The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian the voice of the Jewish community of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Running title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Physical Description:
4 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 8, no. 41 (Dec. 24, 1982)-v. 11, no. 26 (Aug. 30, 1985).
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44606415
lccn - sn 00229548
ocm44606415
System ID:
AA00014310:00078

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)


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ewish floridian
VOLUME 10 NUMBER 34
PALM BEACH, FLORIDA FRIDAY, OCTOBER 26,1984
PRICE 35 CENTS
isual Error'
Peres Says Withdrawal Plan Misunderstood
AVIV (JTA) -
U Shimon Peres has said
there was a "visual
t_ a misreading both in
Is and Israel of his
f remarks with respect to
Lre withdrawal of the
i Defense Force from
inon. He also stressed that
h plans were not inf lu-
fi by Syria.
L spoke to reporters on
Urn from a seven day
visit to the U.S. which inluded
two days of talks with Pres-
ident Reagan, Secretary of
State George Shultz, Defense
Secretary Caspar Weinberger
and other top Administration
officials in Washington. He
was accompanied at those
meetings by Deputy Premier
and Foreign Minister Yitzhak
Shamir.
Peres told reporters that
what he said before and during
his American trip and what he
reiterates now is that within
the next 3-4 weeks the Cabinet
will consider various options
prepared by the Defense Min-
istry for an IDF withdrawal
from south Lebanon that will
ensure the safety of Israel's
northern border.
He emphasized that he did
not say there would be a deci-
sion to withdraw within three
weeks and a pullback within 6-
9 months. The Defense Min-
istry has prepared various
options and these will be
considered by the Cabinet
within 3-4 weeks, Peres
repeated.
He said there was a
mistaken impression that Syria
has become central to events in
the region. Israel does not
need Syrian assent to with-
draw from Lebanon, Peres
said, but Syria should take
into consideration the various
options open to Israel and
know that withdrawal would
be an Israeli decision. "Not
everything depends on
Damascus," the Premier said.
Peres was fulsome in his
praise for the reception he and
Shamir received in Wash-
ington.
lummings Named
Women's Division Campaign Vice President
la Engelstein, president
jie Women's Division of
ish Federaiion of Palm
i County, has appointed
Cummings ;o serve as
ten's Division campaign
| president for the J9&S
i Federation of Palm
County-United Jewish
J campaign.
Inside
tool Board
ICandidates
ivember elections are
si around the corner.
new the School Board
didates and their
litions. See page 4.
Random
Thoughts
e Jewish Floridian
lcomes Muriel Levitt
'CMo its pages after a
ummer hiatus. See
M3
Resident
uses Center
[tos Geriatric Center
ntgivesusher
ssions of the
See page 3.
I^lebrating
Sukkot
P observances arc
JJttf both in Palm
^County and In
"J photo display
In accepting her position
Mrs. Cummings stated,
"Women's Division is striving
to strengthen the ties of
women in this community with
the people of Israel by increas-
ing their commitment both
financially and personalty. In
addition the Palm Beaches
have gone through rapid
expansion and will continue to
grow during the next decade.
Therefore our beneficiary
agencies, the Jewish Com-
munity Center, the Jewish
Community Day School, the
Jewish Family and Children's
Service and the Morse
Geriatric Center, need our
Julie Cummings
commitment to continue to
serve the increasing needs of
this community. To this end
we encourage women to be-
come involved and educated
about the importance of
making their own gift."
Mrs. Cummings, who came
to this area from Detroit,
Michigan, has been active in
Women's Division for several
years. She has served as
Chairman of the $1000
campaign event, member of
the nominating committee and
vice president of education.
She has represented the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County at the Jewish Agency
meetings in Israel and has been
co-chairman of the missions
committee.
Currently Mrs. Cummings
is a member of the executive
committee of the national
United Jewish Appeal Young
Women's Leadership Cabinet
responsible for the portfolio
of Project Renewal. This past
summer she participated in the
national Women's Division
Campaign Chairwomen's and
Directors' Mission to Israel.
In addition to her active
involvement in the Jewish
community, Mrs. Cummings
serves on the board of di-
rectors of the United Way of
Martin County and the Tri-
County Rehabilitation Center.
Peres' Report to Cabinet
U.S. Offers Israel Moratorium On Debt
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Premier Shimon Peres con-
firmed to the Cabinet that the
U.S. government has sug-
gested a moratorium on the
payment by Israel of $500
million in debts which fall due
over the next three months.
Peres explained that the idea
advanced to him, he
stressed, by Administration
and Congressional leaders
is that before the three months
elapse Congress will vote addi-
tional aid for Israel of at least
the $300 million, and possibly
more, thereby effectively
cancelling the debts.
INITIAL REPORTS of this
hitherto secret, but crucially
important, concession were
broadcast by Israel Radio's
Washington correspondent.
Peres told the ministers at a
special Cabinet session
convened to discuss his
trip to the U.S. that he
and Deputy Premier Yitzhak
Shamir had initially balked at
the idea of debt-deferrment,
given the distasteful aura sur-
rounding the idea.
But top American leaders
had assured him that in all that
touched upon Israel's credit
worthiness on the money
markets America's own public
expressions of confidence,
such as that by President
Reagan at the White House,
would secure required loans
for Israel. There was no pre-
tending to the outside world,
the American leaders stressed,
that Israel did not face an
immediate economic crisis.
The $500 million, coupled
with Washington's agreement
to pay the entire $1.2 billion in
economic aid for fiscal 1985
immediately, means that
Israel's dwindling coffers are
to be replenished forthwith to
the substantial tune of $1.7
billion.
PERES STRESSED,
however, that this transient
relief does not in any way
relieve Israel of the need to
attend to its crushing econ-
omic crisis especially the
raging inflation.
Since his return from the
U.S., Peres has laid primary
emphasis on the urgent need to
reach a wage-price "package
deal" involving all sectors of
the economy.
In his report to the Cabinet,
Peres emphasized the Admin-
istration's solid acceptance of
CoatiniMd on Pace 12
TipnDei^T>

D_ 1 I m.
. .
^^^H^Z^^fZ^^ T,:*i'-."'rf '.'.fV'T <>''T ?*''
Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County. Friday, October 26,1984

Celebrating Sukkot
In Jerusalem...
Two men inspect lulavim to ensure that kashrut
requirements are met. These include a closed center
spine, tightness at the top, and a minimum length of
five fists.
'.v*
*-.->.

Two Israelis of Moroccan origin enjoy
their succah in the Musrarah neighborhood
of Jerusalem.
Spinka Hassidim have dinner in iheij
succah in Mea Shearim, Jerusalem.
In Palm Beach County
;
L
h
s
d
E
s
a
P
a
v
b
P
c
f
S
I
Rabbi Steven Westman of Temple Beth Torah conduct
service for Sukkot in the succah of the Jewish Communii* vt
School for Midrasha-Judaica High School si"d teachers. After dinner was served, the rabbi played the gum
and led the group in singing a medley of Hebrew songs.
I
it
I
Residents of the Joseph L. Morse Geriatric Center of the Jewish
Home for the Aged of Palm Beach County celebrate the holida>
of Sukkot by congregating in the succah built on the grounds of
the facility. Rabbi Alan Sherman, the Center's religious
director, led the kiddush and prayers for the holiday.
-
~
i
The children of the Jewish Community Center's Keren Orr Pre-
school are shown \isiting Temple Beth El's Sukkah October 16
while on a neighborhood "Sukkah Safari."


Friday, October 26,1984. The Jewial
Jeacr
irk l^vy
Appointed Chairman Of Leadership Development
, Nickman,
nf" the Jewish
W of palm Beach
Knnounced the ap-
fea of Mark Levy as
r nf the Leadership
Z& Committee in
ft appointment Mr
r1 .tated "Wc must
fe e future in this
En by training the
Hito take leader-
fP am pleased that
fty Unaccepted this
I ship, since he exem-
^c high quality of
I leader which we are
L for to help us build a
*,nd viable Jewish com-
II
It are very excited about
'year's Leadership
foment program, said
k Levy. "We have
id over 40 young singles
couples between the ages
I and 40 to participate in
lUram. Our committee
V up of past participants
Readership Development
Uis over the last several
I They are very enthu-
tindhavc put together a
fine educational program to
help stimulate and provide
enrichment for our Leadership
Development participants."
The first Leadership
Development program was
held in 1973 as a pilot program
chaired by Harriet "Buddie"
Brenner and Rabbi Sheldon
Harr. At that time the Federa-
tion board recognized that the
community was growing and
that there was a tremendous
need for developing leaders
for the future. Six couples
participated in the first
program. The following year
the Federation board asked
Robert Levy, who had been a
member of the National
Young Leadership Cabinet, to
establish an on-going
program. That year the group
expanded to 35 with the
program stressing leadership
skills and community involve-
ment. By 1976, almost half the
Federation board of directors
were graduates of the Leader-
ship Development program.
Although the program has
been called the Young Leader-
ship Development program,
Mark Levy
this year the name of the com-
mittee has been changed to
Leadership Development
Committee. "We have
changed the name of our com-
mittee because we feel that
Leadership Development
should not stop at the age of
40. We are looking to expand
our programs into all areas of
the community, and with the
help of a long range program-
ming committee study, we will
be able to plan effectively for
this type of program," Levy
continued.
In addition to local pro-
gramming, members of the
group will have an oppor-
tunity this year to participate
in the National Young Leader-
ship Mission to Israel, which
will be held for the State of
Florida Feb. 25-March 5,
1985, with a pre-mission in
Poland beginning Feb. 21. In
addition the Statewide Asso-
ciation of Florida Federations
sponsors a National Retreat in
cooperation with the Untied
Jewish Appeal National
Young Leadership Cabinets
and the Council of Jewish
Federations National Com-
mittee for Leadership Devel-
opment.
Levy, an attorney, has been
an active participant in the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County's Young
Leadership program, and cur-
rently sits on the National
United Jewish Appeal Young
Leadership Cabinet. He serves
on the Federation's Campaign
Cabinet, and is a member of
the Human Resource Sub-
Committee of the Compre-
hensive Development Project,
a self study of the Federation.
Levy's involvement in
Jewish concerns extends
through the community. He
sits on the board of the Jewish
Community Day School and is
chairman of the Legal Com-
mittee of the Palm Beach
Chapter of the Anti-Defama-
tion League of B'nai B'rith.
Levy concluded, by stating,
"The future of the Jewish
people depends on our willing-
ness to assume a leadership
role in the Jewish community,
and to educate ourselves in
preparation for the task of
assuming fujl leadership from
our parents' generation. This
is what the Leadership
Development program is all
about."
Morse Geriatric Resident Shares Her Views
'Here, We Have Found Renewal*
ByANITA ANTON
bover a year now that we
been residents at the
Geriatric Center in
Palm Beach. Our lives
health have undergone
s. However, the bigdif-
Bce in being a Morse
Mis now we have larger
We have become
fcnton staff members and
steers, more than on our
l children.
|(t are indeed thankful to
[executive director, Drew
ienheimer, for setting up
lamjsual treatment program
Ithe residents an eclectic
k constantly emphasizing
["kashruth" and the tradi-
pal values of a Jewish
fee. For some of us it is
nl of the kashruth"
economically before
ling to the Home we could
afford to continue. In
Ithe adjustments to ill
land aging, we were begin-
! to sacrifice Judaic tradi-
and to just "make do"
rhoui temple affiliation to
through the Sabbath.
to, we have found renewal.
[Foremost in the residents'
ds is our rabbi and our
nple. We had many misty-
fd family members and
[tors during the High Holy
feys who watched Rabbi Alan
Sherman help a seemingly dis-
oriented resident to remember
prayers while having an
"aliyah." Rabbi never sees
residents as aging or dis-
oriented they are con-
gregants and participants.
At temple services many
memories of good times, when
one was young and financially
secure, are rekindled. We saw
a 98-year-old resident regain
self esteem by initiating
pledges of financial support to
the State of Israel and try to
encourage other residents to
similar interests.
We have a devoted and con-
cerned Volunteer Program at
the Center and it cannot be
praised enough. Last year
Erwin Blonder, president of
the Board of Trustees, called
the volunteers "our life line to
the community." Mr. Blonder
is a man of great vision and he
was more than accurate in his
appraisal of what the vol-
unteers would mean to the
Center. Under the direction of
the volunteer coordinator,
Micki Ross, the programs
have taken off with trem-
endous strides. When the vol-
unteers arrive, the residents
come from everywhere, for it's
our assurance that once again
our special needs are cared for
be it doctor's appoint-
anniversary celebration held this summer.
ments, discussion groups,
temple services, assistance to
nurses and aides, running an
activity, feeding of handi-
capped residents, one to one
relationships, card games, res-
idents' mending, or the
sharing of family "simchas
and tsuris."
We are beholden to staff
members of unusually high
calibre. They are extra-
ordinary people who enter our
lives and keep us tuned to the
present. It's a lot different
than being incapacitated and
restricted to a small home or
apartment, waiting for a call
from a family member or
friend who cannot really keep
up with us and find it difficult
to be with us as our bodies or
minds begin to falter. Here we
are exposed to the profes-
sionals and the very demeanor
of the staff reflects this. They
are, for the most part,
dedicated individuals who
care, and their efforts reflect
Continued on Pane 15
HOLD THE DATE!
|SUNDAY MORNING, NOVEMBER 18,9:30 a.m.
Temple Beth El-Fread Sanctuary
EIGHTH ANNUAL MIDEAST CONFERENCE
Guest Speakers
THE HONORABLE MEIR ROSENNE
Ambassador of Israel to the U.S.
TOM DINE
Executive Director
American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC)
Sponsored by the Israel-Mideast Task Force
of the Community Relations Council of the
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County.
Jewish and Female-
Ad-rcwledge your Impact!
Reservations for the Jewish Women's
Assembly have been coming in at a steady
pace. It is anticipated that by press time
the Assembly will be sold out. Therefore,
checks will be returned that are received
after capacity is reached. The Women's
Division Jewish Women's Assembly com-
mittee thanks the community for their over-
whelming response to the Assembly.
Deborah Brass and Esther Szmuckler,
co-chairwomen
l^HM


