The radical right
rides again, courtesy of the Know
Nothings of 1984. They in-
timidate us all except for the
likes of Mager and his
fellowships whose motives I
therefore regard suspiciously.
The infection of this infestation is
already deep-seated.
Soldier Wounded
TEL AVIV (JTA) An
IDF soldier was wounded in
south Lebanon Wednesday when
two rockets and automatic
weapons fire were directed at an
Israel army post near Lake
Karoun, on the eastern sector.
GETTING THE CHILDREN
TO EAT A DELICIOUS
HOT MEAL IS EASY AS
ABC's &123's
from
Chef Boy-ar-dee
ABC's & 123s
from Chef
Boy-ar-dee"
are tasty
pasta alphabet
letters and
numbers covered
with a rich tomato sauce. The
children will absolutely love it as
a delicious hot lunch and as a
tasty dinner side-dish. And so
will the adults! Either way you
serve it, getting the children to
eat is as easy as Aleph Bez!


rageTV i nefdewisri r lonaian ot Faim Beach Uounty / 1
Bar/Bat Mitzvah
Adam Matthew Karon
ANDY FINE
Andy Fine, son of Judge
and Mrs. Edward Fine of West
Palm Beach, will become a
Bar Mitzvah on Friday
evening, Nov. 23, at Temple
Judea. Rabbi Joel Levine and
Cantor Anne Newman will of-
ficiate.
Andy is a student in the
gifted program at Jefferson
Davis Junior High School and
enjoys computers and reading.
He is twinning his Bar Mitzvah
with Alexi Lein of Leningrad,
USSR, to highlight the plight
of Soviet Jewry.
ADAM KARON
Adam Matthew Karon, son
of Mr. and Mrs. David Karon
of West Palm Beach, will be
called to the Torah on
Saturday, Nov. 24, at Temple
Beth Torah. He will also parti-
cipate in the service on Friday-
evening. Rabbi Steven
Westman and Cantor Nicholas
Fenakel will officiate.
Adam is a seventh grader at
Crestwood Middle School. His
hobbies include playing the
trumpet and computers.
SUSAN KLEINMAN
Susan Wendy Kleinman,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Susan W end) Kleinman
Leon Kleinman of West Palm
Beach, became a Bat Mitzvah
on Saturday, Nov. 10, at
Temple Beth Torah. Rabbi
Steven Westman and Cantor
Nicholas Fenakel officiated.
Susan, an eighth grader at
Crestwood Middle School, is a
member of the National
Junior Honor Society,
Crestwood Varsity Tennis
Team, Crestwood Chorus and
the Crestwood Yearbook
staff. She is publicity chair-
man of Temple Beth iorah's
Kevin Wagner
Junior Youth Group and also
enjoys swimming.
KEVIN WAGNER
Kevin Wagner, son of Dr.
and Mrs. Stephen Wagner of
West Palm Beach, will be
called to the Torah as a Bar
Mitzvah on Saturday, Nov.
24, at Temple Beth El.
An eighth grader at West
Palm Beach Private School,
Kevin plays soccer and tennis
and is an assistant Boy Scout
patrol leader.
Births
DAUGHTER TO LEVINES
Rabbi Joel and Susan
Levine announce the birth of
their daughter, Rachel Hanna,
on Nov. 5 at Good Samaritan
Hospital. Rachel weighed
eight pounds, ten ounces.
Maternal grandparents are
Abe and Elkie Zeitz of West
Palm Beach. Paternal
grandparents are Sam and
Sarah Levine of Lake Worth.
Rabbi Levine is the spiritual
leader of Temple Judea.
DAUGHTER TO
RAMPELLS
Richard and Ellen Rampell
of West Palm Beach announce
the birth of their daughter,
Catherine Chelsea, on Nov. 4
at Good Samaritan Hospital.
She weighed seven pounds,
eight ounces. Catherine's three
and a half year old brother is
Alastair Michael.
Maternal grandparents are
Roslyn and Herbert Kahn of
Teaneck, N.J. Paternal grand-
parents are Naomi Rampell of
Atlantis and Edward Rampell
of West Palm Beach.
