The Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian the voice of the Jewish community of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Running title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Physical Description:
4 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 8, no. 41 (Dec. 24, 1982)-v. 11, no. 26 (Aug. 30, 1985).
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44606415
lccn - sn 00229548
ocm44606415
System ID:
AA00014310:00077

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
VOICE OF
JEWISH
ICOMMUMITY Of
MlMlWH
ItflUNTV
thjewish floridian
VOLUME 10NUMBER 33
PALM BEACH. FLORIDA FRIDAY OCTOBER 19 1984
pninp ti nFWTn
Peres Says Talks With U.S. Reassuing
i
'k
rime Minister Feres
JERUSALEM (JTA) Is-
raeli Premier Shimon Peres
returned to Israel after two
days of talks in Washington
with Reagan administration
officials "reassured about the
nature and the scope of the
support and understanding"
for Israel's problems.
But Peres stressed what
while most of the talks cen-
tered around Israel's economic
problems, the real issue was
how a democracy in a non-
democratic region could
maintain its political and
military strength.
"I did not come to
Washingotn in order to raise
money so that we shall be able
to maintain the standard of
life in Israel," he said. "We
shall do it ourselves."
Peres explained that Israel
needs United States help in
maintaining the present size of
its army, both in personnel
and weaponry, as well as
replacing old weapons with a
new generation of armaments.
He noted that Israel pays for
70 percent of its defense, and
the remaining 30 percent
comes from the United States
in aid to buy military hard-
ware.
The Premier said that while
Israel has received large-scale
United States aid, the value of
the dollar has decreased
because of inflation, while the
price of weaponry has gone up
greatly.
As an example, he said that
in 1974 when large-scale U.S.
aid began, Israel had U.S.
Phantom jets which cost $4
million each. The U.S. F-I5s
and F-16s Israel is now buying
to replace the Phantoms cost
about $40 million per plane.
Peres expressed gratitude
that the United States has
agreed to provide Israel im-
mediately with $1.2 billion of
the $2.6 billion in grants it is
receiving in the 1985 fiscal
year, which began Oct. 1. He
said this would help Israel
meet its immediate needs.
Peres also expressed the
gratitude of Israel for support
in Congress. He said the 96-0
vote in the Senate and the 436-
6 vote in the House to create a
Free Trade Area between Isra-
el and the United States was
"an outstanding
Continued on Page 2
nold Lampert Appointed
Hyron J. Nickman,
csident of the Jewish
kraiion of Palm Beach
iimy, has announced the
oimment of Arnold
npert as general chairman
Ithe 1985 Jewish Federation
Palm Beach County-United
pish Appeal campaign.
Upon accepting the position
Inside
November
Elections
(League of Women
ers has provided a
opsis of the constitu-
al amendments which
II appear on the
"ember ballot. See
\l
| Rejoicing In
The Torah
[Pn about marching
"""thetorahson
Mat Torah captures
roood of the holiday
* Page 8
CRC and
Main Aides
Enounce
Chairmen
president of the
m Federation ol
pm Beach County has
winced the
J^enships of the
"""unity Relations
7*'1 and the
^n Aides program.
1985 General Campaign Chairman
Lampert stated, "As residents
of the Palm Beaches, we have
the responsibility of seeing to
it that we supply the effort and
money necessary to reinforce
and increase the services and
programs vital to maintaining
the quality of life for our local
Jewish community. Over the
last three years federal and
state funds for human service
programs have been reduced.
However, the need for these
programs has escalated.
Unemployment has produced
psychological distress and
family pressures along with
the financial strain. Many of
this community's elderly are
isolated, in need of nutritional
meals and social interaction.
Jewish education must be
increased and strengthened to
help vounasters preserve their
Arnold Lampert
Jewish identity.
"As we provide for the
needs of our people here, we
must also continue to help
Jews in 30 countries around
the world and in Israel. We
must insure that the gates of
freedom open for Soviet Jewry
and that we continue to take
care of the remnant commu-
nities of aging Jews in Eastern
Europe. This year Israel is
facing its greatest economic
crisis ever which has put an
unprecedented strain on its
social service programs and
services. Our priorities to
maintain a strong Israel are in
the areas of immigration and
absorption, development of
settlements within Israel's pre-
1967 borders, education.
Youth Aliyah residences for
troubled teenagers and social
welfare aid to immigrants of
years ago.