D-r
1 t

I
.-
Page4 The Jewish FToridian of Palm Beach County Friday, October 26,1964
Historian Corrects
Record on Jews
In Venta Prieta
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Miamiam Seymour B. Lieberman is an historian and
author. He has special credentials in the history of Jews in
Latin America. In this article Liebman takes exception to a
conclusion that the apparently Orthodox Jews of Venta
Prieta in Mexico trace their origins to the Marranos among
the earliest families of Spanish conquistadors almost 500
years ago.
By SEYMOUR B. LIEBMAN
A noted historian wrote that
most historical accounts of
Mexican history are "folklore
with footnotes." Folklore and
myths are integral parts of
Mexican history.
Venta Prieta, 65 miles north of
Mexico City, is a village
inhabited by a small group of
people called "Indian Jews." To
tourists and some journalists, the
name stimulates images of an
exotic people, probably of ancient
language.
Visitors 'to the village are
regaled with stories of a Spanish
Sephardi Jewish woman who fled
the Inquisition and found refuge
in an Indian village (not Venta
Prieta), an unnamed place, where
she cohabited with an Indian.
She became the ancestress of the
current "Indian Jews." There are
other accounts equally incredible.
THE TRUTH, though less
romantic, is based on well-
documented historical facts.
They are contained in my
Master's thesis at the University
of the Americas (June, 1963). The
"Indian Jews" are neither
Indians nor Jews. They are
Mestizos who adopted Judaism.
They are of Indian origin, but
generations of intermarriage with
non-Indians created the class
known as Mestizos who form the
majority of Mexicans.
According to the laws of Juda-
ism, only one born of a Jewish
mother or one converted by a bet
din, a court of three rabbis, is a
Jew. One cannot acquire the
status of being a Jew by adop-
tion, wishful thinking, observing
Jewish ritual, or the concoction of
myths. Judaism is a formal rel-
igion with its laws and rites as
are Catholicism and Islam.
When Jews were expelled from
Spain in 1492, they were also
barred from entering any Spanish
colony. However, they came to
the New World because they were
Spanish, Spanish was their
native tongue, and Spain had
been their homeland for over a
1,000 years. They have been
known as Marranos or secret
Jews. They professed Catho-
licism publicly while practicing
Judaism secretly.
IN 1528, two Jews were burned
at the stake in Mexico City, and
two others were "reconciled." In
1550, there were more Jews than
Catholics in the white Spanish
colony. It was reported that a
Grand Rabbi was also among
them. A formal branch of the
Holy Office of the Inquisition
was established in Mexico in
1571. Autos da fe were held
periodically from that date until
the beginning of the 19th cen-
tury.
There is a sect in Mexico,
Iglesia de Dios, the Church of
God, whose Mestizo congregants
call themselves Israelitas (the
same term used to refer to Jews)
and claim to be the true descend-
ants of the biblical Jacob. There
is another sect, Casa de Dios,
House of God, with Mestizo
congregants. Both sects worship
Jesus and Mary and are
Protestant in orientation.
About 1931, a lawyer, Baltasar
Laureano Ramirez, drew disciples
from each of those sects. Under
his tutelage, the group pro-
claimed that they were Jews and
descendants of Luis de Carvajal,
el Mozo. Luis, a young pious Jew,
was burned at the stake in
Mexico City on December 8,
1596, together with his mother
and three sisters.
ANOTHER SISTER was
burned on March 25, 1601, and
another died in the Inquisition
cells in 1648. The people of Venta
Prieta made a poor choice in
selecting young Luis as their
ancestor, since he did not and
could not father children. (The
original trial transcripts of the
Carvajals and the data in this
article are taken from the
Inquisition records in the
Mexican National Archives,
Ramo de la Inquisicion. I
The absurdity of the claim of
being descendants of the
Sephardi Spanish Jewish woman
is revealed by the following: a)
only a practicing Jew could fear
the Inquisition. If one did not
practice Jewish rites, his or her
religion would-not be known; b) a
pious Sephardi Spanish woman
in Mexico who fled would not
cohabit with an Indian who was
considered no gente de razon by
the Church.
I licit intercourse would be a
violation of her faith and her eth-
nicity. The famed Spanish
historian, Americo Castro, wrote,
"The people who really felt the
scruple of purity of blood were
the Spanish Jews there is a
punctilious concern for family
purity ... as a consequence of
the persecution in the 15th
century, he became still more
the
Jewish floridian
of Palm Baacfi County
Combining "Our Voice and "Fadaration Raportar
FREDK SMOCHET SUZANNE SHOCHET RONNI EPSTEIN
Editor and Publisher Eiecutive Editor News Coordinator
Published Weekly October through Mid May. Bi Weekly balance ol year
Second Claas Postage Paid at Boca Raton Fla USPS 009030
PALM BEACH BOCA RATON OFFICE
336 NW Spanish River Bird Boca Raton. Fla 33431 Phone 368-2001
Mam Office I Plant 120 N E 6th St Miami Fl 33101 Phone 1 373 4605
oasaiaaSar Return form 3571 to Jewish Floridian. O Boi 01 2173, Miami. Fla. 33101
Advertising Director Steel Lesser Phone SM 1*52
Combined Jewish Appeal-Jewish Federation ot Palm Beach County. Inc Officers President
Myron J Nickman. Vice Presidents Peter Cummings. Alec Engelstem. Arnold Lampert, Barbara
Tanen and Aivm Wilensky. Secretary. Dr Elizabeth S 8hulman. Treasurer Barry Berg Submit
material to Ronni Epstein. Director of Public Relations. SOI South Flagler Or. West Palm Beam
FL 33401
Jewish Floridian does not guarantee Kashruth of Merchandise Advenised
SUBSCRIPTION RATES Local Area U Annual (2 Year Minimum $7 SO), or by membership Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach County. 501 S Flagler Dr. West Palm Beach. Fla. 33401. Phone S32 2120
Out Of Town Upon naauet.
Friday, October 28,1984 SO TISHRI 5745
Volume 10 Number 34
c_____ d j uhman (left) on his visit to Rabbi of Israel Shlomo Goren, and Hi
MZPrSta ^iS^mlhhim (left to right Feller, mohel for the real j
tSSmZdtan Enrique Tellez, leader of the community.
Vent?Prieta group; then-Chief Ashkenazi
acutely aware of his exclusive
particularism."
IT IS KNOWN that during the
colonial period in the New World
Spaniards, among them Jews,
dallied with Indian women and
probably sired Mestizo offspring.
Jewish law does not recognize
such offspring as Jews.
Raphael Patai, noted anthro-
pologist, also studied the people
of Venta Prieta about 1949 and
1950. He wrote, "I succeeded in
finding irrefutable documentary
proof that the Indian Jewish
congregation was organized as a
result of the succession of one of
their present leaders (Baltasar
Laureano Ramirez) from the
Iglesia de Dios."
I VISITED Venta Prieta
several times during my
residence in Mexico, 1960-1966.
One visit in 1964 was made with
Rabbi Shlomo Goren, than Chief
Ashkenazi Rabbi of Israel. On his
return to Israel, he ***>*_[
Panim at Panim that the people
of Venta Prieta were not Jews.
His finding was the same that
was made in 1957 by Rabbi Jacob
Avigdor and his colleague, the
official rabbinate of the legi-
timate Mexican Jewish com-
munity.
During 1957, Sr. Tellez, the
new leader of the group, peti-
tioned the rabbinate of Mexico
City for a mass conversion of his
flock. This was denied, since
Judaism recognizes only indi-
vidual conversions, after study
and preparation.
The Venta Prieta people did
not want individual conversions,
since that would be a publk
admission that accounts of their
ance8try were untrue. A few of
the younger generation have
migrated to Israel where they
underwent Orthodox conver-
sions. At least three have
returned-but not to Venta Prieta.
DR. ROBERT EAVH
nether anthropologw
studied these people ui ,
firmed that these MeniaJ
tourists what they wiat to f
rather than telling the M
Octavio Paz, Mexican poet]
former ambassador, wrow'
Labrynth of Solitude, in whxj
stated, "Our lives reflect whsj
lack and what we desire u]
politics, our love affairs -1
what we are not and *fa
would like to be."
-NOTE-
Political Reading Materi/A
and Advertising on this]
page is not to be consimtdl
as an endorsement by ihe\
Jewish Federation o/Pak\
Beach County.
DON
ROSS
A 14 year resident of
South Florida
President of the
College of Boca Raton
A Business and Community Leader
I AM COMMITTED TO:
Preserving Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid
by ending all talk of even taking a penny away!
Born and raised in Long Island
Educated in Public Schools
Attended N.Y. Institute of Technology
and Hofstra University
Dean of Students N.Y. Institute of Technology
President Wilmington College (Delaware)
Director Boca Raton Chamber of Commerce
Past Chairman United Way
of Boca Raton
Married former Helen Landgreen,
Flushing, N.Y.
2 children
VOTE ROSS
NOV. 6th
Call 421-4588
For More Information
PAID FOR BY THE ROSS FOR CONGRESS COMMITTEE
DISTRICT 14