Catherine also has six great-
grandparents, two of whom
live locally. They are Philip
and Mollie Bachman, res-
idents of West Palm Beach.
L'cliaim to, fife
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Candle Lighting Time
Fit Nov. 235:1 i
pm
Religious Directory
Conservative
CONGREGATION ANSHEI SHOLOM 5348 Gtn,
West Palm Beach 33409. PHone 684-3212 tuHJ*?
Vander Walde. Cantor Mordecai Spektor Dailyil'" .
and 5:30 p.m. Friday: 8:30 a.m., 5 p.m. and a late MnfelVf
p.m., followed by Oneg Shabbat. Saturday 8-30 ?
Mincha followed by Sholosh Suedos. m"5 M
CONGREGATION BETH KODESH OF Rn\
BEACH: 501 N.E. 26 Avenue, Boynton Beach 33435
586-9428. Rabbi Avrom L. Drazin. Monday 8-3fi
Thursday 8:30 a.m. Sabbath services. Fridav R-u H
Saturday 9 a.m. oao W
GOLDEN LAKES TEMPLE: 1470 Golden Lakes ru
West Palm Beach 33411. Phone 689-9430. Rabbi 3
Speiser. Daily Services 8:15 a.m. and 5:30 p.m SabbS
services Friday 8:15 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m., 5 p.m., Minda
followed by Sholosh Suedos. '
TEMPLE BETH DAVID: 4657 Hood Road Palm iwj
Gardens 33410. Phone 694-2350. Rabbi William Mark!
Cantor Earl J. Rackoff. Sabbath services, Friday 8 n.
Saturday 10 a.m. I
TEMPLE BETH EL: 2815 No. Flagler Dr West PiJ
Beach 33407. Phone 833-0339. Rabbi Howard J. HirachJ
Cantor Elaine Shapiro. Sabbath services Friday 8:15 pu I
Saturday 9:30 a.m. Daily Minyan 8:15 a.m., Sunday mil
Legal Holidays 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 315 N. "A" Street, Lake Wortkl
33460. Phone 585-5020. Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg, Cantal
Jacob F.lman. Services Monday and Thursday 8:15 a.m.,1
Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 224 N.W. Avenue G,
Glade 33430. Sabbath services Friday, 8:30 p.m. Phone 996-1
3886.
TEMPLE BETH ZION: Lions Chib, 700 Cameua Dr., Royal
Palm Beach. Mailing Address: POBox 104. 650 Royal Pilol
Blvd.. Royal Palm Beach, FL 33411. Sabbath Services Friday 8|
p.m., Saturday 8:45 a.m. Rabbi Nathan Zelizer. Phone 793-1
9122.
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB: 2177 So. Congress Ave, West Pato I
Beach 33406. Phone 433-5967. Rabbi Dr. Morris Silbenm
Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m., Saturday and Holidays 9a.m.. ]
Monday and Thursday 9 a.m.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL: 190 North County Road, Palm Beach I
33480. Phone 832-0804. Rabbi Joel Chazin. Cantor David |
Dardashti. Sabbath services, Friday 8:30 p.m.; Saturday 9a.m.
THE TREASURE COAST JEWISH CENTER Bail
Abraham: 3257 S.E. Salerno Road, Port Salerno. Rabbi |
Abraham Rose. 1-287-8833. Services Friday evenings 8 p.m.
LAKE WORTH JEWISH CENTER: St. Luke's United |
Methodist Chapel, 165 Ohio Road, Lake Worth. Phone 433-
1869. Friday night serivces 8:15 p.m., Saturday, 9 a.m.
Orthodox
CONGREGATION AITZ CHAIM: Century Village, Watl
Palm Beach. Phone 689-4675. Sabbath services 9 am and5|
p.m. Daily services 8:15 a.m. and 6:30 p.m.
Reform
CONGREGATION BETH ISRAEL: 1592 Floresta. P.O. Box
857146. Port St. Lucie, FL 33452. Friday night services 8pm.
Saturday morning 10:30 a.m. Phone 466-6977.
