The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian the voice of the Jewish community of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Running title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Physical Description:
4 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 8, no. 41 (Dec. 24, 1982)-v. 11, no. 26 (Aug. 30, 1985).
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44606415
lccn - sn 00229548
ocm44606415
System ID:
AA00014310:00079

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
PPPJWW
THE VOICE OF
THE JEWISH
COMMUNITY OF
PALM BIACH
COUNTV
Jewish florid Jan
VOLUME 10-NUMBER 35
PRICE 35 CENTS
Campaign Leadership Conference
To Convene On Sunday, November 1 i
The second annual Cam-
aien Leadership Conference
be convened at the Rovce
lotel on Sunday, Nov. 11,
0 a.m.-2 p.m. Volunteers in
1985 Jewish Federation of
Beach County-United
fish Appeal campaign have
i invited to attend this very
portant day of program-
'National Jewish leaders
be been invited to the Palm
tactics to take part in this
Iference," said Julie
nmings, conference chair-
person. "Our intention is to
provide meaningful informa-
tion for our volunteers regard-
ing the situation in Israel. Our
United Jewish Appeal funds
comprise approximately 16
percent of the national expen-
diture for human welfare ser-
vices in Israel and we are seek-
ing to increase our allocations
in 1985." Cummings noted
that the budget of the Jewish
Agency will be a subject of
discussion at the Campaign
Leadership Conference.
Special workshops will be
designed to review 1985
campaign public relations
materials and to provide train-
ing for volunteer solicitors.
Arnold L. Lampert, general
campaign chairman, com-
mented on the extremely
dynamic nature of the Con-
ference presentations and
stressed that there will be a
great deal of "give and take"
dialogue. "We are going to
look carefully at the needs of
our local agencies as well as
the critical situation with
human service needs overseas.
Our volunteers will learn the
facts regarding our local situa-
tion and will review our mini-
mission program for the year.
We have 17 mini-missions
scheduled to enable people to
visit our local agencies and
meet with the executive
directors, and we will ask the
community to take maximum
advantage of these oppor-
tunities. It is a goal of our
campaign to help many
hundreds of our donors see
with their own eyes what their
funds are accomplishing in our
local community. Our
Campaign Leadership Con-
ference will kickoff our drive
and serve to awaken a sense of
responsibility in each and
every one of us."
For further information on
the Campaign Leadership
Conference, call the Jewish
Federation office at 832-2120.
UJA Hineni Leadership
Forges Ahead With Increased Giving
I'JA AWARD: Samuel H. Miller [center] of
pd is presented with a Roman period glass antiquity for
Ivative leadership as the founding father of Hineni, the
leadership gathering of the United Jewish Appeal.
TR the award is H. Irwin Levy (right] of Palm Beach,
>nal chairman of Hineni HI. The presentation was made
tcent gathering of Hineni HI in Washington, D.C.
on is Mrs. Samuel Miller.
NEW YORK, N.Y. The
1985 United Jewish Appeal
Regular Campaign took an
important step forward at the
third annual UJA Hineni
Leadership Meeting with an-
nounced pledges totaling
$7,638,200, UJA National
Chairman Alexander Grass
has announced. This repres-
ents a 14.3 percent increase
over contributions made by
the same donors last year.
Held for the first time in
Washington D.C, Hineni III,
a three-day gathering of UJA
major leadership, provided an
opportunity for the leadership
to see the United States
government in operation first-
hand and to speak to officials
directly about their concerns
about American-Jewish life
and Israeli-American rela-
tions.
The gathering, held Sept. 30
to Oct. 2, was highlighted by
meetings with Secretary of De-
fense Caspar W. Weinberger,
Secretary of the Treasury
Donald T. Regan, U.S.
Ambassador William E.
Brock, Under-Secretary of
State Kenneth Dam and with
briefings by high-ranking ad-
ministration officials from the
Commerce and Justice depart-
ments and the Civil Rights
Commission.
Both Secretary Regan and
Ambassador Brock reviewed
details of the discussions on a
free trade zone with Israel and
Israel's prospects for increased
aid and credits.
Ohio Senator Howard M.
Metzenbaum and Israeli
Ambassador to the United
States Meir Rosenne also
addressed the group at the
event's major dinners on
Sunday and Tuesday evenings.
In his opening address at the
Organization of American
States Building, Senator
Metzenbaum cited the positive
aspects of the continuing
resolutions to grant aid to
Israel and eligibility of Israeli
companies to bid on U.S.
contracts. But he also ex-
pressed concern about the
future of the currently stable
American-Israeli relations and
advocated a closer look at
church-state relations in this
country.
Hineni III participants also
met with a group of 33
Continued on Page 10
first UJA Campaign Opening In Israel
Yields Major Fundraising Increase
nside
Russia
|ith Love
hek's "Mosaic"
^ram features
Howard Shapiro
N to Russia this
Pirner to bring
Imanyrefuseniks
lome of his expe-
I are featured on
e Parents
N Celebration
I to meet the
I single parent
see page 2.
NEW YORK Opening its campaign in
Israel for the first time, the United Jewish
Appeal recently inaugurated 1985 fun-
draising with pledges totalling over $12
million. Announcing the totals, National
Chairman Alexander Grass of Harrisburg,
Pa., said that of the $12 million, $11,593,743
was committed to the Regular Campaign.
New and increased pledges of $1,171,980
were directed to Project Renewal, the social
welfare and rehabilitation program pairing
American Jewish communities directly with
Israeli neighborhoods in need.
"We are beginning our campaign with a 38
percent increase over pledges by the same
donors last year," Grass stated. I his
outstanding early achievement is the direct
result of first-hand exposure to UJA-funded
programs for rural settlement, absorption
and social services in Israel. We saw the
human aspect (dimension) of the Israel
diaspora partnership at work, he added.
Continued on Page 11
Three national UJA missions joined together at the Kotel in Jerusalem
to convene the First National Opening Conference held in Israel which
opened the 1985 UJA-communlty campaigns.


or
^il_I^_Jewi8h nofidtan of Pain, R--U n_ -
Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, November 2,1984
Morse Geriatric Center
Volunteers Lauded For Their Talent, Time and Devotion
By LOUISE ROSS
Assistant News Coordinator
"Volunteers are our
lifeline," declared Erwin
Blonder, president of the
board of trustees of the Joseph
L. Morse Geriatric Center of
the Jewish Home for the Aged
of Palm Beach County, when
the Center opened its doors
last year. One year later
Blonder looked on with pride
as over 200 volunteers were
recognized for their commit-
ment and dedication during
ceremonies held at the Cen-
ter's Lowe Auditorium re-
cently.
Blonder stressed that the
strong volunteer program
represents the essence of the
Center and is vital to improv-
ing the quality of life of the
residents. "You have enriched
our residents' lives with your
talent, time and devotion. You
are appreciated and most
needed," he told the vol-
unteers.
According to E. Drew
Gackenheimer, executive
director of the Center, the
Center achieved a major ac-
complishment with 214 vol-
unteers working 13,806 hours
this year. However, he noted
that the current goal is to
develop a volunteer network
of 500 workers giving 30,000
hours of their time to helping
the residents. "We had a
tremendous start but more is
needed before we can begin
our expansion program," he
said. Because the 120-bed
Center is filled to capacity,
initial plans for future expan-
sion have been formulated and
will be announced to the com-
munity shortly, according to
Jay Epstein, director of devel-
opment and public relations.
A resident, who is a volun-
teer switchboard operator at
the Center herself, lauded the
other volunteers. "We are be-
holden to you. You are always
in good spirits even though
some of you are not in good
health yourself. Continue your
efforts," urged Anita Anton,
president of the Residents'
Council.
As a documentary film
about the Center was shown,
the volunteers turned to their
neighbors as they recognized
the residents that they had
helped, many of whom had
become their friends. It
brought tears to their eyes.
After the audio-video pres-
entation, Micki Ross, director
of volunteers, reminisced
about the opening day and
how involved and vital the
volunteers were then. "The
residents had a need then. It
has not diminished," she said.
"Working with all of you has
been a fringe benefit tor me."
Blonder and Gackenheimer
presented pins of recognition
to those volunteers who dedic-
ated 100 hours or more of
service to the Home. Top
honors went to Shirley Speigel
who logged over 700 hours. "1
just love it. I have been helping
the elderly since I was 15 years
old," she said in an interview
after the program.
"On the first day so many
of them were distraught and
afraid. 1 put their clothes
away, played cards with them
and just stayed until they felt
better," Mrs. Speigel said. She
spent full days at the Center
helping the residents to adjust
to their new surroundings.
Now she works from 8 a.m.
until 4 p.m. two days a week.
As we were talking
volunteer Sylvia Berger
stopped by to say, "Every
resident just adores her." She
wanted to make sure that the
Vickie Bernstein and her son participate in paper bag dramatics
Over 200 Joseph L. Morse Geriatric Center
volunteers recently attended a Recognition
Day in their honor held in the Center's Lowe
Auditorium.
A *51 x .
importance of Mrs. Speigel's
efforts with the residents
would not be understated.
After the formal ceremonies
the volunteers were treated to
brunch on the first floor patio.
It was evident that the strong
volunteer program at the
Morse is indeed a lifeline for
the residents as well as being a
source of great satisfaction for
the volunteers.
Jean Polakoff was honored
for completing 600 hours of
service; Harry Cohen, Ger-
trude Levitan and Elaine
Mark, 300 hours; Anita
Anton, Jean Cohen, Israel
Cohen, Sam Gordon, Mary
Lebowitz, Maxine Rubin and
Honey Werbel, 200 hours;
Joseph Abel, Ann Bader,
Sylvia Berkowitz, Minn
Breslau, Dorothy Bronstein,
Fan Buckner, Arthur Cohn,
Annette Dronzik and Sarah
Continued on Page 11
m
^* w
W
I H
^ %r 1
Shirley Speigel was presented a pin in recognition of her over
700 hours of service to the Center by Erwin Blonder [left] and E.
Drew Gackenheimer [right]. ____________^
Single Parents Celebrate Sukkot
(Left to right] Rabbi Ed Cohn, Rabbi Joel Chazin and Rabbi
William Marder represent the Palm Beach County Board of
Rabbis at the Sukkot Celebration.
More than 60 single parents
and children recently attended
a Sukkot Celebration held at
the Jewish Community Day
School. The event, sponsored
by the Single Parent Task
Force of the Jewish Federation
of Palm Beach County and the
Palm Beach County Board of
Rabbis, brought together
those who may not have had
family in town with whom to
celebrate Sukkot, and in addi-
tion gave them an opportunity
to socialize with other single-
parent families.
The afternoon began in the
day school's succah where
Rabbi Chazin, president of the
Palm Beach County Board of
Rabbis, explained the holiday
of Sukkot. After kiddush was
chanted everyone dipped
challah and apples into honey
to express the wish for a sweet
year ahead.
As the parents and their
children entered the
"merkaz," the social hall of
the day school, they were
handed a paper bag and a
color-coded envelope with a
piece of puzzle in it. They as-
sembled in groups according
to the color of their envelope
and proceeded to put together
their puzzle.
After having a chance to
meet everyone at their table
through this get-acquainted
exercise, the participants pre-
pared for the next event
paper bag dramatics. They
had to use the objects in their
paper bag to tell a story to the
entire group. "When I built
my succah" was one table's
challenge.
Before concluding the after-
noon, the parents and their
children decided to continue
these holiday get-togethers
and formed a steering com-
ittee to plan for a Chanukah
program. Rabbi Chazin said.
"I am very pleased with the
way the afternoon wentand
am very encouraged with
turnout. We are lookm
forward to more s.ngl-P
family activities in the futu
after this successful I
ning."
For more information about
single parents, contact Mir
Bower at the Federation officej
832-2120.
'J-m
*i

.#>
otm
Rory Levy, 10. of West Palm Beach, enjoys P* nil
dipped in honey in the succah of the Jew*n. nti""11
School during the Sukkot Celebration for single pren


wp
On 'Mosaic9
Rabbi Brings Hope To
Friday, November 2,1984 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 3
R-bbi Shapiro [bottom right] coaxes a smile from Deborah
while brother Misha holds her. Their parents, Boris and
Nitasha Friedman [standing] applied for exit visas three years
ago and were refused.
By LOUISE ROSS
Assistant News Coordinator
"The refuseniks are in
I desperate straits emigration
is way down to just over 1,000
this year and their future is
dim," related Rabbi Howard
Shapiro of Temple Israel after
he returned from his recent
trip to the Soviet Union. He
went to bring consolation and
a message of hope that they
[are not forgotten to many
[refuseniks (Jews who have
applied for exit visas and have
been denied permission to
leave) in Moscow and
Leningrad. He will be in-
terviewed by Barbara Gordon
on "Mosaic," Nov. 4 at 9
a.m. on Channel 5 The TV
program is sponsored by the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County.
"I wanted to meet the
refuseniks and find out what
makes them heroic. What
gives people the impetus that
Refuseniks
"lakes them stand up and
bring scorn upon themselves?
Where does their commitment
come from?" he asked. Rabbi
Miapiro traveled with Rabbi
Barry Tabachnikoff of
Temple Bet Breira in Miami,
Honda under the auspices of
the South Florida Conference
on Soviet Jewry. The organi-
zation briefed them on how to
contact the refuseniks.
They were able to see dozens
of people and none whom they
contacted refused to see them
"They're very happy to
receive us as we bring them a
link with the West. They are
not afraid to have American
visitors although some are
more cautious than others,"
Rabbi Shapiro said. Since the
rabbis hid their true profession
from the Soviet authorities,
they took care never to speak
Hebrew to each other in public
places. However, according to
Rabbi Shapiro, the refusniks
would not exhibit the same
timidity. After refusenik Uri
Spazeman spoke to him in
Hebrew on the street, the
rabbi asked him if he were not
afraid. Spazeman replied,
"No, I even sing in Hebrew."
Rabbi Shapiro sees this
openness as necessary to their
own personal survival. "If
they let the system win, they
have lost," he said. "The
system is designed to make
you cautious and anxious.
They can't give into it."
Uri Spazeman took him to a
wedding of a Moscow
refusenik and a Leningrad
refusenik. They were married
at the bride's parents' home by
a Chabad rabbi from Miami
Continued on Page 5
'JEWISH
FEDERATION
OFRMMDEACH
COUNTY
1985 Campaign
Reaching Out
V ryyvn \y>n ))^> *
YOUR CONTRIBUTION CAN MAKE THE DIF-
FERENCE! The 120-bed resident home and -.killed
nursing care facility of the Joseph L. Morse Geriatric
Center of the Jewish Home for the Aged of Palm Beach
County provides quality health care to those elderly la
need. A resident walks to the activity center helped by
one of the 200 volunteers who devote their service to the
Center. The Morse Geriatric Center is a beneficiary of the
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County and receives
allocations through your donation to the 1985 Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach County-United Jewish Appeal
campaign.
Ex-Nazis Hold Two-Day 'Reunion1
Jkt following are con-
Z'rT f ar,iCl(!S Wf>M
rfi"* >n "Yidion" Neigh-
Qy"Per for Gil Amal
Eton-New Year Edition.
ZlLld" Haber- ***
teuiv'Mezig and
* and Gil Amal are
PROJECT RENEWAL
neighborhoods of Hod
Hasharon and are twinned
with our community through
Project Renewal, the com-
bined effort of the government
of Israel, communities in the
Diaspora and the distressed
neighborhoods themselves to
elevate their quality of life.
BONN (JTA) Several
hundred former members of
the SS Polizei Panzer
Grenadier Division and their
families ended a two-day
"reunion" in the remote
Bavarian town of Mark
Theidenfeld amid charges that
they were propagating Nazi
ideas and traditions.
The Organization of Perse-
cutees of the Nazi Regime and
many other groups organized
a protest that brought some
800 demonstrators to Mark
Theidenfeld to denounce the
reunion as an attempt to revive
and legitimize the spirit of
Nazi Germany. But the local
townsfolk apparently were
quite willing to have the ex-SS
men in their midst. The
reunion has been a tradition in
the town for the past 30 years.
News From Hod Hasharon
(No. l
T* Adult Edocatlo.
1 uP*ns Us 5th Year
V^PARCHI
Director-Tehila
Xaf? half of the
50f the Hod Hasharon
I in iff reached the
r ra Hudies whcre
Cmnndwri,efreely-
Vo,S asaway to erase
ton Uipr8raminHod
ron *as awarded a
National Prize for Excellence.
Unfortunately, we have not
yet found a way to attract men
to the program, even though
we know there are many men
in our neighborhoods who are
in need of such basic educa-
tion. We are hopeful,
however, that this situation
too will change.
According to the head of the
town's Education Depart-
ment, Zaharia Ben Yosef, the
educational master plan calls
for the Tehila program to be
an integral and ongoing part
of the educational system, and
will be housed at the school
which is located near Giora.
Two hundred two students
will begin the year's program
in either morning or afternoon
classes at the Sprinzak School
in Gil Amal and at the Neve
Naaman State Religious
School through the contri-
butions of our Project
Renewal partners of South
: Continued on Pag* 9-
HOLD THE DATE!
EIGHTH ANNUAL MIDEAST CONFERENCE
The Israel-Mideast Task Force of the Community
Relations Council of the Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County is proud to present:
THE HONORABLE MEIR ROSENNE
Ambassador of Israel to the U.S.
and
TOM DINE
Executive Director
American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC)
DATE: Sunday morning, November 18,1984
TIME: 9:30 a.m.
PLACE: Temple Beth EIFread Sanctuary
2815 North Flagler Drive
West Palm Beach
The speakers will analyze recent events In the Mideast
from Israeli and American perspectives.