Radio /TV Highlights M
unsAlC -Sunday. Oct. 28. 9 a.m. WPTV Channel
^ 8th host Barbara Gordon. (Pre-empted)
ftrHAYlM -Sunday. Oct. 28, 7:30 a.m. WPBR
Ejsr-wj,n nst Rabbi Mark s-GoiubTne jewisn
Seder's Digest, a radio magazine.
IciulOM Sunday. Oct. 28, 10 a.m. WPEC
Snel 12 (8:30 a.m. ON TV Channel 51) with host
ihard Peritz.
rucBiTAGE: CIVILIZATION AND THE JEWS -
Ej.v Oct. 29.9 p.m. WPBT Channel 2 and WHRS-
I Channel 42 ROADS FROM THE GHETTO -
ramining the confrontation between European Jewish
En and modernity, this program covers the period of
.Industrial and French revolutions, the struggle for
j5h emancipation, the rise of modern anti-Semitism
^d the birth of Zionism.
|, sponsored by the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
Community Calendar
fern's* merican ORT West Palm Beach board 9:30
[m.
ijsh Federation Leadership Development 8 p.m.
nish Federation Women's Division Jewish Women's
nbly 9:45 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Hyatt Hotel
jnprcgaiion Aitz Chaim 10 a.m. Golden Lakes
temple Sisterhood 10 a.m. Temple B'nai Jacob Men's
flub 9 a.m. United Jewish Appeal Missions to World
Tenters of Jewish Population through Nov. 8.
tlober 29
oneer Women Ezrat trip to Lido Spa through Oct. 31
Women's American ORT Mid Palm through Nov. 4 at
legencv Hotel Spa Hadassah Shalom Calder Raceway
QrandeisUniversity Women Lake Worth 9:30 a.m.
tciober 30
[ioneer Women Theodore Herzl through Oct. 31 at
Miami Beach American Jewish Commitee Dinner
letting at Hyatt Hotel 6:30 p.m.
bctober 31
hish Federation Board of Directors Meeting 8 p.m.
ladassah Yovel 1 p.m. Yiddish Culture Group -
fresihaven 1 p.m. Women's American ORT North
i Beach County Region 9:30 a.m. National Council
(Jewish Women Palm Beach board 10 a.m. Golden
lake- Temple Sisterhood shoppinig trip to Miami B'nai
I'rith Women Masada theatre-luncheon.
lot ember 1
itional Council of Jewish Women board 10:30 a.m.
ladassah Bat Ciurion board 9:30 a.m. Hadassah -
slda Meir board 10 a.m. B'nai B'rith No. 2939 -
jard I p.m. B'nai B'rith Women Ohav 1:30 p.m.
[adassah thai board 10 a.m. Pioneer Women -
teodore Her/I Jewish Federation Human Resource
Iwiing Noon Women's American ORT Evening -
mkah Ba/aar 8 p.m. Jewish Federation Long
lageSelf Siud> -7:30 p.m.
than
Agreement Signed
f RL'SALEM (JTA) -
? Hebrew University and
I University of Hamburg
fc signed an agreement of
operation which will involve
lo universities in a variety learning
pit research projects and
exchange of faculty and
students. This is the sixth such
agreement between the
Hebrew University and West
German institutions of higher
A-AAbot Answerf one
A Division of
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Friday, October 26,1964. The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 6
Orthodox Organizations Criticize
TV Series Civilization and The Jews'
By BEN GALLOB
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Leaders of five major Ortho-
dox organizations, who said
that they viewed segments of
the nine-part TV series
"Heritage: Civilization and
the Jews," have issued a joint
statement expressing dismay.
At the same time, Reform and
Conservative leaders have ex-
pressed general approval.
The series, written and
narrated by former Israel
Foreign Minister Abba Eban,
is being telecast on the Public
Broadcasting Service's more
than 270 TV stations
throughout the U.S. The first
part of th** series was telecast
oct. 1.
THE FIVE Orthodox
agencies which issued the joint
statement are Agudath Israel
of America, National Council
of Young Israel, Rabbinical
Council of America, Religious
Zionists of America, and the
Union of Orthodox Jewish
Congregations of America.
Statements of support
with some reservations of
the first parts of the series
were made by Rabbi
Alexander Schindler, presi-
dent of the Union of American
Hebrew Congregations
(Reform), and Rabbi
Alexander Shapiro, president
of the Rabbinical Assembly of
America (Conservative).
Efforts to elicit a response
from WNET, the PBS station
in the New York area and the
producer and distributor of
the series, were met con-
sistently with the response that
the station had not received
the statement by the Orthodox
agencies.
Their statement said the
series committed an "in-
tolerable offense against
authentic Jewish belief" and
called on viewers to be on the
alert to "a foundamental error
in orientation" in the focus of
the presentation.
"THE PORTRAYAL in the
film of our sacred Torah as a
man-authored work in-
corporating myth and legend,
of our faith as a slowly-
evolving invention and of
God-given halacha as a
changeable system of law,
constitutes a stab at the very
heart of Judaism," the joint
statement asserted, which
"meshes opinion with fact in a
way that can confuse even the
knowledgeable viewer." It
warned that "the uninformed
and untutored public will be
tragically misled."
"A presentation of Judaism
deriving from a secular,
historical, cultural and
humanistic viewpoint, no
matter how laudatory, misses
the entire focus and axis of
Jewish history," the statement
added. The Orthodox agencies
criticized those responsible for
the series for "enlisting the
counsel of only that segment
of Jews whose philosophies
undermine the foundations of
Judaism."
Schindler said he had
"absolutely no quarrel with
the contents of the program,
so far. Us conception of
history conforms to Reform
Judaism fully, even as it
conforms to the approach ot
Jewish scholarship."
HE ADDED that he had
found "the first two
segments," shown Oct. 1 and
2, "which I saw, visually
diasppointing and
Eban
stronger from a dramatic
point of view. His tones are
not sufficiently varied in
volume and pitch and tends to
lull the viewer, but in terms of
its conception, all I can say is
'bravo.' There is no doubt that
this will be a helpful in-
strument for Jewish
education."
Shapiro said that the
Conservative movement,
reacting to the series, "is
affirming about the con-
tribution that can be made by
scientific understanding of the
historical development of
religion, that is, we are af-
firming the contribution made
by Biblical archeologists and
Biblical historians."
But, Shapiro added: "I
want to express my regret at
the insensitivity in the
program to the feelings of
traditionalist Jews, who af-
firm a different system of
values. From our standpoint,
one must seek for a model that
both investigates the past of
the Jewish people within the
background of its own times
but at the same time seeking
for the uniqueness of the Jew-
ish people in its march through
history."
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Abba
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DADE
151
BROWARD
523-5801 t


D-_- t
Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County. Friday, October 26,1984
Organizations
in the News
AMERICAN JEWISH COMMITTEE
William A. Gralnick, Southeast Regional director of the
American Jewish Committee, will address a meeting of the
Palm Beach County Chapter on Tuesday, Oct. 30, at the
Hyatt Hotel in West Palm Beach.
His topic will be "Israel: A Recent Perspective."
Dr. Theodore J. Rosov, president of the Palm Beach
County Chapter of the American Jewish Committee,
announced that this October meeting will be the first in a
series of dinner membership meetings that will be held
throughout the year. These moderately-priced dinner
meetings are educational in purpose and there is no
solicitation of funds.
For more information and for reservations call the AJC
office.
AMIT WOMEN
Rishona Chapter will have a regular meeting on
Wednesday, Nov. 14, 1 p.m., at the American Savings
Bank, Westgate, C.V. Entertainment and collation will
follow.
B'NAIB'RITH WOMEN
The next meeting of Olam Chapter will be held on
Thursday, Nov. 1, 12 noon, at the Challenger Country
Club Social Hall, Lake Worth. Guest speaker, Brian J.
Sheen, an investment planning consultant, will present a
slide program on finances and investments.
HADASSAH
Florida Central Region will hold an annual fall board
meeting at the Royce Hotel, 1601 Belvedere Road, West
Palm Beach, on Oct. 29 and Oct. 30. The keynote speaker
will be Dr. Simon Godfrey, chief of pediatrics at Hadassah
University Hospital, Mt. Scopus, Israel. Dr. Godfrey will
bring to the audience the latest development in the field of
medicine at Hadassah Hospital in Jerusalem. He will speak
from 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. on Monday, Oct. 29.
The next Fundraising Project of Golda Meir-Boynton
Beach Chapter will take place on Sunday evening, Dec. 16,
at Musicana. Reservations for the dinner and show may be
made by calling Eva Moresque or Bea Sacher.
Shalom West Palm Beach will hold its annual Youth
Aliyah luncheon on Thursday, Nov. 15, at the Royce
Hotel. Proceeds will go for Israel's disadvantaged youth.
The guest speaker will be Ellen Ellish, a member of the
national board, and entertainment will be provided by
Pauline Edelson, concert pianist. For reservations, contact
Bertha Rubin or Florence Shapiro.
A complete package at the Regency Spa is offered for
Dec. 4-7. Call Florence Siegal, Frances Nudelman, or
Lillian Schack for details.
HOLOCAUST SURVIVORS
OF THE PALM BEACHES
The first meeting of the year will be held on Tuesday,
Nov. 6, 9:30 a.m., at the American Savings Bank,
Westgate on Okeechobee Blvd. Guest speaker will be Ann
Lynn Lipton, Jewish education director of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach County.
LABOR ZIONIST ALLIANCE
POALE-ZION
The organization will meet on Wednesday, Nov. 7, at
the American Savings Bank.
Bernie Simon will speak about his experiences as a
civilian volunteer with the Israeli Defense Forces.
NATIONAL COUNCIL
OF JEWISH WOMEN
Okeechobee Section will hold their general membership
meeting on Thursday, Nov. 15, 12:30 p.m. at the
American Savings Bank, Westgate. Entertainment will be
provided by the Actors Repertory.
On Nov. 8, 9, and 10 a trip to EPCOT is being planned.
Information contact is Ruth Strauss, Somerset 1-173 or
Maxine Foster, Canterbury A-4.
WOMEN'S AMERICAN ORT
Century Chapter will hold its next meeting on Thursday,
Nov. 8, 12:30 p.m., at Congregation Anshei Sholom. The
Merry Minstrels, a group of men who entertain for
numerous organizations, will be featured.
Okeechobee Chapter will hold their monthly meeting
Monday, Nov. 5, 1:30 p.m., at the home of Rose Sachse,
36 N. Maharij Ct., Royal Palm Beach.
A presentation by Ronni Medei of Florida Power and
Light will be made.
YIDDISH CULTURE GROUP
On Tuesday, Nov. 6, 10 a.m., Century Village Group
will present singers Aaron Savith and Helen Kaufman who
will be accompanied on the piano by Ray Cabot.
Sy Kalick on the violin will be accompanied by pianist
Ethel Philips.
Update
By TOBY F. WILK
Nineteen women made
Jewish history when they
began six years of study at the
Jewish Theological Seminary
of America to qualify them for
ordination as the first women
conservative rabbis. The
Conservative Movement thus
joins Reform and Recon-
structionism in ordaining
women as rabbis. There are
about 90 women rabbis,
mainly Reform.
During West German
Chancellor Helmut Kohl's
visit to Israel at a state dinner,
he noted that it was impossible
today to imagine what had
happened in Nazi Germany.
"But it did happen," he said,
"and Germany bears respon-
sibility for it in history."
Turning to Prime Minister
Shamir, Kohl added: "I bow
to you in grief for the suffer-
ing inflicted on the Jewish
people by the Germans."
At least 350,000 affidavits
of invitation sent from Israel
to Soviet Jews are still out-
standing. A new Soviet decree
renders visa applications
invalid after six months.
Applicants must repeat the
lengthy procedures at regular
intervals, a process intended to
wear down many. Jews trying
to emigrate are subject to dis-
missal from jobs. An unem-
ployed person becomes a
"parasite" subject to criminal
charges. In the Soviet Union
today, Torah and Talmud are
described as works preaching
racism, hatred and violence.
Zionism is dubbed a man-
hating ideology based on "the
ideas and methods of Hitler."
Under terms of a bill signed
by Gov. Cuomo, New York
colleges and universities must
report to the New York State
Department of Education any
gifts from foreign sources or
foreign contracts worth at
least $100,000. The law reuires
public and private schools to
report the amount, date and
conditions of all foreign
contracts and gifts and will be
made public.
The critically acclaimed
Austrian film "The In-
heritors" premiered in New
York Oct. 25; proceeds will
benefit the Wiesenthal Center.
This docudrama focuses on
the attraction of today's youth
in an un-named German-
speaking country to the neo-
Nazi movement. Audiences
throughout Europe have been
taking seriously the threat of a
resurgent neo-Nazi movement
and have been shocked but
moved by the film. The neo-
Nazis' reaction was to bomb a
West German theatre which
showed the film.
Simon Wiesenthal was feted
in New York in k
75th birthday ^r1
b.r?"8ht ,ogeytherTl*
cmc and government \
fnd was chaired m
Walters who coi
gW need for th Wiesenthal Center 0
those who comml
crimes and to preven,,
men and women from L
Prey to the iUusionl
freedom requires no vi,
and that there are nil
Treblmkas stored up
minds of men.
Sen. Charles GrauJ
Iowa received the Un3
Councils for Soviet
Anatoly Shcharil
Freedom Award. Grl
stated he will utiliaj
International Parliamd
Group for Human Ri.J
the Soviet Union tol
advance his efforts and |
of his colleagues. He si
Union and the 1PG ,
raise a cry which will'
some Soviet eardrurasi
further proposed that thd
award the Nobel Peact|
to Shcharansky.
GETTING THE CHILDREN
TO EAT A DELICIOUS
HOT MEAL IS EASY AS
ABC's &123s
from
Chef Boy-ar-dee
ABC's & 123s
from Chef
Boy-ar-dee*
t?^*^_r^f are tasty
/^\MV Sa P3513 alphabet
WJ***^ letters and
v-'v^ numbers covered
with a rich tomato sauce. The
children will absolutely love it as
a delicious hot lunch and as a
tasty dinner side-dish. And so
will the adults! Either way you
serve it. getting the children to
eat is as easy as Aleph Bez!
BUYING COLD & SILVE
Buying...
Scrap cold
in any form, any condition
Buying...
Coins-colds Silver
Collections & Accumulations
U.S. & Foreign
$
NORTH AMERICAN
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2550 OKEECHOBEE BLVD.. W. PALM BEACH. FL.
684-1771
HOUtS: 9:30 a.m.-6:00 a.m.
Member ANA A Ctmmbff of Comnwct
___,