THE REFORM TEMPLE OF JUPITER-TEQUESTA: it
Jupiter High School. Military Trail, Jupiter. Mailing address
Plaza 222, U.S. No. 1, Tequesta 33458. Phone 747-4235. Rabbi
Alfred L. Friedman. Services Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 4600 Oleander Avenue, Fort Pierce, FL
33450. Phone 461-7428. Cantor Anne Newman.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM: St. Helen's Parish Hall, 20th
Avenue and Victory Blvd., Vero Beach 32960, mailing address
P.O. Box 2113, Vero Beach, FL 32961-2113. Rabbi Richard D
Messing. Phone 1-669-0180.
TEMPLE BETH TORAH: at St. Davids in the Puw
Episcopal Retreat, Forest Hill Blvd. and Wellington I**
West Palm Beach. Mailing address: P.O. Box 17008. "
Palm Beach. FL 33416. Friday services 8:15 p.m. Kjw
Steven R. Westman, Cantor Nicholas Fenakel. Phone i
2700. .
TEMPLE ISRAEL: 1901 No. Flagler Dr., West Palm **
33407. Phone 833-8421. Rbbi Howard Shapiro. Cantor*
Soloist Susan Weiss. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE JUDEA: at St. Catharines Greek OrthodoiChurJ
Social Hall, 4000 Washington Rd., at Southern Boukr*;
Rabbi Joel L. Levine. Cantor Anne Newman. U^HfSZ
6164 Okeechobee Blvd.. West Palm Beach. FL 33409. PM"
471-1526.

'


Friday, November 23,184 / The Jewih Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 15
iagogue News
EMPLEBETHSHOLOM
, regular meeting of Sister-
1 will be held on Wed-
av Dec. 5, in the Social
S At 12:30 p.m., latkes
Lauce, etc., will be served
f onor of H?nukah. After
'meeting. Sisterhood and
lsIS will be entertained by
children of the Jewish
Immunity Day School.
L Sisterhood will hold a
Ler-Dance on Sunday,
I i 6 p.m., in the John
L**Social Hall, at 315 N.
[" Street, Lake Worth. A
Cher dinner will be served,
[owed by music and an
rning of dancing.
Tickets are now available to
imbers and friends. For
Ether information contact
jrtShepardor Hilda Zell.
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Dn Friday night, Nov. 23,
itie Zalla, daughter of Lene
J Joseph Zalla, will be
led to the Torah as a Bat
Jtzvah at Temple Israel.
Also participating in the
jvice will be Nancy Sch-
llberg and John Steven
ar, and Vickie Krause and
.hard Seid. Both couples'
nicipation in the service is
telebration of their upcom-
imarriages to take place on
lurday night, Nov. 24.
Friday evening services
kin at 8 p.m.
?ena Sulkes, Southeast
gional Educational liaison
; the Union of American
|brew Congregations, will
net a Religious School
nmittee Workshop for the
benefit of members of that
committee. The meeting will
be held on Thursday, Nov. 29,
at 7:30 p.m. at Temple Israel,
1901 North Flagler Drive,
West Palm Beach.
TEMPLE JUDEA
Rabbi Joel Levine will begin
a three-part sermon series on
"How Reform Jews Differ"
beginning this Friday, Nov.
23, 8 p.m., at Sabbath ser-
vices. Cantor Anne Newman
will chant the music.
Rabbi Levine will examine
how Reform Jews differ from
Orthodox and conservative
Jews in three major areas: the
Bible, Nov. 23; God, Nov. 30;
and Authority, Dec. 7.
The oneg shabbat following
services will be sponsored by
Judge and Mrs. Fine in honor
of their son Andy's Bar
Mitzvah. Members of the
community who wish to learn
more about Reform Judaism
are invited to attend. For more
information, call the office.
The temple's Outreach
Committee will sponsor a spe-
cial workshop on Chanukah
and Christmas Monday even-
ing, Nov. 26, 7 p.m., at the
home of Hope and Jay
Fearnley in Atlantis.