?"^6 The Jewish Floridian of
PBU~ B----- *
Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, November 2,1984
Shultz: The U.S. Will Continue To Stress The Plight of Soviet Jews
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Secretary of State George
Shultz pledged that as the
United States intends to build
a "new, more constructive
period in Soviet-American
relations" following President
Reagan's recent meeting with
Soviet Foreign Minister An-
drei Gromyko, it will continue
to stress the plight of Soviet
Jews and other human rights
issues.
"I hope that no one, either
in the Soviet Union or in this
country, seriously entertains
the idea that once negotiations
are underway, the United
States will refrain from raising
our human rights concerns,"
Shultz told the Leadership As-
sembly of the National Con-
ference on Soviet Jewry
(NCSJ) at the Capital Hilton
Hotel.
"If improvement in Soviet
human rights performance
continues as in the past to be
nothing more than the cynical
manipulation of human lives
for political purposes, then the
Soviets cannot expect that in-
ternational and internal
pressures for better per-
formance will stop growing."
Shultz said the Soviet Union
pays a "large and steadily in-
creasing" price of censure and
isolation for its human rights
violations. "We shall continue
to do all in our power to see
that the price continues to
increase," he stressed.
The Secretary of State was
presented with the NCSJ's
Humanitarian Award by Ken-
neth Bialkin, president of the
Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith and chairman of
the Conference of Presidents
of Major American Jewish
Organizations. The award was
a shofar mounted on wood
with the inscription in Hebrew
and English: "Sound the
Great Shofar of Freedom."
Bialkin noted that Shultz
has made the struggle for
Soviet Jewry "his own" and it
has become a "fundamental
touchstone of American
No Role for U.S.
In Lebanon Now
The Peres unity government is getting
set, or so the Prime Minister says, to come
up with a withdrawal plan for the Israel
Defense Forces in Lebanon. The number of
escalations and additions to the original
requirements for withdrawal, as Peres sees
them, meanwhile continues to mount, and
so it is impossible at any given time to say
just what it is that will get the unity
government to acquiesce to a final plan.
We are not inclined to quote presidential
spokesman Larry Speakes on anything, for
Speakes speaks for we know not whom, his
official title notwithstanding. Nevertheless,
the other day. he said something brief and
to the point, which is not his usual way;
what made it even more significant was
that what he said appeared to be a mirror
image of a statement by Secretary of State
Shultz.
We are not quite sure, said Shultz. just
what it is the Israelis have in mind or on
what basis they will finally agree to leave
Lebanon. In essence, that is what Speakes
said. too.
All of which is even more significant in
light of the fact that the United States has
since declined to accept a mediator's role
among the contending parties once the
Israelis present their withdrawal plan. We
can readily understand this: the American
experience in Lebanon was an agonizing
one.
Does this mean that the Reagan
Administration is saying "a plague on both
your houses" to the contending parties?
You can bet that is not true. What Speakes
and Shultz merely suggested was that
there is no role for the United States to play
at this time. The cards have yet to be
placed on the table: the game has yet to
begin.
"Jewish f loridian

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foreign policy."
Soviet Jewry Condition Is
Very Grim'
Shultz told the Jewish
leaders attending the As-
sembly that he wishes he could
attend a meeting like this one
with "something to cele-
brate." But he noted the
condition of Soviet Jewry "re-
mains very grim. Soviet per-
secution of Jews and other
minorities has not only not
diminished, it seems to be
getting worse."
The Secretary cited the con-
tinued imprisonment of Ana-
toly Shcharansky as well as
recent examples. "Within the
past two months four well-
known Hebrew teachers have
been arrested in what appears
to be an intensifying campaign
of repression aimed speci-
fically at Jewish cultural activ-
ities," he said.
"In the Soviet view, appar-
ently, promoting identifica-
tion with one's religious and
cultural heritage constitutes
'anti-Soviet agitation and
propaganda.' "
Shultz said the Soviets have
been trying to discourage emi-
gration applications by "con-
tinuing to threaten many re-
fuseniks in psychiatric
hospitals, expulsion from their
jobs and internal exile. While
all this has been going on,
there has been an alarming
upsurge in officially-san-
ctioned anti-Semitic propa-
ganda."
In addition, he noted that
emigration "has come to a
virtual standstill." He said
that some 1,300 Jews left the
USSR in 1983 and "this year it
looks like fewer than a thou-
sands Jews will leave the
Soviet Union" even though
"thousands of Soviet Jews
have applied for exit visas.'i
U.S. Speaking Out On Human
Rights Violations
Shultz pledged that "the
United States therefore con-
tinues to speak out at every
opportunity against Soviet
human rights violations He
said that in all diplomatic dis-
cussions, including the recent
Reagan-Gromyko meeting at
the White House, "we have
stressed human rights issues."
The Secretary rejected a
Soviet view that human rights
are an internal matter. "In the
aftermath and in the everlast-
ing memory of the Holocaust,
this attitude must be relent-
evposed as a gross moral
evasion," he said. He added
that "we recognize that
governments not at peace with
their own people are unlikely
to be at peace with their neigh-
bors."
The three-day NCSJ Lead-
ership Assembly marks its
20th anniversary on behalf of
Soviet Jevvrv. "We go on
because the fight is not yet
won and we cannot stop until
it is." Bialkin declared. Shultz
sounded the same theme as he
left the meeting. "We keep
struggling and somehow,
someday we are going to suc-
ceed." he said.
Fonda Pays Trik-nte To Nudel
At a dinner the NCSJ pre-
sented its Solidarity Award to
Jane Fonda for her efforts on
behalf of long-time refusenik
Ida Nudel. Nudel "Has risked
much to stand up to Soviet
authorities to practice her
faith, and to celebrate her
Jewish heritage," Fonda said.
"She continues to be a source
of spiritual support for many
other refuseniks and prisoners
of conscience."
Fonda paid tribute to the
53-year-old Nudel with a
multimedia presentatin
compiled during a trip the
actress made to the jsovmi
Union last April when she
spent three days with Nudel It
was the first time in six year*
that Nudel, who now live, in
unofficial exile in the Molda
vian town of Bendery was
permitted visitors from the
West.
Many of those attending the
Assembly participated in the
daily noon vigil across from
the Soviet Embassy.
f\ Radio /TV Highlights Jf
MOSAIC Sunday, Nov. 4, 9 a.m. WPTV Channel
5 with host Barbara Gordon Interview with Rabbi
Howard Shapiro of Temple Israel on his trip to Russia this
summer.
L'CHAYIM Sunday, Nov. 4, 7:30 a.m. WPBR
1340-AM with host Rabbi Mark S. Golub The Jewish
Listener's Digest, a radio magazine. An interview with one
of the 52 hostages held by Iran, Barry Rosen, on the an-
niversary of his release from captivity.
SHALOM Sunday, Nov. 4, 10 a.m. WPEC Channel
12 (8:30 a.m. ON TV Channel 51) with host Richard
Peritz.
HERITAGE: CIVILIZATION AND THE JEWS -
Monday, Nov. 5, 9 p.m. WPBT Channel 2 and WHRS
Channel 42 THE AMERICAN JEWISH EX-
PERIENCE From colonial times through the Great
Depression, this program traces the successive phases of
Jewish immigration to America. It examines the nature of
Jewish integration into American society and the variety of
Jewish experiences in different parts of the country.
Sponsored by the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County.
Community Calendar
November 2
Pioneer Women Cypress Lakes board 10 a.m.
Temple Beth David Sisterhood garage sale Jewish
Federation Comprehensive Planning Committee Noon
November 3
Temple Judea art auction at Hilton, Singer Island, 7 p.m.
November 4
Golden Lakes Temple Sisterhood board 10IU
lewish War Veterans No. 510 10 a.m. Brandeis
University Women Lake Worth breakfast 10:30 a.m.
November5 _.. n,
Jewish Community Day School board 8 p.m. Rishona
Chapter of Amit Women board Congregation Ansne
Sholom Sisterhood board 9:45 a.m. *omen
American ORT Rishona board 9:30 a.m. Women$
American ORT Mid-Palm board 1 p.m. B naiB ntn
Women Mitzvah Council 7:15 p.m. J*,shJu|
Veterans Auxiliary No. 408 board 10:30 a.m.
Congregation Anshei Sholom Men's Club board- w
a.m. Women's American ORT Okeechobec -1:30 PjJ-.
Women's American ORT Poinciana ooard J*DI
Federation General Assembly Meeting 7:30 p.m.
November 6 _
Flection Da> Women's League for Israel- i P-
Women's American ORT Wellington board.*{-\\
United Order of True Sisters No. 61 Lido Spa throw
November 9 Jewish Community Center -no >
program B'nai B'rith Women Chai board-jw
Jewish Federation Budge, and Allocation Commits |
p.m.
November 7 Wnmti'
Jewish Federation Women's Division Hjf-SS
Assembly Evaluation Meeting 10 a.m.; *?**gg
Women's Division Business and Professional CsmP*.
Meeting 7 p.m. Yiddish Culture Group Crestnave
p.m. -Hadassah Lake Worth board 10 a^
Women's American ORT Golden River J08"!^[.
Temple Beth Sholom Men's Club board *> ^
Temple Israel Sisterhood board 7 p.m. ""jTLfi
Jacob Men's Club trip to Israel through NajJMJ ^
Jewish Community Center Executi\e Board *** .
Board of Directors 8 p.m. Labor Zionist aiiw
p.m.
November I f._.-'Americ
Hadassah Yovel board 9:30 a.m. *"Jan"U
ORT Haverhill board noon Am^ncan
Congress board noon Hadassah *^~vtf0Jk
p.m. Temple B'nai Jacob board I P-; ohiI
Aliya board 10 a.m. B'nai B'rith *omn j
board 9:30 a.m. Jewish War V eterans Nco' |
10 a.m. Temple Beth David Sisterhood boaru
B'nai B'rith No. 3196 7 p.m. Hadassan
Education Day


mw
Hope To Refuseniks
Friday; November 2,1984/ The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
A i ). -,t fil
PageS
Continued from Page 3-
Beach who came specially to
perform the marriage. "The
bride was a convert. Her
mother was not Jewish but her
falher was. Although ac-
cording to Jewish law she was
not Jewish, the Soviet
authorities considered her
Jewish," Rabbi Shapiro said.
Over 100 people were
crammed into the small
apartment and Rabbi Shapiro
fully expected something to
happen besides the wedding.
"Such a capriciousness about
the system makes it more scary
because you don't know
what's going to happen," he
said.
He also met with children of
refuseniks who were twinned
with Bar-Bat Mitzvah
youngsters in this community.
He expressed concerns of the
American chidren that their
Soviet twins do not get their
letters. "Many of the letters
that are sent from America do
get through," Rabbi Shapiro
learned, "but their outgoing
mail is also stopped. We were
shown letters from Bar-Bat
Mitzvah youngsters here so
they do know with whom they
are twinned.
"The twinning program
sponsored by the Soviet Jewry
lit ForoftheCommuni.J
Relations Council of the Jew-
ish Federation of Palm Beach
County is vital because the
refuseniks feel that it brings
their children into the larger
Jewish community that cares
about them," he added.
The Friedmans of
Leningrad are a typical family
visited by Rabbi Shapiro but
they stood out in his memory
They applied for an exit visa
three years ago and were
refused immediately
However, last year they were
promised the sought-after
permission to emigrate. They
sold all their furniture and
were at the point where they
were going to get their actual
exit visas when the Soviet
authorities told them that they
changed their minds and to
reapply in three years.
Boris and Natasha, with
their infant daughter Deborah
and 13-year-old son Misha,
now live in a small three-room
communal flat (bathroom and
kitchen facilities are shared
with ten other families). They
have no furniture except for
two beds, one crib and boxes
ot clothes and household
goods still packed ... and a
piano. "Misha was a concert
pianist who, after his parents
applied to leave, was denied
lessons and transferred to a
different school (he had been
going to one that specialized in
music). Since the new school
was much'rougher,'his father
gave him boxing lessons as a
birthday gift. He has had to
use them. Of course, Boris and
Natasha lost their jobs in their
profession and now do menial
forms of labor to survive. The
family displayed Russian
resignation tinged with humor
over their situation."
Rabbi Shapiro emphasized
the need to spread the story of
the refuseniks to keep their
plight alive. "It is an issue too
easily buried under
frustration. They are bright,
articulate, caring people and
we wouldn't want to lose
them. They need us
desperately and we need
them."
Rabbi Howard Shapiro [right] converses with Uri
Spazeman at the wedding of two refuseniks in the home
of the bride's parents. Rabbi Shapiro recently visited
refusenik families in Moscow and Leningrad.
REGISTERED REAL ESTATE BROKER
Acreage* Homes* Lots Apartments* Income Property
232A Royal Palm Way Office: 656-7886
PALM BEACH. FLORIDA
-NOTE-
Political Reading Material
and Advertising on this
page is not to be construed
as an endorsement by the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County.
PUNCH
NO. 79
VOTE FOR SOMEONE WHO CARES
HERB
EVATT
THE MATURE ONE*
County Commission Republican
DISTRICT 1 PD. POL ADV.
RES: 582-0184
*4Jvv/aariiPur o
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Seven chapels in Dade, Broward and Palm Beach counties. Serving the New York Metropolitan area.