Friday, October 26,1984. The Jewiah Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 7
n honor
The
her bu,
nmenti*
d by
ommenJ
the
'er to
Pmmin(
/event,
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'"usiooi
novij
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utilize!
larlianuT
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will!
drurnsl
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cace]
Women's Division Board Meeting
I
^
* .
I.
members of the Women's Division of the Jewish Federation of Palm
rh County listen attentively to Rabbi Howard Hirsch of Temple Beth El as he
I itdresses a recent board meeting. He stressed the importance of women in the
rneiuation of the Jewish people and the traditional role women have played in
Jewish organizational life.
Rabbi Hirsch traces the history of "tzedakah" and
its significance in Jewish history.
Steinberg to Conduct Workshop
Teacher Training Raises Level Of Jewish Education
After years of working in
line field of Jewish education,
[a nationally prominent
[educator cites quality teacher
learning as one of the prere-
quisites to improving the level
[of Judaic studies taught in
after-hour religious schools
and day schools. Samuel
' Steinberg, who recently retired
to this community after
serving as director of a Jewish
adult studies and teacher
training institute in New Jer-
sey for over 20 years, is opti-
mistic about the future of
Jewish education. "If there
are good people willing to
work hard, both lay and pro-
fessional, we can achieve
startling results," he said.
Steinberg will be conducting
a workshop on "Discussion
Techniques" at a five hour in-
service teacher training
seminar on Nov. 11, 10 a.m.-3
p.m. at Temple Beth David.
These in-service programs are
sponsored by the Jewish
Education Committee of the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County and the
Educators' Council of Palm
Beach County to help teachers
continue their professional
education.
During the workshop on
"Discussion Techniques,"
Steinberg hopes to create an
awareness of the importance
of discussion in the classroom.
"Students do not come with
| the skills to participate in dis-
cussion. However, these skills
can be taught," he stated. He
will take the participants in the
workshop through exercises
designed to enhance these
skills.
Steinberg, who has a
master's degree from New
^ork University School of
Education, was the senior
consultant and director of the
Midrasha Institute of Jewish
Studies for the Jewish Educa-
tion Association of Metropoli-
tan New Jersey. The institute
offered courses in teacher
training and adult education.
Nathan Kosowski, chair-
man of the Jewish Education
Committee, said. "We are
extremely pleased that Mr.
Steinberg will be helping us
with teacher training and we
feel fortunate to have a Jewish
educator ?f his caliber in our
community. '
Two other workshops will
be held in addition to the one
Samuel Steinberg
on discussion techniques.
Hannah Cidon, a specialist in
early childhood education
from New Jersey, will conduct
a morning and afternoon
session on Chanukah and
Shabbat for primary teachers.
"The Jewish Credibility Gap
will be addressed bv Dr. Steve
Roth, a psychologist new to
this community. After his talk
the teachers will engage in a
discussion concerning the
difficulties of promoting
Jewish education in a secular
world.
During lunch Ann Lynn
Lipton, Jewish education
director of the Jewish Federa-
tion of Palm Beach County,
will deliver the keynote ad-
dress, "The State of Jewish
Education in America
Today." Eleanor Newcorn
and Shoshana Sharf (Walner),
two teachers in the community
who were honored as "Out-
standing Religious School
Teachers of the Year" by the
Educators' Council of Palm
Beach County and the Jewish
education committee of the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County, will give a
report on the Coalition for Al-
ternatives in Jewish Education
conference they attended on
an incentive grant this summer
in San Francisco.
Interested individuals who
are not presently teaching in a
religious school are also in-
vited to attend the in-service
teacher training seminar, contact Ms. Lipton at the Fed-
Registration is $10. For more additional office,
information and-or to register, 655-77U6.
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Come and see how much cruise can be yours in just one day.
We call it SeaEscape, and it can be your great getaway day.
Your fun day to the Bahamas departs Miami each day at
8:30a.m.. returning at 11:00p.m. Dine. Dance. Relax at
poolside. Play bingo or try your luck in the casino. There's so
much to do.
More good news. If you're 55 years or over let us
welcome you aboard with your spouse or a friend. You'll pay
our special senior citizen fare of only $83. Your spouse or
friend (also 55 + ) will pay only $41. That's a big discount.
Fares include port charges, three buffet meals and roundtrip
motorcoach from convenient locations in Dade. Broward and
Palm Beach counties. Ask us for details.
This discount offer is valid for same day round-trip travel
Sunday thru Friday: subject to space available and cannot be
combined with other discounts. Offer expires Nov. 15,1984.
So bring along this ad, proof of age, and a friend. You see,
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from Miami, Pier 7. Ship's registry: Panama. Changing room faciteties
not available on the M/S Boheme. Optional cabins available. Inside
cabin* $15, outside cabins $30. suites $50. Minimum 2 persons per
cabin. The M/S Scandinavian Sun will return to service September 29,
1984. Ship's registry Bahamas. One senior cituen (55 + ) traveling
atone receives 25* (kscountofl the $83 fare.
J


Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County. Friday, October 26,1984
Jakobovits
Rabbi's New Book Sizzles Zionism
By MAURICE SAMUELSON
LONDON (JTA) Since
becoming Britain's Chief
Rabbi on the eve of the Six-
Day War, Sir Immanuel Jako-
bovits has frequently aroused
widespread controversy by his
remarks on aspects of Israeli
policies and social trends.
Although he has frequently
expressed Anglo-Jewry's
staunch solidarily with Israel,
some of his views have earned
widespread criticism. While
defenders of embattled Israel
have accused him of treason,
others have hailed him as the
true defender of Israeli in-
terests.
Jakobovits has now at-
tempted to explain himself in a
book about his attitudes
towards Zionism and Israel.
Its title, "If Only My
People .," is taken from
Psalm 18 which says, "If only
my people would hearken unto
me and Israel walk in my
ways, I would soon subdue
their enemies and turn my
hand against their ad-
versaries."
The bQok is unlikely to
make Jakobovits' reputation
any less controversial. It also
reflects the extent to which the
Middle East has over-
shadowed Jewish and interna-
tional life during Jakobovits'
rabbinical career. It was far
less prominent during the
ministry of his two
distinguished predecessors.
Dr. Joseph Hertz and Sir
Israel Brodie, Chief Rabbis
from 1913-1946 and from
1948-1965, respectively.
As Jakobovits frequently
points out, neither of these
two Chief Rabbis referred to
Zionism in their inaugural ad-
dresses and he himself was the
first Chief Rabbi in Britain to
have done so.
Nevertheless, both Hertz
and Brodie were enthusiastic
champions of Zionism at a
time when mainstream
Orthodoxy was closer to the
Jakobovits position. While
Hertz was often in trouble for
being "too Zionist," Jako-
bovits has achieved the op-
posite.
Born in Koenigsberg,
Germany in 1921, the author
admits that he was raised in a
tradition "distinctly lukewarm
to Zionism." The book shows
how deeply this colored his
career, which has included 10
vears as Chief Rabbi of
Ireland (1948-1958); eight
years at New York's Fifth
Avenue Synagogue; and the
past 17 years as Chief Rabbi of
the British Commonwealth,
during which he was knighted.
In this book, he pays tribute
to Israel's positive influence
on the diaspora. But he also
seeks repeatedly to discredit
and denigrate what he
describes as "secular Zion-
ism" which he regards as a
dangerous rival to traditional,
Orthodox Judaism.
He goes so far as to accuse
David Ben Gurion and other
Labor Zionists of "hypo-
crisy" for having told British
leaders in 1937 that "the Bible
is our mandate." He ridicules
the notion of the "pioneers of
secular Zionism" that an
independent State would
"solve the Jewish problem."
He calls this "probably the
greatest illusion and the great-
est disillusionment in Jewish
history," adding that the
secular Zionists had
"seduced" most of the Jewish
people to believe it.
According to Jakobovits,
not only had Jewish statehood
failed to normalize life in the
diaspora but "in some ways it
has added many new problems
which never existed before."
In the aftermath of the Israeli
invasion of Lebanon, he adds,
Israel had not only failed to
solve the Jewish problem but
had become "the core" of th<
problem "inasmuch as ant -
Zionism became the principal
feature and expression of anti-
Semitism."
Besides harboring these
philosophical doubts, Jako-
bovits also found himself fre-
quently at odds with successive
Israeli governments on a wide
variety of practical issues.
These included military
retaliation for terrorist at-
tacks; refusing to repatriate
Palestinian refugees; Golda
Meir's oft-quoted scepticism
over whether the Palestinian
Arabs constitute a nation; and
Israel's armaments exports.
He also ruffled the Israeli
establishment's feathers by
adopting an independent
posture on Soviet Jewry,
including a visit to Moscow at
the invitation of the Soviet
authorities. He claims to have
predicted the decline in Soviet
Jewish emigration and that
this proves the wisdom of his
proposal ignored by Israel
to give equal stress to the
'fight for Jewish "equality"
inside the Soviet Union.
Although "secular
Zionists" bear the brunt of his
arguments, the rise of ultra-
religious Jewish fanatics has
belatedly given him a new
target, manifested in the Gush
Emunim settlement move-
ment, and outbreaks of terror-
ism by Jews.
Describing his "haunting
fear of a new pseudo-
Messianism," he says that
militany or radicalism would
"exacerbate the divisions
within Israel, eventually
reaching some breaking point
in war or civil strife."
*
|s
:\
The 15th National Board Conference of Women'* i
ORT, held Oct. 21 through 24 in Philadelphia, was [Si
some 800 delegates, representing some 145,000 mmk. I
Women's American ORT in 1300 chapters from coast to J
It focused on education in the international ORT ml
abroad, problems in American public education and vital
currently facing the American Jewish communih I J
representatives of the North Palm Beach County RMi
tending included [left to right] Helen Bilawskyrj
president; Nettie Stein, membership chairman; Sylvia (i*
chapter life chairman; Lilyan Jacobs, chairman of the execnil
committee. Also attending though not pictured were suJ
Biller, donor chairman; and Anne Shelton, honor roll c'hii
man. Israeli Ambassador to the United States, the Hon Mi
Rosenne, and former U.S. Ambassador to the United NuJ
and former Supreme Court Justice, the Hon. Arthur
Goldberg, presented major addresses at the gala opening nit
banquet.
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Dcimontc
019*3 DM MM Comcxaion


Friday, October 26,1984. The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 9

Even Prime Minister
Shimon Peres
found time to read
TRIAL LAWYER
during his campaign
to lead Israel.
He calls it "refreshing and well written."__________
All the cases are true! All the names are real!
Prime Minister Peres agrees with the toughest jury
in America-the country's outstanding trial lawyers:
The Honorable Jacob Fuchsberg, former Judge of
New York States highest Court
"Every trial lawyer should be armed with Stanley Rosenblatt's
hook, every Judge should read it, everyone should know it."'
Rov Cohn, New York -
TRIAL LAWYER" is a rare combination of gripping
Courtroom dramas and practical advice for the layman.'"
Smart M. Speiser, New York
"Here is everything the lawyer and client need to understand
about medical malpractice cases."
Melvin Belli, San Francisco -
Take it from me, you'll love this hook. I did. It's great!
It's exciting honest and practical."
Dade County Circuit Court Judge Howard Gross, Miami -
"I loved it. Dynamic and pure."
J.B. Spence, Miami
"I sat up until two o'clock this morning reading TRIAL LAWYER.
It is powerful. I mean really powerful. It ought to be required
nailing for each Circuit Judge and the Supreme Court as well.
I loved the language and the content."
More Critical Acclaim for TRIAL LAWYER:
Chicago Daily Law Bulletin -
"Stanley Rosenblatt uses real names and true situations to
create a sensational effect upon the reader. Riveting.,
brilliant.. skillful. exciting highly recommended.
Bernard Nathanson. M.D.. Board certified < HiCYN. New York -
I have unqualified admiration of the work. This hook is 0)
turns a chilling, fascinating and compelling document which
reflects more accurately than anything I have read In. the
past the gutty reality of the world of the trial lawyer.
Barry Chase. Director of News and Public Affairs
Programming for the Public Broadcasting Service -
Profoundly powerful and disturbing'"
Jerome Murphy. M.D.. Board certified pediatric
neurologist. Milwaukee -
Terrific, constructive and most difficult to put down.________
Stanley M. Rosenblatt,
Producer/Host
of the PBS series
"ISRAELI DIARY."