May Goodstein, chair-
person of Outreach, has
worked with Rabbi Joel and
Susan Levine in planning this
program which will address
the problem of Chanukah
observance in America. Parti-
cipants will learn how to crea-
tively observe Chanukah as a
distinctly Jewish holiday.
Prospective converts, converts
to Judaism, and interfaith
couples will learn how to ap-
proach sensitively both holi-
days. Since more and more
Jewish families now have non-
Jewish relatives observing
Christmas, the Outreach
Committee feels that this
workshop will help clarify the
issues and offer constructive
suggestions. Participants will
also learn how to avoid in-
tegrating American Christmas
customs into the observance of
Chanukah.
This workshop is open to all
members of Temple Judea as
well as' anyone interested in
entering Temple Judea's
conversion class. For more
information about Outreach,
call May Goodstein during the
evening.
The Sisterhood will meet on
Thursday, Nov. 29, 7:30 p.m.,
at Sunrise Bank meeting
room, Military Trail and Gun
Club Road.
Goldie Bernstein, director
of the Lee Vassil singers and
actors group, will present an
original skit on Chanukah.
Please bring a $2 gift for the
grab bag.
LAKE WORTH
JEWISH CENTER
Two students of Midrasha
Judaica High School will
address the congregation at
their Friday evening services
on Nov. 23.
Nancy Beth Farber and
William Harris attended high
school in Israel this spring and
will speak on their experiences
in Israel.
All are cordially invited to
worship and join in the Oneg
Shabbat following services.
Igypt Returns Remains of Missing Girl
KL AVIV (JTA) The
pf police pathologist con-
ked that a body returned to
Jel by Egyptian authorities
|he remains of 17-year-old
|i Herzog who disappeared
[spring while on a tour of
fhern Sinai.
The body was discovered by
Israeli tourists in sand dunes
near Nueiba many months
ago. Although the teen-ager
had been reported missing in
that region, the Egyptians
insisted it was the body of a
woman of about 60. They re-
turned the remains recently, at
the insistence of the Herzog
family and the Israeli author-
ities.
The missing girl's sister,
Orit Bloch, promptly identi-
fied the body from clothing
and jewelry. The identity was
made official by the patho-
logist's examination.
Si*Sig|*
Discover ^-o^-oVed
^dcanng start iunv
X\PV *U^'l w* ""
curious accon.cnt
roTmSn^-^
ft^^^onsw^t
ggSfr\
The Lee Vassil Singers perform for one of the many
organizations in the community who request their services.
Lee Vassil
Singers to Perform
The Lee Vassil Group of
Lake Worth Chapter of
Hadassah will hold it's Paid-
Up Membership Luncheon
Tuesday, Nov. 27, 12:30 p.m.
at Temple Beth Sholom, 315
No. "A" St., Lake Worth.
The program will feature the
Lee Vassil Singers and Actors
in an original skit produced
and directed by Goldie Ber-
nstein.
The Group was formed
about four years ago and has
appeared before Hadassah
Chapters and other social
affairs and meetings through-
out the community.
The Lee Vassil Singers are
Myrna Abrams, Goldie
Bernstein, Frances Buchin,
Lily Budde, Honey Cox,
Sophie Greir, Gerte Golden,
Selma Greenberg, Frances
Lazarus, Eva Kleman, Sylvia
Lerner, Matty Makow, Lillian
Manz, Dorothy May, Phylis
Popper, Anne Presser, Rose
Scheuer, and Ronny Sommer.
Area Deaths
GOLDSTEIN
Morris E., M. of BennlngtonLane, Lake
Worth. Levltt-Weliuteln Guaranteed
Security Plan Chapel. Weit Palm
Beach.
OOOTBLATT
Milton. 73, of 438 Bennlngton Lane, Lake
Worth. Levltt-Welnsteln Guaranteed
Security Plan Chapel, Weit Palm
Beach.
GOTTLEIB
Hortenee, 90. of 8875 S. Oriole Blvd.,
Delray Beach. Rlvenlde Guardian
Funeral Home. Wett Palm Beach.
HERSHORIN
Irving, 78, of Oreenbiiar Century
Village, Weat Palm Beach. Levltt-Weln-
steln Guaranteed Security Plan Chapel.