p..
fage 6 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, November 2,1984
Organizations
in the News
BNAIBRITH WOMEN
The next general meeting of Masada Chapter will be
held on Nov. 13, 6:45 p.m., at the Chase Federal Bank in
the Jefferson Mall.
There will be a book review by Estelle Plaskon.
HADASSAH
The Boynton Beach Chapter will hold a regular meeting
on Monday, Nov. 5, 12:30 p.m., at the Royal Palm
Clubhouse, 554 NE 22nd Ave., just west of U.S. 1.
Election Bazaar and Flea Market sponsored by Shalom
and Yovel Chapters will be held at West Palm Beach
Auditorium Tuesday, Nov. 6,9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Free admission, free parking old and new jewelry,
ceramics, paintings, lamps, linens, piece goods, books,
novelty items, plants and clothing will be offered.
BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY
NATIONAL WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
BOYNTON BEACH CHAPTER
The board of directors will meet at the home of Sally
Friedman, Building 14, on Monday, Nov. 5 at 1 p.m.
The general meeting will be held on Monday, Nov. 19,
12:30 p.m., at the Royal Palm Clubhouse. The guest
speaker Eugene Topperman of the Jewish Family and
Children's Service will be introduced by Janet Asher,
program chairman. Topperman will discuss aspects of
communication with grandchildren of inter-religious
marriages and divorced couples.
On Nov. 26, 1 p.m., at the Royal Palm Clubhouse,
Hannah Turner will review "Shindler's List" by Thomas
Kenealley.
Nov. 28-Dec. 1 (four days, three nights) at the Regency
Hotel Spa, Bal Harbour. Good accommodations, delicious
food, free massages, etc. Husbands are welcome. For
information and reservations please call Helen Milch or
Rhoda Collier.
HADASSAH ASSOCIATES
The Lake Worth Chapterwill hold their regular monthly
meeting on Monday, Nov. 5, 9:30 a.m at the Sunrise
Bank. Military Trail and Gun Club Road. The purpose
to get together with all Hadassah Associates in this area to
form one larger group.
NATIONAL JEWISH
CIVIL SERVICE EMPLOYEES
The next monthly meeting of the South Florida Chapter
will be Sunday, Nov. 4, 1 p.m., at the Florida Gardens
Civic Center, 134 Ohio Road, Lake Worth (one-eighth
mile east of the Florida Turnpike off Lake Worth Road).
The guest speakers will be Congressman Dan Mica and
State Representative Ray Liberti.
The chapter is sponsoring a Thanksgiving weekend trip
to Venice on the Gulf Coast for three days and two nights.
A New Year's Eve weekend trip is also planned for
Cocoa for three days and two nights.
For trip and luncheon information contact Jeanette S.
Levine at 2557 Emory Drive West Villa "C," West
Palm Beach, Fla. 33415.
WOMEN'S AMERICAN ORT
Six ORT Chapters of North Palm Beach County Region
will observe ORT Sabbath at Temple Beth El on Nov. 9,
with Rabbi Howard Hirsch officiating. The six chapters
are Boynton, Haverhill, Indian Spring, Mid Palm, Palm
Beach, and Poinciana. This has been arranged by the
Region education chair, Esther Sugerman and her co-chair
Selma Kunin.
The Atlantis Chapterwill meet Tuesday, Nov. 6, 12:30
p.m., at the home of Sandy Singer. An ORT film will be
presented and refreshments served.
The Palm Beach Evening Chapter is once again spon-
soring its annual Chanukah Bazaar on Thursday evening,
Nov. 1, 8 p.m. at the home of Joan and Mike Schweitz.
Featured will be jewelry by Helen, stationery by Little
Prints, personalized frames by Tia, children's clothing,
toys and cosmetics. Refreshments will be served and all
sales benefit the chapter. Guests are welcome.
The Century Chapter will host a luncheon and card
party at the Red Lobster on Nov. 28.
The Lakes of Poinciana Chapter will meet on Monday,
Nov. 5, 12:30 p.m.,'at the Poinciana Lakes Clubhouse.
The Royal Chapterwill hold its fifth annual Sports Day
at the Indian Trail Country Club, on Mohday, Nov. 5. A
continental breakfast at 8:45 a.m. will start the day. This
will be followed by golf, tennis, or cards and includes
lunch.
The charges are as follows:
Golf Cart Lunch $25, Tennis and Lunch
$13 50 Cards and Lunch $8.75, TeeSponsers $25. Checks
should'be made out to Women's American ORT.
Participants may sign up at Indian Trail Country Club,
or at the Royal Palm Beach Golf Club. For further in-
formation, contact Bella Zatkowsky or Marcia Katz.
A rummage sale will beL held or,'Sunday, Nov. 11.
"under the trees" at Southern Blvd. and Royal Palm
Beach Blvd. in Royal Palm Beach.
Clothing and housewares in perfect condition will be
offered from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
For more information, contact Ruth Gradess, chair-
person or Miriam Korder, co-chairperson.
WOMEN'S LEAGUE FOR ISRAEL
The Sabra Chapter will hold its next meeting, a mini-
luncheon, on Tuesday.Noy. 6. 1 p.m., at the Sunrise
Savings and Loan Association on Military Trail and Gun
Club Road.
The South Florida Region will hold a workshop on
Friday, Nov. 2, 9:30 a.m., at Woodlands Clubhouse No.
7.
Subjects: Leadership, Fundraising, Membership,
Programming, Education, etc. A mini-breakfast will be
served.
YIDDISH CULTURE GROUP
The Nov. 13, 10 a.m. program of the Century Village
Group will feature 'The Ruth Hyde Group' in an original
cantata entitled 'Our Musical Tour of Israel.' It was
written and will be narrated by Lee Duchin, who recently
returned from a trip to Israel. The soloists will be Ann
March and Jack Zuckerman, accompanied by violinist
Harry Levine. Ruth Hyde is musical director and will
accompany on piano.
Also featured will be 'The Musical Friends' with vocalist
Lillian Kessler at the piano and violin players Jacky
Lorber, Phil Herman and Sam Finkenthal.
Training Underway
For JF&CS Quick
Response Program
The Jewish Family and
Children's Service has begun
orientation and training for its
Quick Response program. The
second session will be held on
Tuesday, Nov. 6, at 10 a m
and will address the questions'
What is the Quick Response
service? Who will it serve''
What will it really do?
According to Ned Gold-
berg, program manager, vol-
unteers in the program visit
socially isolated shut-ins for
one hour a week. "Sometimes
the volunteer that comes to the
client's home is the only visitor
that the client sees that week,"
said Goldberg.
Subsequent training sessions
will be held on Thursday,
Nov. 8, Tuesday, Nov. 13, and
Thursday, Nov. 15. All train-
ing sessions will be held at the
Jewish Family and Children's
Service, 2250 Palm Beach
Lakes Blvd., Suite 104, West
Palm Beach, beginning at 10
a.m.
Interested persons may still
register for the training ses-
sions by calling Goldberg at
684-1991.
/pasta and vegetables supreme"-------------------------------N
I The Jewish Homemaker's Guide to Delicious Italian Cooking \
I Gets its Zest from Chef Boy-ar-dee Ravioli.
1 cup chopped red pepper
1 package (10 oz.) frozen corn,
cooked and drained
1 package (10 oz.) chopped
brim c >li. cooked and drained
1 cup sbced mushrooms
' i cup butler or margarine
(4 tablespoons)
2 tablespoons chopped parsley
V, cup chopped onion
1 tablespoon butter or margarine
1 can (15 oz.) Chef Boy-ar-dee
Cheese Ravioli in Tomato Sauce
1 cup water
1 packet G.Washington's Golden
Seasoning and Broth
1. Saute chopped parsley and onion in 1 tablespoon butter.
2. Combine parsley, onion. Cheese Ravioli, water and G. Washington's in
2 quart sauce pan. Cover, simmer for 10 minutes.
3. Meantime, saute red pepper in 1 tablespoon butter. Remove to warm
serving dish.
4. Continue to saute each vegetable separately in 1 tablespoon of butter.
Remove each vegetable to separate warm dish. Serves four.
DON
ROSS
(pi
A 14 year resident of
South Florida
President of the
College of Boca Raton
A Business and Community Leader
I AM COMMITTED TO:
Preserving Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid
by ending all talk of even taking a penny away.
Born and raised in Long Island
Educated in Public Schools
Attended N.Y. Institute of Technology
and Hofstra University
Dean of Students N.Y. Institute of Technology
President Wilmington College (Delaware)
Director Boca Raton Chamber of Commerce
Past Chairman United Way
of Boca Raton
Married former Helen Landgreen,
Flushing, N.Y.
2 children
VOTE ROSS
NOV. 6th
Call 421-4588
For More Information
DISTRICT 14
NOTE
Political Reading Material and Advertising on this page is
not to be construed as an endorsement by the Jewish Fed-
eration of Palm Beach County.
PAID FOR BY THE ROSS FOR CONGRESS COWMITTEE
w*"
l*"


Friday, November 2,1984/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 7
JCC News
ONE MORE TIME WAREHOUSE"
Steven Shapiro, chairperson of the Jewish Community
Center's "One More Time Warehouse," has announced
the appointment of Ruth Goldman as its new manager.
Mrs. Goldman has been an active volunteer at the
Center's "Warehouse" for the past year and a half and is
very knowledgeable of its operation. She will be happy to
arrange for pick-ups of furniture, cars, trucks, small or
large appliances, bric-a-brac, and so on. All donations are
tax deductible. The Warehouse phone number is 471-1077
If no answer, please call the Center at 689-7700.
All are welcome to visit the "Warehouse," which is
located at 3420 W. 45th St., Unit 8 in West Palm Beach to
browse and pick up a bargain.
IN PREPARATION FOR CHANUKAH
The Jewish Community Center is in the process of
putting together a Jewish Book Fair in honor of Jewish
Book Month Sunday, Nov. 18, from 11 a.m. to 330 d m
at the Center, 2415 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach. '
People of all ages will be invited to come and browse and
enjoy the many events that will be held at that time For
adults a film of Jewish interest, and for children a special
Storytime and a movie festival.
A variety of gifts for purchase will be available in ad-
dition to the books. This will be a one-stop shoD for all
Chanukah gifts. Watch for further details.
FIRST SOCIAL FOR NEWCOMERS
Joy Gales, chairperson of the Shalom Newcomers
Network of the Jewish Community Center is pleased to
announce that the first social to be given for newcomers to
the community will be held Sunday, Nov. 4 from 10:30
a.m. to noon.
Mrs. Gales wants to receive names of newcomers (three
years or less) to our area and is asking persons in the
community to call the Center at 689-7700 to inform the
Center in order that invitations may be sent to new
residents.
This is the first in a series of socials being planned for
newcomers.
VOTE FOR SOMEONE WHO CARES
HERB
IEVATT
THE RIGHT CHOICE*
^NSH County Commission Republican
rtU. 79 DISTRICT 1 TO. POL ADV.
Hadassah of Greater Palm
Beach Coulnty |vit
members and friends to honor
RfSl Mt*kin, past president
of National Hadassah at a
Srfate of Israel Bonds
Champagne Brunch on
Sunday, Nov. 11 at 10:30 a.m.
lLf Go,den L,on Restaurant
located at the Challenger
Counirrciub,3536Polnclana
Drive Lake Worth. Mrs.
Matzkin will be the keynote
speaker. She will also be
honored as the "Woman of
the Year" by the State of Isra-
el. Couvert for the brunch is
M0 and a commitment to
purchase an Israel Certificate
or Bond. Reservations are
required. Members may mail
checks to Chapter or Group
Bond chairmen.
NOTE
Political Reading Material
and Advertising on this
page is not to be construed
as an endorsement by the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County.
VOTE NOVEMBER 6
TO RBELECT
Eleanor
Weinstock
QUALIFIED TO SERVE DISTRICT 83
FLORIDA HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
Prime Sponsor of
The School Discipline Act of 1984
Eleanor Weinstock has been YOUR voice in the Florida
House of Representatives for 3 terms. Please vote
November 6 to keep her working for you.
DEMOCRAT
W. Pol. Adv. Paid lof by Eleanor Weinstock Campaign Fund.
I
Congressman
Keep him working for you...
MICA... A Record of Service and Accomplishment
W Congressman Dan Mica is a
stunning example of my point. He
is known throughout the country
tor being a dedicated, hard-
working Representative, one who
truly cares about his constituents'
nghts. %%
February 1983
Sun Sentinel
Dan Mica continues to demonstrate a unique
understanding in working to get problems
solved at the federal level. He has the
experience and Washington know-how, the
expertise on the critical issues important to
me citizens of the 14th Congressional
JJJJp. and, more important, the ability to
881 fob done tor you.
Seeks your views through an annual ques-
tionnaire
Serves as South Florida's representative on
the Committee on Veteran's Affairs
Serves on the Select Committee on Aging
Serves on the Committee on Foreign Affairs
Chairman of the Subcommittee on Interna-
tional Operations
Member of the House Export Task Force
Member of the Congressional Tourism Caucus
Elected by his colleagues as a Southern
Regional Whip
Appointed to National Anti-Terrorism Commit-
tee by Secretary of State George Shultz
Responsible for obtaining a 625-bed medical
and surgical veteran's hospital for our area
Introduced legislation which led to the devel-
opment of a National Veteran's Cemetery in
Central Florida
Cosponsored the Florida Wilderness Act
which passed the House in 1983
Appointed as a member of the U.S. Delega-
tion to the Board of Governors of the Interna-
tional Monetary Fund by Secretary of the
Treasury Donald Regan
Reintroduced the MICA AMENDMENT to
stop the flow of illegal aliens into South
Florida (this will extend its life and effect over
the next two years)
Cosponsored the Law Enforcement Officers
Protection Law
Introduced legislation to increase the number
of judges in South Florida's Judicial District in
order to eliminate a backlog of cases
Cosponsored the Bail Reform Crime Bill
Received the Liberty Bell Award, the highest
honor presented to a non-attorney by the
Palm Beach County Bar Association for his
contributions to the criminal justice system, in-
cluding legislation creating a new Federal
judicial district for the Southern region
Chaired hearings concerning Medicare's fu-
ture held in Boca Raton by the House Select
Committee on Aging
Voted to insure the financial stability of the
Social Security System (passed into law as
P.L 98-21)

RE-ELECT
Congressman Dan Mica...He's Working for You
vOTE in the General Election on November 6th
Pad lo. By m. CorxnWM. io Pmiki Congnnrw Dan Mu Dm Memo* CPA Tfiaw*


PftOalA TU -- ii
Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, November 2,1984
Senior News
FROM THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
TRANSPORTATION
Transportation is available
in our designated area for
persons 60 years of age or over
who do not use public tran-
sportation. We take people to
treatment centers, doctors'
offices, to hospitals, nursing
homes to visit spouses, to
social service agencies and
nutrition centers. There is no
fee for this service, but parti-
cipants are encouraged to
contribute their fair share.
There is a great demand for
this service, so please make
your reservations in advance.
For information and-or
reservations, call 689-7703
Monday through Friday.
HOT KOSHER
LUNCH CONNECTION
Many elements combine to
make the Hot Kosher Lunch
Program at the Jewish Com-
munity Center a success. Fore-
most among this is the oppor-
tunity to form new and lasting
friendships.
Each weekday, seniors
gather for intimate talk,
educational discussions, game
playing, leisure and song.
These activities are followed
by a hot, kosher, nutritious
lunch served with warmth and
hospitality by our dedicated
volunteers. There is no set fee,
but persons are asked to make
a contribution each meal.
Please come and join us.
For information and reserva-
tions (which must be made in
advance) call Carol or Lillian
at 689-7703 in West Palm
Beach.
HOME DELIVERED
MEALS
Persons who are
homebound and need a
Kosher meal please call for
information. Call Carol in
West Palm Beach at 689-7703.
CLASSES AND
DISCUSSION GROUPS
Arts and Crafts. Instruc-
tors: Lee Blumcnthal and
Evelyn Katz. Mondays, 2-4
p.m.
Ulpan-Beginning Con-
versational Hebrew.
Instructor: Samuel Steinberg.
Mondays and Thursdays, 2-
3:15 p.m. Eight weeks,
beginning Nov. 15 Cost $20.
Timely Topics. Round
Table Discussion. Tuesdays,
1:15-3 p.m. Group Leader,
Sylvia Skolnik.
A most outstanding and
stimulating activity. This
group attracts persons who are
interested in good discussion
on topics of the day. Our
thanks to Harry Epstein,
Arthur Levy and others who
have been filling in for Sylvia
Skolnik. Timely Topics will
meet Nov. 6 and 20 during
November. Everyone is wel-
come.
Intermediate Bridge.
Instructor: Al Parsont.
Wednesdays, 9:30-11:30 a.m.
Speakers Club. Thursdays,
9:30-11 a.m. President: Morris
Shuken.
SECOND TUESDAY
ACTIVITY
Special Tribute to Charles
Jarrow on his 90th Birthday
Charles Jarrow, a charter
member of the Speakers Club
of Palm Beach County and an
active participant of the JCC
Senior Center, will be honored
on Tuesdy, Nov. 13 at the JCC
at 1:15 p.m. Morris Shuken,
president of the Speakers
Club, announces that a special
program is planned. Everyone
is invited to attend this festive
occasion. Refreshments will be
served.