TRIAL LAWYER tells what really happens
during actual trials!
Stanley Rosenblatt is one of the country* great l^52EEiluw
THE MIAMI HERALD recently reported "^,"*i2SSlP
verdict in a spinal injury malpractice case. He has also produ id
and hosted the nationally acclaimed television series "
DIARY for the Public Broadcasting Service where he haswtenjwe
such major figures as Shimon Peres. Yitzhak.Shamir: YiUhak Rabin.
Ariel Sharon Moshe Arens, Haim Herzog. \.tzhak Navon.
Teddy Kollek and Abba Eban.
In TRIAL LAWYER, Rosenblatt holds nothing "jjkMjhgW '"
public an insider's view of what really goes .n dur ng a ua ..
trials. As in his earlier Ixx.ks "The Divort-e ^A*JSj2r
and "Malpractice and Other Malfeasances. TRML LAw jn^
written for the general reader in understands e nunt hmai
language. Rosenblatt ^^^^X^^^SSi
In make the trials come alive. The book carries won imp.
and suspense than a novel Iwcause dsjUorje^aji^uimH
Yes. I've reached a verdict in favor "f TRIAL LAWYER
1'Iimm' send mo_________- hardbound coptei ($ih .98 each)
iind___________paperback copies (*!.", each).
I have enclosed my check mom) order for $
payable lo Lyie Stuart. Inc.. Dew. B
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Name _
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Postage and handling included.
TRIAL LAWYER ba-
the Lawyers' Literary Club.
^^"TTas a main selection oi
Available at llookslores Nationwide Published by Lyle Stuart. Inc.
TRIAL IAWYER
/


D------,
Jl
Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County. Friday, October 26,1984
School Board
Integration
1. In order to have integrated schools, do
you favor...
busing
building new schools where easily
integrated, where busing affects black
white proportionately._______________
* capital improvement of inner city schools
2. If busing is used, should limits be set to
the distance students travel or to the
number of schools they pass?___________
No
No
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
No
No
Yes Yes
Yes
Yes
Teachers
1. Do you think Palm Beach County
teachers are adequately paid?
2. Do you favor the state's merit pay
system?________________________
No
No
In the Schools
1. Should corporal punishment be used as a
disciplinary tool7
2. Is discipline adequate in county schools?
3. Do you favor class discussions of moral
and ethical questions, the technique some-
times known as "values clarification"?
4. Should organized prayer be allowed in
public schools?______________________
Yes
No
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
5. Would you eliminate the prayer that
traditionally opens School Board
meetings?________________
6. Do you favor teaching creationism"
instead of evolution?_______________
7. Should drug-sniffing dogs be used in
schools?
8. Do you support the plan to add a
seventh period in high schools?
Miscellaneous
1. Do (or did) your children attend public
schools?
Yes
No
No
No
UD
No
No
No
Yes
No
Yes Yes
Yes Yes
No
No
Yes
Yes
No
Yes Yes
No Yes
Yes
No
No
Yes
No
Yes
2. Do you favor imposing a school impact
fee on new construction?
3. Are women and minorities adequately
represented in district administration?
4. Would you overrule the school adminis-
tration and remove a controversial text-
book that a community group objected to?
5. Do you favor the use of the magnet
schools concept in Palm Beach County?
6. Do you favor preserving the older
nemhborhood schools in coastal areas?
7. Do you favor improving Twin Lakes High
School on its present site?______________
8. Would you retain the present super-
intendent of schools?
No
Yes
Yes
UD
No
No
UD
Yes
No
No
No
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
NC
Yes
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
No
Yes
UD
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
NC
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
NC
No
Yes
No
No
Yes No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
This questionnaire was prepared by the League of Women Voters.
NOTE
Political Reading Material
and Advertising on this
page is not to be construed
as an endorsement by the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County.
The Job
Four-year term with no
salary. The board handles all
matters on public education in
Palm Beach County. Three
seats, each elected coun-
tywide, are on the ballot.
Members must live in the
district they represent.
The Candidates
District 1
Gail Bjork, 40, Jupiter,
owner of design, promotion
and printing business in
Jupiter, free-lance writer,
photojournalist, former
teacher.
David Wardwell, 54, North
Palm Beach, vice president,
Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner
& Smith.
District 3
William Bader, 44, West Palm
Beach, systems technician
AT&T Informations Systems,
president of Palm Beach
County Council of PTA,
member of the board of
directors of the Florida PTA.
Lynda Myers Johnston, 46,
Lake Worth, former
elementary school teacher,
founder of the Volunteers
Upholding Education
program in the county.
District 7
Joseph Belluccio, 52, West
Palm Beach, program
coordinator for mentally
handicapped adults at the
Palm Beach Regional
Achievement Center, former
teacher, counselor, principal.
(Information on candidate
Stepherson was not available)
Vote For Action
Return
Dr. Bernard Kimmel
Florida House District 84 GOP
Punch #50
This year, vote for the candidate who'll make a
difference in Tallahassee. It'll make a big difference
for you.
Campaign Headquarters 6311 South Dixie Highway, West Palm Beach 582-2202
pa Poi.Adv
Action Talks
District 84 needs a state representative
who makes things happen.
District 84 needs
Bernard Kimmel
in the Florida House.
Talk About Action
During his freshman term in the Florida Legislature,
Dr. Kimmel successfully passed five general house
bills. His opponents record? One general house bin
passed in his last term. We need a representative who
gets things done.
Action Makes The Difference
Dr. Kimmel's 25 years of public service prove he's the
man of action:
* Voted one of the two most effective Freshman
Legislators during his freshman term in Tallahassee.
* Served as Chairman of the Palm Beach County
School Board for 2 years: served on Board for
8 years.
' Presently Chairman of the Palm Beach County
Special Olympics Steering Committee.


Friday, October 26,1984. The Jewiah Floridian of Palm Beach County Pagel
jCC News
SHALOM NEWCOMERS NETWORK
nr Paul Klein, president of the Jewish Community
renter has announced that Joy Gales has volunteered to
h d the newly established "Shalom Newcomers Net-
v Newcomers are defined as anyone who has arrived
X community within the last three years.
if vou are a newcomer, or
kiiiw of a newcomer to the
^9-7700 with the in-
Srmation. The first social for
Soup will be held on Nov.
4
lov Gales has recently
returned to this community
Ser experienang being a
Kcomer in both Winnipeg,
Snitoba, Canada and
Minneapolis. Minnesota. In
Minneapolis she became active
ia "Shalom Newcomers"
Jganization. Joy felt this
oup was invaluable to her
assimilation in that com-
munity.
joy was raised in Palm Beach and has seen this area
grow from a small Jewish community to the large thriving
community of today.
COMPREHENSIVE SENIOR
SERVICE CENTER
Jean Rubin, Comprehensive Senior Service Center
director of the Jewish Community Center, attended two
recent conferences relating to working with the older
population.
In September she travelled to Cocoa Beach to attend the
Florida Council on Aging and from the 8th through the
10th of October to Washington, D.C. to a special Con-
ference on Nutrition. Both conferences are tied in with the
I ,*,.:-
Older Americans Act which
funds the Center's Tran-
sportation Grant which serves
approximately 60 transit
disadvantaged daily. It also
funds the Nutrition Grant
which makes it possible for the
Center to serve 150 meals on
two sites daily, one in West
Palm Beach and one in
Delray, plus the delivery of 60
meals daily to the homebound
at both sites.
Mrs. Rubin will be sharing
her experiences in upcoming
talks.
SUNDAY AT THE BEACH
Singles are invited to meet at Singer Island across from
the Greenhouse on Sunday, Oct. 28 at 1 p.m. for an af-
ternoon of fun and sun.
Park at the Greenhouse and walk south down the beach
to the Inlet.
Persons interested in learning how to snorkel will be
assisted by Ron Warren.
Please bring your own snorkeling gear. For additional
information, call Ron at 439-1131.
If the beach isn't your thing, or just to eat, join the
group at 4 p.m. at Portofino's, 2447 Ocean Blvd., Singer
Island.
For additional information, please call Terrie Lubin at
689-7700.
SINGLES DANCE TO OPEN NEW SEASON
The first big event of the season sponsored by the Young
Singles and Single Pursuits of the Jewish Community
Center is a dance featuring a live Disc Jockey to be held
Saturday, Oct. 27 at the Palm Beach Ocean Hotel, 283U
Ocean Blvd., Palm Beach, starting at 9 p.m.
In addition to dancing into the night, a cash bar will be
available plus appetizers and door prizes.
Singles, friends of singles and those who want to be
mends are welcome. The cost for the evening is $7.
For additional information please call Terrie Lubin at
689-7700.
YOUR OPINION COUNTS
Tell ua What you Think"
Sendlettarato:
Tha Editor, Jowlth FlorMan
501 South Flagler Dr. #w
W. Palm Beach, FL 33401
Chaplain Aides
The Chaplain Aide steering committee of the
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
met recently to plan for the coming year.
Shown above are [left to right] Alice
KurUnd, Charles Kurland, Sidney Beraer,
Use Mollen. Bernice Schreier, Nathan
Allweiss, chairman, Ida Mae, Allweiss, Rabbi
Alan R. Sherman, Jeanne Glasser, co-
chairman, Bea Kern and Murray Kern.
JDC Ships 10,000 Hebrew
Books to Jews of Morocco
NEW YORK (JTA) -
More than 10,000 Hebrew
books, including 8,000 prayer
texts for Sephardi rites and
2,000 school texts, were
shipped to the Jewish commu-
nity of Morocco from New
York by the American Jewish
Joint Distribution Committee
(JDC)) and were used for the
High Holidays, it was reported
by Ralph Goldman, JDC
executive vice president.
According to Goldman, the
books are intended for use in
Jewish schools and syna-
gogues in 16 communities
across Morocco such as Casa-
blanca, Fez, Rabat, Meknes,
Marrakech, Tangier and
Tetuan.
Goldman noted that this is
the largest shipment of reli-
gious texts in the history of the
JDC relationship with
Morocco which dates from
1946. "The shipment" he
said, "is expected to meet the
needs of the community for
many years to come," Gold-
man observed that "there are
now 14,000 Jews in Morocco,
while at the close of World
War II the community num-
bered 350,000 and at that time
published its own religious
texts."
-What
other coffee
.-
Ballerina
*Tbaa gnat baftsrina
tolcw concentration
anapraciMon. Ana
too much cofUniur*
oown'tWp.That'*



Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County. Friday, October 26,1984