Weat Palm Beach.
LEVINE. Tilly. SB. of 1081 WolvertonD,
Century Village, Boca Raton. Rlvenlde
Guardian Funeral Home, Weet Palm
Beach.
SI OCR
Carl. 86, of Century Village, Weat Palm
Beach. Levltt-Welnetem Guaranteed
Security Plan Chapel, Weat Palm
Beach.
WALLACH
Samuel. 87. of Eaathampton, Century
VUlage. Weat Palm Beach. Rlvenlde
Guardian Funeral Home, Weat Palm
Beach.
WEINBERG
Jerome. 81. of Dover C-841, Century
Village, Weat Palm Beach. Rlvenlde
Guardian Funeral Home. Weat Palm
Beach.
fa BLUE RIDGE ft
f/g CAMP and RESORT FOR ROYS GIRLS 6-16 U V
7 n u.,,1, uMiuwiui AC HIM Ullian Ciulnn f \
YOUR MOUNTAIN OF FUN Where Spring
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ONLY 2 HOURS NORTH OF ATLANTA
V UNTAIN CITY oa
All Water Sports Our Own Twin Spring Fed Lakes
White Water Canoeing Mt Trail Hikes Tennis
Arts & Crafts Sailing Skiing Gymnastics and
Dance Go Carts Computers Roller Skating
Rock Climbing Basketball Soccer Softball
Hockey Zoological & Science Program
Dietary Laws Observed Shabbat Services
Medical Staff Available at All Times
Accredited Member American Camping Association
Your Camp Directors
COACH J.I. MONTGOMERY
MORRIS & SHEILA WALDMAN
STAN A BARBARA MINTZ
Miami Beach Phone 1-305-538-3434
or Write
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GUARANTEED SECURITY PLAN


Page 16 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, November 23,1984
Reaching Out
Continued from Page 3-
(Left to right) Gertrude Birnback, Century Village;
Emii Knox, Rapallo North; and Irving Rosen, co-
chairman, Rapallo South.
Zelda Pincourt, executive committee,
Jewish Community Center, and Jerry
Melman, executive director, Jewish
Community Center.
[Left to right] Carl Lp*tein,
Creslhaven, and Bill Luchin.
Cresthaven.
Israelis Prepared to
Make Sacrifices
To Hold
Down Inflation
B> HLGHORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA)-A size-
able majority of Israelis are
prepared to make financial
sacrifices in the effort to hold
down inflation, according to a
poll published in Maariv.
The poll, conducted by the
Modi'in Ezrachi organization,
reported that "'l.l percent of
the respondents are willing to
forego part of their monthly
cost-of-living increments
whereas only 17.9 percent are
not. This translates into three
of every four Israelis in
support of the wage-price
freeze package approved by
the Cabinet.
The package required wage-
earners to give up about one-
third of their COL allowance
during the three months the
freeze is in effect.
A substantial majority, 51.7
percent, believe the economic
package deal will succeed in
keeping prices stable over the
three-month period. But 37.8
percent were skeptical, the poll
reported, and 10.6 percent had
no opinion.__________________
Ex-Enemies
Reconcile
Continued from Page 8
man reunification, dissociating
itself from controversial com-
ments by Italian Foreign Minis-
ter Giulio Andreotti, who at an
Italian Communist Party
gathering opposed reunification.
Regular Franco-German
consultations were held in Bad
Kreuznach at the end of October,
but President Mitterrand and
Chancellor Kohl conferred
beforehand on urgent European
issues.
Stanley Lunitz [left], Poinciana Place, and
Frank Goldstein, chairman, Cresthaven.
West
Continued from Page 8-
No one believes that the
revival of this well-worn discus-
sion will in the least way benefit
rapprochement between the
German states. However, it is
obvious that it gives those who
accuse the Germans of sinister
intentions plenty to talk about.
A glance at the Basic Law of
the Federal Republic of Germany
reveals the absurdity of the whole
dispute. In the preamble to the
law, which came into force in
1949, we find the following: "The
whole German people is called
upon to bring about the unity
and freedom of Germany in free
self-determination,''
The Federal Constitutional
Court interpreted this sentence to
be a "call for reunification" and
bound all Federal governments to
make efforts to effect that
reunification.