Miles of white sand beaches, heated
swimming pool, live entertainment In
lounge, tennis and golf nearby, boat
trips available for sightseeng. fish
ing and shelling. Children 18 and
under FREE in room with parents
Children's meals at menu prices.
Writs or Call for
RESERVATIONS
Toll Fro* Florida Watts Lin*
1 (800) 282-3588
VANDERBILT INN on the GULF
11000 Guff Start Oriw. NortfifepfM. FL 33963
Offer expires January 31. 1965
Discount Applies To Hotel Room Only, j
Coupon cannot be used with other discount package
Temple Beth Zion Approves Building Plans
The conceptual site and
floor plans for Temple Beth
Zion of the Western Com-
munities were formally ap-
proved at a general meeting
last week of the Conservative
congregation.
The entire concept was
developed, after many con-
sultations with the Building
Committee, by Ronald M.
Ash and Associates in con-
junction with architect Alan
Strassler.
The building has been
designed so that it can be
constructed in compatible
phases as the needs of the
community increase.
The first phase has been
planned to function as an
interchangeable use building.
It will house the Sanctuary,
social hall, Hebrew school
classrooms, kitchen, lobby,
office and rabbi's study.
The building will feature a
combination of concrete block
and a unique building material
known as Kalwal. This is a
self-insulated semi-opaque
synthetic material which will
permit the filtering through of
a soft light during daylight
hours.
The edifice will be built on a
tract of land donated to the
Temple by the Royal Palm
Beach Colony, Inc. and will be
visible from Royal Palm
Beach Blvd. Vehicular access
will be from Sparrow Drive.
Temple Beth Zion will offer
the use of the building to
Village authorities for
emergency shelter in con-
junction with a recently
adopted Natural Disaster
Plan.
The site plan will provide
for landscaped buffer areas
fronting on Royal Palm Beach
Boulevard along the southern
boundary, and also along the
northern boundary which is
contiguous to the fire and
police complex and adjacent
to the Royal Townhouse
Project.
Temple Beth Zion plans t0
submit its site plan for ap-
proval by Village authorities
within the next 90 days.
Mrs. Jasen Mishkit is
president of Temple Beth
Zion. Nat Crandall is vice
president and chairman of the
Building Committee.
Dr. Joe Rivin is vice
president for fund raising
while Irving Greenspan and
Bill Rachles complete the five-
member Construction Com-
mittee team.
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^
News From Hod Hasharon
Continued from Page S
Broward and Palm Beach,
Florida.
Article No. 2
The second article deals
with a problem that unfortun-
ately is not limited to our Hod
Hasharon neighborhoods, or
Sen to Israel. The headline
reads "School Bus Tran-
sportation of Hod Hasharon
Children: Behavioral
Problems of Children and
Parents Alike." The article
eoes on to tell of incidents of
rowdyism on an almost daily
basis on the school buses by a
small number of disruptive
children. And of the inability
and-or unwillingness of the
parents involved to take a firm
hand with their children.
The article suggests that
monitors be on each bus and
that the teachers be involved
and that general PTA meet-
ings be held to deal with the
problem.
Article No. 3
Elections are to be held in
the Giora neighborhood for a
new neighborhood committee
for representatives to the local
Project Renewal Steering
Committee. The article states
that all residents 18 or older
are eligible to stand for elec-
tion and to vote. On Oct. 23 at
8 p.m. a general neighborhood
assembly was held. All
prospective candidates must
present their candidacy to the
election committe 2 by Nov. 2,
and the election will be held on
Nov. 6.
Article No. 4
The Senior Center in Gil
Amal Renews its Activities
(After the Summer). The
article goes on to wish for a
good, healthy and active year
for all of the participants in
the activities of the Center.
The exciting news is that the
Austria to Postpone
Decision On Controversial
Conference Center
ByREINHARDENGEL
VIENNA (JTA)
Chancellor Fred Sinowatz an-
nounced a postponement of a
Parliamentary decision on the
controversial international
conference center to be built in
Vienna and financed largely
by Arab states.
The project has been at-
tacked by the opposition
Peoples Party on grounds that
the Arab backers would exert
undue influence over the
management of the center,
possibly excluding Israel from
invitations to international
gatherings.
They also faulted the favor-
able terms granted the Arabs,
especially tax exemptions
which critics said would make
the center more expensive to
build than if financed by
Austrian banks or bond issues.
The ruling Socialist-Liberal
coalition which controls the
Lower House of Parliament
approved the project. The
Peoples Party which com-
mands a majority in the Upper
House vetoed it. A motion is
pending in the lower chamber
to override the veto but
Sinowatz said that a vote on
this has been postponed.
He defended the contract
nevertheless, saying he is
convinced that the Arab
shareholders favor Austrian
sovereignty in the manage-
ment of the convention center.
The project was initiated by
former Chancellor Bruno
Kreisky several years ago,
mainly to create jobs at a time
of rising unemployment.
Kreisky sought financing from
Arab Gulf states because his
government was running a
deficit.
NOTE
Political Reading Material and Advertising on this page is
"oi to be construed as an endorsement by the Jewish Fed-
eration oj Palm Beach County.
Friday, November 2,1984 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 9
youngsters and young adults
in the neighborhood have
decided to take an active role
in the Center and will invite
the Seniors to participate in
joint activities, especially
around Holiday celebrations.
Article No. 5
This tells local residents that
the possibility still exists for
them to enlarge and renovate
their homes through Project
Renewal loans and grants.
Translation of article about
Seniors by Moshe Ashkenazi.
"Nice Boredom"
I saw him in the public park,
sitting alone as if glued to one
spot. I thought to myself,
what have they to do all day
long, all week long? They
must be bored to death in the
neighborhoods, sitting alone
on benches with nothing to do
all day long.
I sat down next to him and
we began to talk. He said,
'Aren't you bored? What do
you do all day? Only sit and
think? 'I'm thinking about the
conversation we had today at
the Senior Center after the
exercise class,' I told him.
'What are you talking about
- which Center?' he asked me.
'The Senior Center, right here
in the neighborhood,' I an-
swered. 'So what,' he said,
'one day out of the week there
is something to do.'
'What do you mean,' I said.
'Exercise class is twice a week,
every Sunday and Thursday.
And after exercises, we do
handicrafts.'
'What? Exercises, handi-
crafts, and also conversa-
tion?,' he asked.
'Yes, and that's not all. Pe-
riodically, we have movies and
special events, such as parties
and trips. For example, our
last trip was to Safed and
Nazareth and our next will be
to the Golan Heights and the
ElHamma Hot Baths.'
'How wonderful that you
have such fine programs and
that you youngsters make it
possible," he said with a
twinkle in his eye.
VOTE FOR SOMEONE WHO CARES
4EVATT
PUNCH
NO. 79
THE BEST CHOICE*
County Commission Republican
DISTRICT 1 PD. POL ADV.
Protect Our Quality Of Life
1984 Sierra Club
Legislative Award
For The Environment
100% Environmental
Voting Record By
The League Of
Conservationists
Endorsed By League
Of Conservationists
RE-ELECT RAY
LIBERTI
STATE HOUSE DIST. 82
DEM.
PO POl ADV R H6CRT1-TREAS
VOTE NOVEMBER 6th
Keep
Allen C.
CLARK
ACHIEVEMENT AS
TAX COLLECTOR
Initiated change in Florida Law to allow invest-
ment of Tax Collections; Making 8 MILLION
dollars in pure interest available to taxing
authorities (that's $8,000,000 of LESS TAXES
NEEDED).
Has kept abreast of data processing technology
to make office more efficient and cost-effective
Palm Beach County was first in the state with an
on-line motor vehicle registration system.
Every annual office audit has been without sub-
stantive discrepancies ... over 400 MILLION-
dollars is collected and distributed annually.
Has run the office on budget well below fees
collected, returning over $18,000,000 to taxing
authorities; AGAIN REDUCING THE REQUIRE-
MENT FOR TAX DOLLARS.
QUALIFICATIONS
40 Years Management Experience
10 Years as Tax Collector
| Certified Florida Collector (University of Florida)
i Graduate Management Courses
"ftHAdv.
County Tax Collector
EDUCATION
Palm Beach High School, University of Miami,
University of Maryland, U.S.A.F. Air University, Pro-
fessional Military Courses.
MILITARY
Retired Regular U.S. Air Force Officer and
Command Pilot with 31 years service, includina
WWII, Korea and Vietnam.
MEMBERSHIPS
Kiwanis Club of West Palm Beach
Forum Club of the Palm Beaches
Chamber of Commerce of the Palm Beaches
Democratic Executive Committee
Memorial Presbyterian Church
Palm Lodge #327 F & AM
Scottish Rite Bodies, Valley of Lake Worth
Amara Shrine
DEMOCRAT


Pamlfl tv-i-
-. -.- .'
Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday. November 2,1984
UJA Hineni Leadership Forges Ahead Cand|e UgMng Tlm
Continued from Page 1\
senators, invited by their col-
league Senator Arlen Specter
of Pennsylvania, at a luncheon
in the Senate Caucus Room.
During an exchange of greet-
ings, the senators expressed
their support for Israel. They
repeatedly reflected upon the
importance of the UJA's work
and the commitment of its
leadership to human needs.
The senators called the meet-
ing a valuable occasion to
meet the UJA leadership and
exchange views.
Senator Specter, who
recently visited Israel and
Arab nations in the Middle
East, said that Syria has no
interest in a peaceful relation-
ship with Israel. He called for
renewed leadership by the
U.S. to bring "rationality"
into the area.
In his speech Tuesday
evening Ambassador Rosenne
said, "Israel needs partners
for peace. It can't sit down by
itself to negotiate a treaty. The
Arab countries cannot impose
peace on Israel." He said the
key to peace is a strong Israel.
Turning to the partnership
role of the UJA with Israel, he
said, "I'm convinced that
when the history of Israel is
written, the UJA will be a
sweet chapter. Through UJA,
people leave their jobs to visit
Israel. They are moved by a
love for Israel and that's our
secret weapon."
Other program highlights
included an "Update on the
Washington Political Scene"
by Thomas Dine, executive
director of the American Israel
Public Affairs Committee,
and Mark Talisman, director
of the Washington Action
Office of the Council of
Jewish Federations. There was
also a panel on "Israel
Today and Tomorrow" at the
Israeli Embassy.
In addition to briefings and
meetings, the 117 participants
from 24 communities also
experienced the historical and
cultural atmosphere of the
nation's capital with a paddle-
wheeler cruise hosted by
Lynda J. Robb. wife of Gov-
Fri. Nov. 25:19
H. lrwin Levy [kit], national chairman of UJA Hineni III,
discusses the conference with Samuel ".Miller [centerj,
1SSl father of H.nenl, .. the Honorable Meir Rosenne
[right], Israel's Ambassador to the U.S., looks on.
ernor Charles S. Robb of
Virginia, down the Potomac
River to Mount Vernon,
George Washington's estate.
Governor Robb met the group
for a tour of the historic
mansion.
In evaluating the campaign
results of the Hineni meeting,
UJA National Chairman
Alexander Grass said, "The
giving set the pace and tone
for the year ahead and con-
tinues the momentum estab-
lished in September at the Na-
tional Opening Conference."
Samuel H. Miller of Cleve-
land, a UJA National vice
cnairman, was honored as the
founding father of Hineni,
which takes its name from a
biblical quote in which
Abraham expressed his readi-
ness to serve the Lord.
In accepting his award, a
piece of antique Judean glass
from the Roman Period,
Miller recounted a personal
anecdote about his mother
who taught him the principles
of tzedakah. "We were a poor
family," Miller said, "but no
matter who came to the door,
she always gave that person
something. My mother told
us, 'Don't you ever turn any-
body down even if you are cer-
tain they don't need help. One
out of 100 might be totally
I legitimate and you will have i
turned that person down. And
then you will have committed
a sin against the Lord forever.
"I will remember that for
the rest of my life," he af-
firmed.
Commenting on the event,
H. Irwin Levy of Palm Beach,
Fla., Hineni chairman, said,
"It was truly a successful three
days. I am gratified that so
many high-ranking admin-
istration officials such as
Secretary Regan, Secretary
Weinberger and Ambassador
Brock met with us."
Also attending from Palm
Beach County were Ruthe and
Heinz Eppler, Jeanne Levy,
Stacey and Mark Levy and Dr.
Elizabeth S. and Alan
Shulman.
In addition to noting the
significance of 33 senators
attending this meeting of
major contributors to UJA,
the gathering had a more
personal meaning for Heinz
Eppler. For the first time he
and his wife, Ruthe, attended
the Hineni meeting together
with all their children and their
husbands. "It was an excellent
vehicle which exposed our
children to those things we're
interested in. That spirit was
transmitted to them," he said.
Bar Mitzvah
KOSHER HOTEL
PALM BEACH
FLORIDA AREA
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Scott Garvls
SCOTT GARVIS
Scott Brian Garvis of North
Palm Beach will become a Bar
Mitvah on Nov. 3 at Temple
Beth David. He will also parti-
cipate in the service on Friday
night. Rabbi Wiliam Marder
and Cantor Earl Rackoff will
officiate.
Scott is an eighth grader at
Howell Watkins Junior High
and calls surfing his number
one hobby. He also enjoys
racquetball.
Religious Directory
Conservative
CONGREGATION ANSHEI SHOLOM: 5348 Grove Street
West Palm Beach 33409. PHone 684-3212. Rabbi Isaac
Vander Walde. Cantor Mordecai Spektor. Daily: 8:30 a.m.
and 7:30 p.m. Friday: 8:30 a.m., 5 p.m. and a late service at
8:15 p.m., followed by Oneg Shabbat. Saturday: 8:30 a.m.,
7:30 p.m., Mincha followed by Sholosh Suedos.
CONGREGATION BETH KODESH OF B0YNT0N
BEACH: 501 N.E. 26 Avenue, Boynton Beach 33435. Phone
586-9428. Rabbi Avrom L. Drazin. Monday 8:30 a.m.;
Thursday 8:30 a.m. Sabbath services, Friday 8:15 p.m.,
Saturday 9 a.m.
GOLDEN LAKES TEMPLE: 1470 Golden Lakes Blvd.,
West Palm Beach 33411. Phone 689-9430. Rabbi Joseph
Speiser. Daily Services 8:15 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. Sabbath
services Friday 8:15 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m., 5 p.m., Mincha
followed by Sholosh Suedos.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID: 4657 Hood Road, Palm Beach
Gardens 33410. Phone 694-2350. Rabbi William Marder,
Cantor Earl J. Rackoff. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m.
Saturday 10 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 2815 No. Flagler Dr., West Palm
Beach 33407. Phone 833-0339. Rabbi Howard J. Hirsch,
Cantor Elaine Shapiro. Sabbath services Friday 8:15 p.m.,
Saturday 9:30 a.m. Daily Minyan 8:15 a.m., Sunday and
Legal Holidays 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 315 N. "A" Street, Lake Worth
33460. Phone 585-5020. Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg, Cantor
Jacob Elman. Services Monday and Thursday 8:15 a.m.,
Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 224 N.W. Avenue G, Belle
Glade 33430. Sabbath services Friday, 8:30 p.m. Phone 996-
3886.
TEMPLE BETH ZION: Lions Club, 700 Camelia Dr., Royal
Palm Beach. Mailing Address: POBox 104, 650 Royal Palm
Blvd., Royal Palm Beach, FL 33411. Sabbath Services Friday 8
p.m., Saturday 8:46 a.m. Rabbi Nathan Zelizer. Phone 793-
9122.
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB: 2177 So. Congress Ave., West Palm
Beach 33406. Phone 433-5957. Rabbi Dr. Moms Suberman.
iabbath services. Friday 8 p.m., Saturday and Holidays 9a.m.,
Monday and Thursday 9 a.m.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL: 190 North County Road Palm Beach
33480. Phone 832-0804. Rabbi JoalJChasm Cantor David
Dardashti. Sabbath services, Friday 8:30 p.m.: Saturday 9a.m.
THE TREASURE COAST JEWISH CENTER -Ben
Abraham: 3257 S.E. Salerno Road. Port Sale. Rabbi
Abraham Rose. 1-287-8833. Services Friday evenings 8 p.m.
LAKE WORTH JEWISH CENTER: St. Luke's Un.ud
Methodist Chapel, 165 Ohio Road. Lake Worthy Phone 433
1869. Friday night serivces 8:15 p.m., Saturday. 9am.
Orthodox
CONGREGATION AITZ CHAIM: Century^ Village West
Palm Beach. Phone 689-4675. Sabbath services 9 a.m
p.m. Daily services 8:15 a.m. and 6:J0 p.m.
Reform
CONGREGATION BETH ISRAEL: 1592.FrestaJP.C>.*
857146, Port St. Lucie. FL 33462. Fridaynight services P
Saturday morning 10:30a.m. Phone465-697'.
THE REFORM TEMPLE OF JWITER-TEg^
Jupiter High School. Military Trad, Jupiter. Maiung
Plaza 222, U.S. No. 1. Tequesta 33458. Phone 747-4235. r
Alfred L. Friedman. Services Friday 8 p.m.
Pt
TEMPLE BETH EL: 4600 Oleander Avenue, Fort Pierce.
33450. Phone 461-7428. Cantor Anne Newman. _
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM: St. Helen's Parish "au.
Avenue and Victory Blvd.. Vero Beach 32960,^gj,
P.O. Box 2113. Vero Beach, FL 32961-2113. Rabbi Ricnara
Messing. Phone 1-669-0180.
TEMPLE BETH TORAH: at St Davijs toUw^JJ
Episcopal Retreat. Forest HillI Blvd. and WdhntfJJ
Wast Pahn Beach. Mailing address: P.O. Box N**,^
Palm Beach, FL 33416. Fridav .wvices 8.15 P* ^
Steven R. Westman. C^tor Nicholas Fenakel. rT
S*700- _i n. West Palm Be*d>
TEMPLE ISRAEL: 1901 No. Flagler Dj-WJ. Cantor*!
33407 Phone 833-8421. Rabbi Howard Shapiro^
Soloist Susan Weiss. Sabbath services, Fnday P_
TEMPLE JUDEA: at St. Catharine's Greek ^^SL^li
Social Hall. 4000 Washington Rd., at ^'ff1^ addie*
Rabbi Joel L. Levine. Cantor Anne **?^w09. Phone
5164 Okeechobee Blvd.. West-Palm Beach, FL *>*"
471-1626.