News In Brief
Senior News
FROM THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
Transportation is available
in our designated area for per-
sons 60 years of age or over
who do not use public trans-
portation. We take people to
treatment centers, doctors'
offices, to hospitals, nursing
homes to visit spouses, to
social service agencies and
nutrition centers. There is no
fee for this service, but partic-
ipants are encouraged to con-
tribute their fair share. There
is a great demand for this
service, so please make your
reservations in advance. For
further information and-or
reservations, call 689-7703
Monday through Friday.
HOT KOSHER LUNCH
CONNECTION
Many elements combine to
make the Hot Kosher Lunch
Program at the Jewish
Community Center a success.
Foremost among these is the
opportunity to form new and
lasting friendships.
Each weekday, seniors
gather for intimate talk,
educational discussions, game
playing, leisure and song.
These activities are followed
by a hot, kosher, nutritious
lunch served with warmth and
hospitality by our dedicated
volunteers. There is no set fee,
but persons are asked to make
a contribution each meal.
Please come and join us.
For information and reser-
vations (which must be made
in advance) call Carol or Lil-
lian at 689-7703 in West Palm
Beach.
HOME DELIVERED
MEALS
Persons who are home-
bound and need a Kosher meal
please call for information.
Call Carol in West Palm
Beach at 689-7703.
JCC OPEN AIR MARKET
SUNDAY, DEC. 9,
10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
This is your opportunity to
raise money!! The JCC invites
you to rent space at $10 for
non-profit organizations and
$20 for commercial enter-
prises. Bring your own table
and chairs and your wares. No
food please!!
The JCC will provide the
publicity. Space is limited.
Register early.
Mail checks made payable
to Jewish Community Center
Return by Nov. 30, 1984
Address: 2415 Okeechobee
Blvd., West Palm Beach, FL
33409, AttmSippi
To meet the technological challenges of the 21st cen-
tury, OR I-operated schools in Israel, France, Latin
America and the U.S. have added a fourth "R"
robotics. Here, a student at the ORT Syngaiowsky
Technical High School in Tel Aviv works with Shlomit
[at left] and Tzvika, two robots built by students in the
school's computer and robotics program. ORT is a
beneficiary, through the American Jewish Joint
Distribution Committee, of funds raised by UJA-
Federation campaigns.
Peres Report
his contention that Israel's
fundamental problem was the
dilemma between its defense
needs and its economic chal-
lenges. Israeli aides quoted
Peres as saying in Washington
to top U.S. leaders: "If you
had an- Israel in Southeast
Asia, or in Central America,
you would look different
there."
His inference. and it was
entirely endorsed by Reagan
and Secretary of State George
Shultz, according to the aides
was that Israel's defensive
Continued from Page 11
capability was a strategic boon
to the West, and at the same
time was the root-cause of
Israel's present economic
predicament.
The aides said Peres did not
conceal his reservations over
economic policy during the
Likud years. But he stressed
that a modicum of consumer
relaxation was understandable
after the decades of strain and
hardship. In the end, the bulk
of Israel's effort still went to
defense, not luxuries.
By JTA Services
PARIS The preliminary
investigation into Klaus
Barbie's war-time activities in
France is nearly finished, and
he will probably be brought to
trial early next year.
French judicial sources say
investigating Magistrate
Christian Riss and Lyons
Public Prosecutor Louis
Fouletier are putting the last
touches to the file. Barbie will
be indicted for crimes against
humanity, which under French
law are not covered by the
statute of limitations.
Barbie, who served as
deputy head of the Gestapo in
the city of Lyons practically
till the end of the war, was ex-
pelled by Bolivia to France last
February. He has been held
since then at the Saint Luc
Prison, a former fort in which
Barbie held most of his
prisoners during the war.
NEW YORK For the first
time in United States military
history, a rabbi has been
promoted to the rank of
Brigadier General, it was an-
nounced here by the West
Point Jewish Chapel Fund.
Rabbi Israel Drazin, 48, a
practicing attorney serving in
the U.S. Army reserves as
Colonel in the Army Chap-
laincy, was nominated for his
new rank by President
Reagan. The U.S. Senate con-
firmed the nomination. Army
officials then waived the usual
waiting period for a vacancy
and immediately promoted
Drazin to Brigadier General.
Drazin was recalled to active
service in 1981 to prepare the
government's defense against
a law suit that challenged the
constitutionality of the Army
Chaplaincy. The government
won the case last February.
WASHINGTON The
Reagan Administration made
it clear again that it does not
want to be a mediator at this
time in the effort for an Israeli
withdrawal from south
Lebanon. State Department
spokesman John Hughes
stressed that the United States
continues to be in an "explor-
atory mode" and is "not
negotiating" because all of the
parties involved are "quite far
apart."
Hughes said there needs to
be "compromise" on the part
of the various countries in-
volved. While he did not go
into details, he said one of the
difficulties is the need to
ensure the security of Isrel's
northern border.
Israeli Premier Shimon
Peres, on returning to Israel
from the U.S., said he could
submit a plan for withdrawal
to the Cabinet within a month.
Hughes said any such time-
table was an "Israeli
not ours."
But he stressed that t]
wanted to be helpful.
Pans later this month fo f
with President Francoi[!
terrand. The two will
before Mitterrand*" fi
coming trip to Damascus i
month and before israt
Premier Shimon Peres' ,,
pected visit to Paris.
In spite of French officiil
denials there are continued
unconfirmed reports of a nos
stole French diplomatic inhia
live in the Middle East.
TEL AVIV (JTA)-Overa
million flowers from Israel
and 43 other countries go on
display at the 10th Interna-
tional Flower Show which
opened in Holon south of Tel
Aviv last week. Israel is being
represented by 370 growers.
-NOTE-
Polilicat Reading Material
and Advertising on this
page is not to be construed
as an endorsement by the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County,
NOV. 6
KEEP
ALLEN C.
CLARK
County Tax Collector
Pfl Pol Adv
Democrat
FOR THE FINEST IN
SECULAR AND JEWISH
EDUCATION ENROLL
YOUR CHILDREN NOW.
JEWISH
COMMUNITY
DAY SCHOOL
0' PALM Bf. ACM COUNTY
5801 Parker Ave.. West Palm Beach. FL 33405
(305) 585-2227
HORNSTEIN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
RAPAPORT JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL
FULLY ACCREDITED BY
THE FLORIDA COUNCIL OF INDEPENDENT
SCHOOLS
OUR PROGRAM
The Hornstein
School provides an
enriched program ot
Hebrew and Judaic
Studies in conjunction
with a superior
Secular Studies
Program, including
art music, physical
education and
mterscholastic
activities for
Kindergarten
through grade eight
This superior
curriculum is taught in
an innovative and
success oriented
learning environment
The Hornstein Jewish
Community Day
School admits
students ot every race,
color, sex, creed,
national and ethnic
origin
OUR NEW HOME
The Parker Avenue
Campus a seven acre
site provides the
necessary
environment to give
our children o
well-rounded
education Trie facility
includes spacious
classrooms, a Library
and Media Center on
Art and Music Center
Science Laboratory,
Auditorium and
Chapel Building with
a Kosher cafeteria
facility, athletic fields
basketball, tennis
courts, ond
administrate offices
A Biblical garden
enhances the natural
beauty of the site and
promotes living
Judaism
A BENEFICIARY AGENCY OF THE JEWISH FEDERATION OF PALM BEACH COUNTY


Random Thoughts
Friday, October 26,1984. The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 13
By MURIEL LEVITT
if i were writing a movie
. TV script, I
tnano
or a
this story
JD-
ljunkie.
However
The
the
this is not
nor is it
make-believe.
BKT=?Ha
|.h, whole truth
Ed i the way
lhappened.
The Jewish
it actually
Grandma in
n is''actually a member
q mv family- She is my
of W \t.y~ Teddy (nee
cousin
Sfthen'Se was born and
Brownsville,
in
fehep^rbiaibed'of
SJal was widowed at an
S age, i heanng_ inad-
ymak<
imperative, and
Key makes the use of an aid
Stive, and she has had
2 Ssurgery.lnspiteof
Km, Teddy must be push-
jing gu, give or take a few
years.
Her most important asset is
, truw fantastic sense of
umor. She has an endless
reasuryofjokesandstor.es
and most are of Yiddish
origin. Tales of her early expe-
riences in Brooklyn are so
wild, so funny, so delightful,
that she can hold a crowd
spellbound. She is a clever,
sharp lady who, although
diminutive in size, is gutsy and
aborn survivor.
Well, Teddy's children
moved to Phoenix, Arizona,
and begged her to follow. At
lhat time she was living alone
in Far Rockaway, New York,
and the kids felt it was no fit
place for a woman alone. So,
off she went, bag and
baggage, to face her future in
the Sun Belt. It goes without
saying that not too long after,
the children were transferred
and she remained in Phoenix.
Hopefully, they will return
sometime in the future, but
until then, Teddy is on her
own.
Being the resourceful person
that she is, Teddy became
involved immediately. She
works at the JCC and is a
mainstay among her fellow
senior citizens. Everything was
going smashingly until last
month.
During mid-week at 2 a.m.
one morning, Teddy left her
bedroom to get a drink.
Passing through her living
room she noticed the front
door ajar and a large arm
chair misplaced.. She said to
herself, "Teddy baby, you've
been robbed!"
Seeing the arm chair shoved
into a corner, she went to
move it back and saw it was
occupied by a head band, long
hair, blue jeans, and bare feet.
A young man in his twenties
looked at her and she looked
at him. His pupils were pin
points, his cheek twitched and
his breathing was heavy.
Teddy had seen enough TV to
know he was in a bad way.
She immediately
questioned, "What are you
doing in my house?" and he
wgan to talk. Teddy inter-
red and told him she was
hard of hearing and needed
" aid. After assuring him
hat she would not call the
Mice, she got her hearing aid
Md returned to cope with Mr.
jobber. But as she started to
"" the aid, it began to
wnistle shrilly as it sometimes
s before being properly
ted. He thought it was a
Then she told him that he
looked like a nice God-fearing
person and would he please
leave since she had a bad heart
condition. She suggested that
if there were further excite-
ment something dire might
happen and then he would be
held for homicide. Teddy even
asked him to get her nitro pills
from the kitchen.
He told her to go into her
room, shut the door, and then
he would go. She did this but
heard a noise and came back
in again. There was Mr. Nice
Guy (as she put it) carrying her
huge jewel box which the kids
had given her as a gift. She
grabbed the thief and told him
it contained nothing but junk
jewelry and that she would
give him money instead. He
agreed.
Teddy- then gave him her
wallet and he was shocked to
find only 80 dollars. She
advised, "This is not a bank,
kiddo, I'm only a poor retiree
Police
warning and grabbed
on Social Security. That's all I
have until my next check
comes." He replied, "Keep it,
lady. You need it more than I
do!" But she handed the
money back to him, saying,
"If you go around frightening
old ladies in the middle of the
night, you must be hungry or
desperate." He still would not
take it.
At that point she admitted
she was feeling sick again and
that he had better leave. Teddy
gently pushed him out the
front door and thought that he
was probably glad to get away
from such a confused lady.
She then called the police
who came and told her that
she was really lucky because
her screen and window had
been jimmied professionally.
The fact that she did not
scream or threaten him was
probably the reason he left
peacefully.
Teddy originally went to
Arizona because Far
Rockaway was not a proper
area in which to live. Now she
has locks on every door and
window and is virtually a part-
time prisoner in an affluent
retirement community.
There must be a moral or a
message somewhere in this
story. Senior citizens, it would
seem, are the unlawful prey of
thieves, junkies and degener-
ates. Aren't people entitled to
privacy, and when will they
feel secure in their own little
corner of the world? When
will these indignities stop?
Why isn't more being done to
insure personal safety? This
time it was my cousin Teddy
next time it might be some-
one you know.
Oh, yes a final note. After
the excitement had died down,
Teddy discovered that he had
taken her gold Chai from the
dresser top. But as she said,
"Better my Chai than my life.
Now I know that God must
surely love me!"
Hadassah-Israel Bond Brunch
Hadassah of Greater Palm Beach County invites
members and friends to honor Rose Matzkin, past
president of National Hadassah at a State of Israel Bonds
Champagne Brunch on Sunday, Nov. 11, 10:30 a.m., at
the Golden Lion Restaurant at the Challenger Country
Club, 3536 Poinciana Drive, Lake Worth.
Mrs. Matzkin, a dedicated worker for Hadassah and
Israel, will be the recipient of the "Woman of the Year"
award presented by the State of Israel.
Couvert $10 and a commitment to purchase Israel
Certificate or Bond. Reservations are required. Members
may mail checks to Chapter or Group Bond chairman.
J* aid, intending to throw it
"< the window. Teddy
ftled with him until he was
jonvinced it was a normal
S and n0t a warnin
DOLPHINMANIA
WINNERS!
Ddphmmaraa is easy lo play and no purchase is necessaiy Just pick up a
tree OCH.PMINMANIA COLLECTOfl CARD and GAME TICKET at your
nearest participating Put*. scratch oil the prize box squares on me qame
ticket and you could become an INSTANT WINNER! II you don I win
instantly YOU CAN STILL WIN by collecting the pertoraled pieces on the
game trckel and placing them m the matching peture and number spaces
on the coHeclor card
$500 $1,000
R. L. Seitlin
Miami Springs
Frank Van Straalen
Lauderhill
Anne Schneider
Boca Raton
Mae Gross
Boca Raton
John Urdea, Jr.
Jupiter
Elena Gaitan
Miami Beach
John Correale
Ft. Lauderdale
Geneva Weeton
Dania
Gary Baer
Tamatac
Jean Priellpp
Tequesla
Mildred Moorer
Miami
$2,500
Tonl Weeton
Miami Shores
Evelyn Brenner
Palm Beach ___
where shopping is a pleasure 7days a week
Publix Bakeries open at 8:00 A.M.
Available at Publix Storee with
Freeh Danish Bakeries Only.
Decorated for Halloween
Holiday
Cupcakes
fret.
pkg.
Available at Publix Stores with
Freeh Danish Bakeries Only.
Plain or with Seede
Italian Bread
Available at PuMIx Stores Freeh Danish Bekeriee Only.
Baked Fresh In our Bakery,
Serve wRhPubix
Premium Ice Cream
Apple Pie
$159
each
Available at All Pubix Stores
and Danish Bakeries.
Glazed wtmColortuI Icings
CakeDonuts..............6 for y
Danish Butter Ring.......ee* $159
6-Ct QQC
Bran Muffins.................*< **
Caramel Iced $-\99
Applesauce Cake.........see*
DOLPHINMANIA
PiayitatPUblix.
Prices Effective
Oct. 25th thru 31st, 1984.
Quantity
Rights R#ft#rv0O