THIS, however, has not in the
past prevented the Soviet Union
from accepting the Federal
Republic as a partner in peaceful
cooperation, not to mention
Bonn's western allies.
What is more, any suspicion
that the current West German
government intends to go it alone
in any effort to reunite the two
German states can be categoric-
ally ruled out.
Foolish polemics of the kind
now introduced into the discus-
sion by Hans Apel only blur the
issue. Any unbiased onlooker will
find sufficient evidence that,
when the government or the
opposition talk of
East and m the West. *
Anyone who evob-.u.
Bonn and East Berth i"
German party leadersL11*
55 ULTIMATE w
cooperatmg with ft* fiL
achieve a reunificathn Jl
strengthen CoSpSl.^
This leads to the contra
which critics i both S?
We would soon $%
rather than emotionally.
They claim that fi.
harbor a blind urge for relj.
tta, which could transcevH
existing realities. The^
on the one hand, that m
reunification is impossible!
apart from the fundamental!
ferences in the social svst^l
world could noTTSS
reunited Germany Yet mi
other hand, they wam'ae
such a reunited Germany
the Germans were able"
reestablish such a status at
the will of other nations.
What Bonn and East
have been practicing
no more than detente.
However, detente, the r
or easing of tension b
nations, would still appear J
rest of the world to have I
character of a conspiracy if tl
two nations happen to be I
man.
You want the best for your
family. And that's just
what you're getting when
Su choose from the
?1 Monte family of
Suality tomato products.
EL MONTE* Catsup,
Stewed Tomatoes
and Tomato Sauce are
all made with luscious, ripe
61983 M MonM C(XQOra*on
tomatoes and the finest
spices. Nothing artificial is
added. And they re all
certified Kosher-Parve.
So for a family of goodness,
look for Del Monte.
Ocimontc
<:
ii


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Friday, November 23,1984 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 9
Federation Board Approves Allocations
Continued from Page 1
^984 Federation's Budget and Allo-
cations Committee, noted that the
review process that determined where
the allocations should be made was in-
DISTRIBUTION OF 1984 ALLOCATIONS
rhe Board of Directors has approved the distribution of
|2 000 from pledges raised in the 1984 campaign. The
Idict and Allocations Committee reviewed the requests
[the local, national and overseas agencies and submitted
Lr recommendations to the Board for final review and
oroval. A 3 percent shrinkage is allowed for uncollected
jdges Tnis is deducted from lne Sross figure leaving
[381,286 for distribution.
fetSEAS
liied Jewish Appeal......................$3,177,610
Lew Immigrant Aid Society ..................2,500
lerican-lsrael Cultural Foundation...............250
Heraied Council of Israeli Institutes...............300
Total $3,180,660
ITIONAL HUMAN RELATIONS AGENCIES
herican Jewish Committee.................$ 250
Eerican Jewish Congress........................500
bi B'rith Anti-Defamation League.............1,500
Irish Labor Committee.........................600
pish War Veterans...........................1,000
kional Conference on Soviet Jewry.............1,000
kional Jewish Community Relations
Advisory Council..........................3,500
herican Academic Association for Peace
in the M iddle East..........................1,500
Total $ 9,850
TIONAL CULTURAL, EDUCATIONAL AGEN-
ES
nt Cultural Appeal.......................$ 500
jiish Education Service of N. America...........2,300
Herican Jewish Archives........................150
ppsie University...............................150
fish Chautauqua Society.......................200
Irish Theological Seminary......................500
brew Union College Jewish Institute
of Religion.................................500
Ihiva University...............................500
Irish Telegraphic Agency........................900
kional Jewish Resource Center...................500
kional Tay Sachs and Allied Diseases.............800
Total $ 7,000
iTIONAL SOCIAL SERVICE AGENCIES
iional Jewish Welfare Board...............$ 6,656
ai B'rith Youth Service........................250
in American Jewish Students Appeal............600
lish Braille Institute...........................750
ociation of Jewish Family & Children's Agencies .. 300