_______ Friday, November 2,1984 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 11
Synagogue News
TEMPLE BETH DAVID
Sisterhod will be holding a
Garage Sale at the temple,
4657 Hood Road, Palm Beach
Gardens, on Friday, Nov. 2,
from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. There
wjH be household items,
clothes, furniture, bicycles and
much much more.
Sisterhood is looking for craft
and gift vendors for their
Holidav Boutique Bazaar,
which will be held at the
temple on Sunday, Dec. 2, 11
a.m. to 3 p.m. Vendors are re-
quested to make reservations
by calling the temple office.
An Art Auction presented
by the Sisterhood will be held
on Saturday evening Nov. 17,
at the temple. Previews will
begin 7:30p.m. Admission will
be $2.50 per person. There will
be a door prize and desserts.
Each couple or single at-
tending the Art Auction will
receive a free lithograph. Visa
and Mastercard will be ac-
cepted.
The prize art collection in-
cludes works by Agam,
Chagall, Dali, Matisse, Miro,
Neiman, Picasso, Rockwell
I and many other noted artists.
There will be lithographs,
etchings, engravings, water-
colors, enamels, sculpture,
I etc.
The community is cordially
I invited to attend. For further
information phone the temple
office.
CONGREGATION
BETH KODESH
The congregation an-
nounces a series of classes,
l"The Life and Times of the
lAmerican Jew," to be con-
ducted by Rabbi Avrom L.
IDrazin. In this series of lec-
[ttire-discussions, Rabbi Drazin
will discuss how the American
lJe approaches the ob-
vance of his faith.
Rabbi Drazin will preview
Fseries with a special lecture
Pn Conversion and Inter-
narnage" during the Oneg
fiibbai following the service
rnday, Nov. 2, at 8:15
p.m.
De to the Presidential
""on, the series itself will
won Tuesday, Nov. 13 at
P-m. at ,hc synagogue,
rk tu- Ave- Boynton
rhis is a delay of one
the originally
Sisterhood will hold their
meeting at the temple on Tues-
day, Nov. 13, 12:30 p.m.
The program will be com-
prised of poetry readings and
original stories authored and
rendered by Lou Mass.
Plans for the Chanukah
party for Sunday, Dec. 9, 7
p.m. are now completed and
will include supper, profes-
sional entertainment, music,
and door prizes. Tickets are
$7.50 per person. Esther
Masarik and Bertie Becker arc
co-chairpersons and tickets
will be sold by their captains.
Reservations for the New
Year Weekend to St. August-
ine are practically sold out. To
participate call Betty Roth or
Rose Greenberg.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
Sisterhood will hold a
regular meeting on Wednes-
day, Nov. 7. in the Social
Hall at 315 N. "A" St., Lake
Worth. Coffee and cake will
j?e see followed by the meeting at 1
p.m.
A book review will be pre-
sented by Helen Nussbaum
immediately after the meeting.
TEMPLE JUDEA
The temple is planning
"Outreach Sabbath" as a
special project for the con-
gregation and the community.
"Outreach Sabbath" will be ;
held on Friday, Nov. 2 at 8
p.m. at St. Catherine's Cul-
tural Center. Rabbi Joel Le-
vine and Cantor Anne New-
man will officiate.
"Outreach" is a national
project of the Union of
American Hebrew Congrega-
tions. "Outreach" sensitizes
the Jewish community about
the needs of those converting
to Judaism, those who have
converted to Judaism, and to
non-Jews who are married to
Jews.
During services, May Good-
stein, chairperson of Temple
Judea's Outreach committee,
will introduce a presentation
by members of her committee.
Bill Kline, Mary Parker, and
Susan Wilders will make
personal statements about
their experiences of being new
to Judaism.
It is important to note that
"Outreach" is also aimed at
non-Jews who are married to
Jews. "Outreach" has as its
goal not to convert but to
sensitize both parties to Jewish
life.
Call the temple office for
more information.
LAKE WORTH
JEWISH CENTER
Frank Shapiro, popular
guest of many organizations,
will be the speaker at the
Center on Friday evening,
Nov. 2.
His topic will be, "The Por-
tion of the Week."
Program For Interfaith
Couples Offered
keduleddate."
^further information and
*tion for ,he 10-session
iIlce' ca" the congregation
The Union of American
Hebrew Congregations, as
part of its National Outreach
Program, is sponsoring an
eight week program designed
exclusively for unaffiliated
interfaith couples. The
seminar has been piloted in
Los Angeles and is now being
offered in five major cities
across the United States. In
Boca Raton the seminar began
at Temple Beth El on Oct. 25
and will run through Dec. 20
(excluding Thanksgiving) on
Thursdays from 7:30-10 p.m.
Participants in the seminar
will have a unique opportunity
to share with others in like
circumstances their concerns
about the religious environ-
ment of their home, their
questions about Judaism and
the issues surrounding the
blending of their two lives.
Discussion is facilitated in a
safe, non-judgemental setting.
If you would like more in-
formation about the program,
or if you know of someone
who might be interested in
participating, please contact
Linda Spitzer, outreach
coordinator, UAHC office,
3785 NW 82 Ave., Suite 210,
Miami, Florida 33166.
Morse
Si d"? B-ach LakM Boulevard Suite 104
pi Palm Beach, Florida 33409
f^ISHFAM,LYAND CHILDREN'S SERVICE
l**isi5'rn<'"'C pro'ess'"l and counseling agency serving the
|con/,fl,n, mun"y ol Pn Beach County. Professional
wai help ls available tor
ana
Z'^otlHeagmg
h"""onn/ 9
['""on services
til
j^
Marital counseling
Parent-child contacts
Personal problems
684-1991
Mril
'.hn "" char0d In family and Individual counaallng to
U,Wl,hc'n D,y I^mi ara baaad on Incoma and family alza)
Jiwiih c -mMy and Children's Ssrvlcas la a banaflclary ap^ncy of
*n 'dsrstion of Palm Batch County.
Continued from Page 2-
Eller, 100 hours.
Also completing 100 hours
of service were Sylvia Gold,
Sydney Goldstein, Rose Haas,
Sonia Herman, Jeanne Kane,
Maria Moss, Nettie Moss, Tira
Rosen, Mae Ross, Sylvia
Schuster, Tess Schwartz,
Genevieve Silberman, Rose
Sklar, Sidney Sklar, David
Silverman, Mary Winnick,
Lillian Wreschner, Dennis
Willinger and Margaret
Willinger.
To learn more about the
Center's volunteer program,
contact Micki Ross at 471-
5111.
first UJA Opening
Continued from Page 1
Three national missions
contributed to the final tally.
The Campaign Chairmen's
Leadership Mission brought
441 participants from 46 com-
munities on a five-day fact-
finding tour which concluded
with a caucus in Eilat on Sept.
13. Commitments of
$9,795,718 for the Regular
Campaign were recorded, with
an additional $1,001,750
secured in new or increased
pledges for Project Renewal.
Grass and Mission Chair-
man Sandra Weiner of
Houston announced that there
are now 45 new givers at the
$10,000 level, the minimum
pledged in advance by those
who participated in this
mission.
The Community Campaign
Leadership Mission's 161
commitments for 1985 totalled
$1,396,985 for the Regular
Campaign and $62,850 new or
increased pledges for Project
Renewal, a 34 percent rise in
pledging for these par-
ticipants.
The National Women's
Division Leadership Mis-
sion, headed by Women's
Division National Chairman
Harriet Zimmerman of
Atlanta and Missions Chair-
man Dorothy Goren of Los
Angeles, began with a visit to
the Jewish community in
Budapest, Sept. 9-13, and
ended with a caucus in Tel
Aviv on Sept. 20. The 87
commitments made there
represent a 54 percent increase
over 1984 pledges, with
$401,040 being pledged to the
Regular Campaign and
$107,380 in new or increased
funds for Project Renewal.
As these final results for the
opening events were an-
nounced, Stanley Horowitz,
'president of UJA, said, "We
launched our 1985 campaign
with a complex and dramatic
program involving a large
sample of leadership from
diverse American Jewish com-
munities. The strong show of
commitment, concern and
generosity which resulted will
help Jews in Israel and in
many other lands."
"This kind of active and
responsive community parti-
cipation will assure the success
of the 1985 campaign,"
Horowitz added.
The three national missions
joined together in Jerusalem
on Sept. 14-16 to convene the
First National Opening Con-
ference, the official beginning
of UJA's 1985 campaign.
The weekend Conference
culminated with Shimon
Peres' first major address as
prime minister. "It is the
solidarity of our people,"
Peres told the 1,000 leaders
representing more than 70
American Jewish com-
munities, "that enables us to
build and hope."
Other notables addressing
Conference participants in-
cluded Israeli President Chaim
Herzog, the new Defense
Minister Yitzhak Rabin and
the Mayor of Jerusalem,
Teddy Kollek.
The core of the Conference
program was an extensive
series of dialogues between
participants and represen-
tatives from many segments of
Israeli business, academic and
political life.
Interviews with local parti-
cipants in the Campaign
Chairmen's Leadership Mis-
sion and the National
Women's Division Mission
will be published in next
week's Jewish Floridian.
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Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, November 2,1984
VANTAGE
THE TASTE OF SUCCESS
I


Friday, Novemr.
Ex-CIA Man Wants Nazi to Stay In U.S.

.ROCHELLESAIDEL
NEW YORK (JTA) In a
Ijiuni apologia for the
rr .linn of Nazi war
K Is by the United States.
tries, wh0 was *c
I iher two man in the
X 2 intelligence Agency
K its inception unUl his
Sm n. Tn V said that
S3 Nazi war criminal
3 e labor camp should be
Llooked in return for his
contributions as a missile
I scientist in the American space
I program.
Clines said in answer to a
nues ion by Ted Koppel, host
ABC-TV's "Nightline"
program
which aired Oct. 18,
fhat Rudolph and others who
nay have murdered thousands
of innocent victims during
World War II had paid their
debts to society by providing
security and technology gains
for the American government.
The Justice Department
announced on Oct. 16 that
Rudolph, a German-born
National Aeronautics and
Space Administration (NASA)
official who in 1965 was made
director of the Saturn V
program that produced the
rocket that carried the Apollo
astronauts to the moon, had
quietly surrendered his citizen-
ship and left the United States
for West Germany, rather
than face charges that he had
persecuted slave laborers at
Dora-Nordhausen, a Nazi
concentration camp and
rocket factory in the Harz
mountains.
Rudolph had been director
for production of V-2 rockets
there. A third to one-half of
the 60,000 prisoners in the
camp died because of the
inhumane conditions under
which they were forced to
work.
Appearing on the live
program with Clines, Nazi war
criminal expert Charles Allen,
Jr., attacked Clines' remarks.
Responding to Clines' defense
of Rudolph, Allen labeled it as
a clear statement by the CIA,
justifying utilization of Nazi
genocidists by United States
intelligence. Clines com-
plained on the air that Allen,
Koppel, and another guest,
Allan Ryan, Jr., former
director of the Office of
Special Investigations (OSI) of
trie Justice Department, all
displayed anti-CIA bias.
Eli Rosenbaum, former OSI
attorney who developed the
Rudolph case, and former
New York governor Hugh
Carey, who was with the
liberating forces at Dora-
Nordhausen on April 11,
1945, also made brief ap-
pearances.
Clines attempted to shore
up his defense of Rudolph by
bringing up the name of
Reinhard Gehlen, Nazi chief
QjROWARD
QAPER a
Packaging
of intelligence on the Russian
front who later ran the CIA's
anti-Soviet espionage-
sabotage operation in Europe.
When Clines went so far as
to describe Gehlen as a close
personal friend, Allen faced
him down. "1 don't care if he
was your friend," Allen said,
he added that Gehlen's record
as a mass murderer during the
Holocaust is clear in history,
and that the CIA later used
him. The role of the CIA and
other American intelligence
agencies in using Nazi war
criminals after the war has
been dealt with in detail by
Allen in a series of articles in
the Jewish Telegraphic Agency
Daily News Bulletin.
Answering another of
Koppel's questions, Clines
denied that the CIA in-
struction handbook advising
Nicaraguan Contras to
commit political assas-
sinations, is related to the
knowledge gained from the
CIA's utilization of Nazi war
FREE DELIVERY FLORIDA
PALM BEACH 832-0211
QjROWARD
QAPER a
Packaging
criminals. Allen again con-
fronted Clines, pointing out
that the first counter-
insurgency training at Fort
Meade, Md., was derived
from the anti-guerrilla Nazi
experience. Allen said there
was probable utilization of
accused Nazi war criminals for
counter-insurgency training.
He said he and others had put
it on the record that the CIA
was the primary user.
Clines was the featured
speaker at the World Anti-
Communist League (WACL)
convention Sept. 3-7 in San
Diego (discussing the People's
Republic of China). Allen
described WACL to the JTA
as "the major international
fascist organization at the
highest level." Past speakers
have included well-known
racists, anti-Semites and
fascists, such as Theodor
Oberlander, the notorious SS
commander and accused Nazi
war criminal.
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AN HISTORIC &
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You must reserves6y9fevemBef 1$, m4.
In 1981 a unique Hanukkiya, or
Hanukka lamp, was presented to the
Yad Vashem Museum in Israel. It had
been fashioned from scrap metal in the
infamous Theresienstadt ghetto dunng
the second world war.
Israel's 15th Hanukka Commemora-
tive Coins offer homage to the victims of
Theresienstadt, to a heroic and^agic epi-
sode at the rime of the Holocaust.
The coins are being issued in denom-
inations of one shekel and two shekel and
Tre limited to one silver Proof 2-shekel
coin and two silver BU.l-sheke corns to
each collector. Reservations postmarked
a ter November 16, 1984 cannot be ac-
cepted. So share this histonc occasion by
placing your order today.
ISRAEL'S 1984 HANUKKA
COMMEMORATIVE COINS
A Israel Government Coins and Medals Corporation
!HP 350 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10118
Please reserve the following 1984 Hanukka Commemorative coins:
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Quant. Coin Metal Diameter Weight
2 Shekel Silver/8 50 37 mm 28.8 g
1 Shekel Silver/8 50 30 mm 14.4 g
Legal tender issued by the Bank of Israel
NAME-------------------------
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ADDRESS.
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ZIP.
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Reservations must be postmarked bv November 16. TO4 to assure confirmation
ot your order You will receive your order lorm and price to confirm your option
Profits from the sale of these commemorative coins are earmarked for improve
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"The Spirit of Israel
n


uMui vouniy/ rnaay, iNovemt
i
Exhibition On Life of German Youth
During Nazi Era Draws Criticism
neo-Ni
v'i sited
By DAVID KA VI OR
BONN (JTA) An exhibi-
tion in Frankfurt portraying
with authentic artifacts and
documents the life of German
youth during the Nazi era, has
drawn criticism from some
Jewish quarters. Its purpose,
according to the directors of
the municipal museum, is to
dpeict how youths were
seduced by Nazi propaganda
and symbols. But, some
Imprisoned Soviet Jewish POC
On 33rd Day of Hunger Strike
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Soviet Jewish Prisoner of
Conscience Aleksandr Khol-
miansky passed the 33rd day
of a hunger strike, the Greater
New York Conference on
Soviet Jewry has reported.
While visiting with prison
officials in Tallinn,
Kholmiansky's mother learned
that her son has been on a
hunger strike since Sept. 13
and is being force-fed within
the prison hospital. According
to his mother, Kholmiansky
undertook the hunger strike to
Jack and Pearl Resnick of
Palm Beach and New York
will receive the coveted Louis
Marshall Memorial Medal of
the Jewish Theological
Seminary of America at the
28th Annual Marshall Award
Dinner, Thursday, Nov. 15, at
the Waldorf Astoria Hotel,
New York City. Tbe Marshall
Medal is awarded to out-
standing lay leaders for their
"consecrated service to
Judaism, to tbe American
Jewish community and to all
men and women, wherever
they may be, in whatever cir-
cumstance of need."
The Resnicks, members of
the Seminary's Board of Over-
seers, are active lifelong
participants in Jewish civic
affairs and staunch supporters
of the Seminary, where they
have donated the Jack and
Pearl Resnick Scholarship at
the rabbinical school and
helped in establishing the new
Boesky Family Library
complex on the New York City
campus.
protest his groundless impri-
sonment.
Kholmiansky, a Moscow
refusenik who applied to
emigrate in 1978, was arrested
on July 25 and charged with
"hooliganism." He has been
held since then while Soviet
authorities have attempted to
build a case against him, the
Conference said. According to
Jewish activists in the Soviet
Union, Kholmiansky is being
accused of organizing a
"national Hebrew study
group," although no such
group exists. The prosecutor
now also claims to have
"found" a gun and ammuni-
tion in Kholmiansky's apart-
ment. Kholmiansky was
expected to go on trial in
Tallinn.
Calling All Teens
The Jewish Youth Council
(JYC) invites all area Jewish
high school teens to a Dance
Party on Saturday, Nov. 3,
8:30 p.m., at the Jewish
Community Day School, 5801
Parker Avenue, West Palm
Beach. This is the second
social that the newly-formed
organization has held. Last
summer teens from all over the
county got together at Six
Flags Atlantis to inaugurate
activities for Jewish young
adults.
A disc jockey will spin the
records as teens dance the
night away, from disco to
break dancing. Donation is SI
per teen and can be paid at the
door. For more information
contact the Jewish Com-
munity Center at 689-7700.
observers contend, it may be
counter-productive. It has, in
fact, become a magnet for
neo-Nazi groups from all over
the Federal Republic.
Jewish critics have not ex-
pressed their specific objec-
tions in public. The articles
displayed give a comprehen-
sive picture of the Germany of
the 1930's and '40s. Those
who mounted the exhibition
apparently wanted it to speak
for itself and accordingly
explanations and clarifications
are rare. The display is there
without much commentary.
For that reason, many
argue, it could revive nation-
alistic sentiments and serve as
a means for present day-
Germans to identify with the
Nazis. Neo-Nazi groups have
already come to the museum
on pilgrimages and seem de-
lighted w ith the exhibition.
Dr. Juergen Steen, a
museum official, told an inter-
viewer that he was guided by
the purpose of showing the
young generation and the
general public how the Nazis
achieved their popularity with
German youth a half century
ago. But, he added, the
exhibition also stresses the
contemporary youth move-
ments which rejected Nazi
ideas or even actively opposed
Nazi rule.
Displaying "the so-called
Nazi aestheticism" is part of
making it understandable how
the rise of the Nazi movement
in Germany became possible,
Steen said. He conceded that
he and his colleagues foresaw
a possibility that the exhibition
one of four on the Third
Reich currently at the Museum
NOTE
Political Reading Material
and Advertising on this
page is not to be construed
as an endorsement by the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County.
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Steen said he knew of three
such occasions reported to him
by museum guards. In the first
two. followers 0f
leader Michael Kur>h
fcn ofe theUehnen
Viking Jugend" .
exhibit and *cre pic^
"On a third ocS/
unidentified person Scr4
an anti-Semitic slogan '
wall. That was'th8eanon0;i!
"dent of its klnd g,
opening, Steen said. '
Punch No. 78
rerawj?
Vote For Action
Return
Dr. Bernard Kimmel
Florida House District 84 GOP
Punch #50
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difference in Tallahassee. It'll make a big difference
for you.
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District 84 needs a state representative
who makes things happen.
District 84 needs
Bernard Kimmel
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During his freshman term in the Florida Legislature,
Dr. Kimmel successfully passed five general house
bills. His opponents record? One general house bill
passed in his last term. We need a representative who
gets things done.
Action Makes The Difference
Dr. Kimmel's 25 years of public service prove he's the
man of action:
* Voted one of the two most effective Freshman
Legislators during his freshman term in Tallahassee.
* Served as Chairman of the Palm Beach County
School Board for 2 years: served on Board for
8 years.
* Presently Chairman of the Palm Beach County
Special Olympics Steering Committee.