Jl\
i age it
inejewisn Meridian of Palm Beach County. Friday, October 26,1984
Temple Emanu-El Adult
Education For 1984-85
Candle Lighting Time
Temple Emanu-El of Palm
Beach announces the enlarged
Adult Education program for
the 1984-85 season. A brief
description of the various ac-
tivities which will be under-
taken follows:
Scholar's Weekend. Dr.
Irving Greenberg, president of
the National Jewish Research
Center and an ordained rabbi,
scholar and prominent lec-
turer, will be the Scholar-in-
Residence. His wife, Blu
Greenberg, vice president of
the Commission on Synagogue
Relations, a division of the
Federation of Jewish Philan-
thropies, will also participate.
She is a well-known educator,
writer and lecturer. The dates
are Jan. 18 through 20, 1985.
Wednesday Series. This
series will follow the same
format as last season, but will
be extended, lasting from
Nov. 28 through Feb. 27. The
lecturers and teachers also will
be the same as last year.
Classes will begin at 9:30 a.m.
and end at 3:10 p.m., with a
break for lunch.
Rabbi Melvin Kieffer, for-
merly of the Westbury Hebrew
Congregation, who last year
agreed to join the Adult
Education Faculty, will cover
"Hosea: A Prophet of Love
and Tenderness" from 9:30
a.m. to 10:30 a.m.
Rabbi Chazin will lead a
discussion course on
"Bringing the Torah to Life"
from 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.
The Wisdom of the Fathers
will be compared to the trends
and ethics of today.
Professor Nathan Mazer,
who for the past two seasons
was the lecturer on Yiddish lit-
erature, will give a mini-course
on "Shakespeare's Great
Themes" from 11:30 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. He will emphasize
the universality of these
themes.
" I Muriel Stern will teach a
course on "Beginners He-
brew," starting with the Alef-
Bet, from 1:10 p.m. to 2:10
p.m.
Florence Poel will teach
"Intermediate Hebrew" from
1:10 p.m. to 2:10 p.m. the
course is intended to develop
familiarity with the Friday
evening and Sabbath morning
services. She will also give an
"Ulpan Course," to promote
Hebrew conversational skills,
from 2:10 p.m. to 3:10 p.m.
This course is particularly
useful for those who plan to
visit Israel.
Friday Evening Forums.
The once-a-month Forums are
scheduled as follows:
Nov. 16 The featured
speaker will be Ann Lynn
Lipon, Jewish education
director of the Jewish Federa-
tion of Palm Beach County.
The topic will be "Intermar-
riages, Conversion and As-
similation." Ms. Lipton
received two Fulbright grants
one to teach in England and
the other to study in Israel.
Her present responsibilities in-
clude coordinating Midrasha
High School and teacher
training in Palm Beach
' County.
Dec. 14 The speaker will
be Dr.- Samuel Portnoy,
former president of the
Florida Conference of College
Teachers of History, and
prominent lecturer on subjecs
of current and historic impor-
tance. His topic will be "An-
drei Sakharov and the Dis-
sident Movement in Russia."
Feb. 15, 1985 The
speaker will be Alan L. Shul-
man, member of the national
board of Federation-UJA.
The topic will be "A Fresh
Look at the Diaspora." Shul-
man, a lawyer by profession,
has made many trips to Israel
and participated in the United
Jewish Appeal Prime
Minister's Mission and Presi-
dent's Mission.
March 22, 1985 A special
program to be announced.
Memorial Lecture. Susan-
nah Heschel, daughter of the
great Rabbi Abraham Joshua
Heschel, will deliver the
Annual Memorial Lecture on
Wednesday evening, March
10, 1985, honoring Temple
Emanu-El members who have
passed away during the pre-
vious year. Author, scholar
and lecturer, Miss Heschel will
speak on "From the Sixties to
the Eighties: Changes in
Jewish Life."
Jewish film."Green Fields"
will be show n Sunday evening,
Feb. 24, 1985. It is a classic
pastoral romance featuring
Michael Goldstein and
Hershel Bernardi, based on
Peretz Hirschbein's legendary
tale of an Hassidic youth who
leaves a yeshiva and marries
into a family of simple Jewish
peasants. Suggested donation
is S2 per person.
Musical Recitals. "Music
for a Sunday Afternoon at
Three." This activity, under
the chairmanship of Tob>
Susskind, is a first for Temple
Emanu-El. It consists of a
series of four varied concerts,
each of which will feature a
young outstanding artist,
sponsored by Young Concert
Artists, Inc., a non-profit
organization.
The following Sunday dates
have been selected:
Dec. 16 Marya Martin,
Flutist
Jan. 6 Ben Holt,
Baritone
Feb. 3 Daniel Adni,
Pianist
March 3 Sung-Ju Lee,
Violinist
All performances begin at 3
p.m. in the sanctuary of
Temple Emanu-El.
Tickets are available only by
subscription to all four con-
certs in three price categories:
Subscriber $25, Angel $50,
Patron $100 and over.
The overall program, which
is open to the public, is due to
the input of the Temple
Emanu-El Adult Education
Committee, with the guidance
of Rabbi Chazin, Past Chair-
man Morrie Cohen, Chairman
Samuel Gofseyeff, and Vice-
Chairmen Jonas Barenholtz,
Esther Gottesman, Dorothy
Greenbaum and Frances
Korn.
For further information and
brochures on the above activ-
ities, phone the Temple office,
832-0804.
Fri. Oct. 266:24
pm
Congregation
Anshei Sholom's
Adult Education Set
Congregation Anshei
Sholom's Adult Education
Program commences on
Monday, Nov. 12. Courses
range from Aleph-Bet
(Beginner's reading) to
conversation, reports and
discussions in Hebrew in Chug
Ivri. For those seeking the
flavor of nostalgia, "Mame
Loshen," a course in Yiddish
conversation with a touch of
literary overtones, is offered.
Lecture and discussion
courses in Hebrew texts in-
clude (1) the Bible, its archeo-
logical and historical founda-
tions; (2) the Prophets, Torah
and Haftorah; and (3) Pirke
Avoth, "Sayings of the
Fathers" which have been
translated over 300 times and
into many languages.
The program stresses the
reading of prayers in Hebrew
in Intermediate and Advanced
Siddur reading. "Ask the
Rabbi" as well as Bat Mitzvah
preparation will be given bv
Rabbi Vander Walde.
The staff, headed by the
rabbi, includes Dori Dacher,
Lee Feingaum, Rhea Passon,
Ray Reeber, Morris Shapiro,
and Aaron Rose, who is
overall chairman.
Registration takes place
Oct. 29 through Nov. 15, at
9:30 a.m., Monday through
Thursday, except on Election
Day. Fees are $5 for members,
and $15 for non-members. An
orientation assembly will be
held on Wednesday, Nov. 7.
At this assembly questions will
be answered on course offer-
ings. Classes begin on
Monday, Nov. 12, and will
continue until 20 sessions are
completed.
Classes are given once a
week usually for one hour.
Some of the lectures last an
hour and a half. All sessions
are in the morning hours on
Monday, Wednesday and
Thursday. All are welcome!
^J If you have a new address or
%i are planning to move, please
let us know. Also, if you know
some folks who are not now
receiving The Jewish Floridian
and would like to, also let us
know. Every issue of the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County's newspaper
contains news you won't want
to miss. Simply call 832-2120.
Religious Directory
Conservative
CONGREGATION ANSHEI SHOLOM: 5348 Grove St
West Palm Beach 33409. PHone 684-3212. Rabbi ha
Vander Walde. Cantor Mordecai Spektor. Daily: 8 30 a a
and 7:30 p.m. Friday: 8:30 a.m., 5 p.m. and a late service u
8:15 p.m., followed by Oneg Shabbat. Saturday: 8:30 am
7:30 p.m., Mincha followed by Sholosh Suedos.
CONGREGATION BETH KODESH OF BOYNTOn
BEACH: 501 N.E. 26 Avenue, Boynton Beach 33435 PhZ
586-9428. Rabbi Avrom L. Drazin. Monday 8:30 am
Thursday 8:30 a.m. Sabbath services, Friday 8:15 nm'
Saturday 9 a.m.
GOLDEN LAKES TEMPLE: 1470 Golden Lakes Blvd
West Palm Beach 33411. Phone 689-9430. Rabbi Joseph
Speiser. Daily Services 8:15 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. Sabbath
services Friday 8:15 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m., 5 p.m., Mincha
followed by Sholosh Suedos.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID: 4657 Hood Road. Palm Beach
Gardens 33410. Phone 694-2350. Rabbi William Marder,
Cantor Earl J. Backoff. Sabbath services. Friday 8 p.m!
Saturday 10 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 2815 No. Flagler Dr.. West Palm
Beach 33407. Phone 833-0339. Rabbi Howard J. Hirsch,
Cantor Elaine Shapiro. Sabbath services Friday 8:15 p.m.'
Saturday 9:30 a.m. Daily Minyan 8:15 a.m., Sunday and
L.'ii.il Holidays 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 315 N. A" Street. Lake Worth
33460. Phone 585-5020. Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg. Cantor
Jacob Elman. Services Monday and Thursday 8:15 a.m..
Friday 8:15 p.m.. Saturday 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 224 N.W. Avenue G, Belle
Glade 33430. Sabbath services Friday. 8:30 p.m. Phone 996-
3886.
TEMPLE BETH ZION: Lions Club, 700 Camelia Dr., Royal
Palm Beach. Mailing Address: POBox 104. 650 Royal Palm
Blvd., Royal Palm Beach. FL 33411. Sabbath Services Friday 8
p.m., Saturday 8:45 a.m. Rabbi Nathan Zelizer Phone 793-
9122.
TEMPLE BNAI JACOB: 2177 So. Congress Ave.. West Palm
Beach 33406. Phone 433-5957. Rabbi Dr. Morris Silberman.
Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m.. Saturday and Holidays 9a.m.,
Monday and Thursday 9 a.m.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL: 190 North County Road, Palm Beach
33480. Phone 832-0804. Rabbi Joel Chazin. Cantor David
Dardashti. Sabbath services, Friday 8:30p.m.; Saturday 9a.m.
THE TREASURE COAST JEWISH CENTER Ben
Abraham: 3257 S.E. Salerno Road, Port Salerno. Rabbi
Abraham Rose. 1 -287-8833. Services Friday evenings 8 p.m.
LAKE WORTH JEWISH CENTER: St. Lukes United
Methodist Chapel. 165 Ohio Road, Lake Worth. Phone 433-
1869. Friday night serivces 8:15 p.m., Saturday, 9 a.m.
Orthodox
CONGREGATION AITZ CHAIM: Century Village, West
Palm Beach. Phone 689-4675. Sabbath services 9 a.m. and a
p.m. Daily services 8:15 a.m. and 6:30 p.m.
Reform
CONGREGATION BETH ISRAEL: 1592 Floresta, P.O. Box
857146, Port St. Lucie, FL 33462. Friday night services 8 p.m.
Saturday morning 10:30 a.m. Phone 465-6977.
THE REFORM TEMPLE OF JUPITER-TEQUESTA: at
Jupiter High School. Military Trail, Jupiter. Mailing address:
Plaza 222, U.S. No. 1, Tequeata 33458. Phone 747-4235. Rabbi
Alfred L. Friedman. Services Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 4600 Oleander Avenue. Fort Pierce, FL
33450. Phone 461-7428. Cantor Anne Newman.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM: St. Helen's Parish Hall, 20th
Avenue and Victory Blvd., Vero Beach 32960, mailing address:
P.O. Box 2113, Vero Beach, FL 32961-2113. Rabbi Richard D.
Messing. Phone 1-569-0180.
TEMPLE BETH TORAH: at St. David's in the Pines
Episcopal Retreat, Forest Hill Blvd. and Wellington Trace,
West Palm Beach. Mailing address: P.O. Box 17008, West
Palm Beach, FL 33416. Friday services 8:16 p.m. Rabbi
Steven R. Westman, Cantor Nicholas Fenakel. Phone 793-
2700.
TEMPLE ISRAEL: 1901 No. Flagler Dr., West Palm Beecn
33407. Phone 833-8421. Rabbi Howard Shapiro, Cantonal
Soloist Susan Weiss. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE JUDEA: at St. Catharine's Greek Orthodox Church
Social Hall. 4000 Washington Rd., at Southern Boulevard.
Rabbi Joel L. Levine. Cantor Anne Newman. Mailing address
5154 Okeechobee Blvd.. West-Palm Beach, FL 33409. Phone
471-1526.