bference of Jewish Communal Service............200
Iional Association of Jewish Vocational Services ... 100
Total $ 8,856
,IOS VI SERVICES
ai B'rith Hillel Foundation of Florida......$ 28,600
CAL AGENCIES
lish Family & Children's Service...........$ 258,000
lish Community Day School................200,500
lish Community Center....................239,500
>ph L. Morse Geriatric Center................90,000
Total $ 788,000
VISH FEDERATION
ninistration............................$ 386,565
bpaign..................................656,555
Total $1,043,120
VISH FEDERATION SERVICES
Community Relations Council............$ 53,180
Floridian Newspaper.......................56,570
Jiver Garden Home for the Aged (Jacksonville) .4,000
Jewish Education Service....................26,500
Readership Development....................24,200
chaplaincy Program .......................38,570
Mosaic TV Program.........................7,380
Endowment Fund..........................17,300
wngle Parent Family Program.................8,000
-RC State Co-ordinator.....................9,000
women's Division Education Program.........1.500
Israel High School Scholarship ...............5,000
immunity High School (Midrasha) .........61,550
Kadio Program L'Chayim..................4.000
Total $ 315,250
Grand Total $5,381,286
Yaacov Sassi
Israeli Folk Singer
Hebrew Chassldlc English Yiddish
For All Occasions
Organizations Clubs Synagogues
Private Parties
For Mora Information, Call:
tensive and involved. "We had over
thirty requests for funding and spent
countless hours and many evenings in
deliberation. Even though we had the
highest amount of dollars to allocate
this year, there are always more areas
that need to be funded than we have
resources for. The decisions are dif-
ficult ones that must be made by the
committee but it makes us realize how
vital the efforts of our community are
in perpetuating world Jewry. I am
greatly indebted to my committee for
their unceasing efforts and commit-
ment," Wilensky stated.
Members of the committee include:
Barry Berg, Stanley Brenner, Alec
Engelstein, Sheila Engelstein, Arthur
Gladstone, Harvey Goldberg, Rabbi
Howard J. Hirsch, Arnold Lampert,
Jeanne Levy, Myron J. Nickman,
Larry Ochstein, Marva Perrin,
Berenice Rogers, Rabbi Howard
Shapiro, Alan L. Shulman, Dr. Eliz-
abeth S. Shulman, Leah Siskin, Dr.
Peter Wunsh, Michael Zimmerman.
JCC Advisory Board of Trustees
272-1287
Continued from Page 1
Welfare Board, who is travel-
ing from Milwaukee to Palm
Beach for the event. Prelim-
inary architectural plans for
the new campus will be re-
viewed at that meeting.
In August the JCC agreed to
purchase the $886,000 parcel
of land on Haverhill Road in
response to a needs assessment
study by the Center, the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County and many com-
munity groups. Partial pay-
ment has been made toward
purchase of the property,
through a loan from the Fed-
eration.
The Advisory Board of
Trustees will include civic,
professional and business
leaders from throughout the
Palm Beaches, Dr. Klein said.
Mrs. Levy has long been ac-
tive in regional and national
Jewish affairs, and is im-
mediate past president of the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County. She has served
as Women's Division pres-
ident and campaign chair-
person for the Jewish Federa-
tion, and has been chairperson
of the organization's Budget
and Allocations Committee.
She was campaign chair-
person for the National
Women's Division, Palm
Beach Campaign of the United
Jewish Appeal. Her husband,
developer H. Irwin Levy, is
UJA national vice chairman.
Mrs. Levy was a board mem-
ber of the Jewish Community
Day School, and is a past pres-
ident of Temple Beth El
Sisterhood and Tamar Hadas-
sah.
Mrs. Cummings' civic
involvement includes serving
on the Executive Committee
of the National United Jewish
Appeal Young Women's
Leadership Cabinet. She is
Women's Division campaign
vice president for the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County. She represented the
Federation at the Jewish
agency meetings in Israel this
year. Mrs. Cummings also
serves on the board of the
United Way of Martin
County, and has been a
member of the board of dir-
ectors of the Tri-County
Rehabilitation Center.