Friday, November 2,1984/ The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 15
Keep Justices
Ehrlich and Shaw
When the Florida Bar polled its members by secret ballot and asked whether
Justices Raymond Ehrlich and Leander Shaw should remain on the Florida Supreme
Court, nearly 9 out of 10 voted "Yes!"
Editorial writers, columnists and law enforcement officials across the state of
Florida have agreed:
". both Shaw and Ehrlich have brought excellent
backgrounds to the court and considered outstanding jurists.
Robert Delaney, Editorial Writer
Cocoa Today
"We wish you (both) God Speed in your endeavor and
may the citizens of Florida, in their wisdom, vote over-
whelmingly to support your continued, valuable services to
us all."
Willis D. Booth, Executive Director
Florida Police Chiefs Association
"Florida citizens arc fortunate to have Supreme Court
Justices who regard the Constitution as a vault for safekeep-
ing principles of government, not as a pantry easily opened
to special interests."
Tampa Tribune
October 21, 1984
"We highly recommend that the people vote "yes" to
retain Supreme Court Justices Raymond Ehrlich and
Leander Shaw Jr. They are among the best justices on the
court. Theif records have no blemishes. They are fair-minded
justices of even temperament. They have demonstrated
intellectual honesty, independence and integrity on the
bench. We know of no reason either justice should be
rejected for a second term."
St. Petersburg Times
"Should they be retained? We don't think there's any
question about it: The answer is yes.
"A justice's job is to interpret the law. based on their
records of doing just that. Justices Leander Shaw Jr. and
Raymond Ehrlich deserve to remain on the Florida Supreme
Court."
The Orlando Seminal
October 18, 1984
"Citizens who believe in constitutional government and
an independent judiciary ought to rally strongly behind
Ehrlich and Shaw? They have good records."
The Tampa Tribune
August 6, 1984
"In fact, though they are the newest justices on the court,
they are among the best."
St. Petersburg Evening Independent
September 10, 1984
"Justices Ehrlich and Shaw deserve the unqualified and
strong support of every member of the Bar of this State.
Every opportunity should be taken to deliver the message
that a free and independent judiciary has always been the
true guardian of freedom in this nation."
Larry Seidlin, Columnist
Broward Informer
September 13, 1984


Justice
Leander
Shaw
Vote lor Both
and
Pd. Pol. Adv.
Justice
Raymond
Ehrlich
#98


r-------i
Sar 16 The Jewia^floiridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, November 2,1964
Finally: Novelist Heller Tackles A Jewish Theme
a/ t -:._-., Ilia mnvtrutinn in n n ..
By ARTHUR J. MAGIDA
Copyright Baltimore Jewish Times
Reprint by Special Arrangement
Joseph Heller used to be asked
why he hadn't written a Jewish
novel. It was probably a logical
question for a successful
American novelist with Hebraic
genes. After all, people like Philip
Roth and Saul Bellow and
Bernard Malamud had grappled
in print with "the Jewish ex-
perience in America." Some
rarely wrote of anything else.
Why, went the frequent question
at Heller's readings, should he be
any different from the rest of the
literary pack?
In his first book, Catch-22,
Heller had tried to make some
sense out of the Army. Maybe he
could make some sense out of
being Jewish in the land of the
garment industry, JAPS, and
Judaic upward mobility.
HELLER TOOK these
questions to heart and, four years
ago, gave us Good As Gold, a
savvy, bitter, jaundiced attack
on the Jewish family and Jewish
neo-conservatives.
But Heller hand't milked the
Jewish experience for all it was
worth. Maybe the Jewish ex-
perience in America, but not the
Jewish experience. Heller's new
book, God Knows, is all about
being Jewish. It's also about love
and romance and the struggle for
power and the struggle to live.
It's about faith, faith in God and
faith in self, and the longing to
have back one's youth, a time
when the simple answers seemed
to satisfy the complex and nasty
questions that baffle us as we get
older.
God Knows is about the David
of the Bible, an unlikely subject
for a man whose previous three
books were more contemporary
and topical.
Before God Knows, Heller
wrote out of his own time and,
often, out of his own experience.
His 60 missions as a bombardier
in World War II gave him
enough anger and distress to
produce Catch-22.
HIS STINT as promotion
director for Time gave him
Something Happened, a mordant
comment on the bureaucracy of
the corporation. His cynicism
about politics and academics
gave him Good As Gold. Nothing
but inspiration and "the desire to
write a love story" gave him God
Knows.
"I thought I might write a love
story because I didn't know what
one was," Heller told me. "From
there, my mind somehow went to
David. I had some knowledge of
David and Bathsheba. But I
could have just as well gone to
Anthony and Cleopatra. The few
episodes I remembered from
David's life seemed to lend
themselves to a novel that might
or might not be a love story, a
novel that could be both funny
and deadly serious."
Heller hadn't touched the Bible,
in years. He opened it up "and
was absolutely ecstatic" at the
treasures he had found. "There
were treasures of two kinds. One
was the number of adventures
and episodes in David's life. The
other was the elements of tragedy
and grief."
Heller will probably always
associate God Knows with
tragedy and grief. After writing
the first three chapters of the
book, he was struck with
Guillain-Barre syndrome, a
bizarre form of paralysis that
strikes without warning. Each
year, about 19 people per million
get the disease, which invades
the nervous system when the
body's immune defenses backfire.
EARLY IN December, 1981,
Heller had trouble swallowing.
The next day, his arms were weak
ind he was tired. He was checked
nto the intensive care unit at
sew York's Mt. Sinai Hospital
hat afternoon. Within 10 daya,
le could barely move.
Heller's God is
a practical joker
on a cosmic scale.
"I hid from myself the fact
that I was seriously ill. I did it by*
denying the amount of anxiety I
felt in intensive care. The first
night I was there, the man next
to me died. Every few days,
somebody would die. After three
or four days, I was scared stiff
without realizing it. I was afraid
to go to sleep, but I was dying for
sleep. My eyes kept falling shut,
but I kept snapping my head up.
I felt if I fell off to sleep, I would
never wake up."
Heller was assured by a
psychiatrist that he was not
psychotic. "If I had any different
reaction to being there," he was
told, "then there was reason to
worry. Consciously, I was not
afraid of dying or of permanent
paralysis. Unconsciously, I
suppose I was scared stiff."
FRIENDS VISITED Heller.
Mel Brooks, said Heller, "was
drawn just by the sheer horror of
the disease." Dustin Hoffman
brushed Heller's teeth for him.
He soon returned with a list of
Guillain-Barre symptoms he
was afraid he, too, would get it.
"Mario Puzo felt ill just
walking into intensive care,"
Heller said, "and wanted to leave
immediately."
Heller left the hospital five
months later. A friend and a day
nurse cared for him, first at his
small Manhattan apartment and
then at his Easthampton home>t
the tip of Long Island. It! until 14 months after contracting
the disease that he was able to
stand up by himself.
"I call myself 100 percent
recovered," Heller said, "but the
doctors don't. Tremendous
atrophy sets in with the disease. I
doubt if there's a muscle that's
fully recovered." Heller still
doesn't have full use of his
tongue and left arm.
By the summer of 1982, Heller
was able to resume writing God
Knows- There is a "grotesque
similarity," he said, between
certain scenes in the book and his
bout with Guillain-Barre. "It was
not lost on me that I was in a
similar position as King David. I
was confined to bed, unable to
take care of myself. I can in-
terpret that as God giving me a
warning. Or as God giving me a
punishment. Or it was purely
coincidental."
HELLER DENIES that the
illness influenced the book. He
had already written note cards
with dialogue and description for
God Knows, the "signposts" he
needs before tackling the actual
writing of a book. And he denies
that the illness had any per-
manent effect on his personality.
"I was told by friends during the
long period of rehabilitation that
I was a more patient, more
likeable person than before. Now,
more and more, I hear from
friends the comment, He must
be all better. He's his old self
again.' "
Did Heller learn anything from
his paralysis? "Only that you
should have lots of major medical
insurance."
Heller knew little about the
Bible before he began God
Knows. "And," he claims, "I
know very little more now."
The latter statement is a
modest one. After spending four
years with the Bible, Joe Heller
can rattle off the names of
prophet after prophet, warrior
after warrior, concubine after
concubine: Adonijah, Abishai,
Abishag the Shunammite, Zadok
the young priest, Barzillai the
Gileadote. Unlike Adam and
Esau and Noah and Lot and his
unfortunate wife, these are not
household names.
THE OSMOSIS of 48 months
of reading and re-reading and
indexing and cross-indexing the
characters and the incidents of
David's life have given Heller a
familiarity with the Old Testa-
ment that could make a Biblical
scholar envious.
There is a certain incongruity
about sitting in the Jockey Club
of the Kit/. Carlton in
Washington and discussing the
Bible with Joseph Heller. It is
not a literary atmosphere. It is
certainly not a religious atmos-
phere. Not with those $1,000
suits on all the gents and enough
jewelry on the women to break
the bank at Monte Carlo.
But, then, there is a certain
incongruity to Heller. He doesn't
quite belong here. Although he
hasn't lived in Brooklyn since
1942, the old neighborhood is still
very much with him. It's in his
accent. It's in his laugh.
BUT HELLER doesn't seem
uncomfortable among the
bourgeois blandishments of the
Ritz Carlton: give him good
service and fine cooking and a
certain hushed elegance, and, like
any sensible man he'll gladly
accept. But his collar is open and
his jacket lapel is twisted just a
bit behind the neck. His khaki
pants are a tad crumpled and, in
a room where everyone else is
probably wearing Bally shoes, his
sneakers are overly casual.
Heller has done well as a
novelist. He lives among writers
and painters in Easthampton.
His home is a converted far-
mhouse with a swimming pool
and several acres and a great deal
of privacy. His conversation is
littered with the names of such
friends as Mel Brooks, Carl
Reiner, Tony Curtis, Kurt
Vonnegut, Tom BrOkaw, Mary
McCarthy. But the names of
lesser known friends also crop up
in the same conversation:
"Speed" Vogel, Marvin Winkler,
George Mandel, Julius Green.
Most are old friends from the old
neighborhood. Most have
nothing to do with show business
or literature.
"As I get older," Heller said,
"I feel most comfortable with my
own past." A few years ago,
Heller said he didn't think he
"deserved all the money" his
books had earned. "It puts me
into a social class for which I
have very little sympathy."
THAT ALSO holds true today.
"I'm still not comfortable with
rich people. But," he smiled,
"I'm not comfortable with poor
people, either. Go figure."
As a boy, Heller lived in the
Coney Island section of
Brooklyn. It was "a wonderful
neighborhood to grow up in.
There were so many kids.
Everywhere you went, there were
huge numbers of kids. And we
were always joking around. The
same kind of joking that I now
see on the streets of New York
among black kids and Puerto
Rican kids not the white
kids."
Coney Island was full of poor
Eastern European Jews. Heller's
father, Isaac, had fled Russia in
1913. Ten years later, his second
son, Joseph, was born. A socialist
agnostic, Isaac discouraged his
family from practicing religion.
His wife was no more religious
than he, but less secure about it.
Heller and his siblings brother
Lee and sister Sylvia never
attended synagogue. Yet Lena
Heller had them put on their best
clothes on the Sabbath. Heller
remembers intentionally em-
barrassing her one day by yelling
from the street, "Hey Ma, throw
me a ham sandwich."
ISAAC HELLER drove a
delivery truck for a bakery. He
died in his early forties when
Joseph was five years old. The
cause of his death was a bungled
ulcer operation. His mother later
told him that he had gotten the
ulcers from the cake at the
bakery.
Marvin "Beansy" Winkler
says Heller is "exactly the same
now as when he was a kid
impossible." Winkler, now a
candy manufacturer in Santa
Monica, shared the same playpen
when he and Heller were each
about one year old. "He used to
wet my carriage," he said. As
Heller and his bladder got
older, his "genius" became more
apparent. "There was always no
room for error when talking with
Joe." said Winkler. "He's a sweet
fellow, but he's always been
slightly impatient."
"About five of our friends in
Coney Island were writing when
we were kids," Winkler said.
"There must have been some-
thing in the air that produced so
many writers."
Heller is the only one of his
crowd of Coney Island writers
who made it big. "When Catch-22
caught on," Winkler remem-
bered, "Joe handled it well. He
always knew he was a genius."
IN FIRST grade, Heller
brought home a note for his
mother to meet with his teacher
at P.S. 188. "We were aU
terrified," said his sister Sylvia.
Then 12 years old, Sylvia met
with the teacher because his
mother was still uncertain of her
English. The teacher complained
that Joe never listened in class
and always looked bored. The
teacher occasionally tried to
catch him, but he always knew
the answers to her questions.
"All we could do." she said,
"was tell Joe to try and look as
though he was paying attention."
When he was 16 years old,
BSE*ft2? *** for
Western Union for four hou
every day after school. He 2
about $6 week. 5*328
the Western UnionTlmTti;
day khaki pants and shit,
cap and jodhpurs and ridinl
his bike around New York Helli
"felt gallant and rafi
Sometimes I didn't take
uniform off until long after I
home."
the
got
With about 30 other bov
Heller would change into hk
uniform at a central Western
Union office. There, he had hU
first brush with anti-Semitism
The conversation among those
guys was so blatantly anti-
Semitic I couldn't believe it"
One of two Jewish messenger
boys, Heller "couldn't tell them I
was Jewish or they would have
beat the heck out of me."
HELLER SIGNED up for the
Army Air Corps in 1942. He was
19 years old. His mother said
farewell to him at the local trolley
stop, dry-eyed and collected
Years later, his sister told him
that their mother had collapsed
with tears as soon as he was out
of sight. She had to be helped
home.
Heller spent three years in the
Army. He saw one year of
combat with a squadron of the
12th Air Force on the island of
Corsica. "1 enjoyed it. he said,
"until my 37th mission.-'
Returning to Brooklyn at the
end of the war, Heller met and
married Shirley Held. He briefly
attended the University of
Southern California at the same
time as another humorist, Art
Buchwald. The two never met at
USC.
"I didn't like USC at all,"
Heller said, "and didn't par-
ticipate in campus life. It was
heavy with fraternity life which
was anathema to me. I m the sort
of guy who quit the Boy Scouts
at the age of 10."
HELLER AND Shirley
returned to the East Coast, where
he got a BA from New York
University. He earned a master's
degree from Columbia, attended
Oxford University for one year as
a Fulbright Scholar, taught for
two years at Penn State, then
returned again to New York.
Days were spent in the ad-
vertising department of, suc-
cessively, Time, Look, and
McCaU's. Nights were spent
writing a book.
Heller had written many short
stories back in Coney Island and
in college. Several were published
in Esquire and the Atlantic. "By
the time I got to college," he said,
"I knew I was imitating other
short story writers. 1 had nothing
to say."
Heller didn't write again until
he was almost 30 years old. Then,
"I got the idea that maybe I
could write a novel. That came
from reading a good number 0
novels and thinking I could do a
least as well. Following that, I
needed a subject. The subject
wasCatc/i-22."
IN THE beginning, when
Joseph Heller writes a book,
there isn't the word: There is the
line. Each of his four books have
come to him not in the form 01
sweeping, full-blown themes,
such as "war" or "peace or
"love" and "death," the sort ol
stuff that would tantalize
someone like DoatOWfjW *
Woody Allen. Instead, each of n
books start with one meager line
"I think." he said, "j
daydream. Lines come to me '
they lead to a subject, I begin
exploring."
The line that came to Heller i
the first line that appears
Catch-22: "It was love at hrtf
sight." It's a common enougn
line. The next line that came
the second line of Catch-22:
first time Yoasarian saw
chaplain he fell madly in
with him." This ia not a common
Continued 00 Page 18-,
the
love