Synagogue News
Friday, October 26,1984. The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 15
The Singles Group of the Lake Worth Jewish Cenlerwill
hold a "Bring Your Own Picnic Lunch" on Sunday, Oct.
28, 9 a.m., at the Gulfstream Park, on the ocean, in
Boynton Beach.
CONGREGATION
ANSHEI SHOLOM
swterhood of Congregation
LSffsiolo- will holdUs
board meeting on Monday,
J?" 5 9:45 a.m., and its
Par meeting on Tuesday,
2v 20, 1 P-m- EstHer
LrLPk will give a book re-
fetJ-VW by Leon
L'ris.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID
I on Friday, Oct. 26, 8 p.m.,
,he temple will hold its regular
Shabbat evening service
honoring the anniversary of
he Bat Mitzvah of Jessica
Sloop, daughter of Dr and
urs Ron Sloop of Palm
Beach Gardens. The following
Lrning. Saturday, Oct. 27 at
10 a m., Jessica will chant her
Bat Mitzvah Haftorah con-
tinuing her anniversary cele-
bration during regular serv-
ices.
TEMPLE JUDEA
Rabbi Joel L. Levine will
conduct a Torah seminar en-
titled "The Book of Genesis
Tills It Like It Is" at Sabbath
services. Friday, Oct. 26, 8
p.m., at St. Catherine's
Cultural Center. Cantor Anne
Newman will chant the music.
The Torah seminars are
regular features of Temple
Judea's pulpit adult education
program. The community is
invited to attend. The oneg
shabbat sponsored by Sister-
hood and the junior oneg for
children are always a part of
ihe evening.
Temple Judea will hold its
annual fall Art Auction on
Saturday evening, Nov. 3 at
the Hilton Inn on Singer Is-
land. Preview begins at 7 p.m.
ith the auction following at 8
p.m. Admission is compli-
mentary. Door prizes and re-
I'resnmeim are available.
Myra Berger is chairperson
of the event. This is the third
Art Auction which she will
chair for Temple Judea.
Mrs.Berger has engaged the
Sakal Galleries Ltd. of Fort
Lauderdalc to present the
auction.
This auction will feature a
Area Deaths
Mm
| jWhr. W. or Uke Worth. Menorah
wrdeni and Funeral Chapel, Wet
PUm Beach
MMGARO, David. 70, ol Dorcheste.r
""fory Village, Witt Palm Beach.
'verside Guardian Plan Chapel, Wast
pm Beach.
GROSS
"* J. 77, or Coventry. Century
r.M e" Pa,m Beach Menorah
&cahnd FUnera' CI,"peI> WMt
Wenheim
kL'h ^J* CresUlven. West Palm
" Rlver8lde Guardian Plan
"W.Weat Palm Beach.
I &, \f F,ande" -0. Delray
c.w^rB^hartu'n pun
NIN
ht*wl^el,"ngt0n aoe' c"""-y
OmS;. i*1 Palm Bch. Riveralde
gjin Funeral Home, We.t Palm
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ft "pal'm0^nbrler Cntt*"V Vlll*e'
5arant.iT,, each Levltt-Welneteln
J5jScurttyPiaChapel, Wat
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h*,p^rarh,,an IN$TElN
WBmJV" M9 S- cean Blvd..
**..v.,,- HR,vr Guardian Plan
collector's corner as well as
affordable art in the medium
of sculpture, water color,
enamel, oil, signed and num-
bered graphics, and posters.
Artists represented will include
Agam, Calder, Dali, Sandu
Liberman, Dom Mingolla,
Boulanger, and Ebgi Amram.
Moulton glass will also be
available.
This Art Auction is a major
fundraising event for Temple
Judea. The community is wel-
come. For more information,
call the office.
The Sisterhood is having a
rummage sale, Sunday, Nov.
4, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., at Palms
Foods parking lot, formerly
Millers, Military Trail near
Southern Blvd.
Rummage can be brought
on the day of sale. Help is
needed.
For additional information
call Gail Schwartz, Angela
Gallicchio or Mary Parker in
the evening.
LAKE WORTH
JEWISH CENTER
Norman J. Schimelman,
executive director of the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County, will be the
guest speaker at Friday night
services on Oct. 26.
Schimelman has served the
Federation in many areas of
the country and has been to
Israel seven times during the
past two years.
His subject will be "The
Jewish Community of Palm
Beach County Its Growth
and Its Implication."
3,000 People Rally
For Soviet Jews
By MICHAEL SOLOMON
MONTREAL (JTA) -
About 3,000 persons held a
mass demonstration on behalf
of Soviet Jews in downtown
Montreal last week and then
marched on the Soviet Con-
sulate where, facing barred
doors, they demanded human
rights for Soviet Jewry and the
right to emigrate.
The demonstrators massed
first in Dominion Square,
carrying flags, banners and
slogans. A band played Jewish
and Israeli folk songs. Pupils
and teachers from every
Jewish day school in the area
participated as did the two
Jewish members of Parliament
from the Montreal area, Sheila
Finestone and Gerry Wiener.
Herbert Marx, a member of
the Quebec National Assem-
bly, and Mayor J. Lang of
Cote St. Luke were also
present along with leaders of
suburban communities.
After Rabbi David Sabbad
read the invocation in French,
the 3,000 demonstrators
marched the several blocks to
the Soviet Consulate. There,
Irving Cotler, a professor of
law at McGill University,
indicted the Soviet govern-
ment for raising anti-Semitism
"to the level of a State reli-
gion."
"I say to the representative
of the Soviet Union opposite
me behind closed doors,
J'Accuse for the crime of
inhumanity and crimes against
humanity," Cotler declared.
He vowed, "We shall not take
leave of this assembly without
resolving to do something
every day on behalf of Soviet
Jews."
A large menorah was raised
in front of the Consulate.
Each of its seven candles was
lighted by a child on behalf of
Jewish prisoners in the USSR.
THE JOSEPH L MORSE GERIATRIC CENTER
Welcomes applications for admission to the 120-bed
long term care skilled nursing facility
THE NEW CENTER FEATURES
Modernly designed semi private
and private rooma for comfort
and liability
24-hour skilled nuraing care
by qualified profeaaionala
Complete medical services
Including:
Physician
Physical Therapy
Occupational Therapy
Speech Therapy
Podiatry
Dental
Social Services
Full program of Recreational
Activities
'Beauty and Barber Shop
Library
Qlft Shop
Solariums.
Roof top gardens
and spacious outdoor
patio
Planned outings
Synagogue/Auditorium
' Observance of Sabbath
and Holidays conducted
by Rabbi Alan Sherman
IChaplalncy Servlcee
Regular and Special
menus all In accordance
with Kosher dietary laws
Write or Call
The Joseph L. Morse Geriatric Center
4847 Fred Gladstone Drive
West Palm Beach, Florida 33407
AttmSocial Service Department
(305)471-5111
ISEXtt^S^**0-*
Morse
the happy, clean atmosphere
that greets visitors on arrival.
The best way to witness the
growth of the Center is to visit
any of the three floors of res-
idents when you are in the
neighborhood and to see for
yourself. You will see a sched-
uling of activities which are
meaningful in our lives in that
they keep us busy with skills to
heighten self esteem and the
senses and lessen the threat-
ening arthritis or other
symptoms of aging.
It has been a productive
year for a lot of us. While it is
difficult at times to face the
tolls taken in sickness and
aging, being in a Home that
constantly strives to enrich the
residents' lives by new in-
terests and new modalities
Continued from Page 3
skillfully worked out by Social
Services, the focus of attention
is away from the negatives and
re-directed towards the
positives in life.
Morse Geriatric's is a Jew-
ish atmosphere, a healthy
atmosphere, and I liken our
prograss to the remark from
Mr. Gackenheimer, when he
was congratulated by a visitor
on the beauty of this year's
Succah. Mr. G's comment was
like his infectious, energetic
self, "Thank you, and next
year's succah will be even
bigger and better!"
Anita Anton is president of
the Residents' Council of the
Morse Geriatric Center. The
Center is located at 4847 Fred
Gladstone Drive, West Palm
Beach, Florida.
Peres meets UJA: Israeli Prime Minister Shimon Peres is
welcomed upon his arrival in New York by the leadership of the
national United Jewish Appeal. Greeting Prime Minister Peres
are UJA National Chairman Alexander Grass [left], UJA
National Vice Chairman Norman H. Lipoff [second from right]
and UJA President Robert E. Loup [right]. Peres came to the
United States to discuss Israel's economic problems and
strategic concerns with top administration officials.
MEMORIAL CHAPELS
Serving the greater Florida area
in the finest of Jewish tradition.
WEST PALM BEACH 689-8700
DELRAY BEACH 278-7600
5411 Okeechobee Boulevard
Jack Weiss
Manager
PRE ARRANGED FUNERALS AVAILABLE THRU
GUARANTEED SECURITY PLAN
PRE NEED COUNSELORS
Men/Women
Palm Beach County's only combined All-
Jewish Cemetery and Funeral Chapel NEEDS
YOU.
Earn a substantial income working close
to home full-time or part-time.
Call Elaine Schimek
627-2277


jn
Page 16 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County. Friday, October 26,1984
Ihe surprising truth abou
who's the lowest.
i
THE LOWEST
Warning The Surgeon General Has Determined
That Cigarette Smoking Is Dangerous to Your Health
SOFT PACK 100s FILTER. MENTHOL 3 mg. "tar". 0.3 mg. mcotme
. per cigarette by FTC method.
Competitive ta< level reflects the Feb 84 FTC Report
NOW THE LOWEST OF AJ1 BRANDS
^


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