Barenholtz is a member of
the JCC's board of directors
and serves on the Board of
Governors of the Jewish
Theological Seminary in New
York City. He is president of
Walden Properties, a devel-
opment firm based in
( leveland. He i- also an active
member of Temple Emanu-el
in Palm Beach, and is on the
board of directors of Temple
On The Heights in Cleveland.
Barenholtz was a member of
the board for the College of
Jewish Studies in Cleveland,
and served on the Review
Committee of that city's
Mandel is chairman of the
executive committee of
Premier Industrial Corpora-
tion in Cleveland, where he
has been active in Jewish
organizations for many years.
His work with that city's
Jewish Federation includes
serving on the board of
trustees and on the Endow-
ment Fund Foundation Ad-
visory Council. He is also a
member of the board of
trustees of the Cleveland Jew-
ish Community Center, and is
general co-chairman of the
Mount Sinai Living Heritage
Fund Campaign. He is past
general co-chairman of the
Jewish Welfare .Fund cam-
paign in Cleveland, and is the
founder and a trustee of the
Cleveland Jewish News.
f\ Radio /TV Highlights ,!j
MOSAIC Sunday, Nov. 25, 9 a.m. WPTV
Channel 5 with host Barbara Gordon An interview
with the Honorable Bella Abzug, former congresswoman
from New York.
* L'CHAYIM Sunday, Nov. 25, 7:30 a.m. WPBR
1340-AM with host Rabbi Mark S. Golub The Jewish
Listener's Digest, a radio magazine.
SHALOM Sunday, Nov. 25, 10 a.m. WPEC
Channel 12 (8:30 a.m. ON TV Channel 51) with host
Richard Peritz.
HERITAGE: CIVILIZATION AND THE JEWS
(Repeat from Nov. 19) Saturday, Nov. 24, 1:30 p.m.,
WHRS Channel 42 INTO THE FUTURE The final
program explores the rise of the State of Israel and its
relationship with Jews in other parts of the world, the
plight of Soviet Jewry and finally, the questions facing
world Jewry today.
Sponsored by the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County.
Community Calendar
November 23
Jewish Community Center no school program
November 25
Congregation Aitz Chaim 10 a.m. Women's American
ORT Mid Palm Royal Palm Theatre Golden Lakes
Temple Sisterhood 10 a.m. Temple B'nai Jacob Men's
Club-9 a.m.
November 26
B'nai B'rith No. 2939 trip to Harder Hall B'nai B'rith
Women Menorah board -10 a.m. Women's American
ORT Mid Palm -1 p.m. Temple B'nai Jacob Sisterhood
- 10 a.m. Hadassah Z'Hava board 10 a.m. B'nai
B'rith No. 3196 trip to Harder Hall Jewish Federation
Catholic-Jewish Dialogue noon Women's American
ORT Poinciana paid up luncheon Jewish Federation -
Community Planning Meeting 4 p.m. Synagogue-
Federation Commission Meeting at Temple Emanu-EI -
7:30 p.m.
November 27
Congregation Anshei Sholom 1 p.m. Hadassah Lee
Vassil paid up luncheon Women's American ORT -
Boynton Beach board 12:30 p.m. -B'nai B'rith Women
- Masada board 7 p.m. Temple Beth David Sisterhood
- 8 p.m. Women's American ORT Poinciana Evening
at Loehmanns
November 28
Jewish Federation Board of Directors Meeting 8 p.m.
Yiddish Culture Group Cresthaven 1 p.m. Women's
American ORT North Palm Beach County Region -
board 9:30 a.m. American Red Magen David for Israel
- 1 p.m. B'nai B'rith No. 3196 board 7 p.m.
Hadassah Chai 12 noon
November 29
Hadassah Bat Gurion 10 a.m. Hadassah Aliya 1
p.m. Jewish Community Center Advisory Board
meeting at The Biltmore 3 p.m. Jewish Community Day
School Education Committee 8 p.m. Temple Beth El -
Israeli Folk Dance 7:30 p.m.


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