Friday, November 2,1984 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 17
WHEN YOU CLOSE THE CURTAIN
TO VOTE, WILL YOU BE CLOSING
IT ON YOURSELF?
Can It Happen Here? A Time For Soul Searching.
For The First Time, In The Depths Of My Soul, I Wonder-
What Does The Democratic Party Really Stand For?
HAVE YOU ASKED YOURSELF THE SAME QUESTIONS
I AM ASKING MYSELF?
Where is the Democratic Party going in 1984? Has its direction actually changed from liberalism to an undemocratic
ideology? From speaking out against bigotry to remaining silent to gain votes? I cannot forget that less than 50 years ago
in Germany, the people stood silently by while the Nazis smashed synagogues and beat and murdered Jews. The silence
was devastating. It was a silence heard round the world. A silence that allowed a genocide unparalleled in the history
of mankind. I ask myself how can I vote for a party that would compromise religious freedom for a few votes?
THE ANSWERS I GET ALARM ME.
I see a party embracing a would-be candidate who sounds as if he is a spokesman for The Third World.
I see a party failing to speak out against overt anti-Semitism.
I see a party more interested in party unity than uniting against what is right and just.
I see a party that has failed to speak out strongly against the Russians treatment of its Jews and dissidents such as Sakharov.
I see a party unclear about the strengths and future of America.
AND SO I HAVE BEEN SEARCHING FOR BETTER ANSWERS
IN THIS IMPORTANT ELECTION YEAR.
I find myself agreeing with what President Reagan and the Republican Party are saying and doing.
I find a Party and a President who speak out against anti-Semitism.
I find a Party and a President who speak out against the venom of Louis Farrakhan.
I find a Party and a President who speak out to the UN to stop its anti-American, anti-Israel, ant.-Semitic tirades.
I find a Party and a President who are no. naive and gullible about the policies and plans of the Soviet Union.
1 find a Party and a President that Israel says is one of the best administrations they have ever dealt with. One that fully realizes
the importance of Israel as a friend and strategic ally.
I find a Party and President who have consistently come to the aid of our mends and allies amund the world.
I have examined the issues that are important to me and 1 know where I m going.
Because I Believe In Democracy,
I AM VOTING REPUBLICAN.
/fvU^U
I am not raising funds so please
do not send money, just your comments.
This is a personally paid ad to express my personal reeling.
Meshulam Riklis
888 Seventh Ave.44th Fir
New York, N.Y. 10019


I'agexo- inuj ewisn t londian of Palm Beach County / Friday, November 2,1964
Jewish Novel from 'Catch-22' Author
Continued from Page lfr
enougn line.
For the eight years Heller
worked on Catch-22, one line
followed another. By 1961, he had
a book. But contrary to the myth,
he didn't necessarily have a best-
seller. "The first reviews for
Catch-22," he said, "were in-
sulting dismissals. They weren't
3ven condescending dismissals."
Heller recalls the reviewer in the
Sunday New York Times
snickering that Catch-22 "gasps
for want of craft. It's not even a
novel."
"The New Yorker magazine,"
he said, "was even more severe."
THE REVIEWS "wounded"
Heller. He had thought Catch-22
would "strongly appeal to a small
group of people who were as
interested in literature as I was.
It's not an easy book to read and
it's not designed to be easy. I
thought I was writing a book in
the obscurantist tradition of
people like Faulkner."
The catch in Catch-22 was the
ultimate double-bind. "A concern
for one's safety in the face of
dangers that were real and im-
mediate," wrote Heller, "was the
process of a rational mind." Orr,
"a grinning pygmy with pilot's
wings and thick, wavy, brown
hair parted down the middle,"
was crazy. He could be grounded.
"All he had to do was ask; and as
soon as he did, he would no
longer be crazy and would have
to fly more missions. Orr would
be crazy to fly more missions and
sane if he didn't, but if he was
sane ha had to fly them."
Such double-binds abound in
Catch-22. Chief White Halfoat,
an Indian from Oklahoma, told of
his family's exploitation by the
oil companies: "Every place we
pitched our tent, they sank an oil
well. Everytime we sank an oil
well, they hit oil. And every time
they hit oil, they made us pack
our tent and go someplace else.
We were human divining rods.
Soon every oil company in the
world had technicians chasing us
around."
THE HALFOAT family
became "a walking business
boom." It received invitations
"from some of the best hotels
just for the amount of business
we would drag into town with us.
Some of those invitations were
mighty generous, but we couldn't
accept any of them because we
were Indians and all the best
hotels that were inviting us
wouldn't accept Indians as
guests."
Despite extensive advertising
by his publisher for Catch-22, it
was eight months before Heller
was asked for an interview. It
was one year before the book's
rights were sold to the movies. It
wasn't until 1970 nine years
after publication that the movie
was released.
By then Catch-22 had finally
begun to sell. Its account of
trying to keep one's sanity in the
middle of an insane situation
war dovetailed with the
national frustration and con-
fusion and rage over Vietnam.
Heller left advertising to become
a Distinguished Professor of
English at the City College of
New York, a position with a title
that flattered his ego and with
enough flexible time so he could
do more writing.
THE PHRASE, "Catch-22,"
has entered the language. It has
been used in at least one Supreme
Court decision. It has earned
Heller a certain literary im-
mortality (as well as a very
handsome buck). He is invariably
introduced as the man who wrote
Catch-22, not as the man who
wrote Something Happened or
Good As Gold. Heller denies that
he feels captive to Catch-22. "No,
it's made life easier for me. It's a
very proud achievement. My
next book might be a sequel
about some of the characters in
Ctch-22."
When Heller's second book,
Something Happened, was
published in 1975, lie finally felt
secure enough to leave teaching
and spend all his time writing.
Something Happened is a more
mature book, a more interesting
book than Catch-22. It is also a
less entertaining book.
Many people say that nothing
happens in Something Hap-
pened. That is the black joke of
the book. Nothing much does
happen in the maw of the cor-
poration where Something
Happened is set. The book is
coupled to the slow, tedious pace
of life in the world of offices and
memos and titles that imply that
someone is an assistant to
someone who isn't too far up the
corporate ladder and will always
stay just about where he is.
BOB SLOCUM, the non-hero
of Something Happened, is Jew-
ish, Heller confided to me. "I
didn't identify him as Jewish
because I didn't want him to
obsess on that. And discerning
people know that Yossarian (in
Catch-22) is Jewish, too. His
compassion for other people is
very Jewish."
Heller spent half as long on his
next book as he had on his
previous two only four years.
Good As Gold was Heller's foray
into "the Jewish novel." Much of
it did not endear him to the Jew-
ish community. He wrote in a
snickering, combative way about
a Jewish family in Coney Island,
one that gets extraordinary
pleasure from non-stop bickering,
competitive preening, audacious
bragging and talented put-
downs.
Heller claims that the Gold
family was not based on his own
family. Much of the Gold's
nastiness, he said, came from his
imagination; some came from his
buddy Mel Brooks' stories of his
own childhood.
Good As Gold deviated from
Heller's regular story-telling. His
previous books were cynical; the
same incidents came up again
and again, told from a different
vantage or with a new wrinkle.
Good As Gold has a traditional
plot.
WITH God Knows, Heller
returns to writing books "the
way my mind works best." God
Knows is more commentary than
novel. Told by the 70-year old
King David from his deathbed,
it's a collection of cantankerous,
curmudgeonly jokes and set-ups
about the Bible. It's the Old
Testament playing the Keith-
Albee vaudeville circuit:
burlesque jokes about Sarah and
Abraham and all the multitudes
their seed produced. One can
almost see King David coming
out on stage just after Bums and
Allen wrap up their act. Fat cigar
in hand, his regal wit has 'em
rolling in the aisles. He might not
be much of a monarch, but give
the guy a few howlers and he's
dynamite.
Heller's David is not the
Bible's David. He's cranky and
jealous. Michelangelo, he says,
did a better job with his statue of
Moses than he did with him.
Shakespeare stole his best plots
from him.
H is son, Solomon, was a dolt, a
numbskull. Thinking he was
being fair, not shrewd, he was
"dead serious when he proposed
cutting that baby in half, that
putz."
BUT DAVID is also sad.
Bragging about his military
victories, all he longs for is to lie
once again with Bathsheba;
sounding off about his political
coups, he still mourns the death
of several children. King of all Is-
rael, David is not a happy man.
It is obvious that Heller had
fun with the Bible, especially its
language, which can be seen as
either poetic or clumsy,
depending on your mood.
Reminiscing about his first
dalliance with the beauty
Bathsheba, aged King David
remembers with delight, "Oh,
boy, did I cleave to her!"
King Saul, furious at his son
Jonathan for meeting with David
behind his back, calls him "a
confusion to his mother's
nakedness.'' The phrase, which
Heller lifts directly from the
Bible, makes little sense to
Jonathan.
"David," he says, "you're
smart, maybe you can figure it
out."
David, stumped, has about as
much luck with the words as
most modern readers of the Bible.
God Knows is not about
religion. Heller said. "The Bible
is not about religion until you get
very, very far past where I go
with David. There's almost
nothing about religion in the Old
Testament. The most they did in
the way of prescribed religious
practices was to sacrifice a lamb
every now and then."
"DAVID BRINGING the Ark
of the Covenant to Jerusalem
seems as much an act of
demagoguery as anything else
an excuse to have a parade. The
religious and spiritual element
doesn't come in until you reach
that period of the prophets that
more or less corresponds to the
threat of the Babylonians and the
Jews' capture by them. Then,
there's much more talk about
God."
There isn't too much talk of
God in God Knows, either. When
Heller does bring Him into the
book. He turns out to be as much
of a second banana as David.
Always with the jokes, Heller's
God is a practical joker on a
cosmic scale. Asked by Moses
one day whether he is a good
God, God thunders:
"Where does it say I have to be
good? Isn't it enough I'm God?
Don't waste your time
daydreaming, Moses. I ordered
Abraham to be circumcised when
he was already a grown man.
Was that the act of someone
who's kind?"
DAVID GRIPES that the
Chosen People got a bum deal.
God promised the Jews "a land of
olive trees and honey." "That's
what he promised and that's all
he gave us, along with a com-
plicated set of restrictive dietary
laws that have not made life
easier. To the goyim he gives
bacon, sweet pork, juicy sirloin,
and rare prime ribs of beef. To us,
he gives a pastrami. In Egypt, we
get the fat of the land. In
Leviticus, He prohibits us from
eating it."
One can hear Heller, not
David, kvetching here. Heller
eagerly admits that one of his
"favorite exercises" is eating. He
is horrified by anything that
restricts anyone's diet.
One can also hear Heller when
he has God saying, "If you want
to have sense, you cant' have a
n M10" j our year8 with the
Bible and King David have not
made him more religious than
before.
"I CAME AWAY with no new
wisdom, he said. "I believe
there s an innate wish to believe
there s a compassionate diety
But you can view God as a myth
a fairy tale or a legend. I have no
respect for the Bible other than
as a work of literature. I certainly
don't regard it aa the word of
God. I know as much about God
as anyone on earth. Which is to
say, there's no way to know
anything about him. Go figure."
Until recently, Heller was
"indifferent" about being Jewish.
"My tolerance as a liberal," he
said, "made me try to recognize
no ethnic barriers. Now, I feel
more comfortable not about
Judaism, but about being Jew-
ish. It's something I not only
want to acknowledge, but want
to embrace. Maybe that's what
happens as you get gloser to the
grave."
Heller insists that there is little
of him in God Knows aside from
"the humor and irony and
sentiment." But his King David
is not unlike Heller. He is a man
who has done it all and seen it all
at least all that could be done
and seen in the Middle East of
the 10th Century, BCE. At three
score and ten years. Heller is a
man searching for some sense in
his life. "I want my God back,"
David says ruefully, "and they
send me a girl."
LYING FEEBLE and im-
potent, the most beautiful virgin
in Israel tries to give him
comfort. Warmth he gets, but not
satisfaction. That can come only
from his God.
Heller is >, i
ymn oW fc
year?' he has u^1
he has Sr'^i
HelJers claim that k. *
nothing froffl the^'
works in strange way8 J
t's just the hoary JJuH
a^entr^kthaUwSV
Joseph Heller says J ?
Heller opens God Kncl 3
""enpt'on that he gj&
Bjble^Buthowcanone^
^."WHENlfoundthttJ
Bible, Heller said i J
That's how I feel. A, ,3
older, one sees even onei,'
intimate friends less hw
But one still does need,
and companionship."
The catch for Joseph hi
may be that God does knot i
than he thinks, that there!
be some cosmic scheme out I
that takes care of people (
of best-selling writers.
Go figure.
'getting older, I feel more
comfortable with my past
xl)
Please Share My
Dreams of a Better
Palm Beach County!!
KEN ADAMS
County Com mission Candidate
District 5 Rep.
*l want to live in a Palm Beach County where the
quality of life remains unequaled .. where crime is
better controlled ... and where utility rates do not
constantly increase.
I want to live in a Palm Beach County where there
are affordable and comfortable facilities tor m
elderly and where those on fixed incomes are noi
burdened with accelerating medical costs.
*l want to live in a Palm Beach County where resi-
dents are proud and protected participants
where county government is responsible anu
responsive to the needs of its people.

COCOMM f>,t
Ken Adams is formerly Chair^
man of the Board of a True
Value Chain and will help run
our County as .tightly ana
efficiently as his hardware
businesses)
^
PUNCH#85
Ptd PoMical AOmmmi by Coi" *
Elect K.n Adam*. C A. Fom- TrMW*'


Friday, November 2,1984 / The Jewish Floridian of
t0 am Bo.-.oo In.- Cn* Sc-qs 0M>4 BcFo.t LMWtt* juB.. u *, *, ,, ef n> p B, p. H. p,m .,, ,.,,...p,, Sp-q-. #1....... <-..,
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4Mtfl H.i*t"M M.MMt.M.nig'' H,ghMii,| t'.i'fc M,i:<'t m.,M. '.I i.'


n----
1
A Plea To World Jewry
By LEV ELBERT
The Jews of the Soviet
Union need you more than
ever. Your voices and your
strength have helped us in the
past, and together we will be
successful in the future.
Especially now, when
emigration is at a standstill,
when new arrests and show
trials are taking place, we need
to know that you remain
steadfast and strong, because
then, weare strong. It is world
opinion, spearheaded by you,
that stands between us and
mass arrests, labor camps and
psychiatric prisons.
In the past, our efforts have
centered to obtaining the
reunification of families in
Eretz Israel or other countries.
I think we should insist, that
when a Jew wants to be repa-
triated to Israel, he should not
need an "invitation" from a
relative. The "invitation"
should not have to be "re-
newed." It should not have to
come from a "first degree"
relative and fall by the wayside
of all kinds of legalistic
maneuvers. Repatriation to
one's homeland is a uni-
versally recognized right: I am
in a certain geographical place
where I do not want to be; my
homeland (patria) is some-
where else. I have a right to go
home.
Countless international
conventions support my right
to live in my homeland, in my
case Israel. I want to be re-
patriated.
Precisely now, when suc-
cesses are scarce, you have to
continue to work with double
vigor. The survival of Judaism
was never put into question by
temporary setbacks.
We shall float in the water
that is carrying us; we shall not
drown; we shall hold on until
the day comes when the sun
will shine endlessly from free-
dom's skies in Eretz Israel.
GIVE US YOUR HAND!
Peres: Hussein's Refusal Not Last Word
By DAVID K AN TOR
BONN (JTA) Israeli
Premier Shimon Peres believes
King Hussein's refusal so far
to enter peace negotiations
with Israel is not his last word
and indicated there would be
wide scope for bargaining
once negotiations between Is-
rael and Jordan get underway,
according to an interview with
the Israeli leader published in
the mass circulation West Ger-
man news magazine Der
Spiegel.
Peres also remarked that
experience shows that the
outcome of peace negotiations
always differs from the initial
positions of the parties in-
volved, Der Spiegel reported.
He said in response to
questions that what Israel has
to offer Jordan above all is
peace. He did not mention
territorial concessions but
hinted they were possible
Elaine Ellish, national board
member of Hadassah, will
keynote Lake Worth Chapter
of Hadassah's Annual
Education Day on Wednes-
day, Nov. 14 from 10 a.m. to
2:30 p.m. at Temple Beth
Sholom, 312 Ave. A, Lake
Worth. In addition Alice
Freed man, education vice
president, has announced the
following program: Rabbi
Theodore Feldman. B'nai
Torah, Boca Raton, will
discuss "U.S. Jewry: Culture
in Crisis," and Rev. Ralph
Halvorson, minister, First
Unitarian Church of West
Palm Beach, will speak on
"Religion and Politics." The
Repertory Company will enact
scenes from "The Diary of
Anne Frank." Hatbands,
friends and the public are
invited. Please bring a dairy
sandwich. Beverage and
cookies will be served. Lake
Worth Chapter is comprised
of Ali.va, Chai, Henrietta
Szold and Lee Vassil groups.
when, according to Der
Spiegel, he said it was not
possible or necessary to
dismantle Jewish settlements
on the West Bank because it
was in principle unthinkable to
have Israeli villages under
Arab sovereignty.
FREE TICKETS!
Dolphins vs. Jets
Monday Nov. 26th
On* pair of tickets to the Dokihins/ Jets
game will be given away by drawing on
November 1st. in every Publix
from Vero Beach to Homestead.
00LPHINMANIA WINNERS
$500 $1,000
William Smith Geneva Wetton
Golden Beach Dania
Virginia Von Spreecken Qary ga9r
Ft. Lauderdale Tamarac
August Relnerl jMn Pneiipp
Pompano Beach Tequesta
Donna Christensen Mildred Moorer
Coral Gables Miami
Peter Necastro Eva Rohan
Miami Ft. Pierce
$2,500
Toni Weston
Miami Shores
Evelyn Brenner
Palm Beach
^ where shopping is a pleasure 7days a week
Publix Bakeries open at 8:00 A.M.
Available et Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Plain or with Seeds
Rye Bread
.oef3i|
f
Available at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Topped with Creamy Chocolate
Eclairs
3~$1
Available at Pubix Stores with
Freeh Danish Bakeries Only.
Fresh and Spicy
Pumpkin Pie
H59
j
Available at AN Pubix Stores
and Danish Bakeries.
Mapte Walnut
Coffee Cake
Deep South
Carrot Cake.
each
each
S-|69
$209
Fled with Fruit and Nuts
Fruit Stollen........
*2*>
Available at Pubix Stores with Fresh
Danish Bakeries Only.
Baklava, Pecan
Queen or Chocolate
Almond Log..................each 69*
Prices Effective
Nov. 1st thru 7th. 1984.


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Page 16 The JmriaH vu^m-----
Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, November 2,1984
Organizations
in the News
B'NAl B'RITH WOMEN
The next general meeting of Masada Chapter will be
held on Nov. 13, 6:45 p.m., at the Chase Federal Bank in
the Jefferson Mall.
There will be a book review by Estelle Plaskon.
HADASSAH
The Boy n ton Beach Chapter will hold a regular meeting
on Monday. Nov. 5, 12:30 p.m., at the Royal Palm
Clubhouse, 554 NE 22nd Ave., just west of U.S. 1.
Election Bazaar and Flea Market sponsored by Shalom
and Yovel Chapters will be held at West Palm Beach
Auditorium Tuesday. Nov. 6, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Free admission, free parking old and new jewelry,
ceramics, paintings, lamps, linens, piece goods, books,
novelty items, plants and clothing will be offered.
BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY
NATION AI WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
BOYNTON BEACH CHAPTER
The board of directors will meet at the home of Sally
Friedman. Building 14. on Monday. Nov. 5 at 1 p.m.
The general meeting will be held on Monday, Nov. 19.
12-30 nm at the Roval Palm Clubhouse. The guest
speaker, Eugene Topperman of the Jewish Family and
Children's Service will be introduced by Janet Asher.
pronram chairman. Topperman will discuss aspects of
communication with grandchildren of inter-religious
marriages and divorced couples.
On Noi 26. 1 p.m.. at the Royal Palm Clubhouse.
Hannah Turner will review Shindler's List" by Thomas
KeneaUej
No\ 28-Dec. 1 (tour days, three nights) at the Regency
Hotel Spa Bal Harbour. Good accommodations, delicious
food, free massages, etc. Husbands are welcome. _For
information and reservations please call Helen Milch or
Rhoda Collier.
HADASSAH ASSOCIATES
The Lake Worth Chapter will hold their regular monthly
meeting on Monday. Nov. 5. 9:30 a.m at the Sunr.se
Bank Military Trail and Gun Club Road. The purpose is
to get together with all Hadassah Associates in this area to
form one larger group.
NATIONAL JEWISH
CIVIL SERVICE EMPLOYEES
The next monthly meeting of the South Florida Chapter
will be Sundav, Nov. 4, 1 p.m.. at the Florida Gardens
Civic Center. 134 Ohio Road. Lake Worth (one-eighth
mile east of the Florida Turnpike off Lake Worth Road).
The guest speakers will be Congressman Dan Mica and
State Representative Ray Liberti.
The chapter is sponsoring a Thanksgiving weekend trip
to Venice on the Gulf Coast for three days and two nights.
A New Year's Eve weekend trip is also planned for
Cocoa for three days and two nights.
For trip and luncheon information contact Jeanette S.
Levine at 2557 Emory Drive West Villa "C," West
Palm Beach. Fla. 33415.
WOMEN'S AMERICAN ORT
Six ORT Chapters of North Palm Beach County Region
will observe ORT Sabbath at Temple Beth El on Nov. 9.
with Rabbi Howard Hirsch officiating. The six chapters
arc Boynton, Haverhill, Indian Spring, Mid Palm, Palm
Beach, and Poinciana. This has been arranged by the
Region education chair. Esther Sugerman and her co-chair
Selma Kunin.
The Atlantis Chapter will meet Tuesday, Nov. 6. 12:30
p.m.. at the home of Sandy Singer. An ORT film will be
presented and refreshments served.
The Palm Beach E>ening Chapter is once again spon-
soring its annual Chanukah Bazaar on Thursday evening,
Nov. 1, 8 p.m. at the home of Joan and Mike Schweitz.
Featured will be jewelry by Helen, stationery by Little
Prints, personalized frames by Tia, children's clothing.
I6ys and cosmetics. Refreshments will be served and all
sales benefit the chapter. Guests are welcome.
The Ceatuo Chapter will host a luncheon and card
party at the Red Lobster on Nov. 28.
The Lakes of Poiaciaaa Chapter will meet on Monday.
Nov. 5, 12:30 p.m.. at the Poinciana Lakes Clubhouse.
The Royal Chapter will hold its fifth annual Sports Day
at the Indian Trail Country Club, on Monday. Nov. 5. A
continental breakfast at 8:45 a.m. will start the day. This
will be followed by golf, tennis, or cards and includes
lunch.
The charges are as follows:
Golf Cart Lunch $25, Tennis and Lunch
$13 50, Cards and Lunch $8.75. TeeSponsers $25. Checks
should be made out to Women's American ORT.
ParticiDants may sign up at Indian Trail Country Club,
or at hePRo?Jpilm Beach Golf Club. For further in-
formation, contact Bella Zatkowsky or Marcia Katz.
a rummase sale will be held on Sunday, Nov. 11,
"underTe frees'' at Southern Blvd. and Royal Palm
Beach Blvd. in Royal Palm Beach.
Clothing and housewares in perfect condition will be
offered from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
For more information, contact Ruth Gradess. chair-
person or Miriam Korder, co-chairperson.
WOMEN'S LEAGUE FOR ISRAEL
The Sabra Chapter will hold its next meeting, a mini-
luncheon, on Tuesday.Noy. 6. 1 p.m.. at the Sunrise
Savings and Loan Association on Military Trail and Gun
Club Road.
The South Florida Region will hold a workshop on
Friday, Nov. 2, 9:30 a.m., at Woodlands Clubhouse No.
7.
Subjects: Leadership, Fundraising. Membership,
Programming. Education, etc. A mini-breakfast will be
served.
YIDDISH CULTURE GROUP
The Nov. 13, 10 a.m. program of the Century Village
Group will feature 'The Ruth Hyde Group' in an original
cantata entitled 'Our Musical Tour of Israel.' It was
written and will be narrated by Lee Duchin, who recently
returned from a trip to Israel. The soloists will be Ann
March and Jack Zuckerman, accompanied by violinist
Harry Levine. Ruth Hyde is musical director and will
accompany on piano.
Also featured will be 'The Musical Friends' with vocalist
Lillian Kessler at the piano and violin players Jacky
Lorber, Phil Herman and Sam Finkenthal.
Training Underway
For JF&CS Quick
Response Program
The Jewish Family and
Children's Service has begun
orientation and training for its
Quick Response program. The
second session will be held on
Tuesday, Nov. 6, at 10 a.m
and will address the questions
What is the Quick Response
service? Who will it serve1'
What will it really do?
According to Ned Gold-
berg, program manager, vol-
unteers in the program visit
socially isolated shut-ins for
one hour a week. "Sometimes
the volunteer that comes to the
client's home is the only visitor
that the client sees that week,"
said Goldberg.
Subsequent training sessions
will be held on Thursday,
Nov. 8, Tuesday, Nov. 13, and
Thursday, Nov. 15. All train-
ing sessions will be held at the
Jewish Family and Children's
Service, 2250 Palm Beach
Lakes Blvd., Suite 104, West
Palm Beach, beginning at 10
a.m.
Interested persons may still
register for the training ses-
sions by calling Goldberg at
684-1991.
/pasta and vegetables SUPREME >------------------------------N
I The Jewish Homemaker's Guide to Delicious Italian Cooking \
I Gets its Zest from Chef Boy-ar-dee Ravioli.
2 tablespoons chopped parsley
N cup chopped onion
1 tablespoon butter or margarine
1 cm (15 oi.) Chef Boy-ar-dee
Cheese Ravioli in Tomato Sauce
1 cup water
1 packet G. Washington's Golden
Seasoning and Broth
1 cup chopped red pepper
1 package (10 oz.) frozen com,
cooked and drained
1 package (10 oz.) chopped
broccob. cooked and drained
coccob. cooked
1 cup sbced mushrooms
^ cup butter or margarine
(4 tablespoons)
1. Saute chopped parsley and onion in 1 tablespoon butter.
2. Combine parsley, onion. Cheese Ravioli, water and G. Washington's in
2 quart sauce pan. Cover, simmer for 10 minutes.
3. Meantime, saute red pepper in 1 tablespoon butter. Remove to warm
serving dish.
4. Continue to saute each vegetable separately in 1 tablespoon of butter.
Remove each vegetable to separate warm dish. Serves four. __ J
DON
ROSS
A14 year resident of
South Florida
President of the
College of Boca Raton
A Business and Community Leader
I AM COMMITTED TO:
Preserving Social Security. Medicare and Medicaid
by ending all talk of even taking a penny away.
Born and raised in Long Island
Educated in Public Schools
Attended NY. Institute of Technology
and Hofstra University
Dean of Students N.Y. Institute of Technology
President Wilmington College (Delaware)
Director Boca Raton Chamber of Commerce
Past Chairman United Way
of Boca Raton
Married former Helen Landgreen,
Flushing, N.Y.
2 children
VOTE ROSS
NOV. 6th
NOTE
Political Reading Material and Advertising on this page is
construed as an endorsement by the Jewish Fed-
eration or Palm Beach Cour
Call 421-4588
For More Information
PAID FOB BY THE ROSS FOR CONGRESS CoAl
DISTRICT 14
MITTEE


w
Friday, November 2,1984 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 7
JCC News
ONE MORE TIME WAREHOUSE"
Steven Shapiro, chairperson of the Jewish Community
Center's "One More Time Warehouse," has announced
the appointment of Ruth Goldman as its new manager.
Mrs. Goldman has been an active volunteer at the
Center's "Warehouse" for the past year and a half and is
very knowledgeable of its operation. She will be happy to
arrange for pick-ups of furniture, cars, trucks, small or
large appliances, bric-a-brac, and so on. All donations are
tax deductible. The Warehouse phone number is 471-1077
If no answer, please call the Center at 689-7700.
All are welcome to visit the "Warehouse," which is
located at 3420 W. 45th St., Unit 8 in West Palm Beach, to
browse and pick up a bargain.
IN PREPARATION FOR CHANUKAH
The Jewish Community Center is in the process of
putting together a Jewish Book Fair in honor of Jewish
Book Month Sunday, Nov. 18, from 11 a.m. to 3:30 p m
at the Center, 2415 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach. '
People of all ages will be invited to come and browse and
enjoy the many events that will be held at that time. For
adults a film of Jewish interest, and for children a special
Storytime and a movie festival.
A variety of gifts for purchase will be available in ad-
dition to the books. This will be a one-stop shop for all
Chanukah gifts. Watch for further details.
FIRST SOCIAL FOR NEWCOMERS
Joy Gales, chairperson of the Shalom Newcomers
Network of the Jewish Community Center is pleased to
announce that the first social to be given for newcomers to
the community will be held Sunday, Nov. 4 from 10:30
a.m. to noon.
Mrs. Gales wants to receive names of newcomers (three
years or less) to our area and is asking persons in the
community to call the Center at 689-7700 to inform the
Center in order that invitations may be sent to new
residents.
This is the first in a series of socials being planned for
newcomers.
VOTE FOR SOMEONE WHO CARES
PUNCH
I NO. 79
EVATT
* THE RIGHT CHOICE
County Commission Republican
DISTRICT 1 PO. POL ADV.
Hadassah of Greater Palm
Beach Coulnty Invites
members and friends to honor
Rose Matzkln, past president
of National Hadassah at a
State of Israel Bonds
Champagne Brunch on
Sunday, Nov. |] at 10:30 a.m.
at the Golden Lion Restaurant
located at the Challenger
CountrrClub, 3536 Poinciana
Drive Lake Worth. Mrs.
Matzkin will be the keynote
speaker. She will also be
honored as the "Woman of
the Year" by the State of Isra-
el. Couverl for the brunch is
$10 and a commitment to
purchase an Israel Certificate
or Bond. Reservations are
required. Members may mail
checks to Chapter or Group
Bond chairmen.
NOTE
Political Reading Material
and Advertising on this
page is not to be construed
as an endorsement by the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County.
VOTE NOVEMBER 6
TO RE-ELECT
QUALIFIED TO SERVE DISTRICT 83
FLORIDA HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
Prime Sponsor of
The School Discipline Act of 1984
Eleanor Weinstock has been YOUR voice in the Florida
House of Representatives for 3 terms. Please vote
November 6 to keep her working for you.
DEMOCRAT
Pd. Pol. Adv. Paid lof by Eleanor Weinstock Campaign Fund.
Congressman
Keep him working for you

MICA... A Record of Service and Accomplishment
ft Congressman Dan Mica is a
stunning example of my point. He
is known throughout the country
for being a dedicated, hard-
working Representative, one who
truly cares about his constituents'
"ghts. %%
' February 1983
_____ Sun Sentinel
Dan Mica continues to demonstrate a unique
understanding in working to get problems
solved at the federal level. He has the
experience and Washington know-how, the
expertise on the critical issues important to
Jje citizens of the 14th Congressional
"strict, and, more importantly, the ability to
981 ** job done for you.
RE-ELECT
Seeks your views through an annual ques-
tionnaire
Serves as South Florida's representative on
the Committee on Veteran's Affairs
Serves on the Select Committee on Aging
Serves on the Committee on Foreign Affairs
Chairman of the Subcommittee on Interna-
tional Operations
Member of the House Export Task Force
Member of the Congressional Tourism Caucus
Elected by his colleagues as a Southern
Regional Whip
Appointed to National Anti-Terrorism Commit-
tee by Secretary of State George Shultz
Responsible for obtaining a 625-bed medical
and surgical veteran's hospital for our area
Introduced legislation which led to the devel-
opment of a National Veteran's Cemetery in
Central Florida
Cosponsored the Florida Wilderness Act
which passed the House in 1983
Appointed as a member of the U.S. Delega-
tion to the Board of Governors of the Interna-
tional Monetary Fund by Secretary of the
Treasury Donald Regan
Reintroduced the MICA AMENDMENT to
stop the flow of illegal aliens into South
Florida (this will extend its life and effect over
the next two years)
Cosponsored the Law Enforcement Officers
Protection Law
Introduced legislation to increase the number
of judges in South Florida's Judicial District in
order to eliminate a backlog of cases
Cosponsored the Bail Reform Crime Bill
Received the Liberty Bell Award, the highest
honor presented to a non-attorney by the
Palm Beach County Bar Association for his
contributions to the criminal justice system, in-
cluding legislation creating a new Federal
judicial district for the Southern region
1 Chaired hearings concerning Medicare's fu-
ture held in Boca Raton by the House Select
Committee on Aging
Voted to insure the financial stability of the
Social Security System (passed into law as
P.L 98-21)
Congressman Dan Mica...He's Working for You
VOTE in the General Election on November 6th