"I am pleased and honored
to accept this position,"
Lampert concluded, "and
urge everyone to join with me
and the many volunteer
workers to meet the challenge
of this year's campaign of
building a vital Jewish com-
munity the world over."
In addition to this leader-
ship position, Lampert serves
on the board and executive
committee of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County and on the budget and
allocations committee. He also
sits on the national United
Jewish Appeal budget and
allocations committee.
Lampert, who came to Palm
Continued on Page 3-
Evangelical Church Offers Support
of Israel and The Jewish People
By LOUISE ROSS
Assistant News Coordinator
It was a first, certainly in Palm Beach County. An
evangelical church invited the Jewish community to
their "Feast of Sukkot" to help them learn about the
festival, and so stir up a love among their members,
who are friends of Israel, and the Jewish people.
Rousing song and dance numbers including We
Will Dance Like David Danced" and the Israel,
popular song. "Hallelujah," performed by a variety
of singers and musicians had everyone swayinI to.he
music and clapping their hands in an uplifting display
of good will.
The Calvary Temple. Assembly of God. was MM
to overflowing as members rose to proclam their
solidarity with the Jews "as God s ancient chosen
people." As Pastor William lln.sky and he
congregation read the proclamation, a Holocaust
survivor wiped tears from her eyes. She couldn I
believe that this was happening and had to come and
see for herself. .
In response to the statements of support for brad
and the Jewish people worldwide. Rabb' Ata"
Sherman, director of the ^^l^SSi
Council of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beacn
Countv. said. "You have extended the hana oi
Continued on Pg *
Members of the Christian.and Jewish communities sing together
at Calvary Temple, Assembly of God.


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, October 19,1984
Peres
Continued from Page 1
phenomenon" which "warms
our hearts."
The joint economic
development group between
Israel and the United States,
announced by President
Reagan after his two-hour
meeting with Peres and
Foreign Minister Yitzhak
Shamir, is designed to help the
new unity government
restructure Israel's economy,
Peres explained. Peres said his
government wants to change
Israel's economy from
dependence on its old in-
dustries to an information
economy which exports
science and technology.
The government hopes to
increase exports from the
present $11 billion a year to
$19 billion, the Premier said.
He said this would end the
balance of trade deficit and
help make Israel self-sufficient
and thus need less aid from the
United States. He said Israel
wants to increase productivity
and exports, particularly
exports to the United States.
Peres, who, after his
meeting with Reagan, called
the President "a true friend of
Israel," stressed that he had
gone to the United States
because of "Israel's needs"
and not because of anything
connected with the U.S. presi-
dential election. "I feel very
strongly that Israel is not a
partisan issue in American
life," he said.
Noting that he also met
former Vice President Walter
Mondale in New York last
Wednesday afternoon, Peres
said that he has known
Mondale for many years and
has had "good relations" with
him. Asked if the Democratic
presidential candidate was also
a true friend of Israel, Peres
said, "What's wrong with
having many friends?"
Peres contended that in his
meeting with Reagan and five
meetings with Secretary of
State George Shultz he found
the United States and Israel
see "eye to eye" on Lebanon.
He said that while Israel plans
to withdraw from Lebanon, a
process he said would take six
to nine months, Israel could
no longer hinge withdrawal
from Lebanon on what Syria
would and would not do.
"We do not look for any
trade-off on the Syrian side,"
Peres said. "It is up to the
Syrians to decide if they want
to confront every morning our
army deployed alongside their
line 16-17 miles from the
outskirts of Damascus."
Peres said that the United
Nations Interim Force in
Lebanon (UNIFIL) could
replace the Israeli troops in the
areas from which Israel with-
draws. But he made clear
again that Israel wants the
troops commanded by Brig.
Gen. Antoinc Lahad to remain
along the border to patrol the
areas from where Katyusha
rockets could hit northern Is-
rael.
Peres said Lahad, the
successor to the late Saad
Haddad, represents the "real
desire of the Lebanese people
who reside in southern
Lebanon. I think they are as
much interested in keeping
southern Lebanon peaceful as
we are."
Peres said that while Reagan
renewed his commitment to
his September 1, 1982, peace
initiative, the Israelis were not
asked to support it. "We
know the initiative is in
existence," the Premier said.
Continued on Pace 6
Constitutional Amendments on November Ballot
Information provided by the League of Women Voters of Florida/ League of Women Votera of Florida Education Fund
Short title and explanation
AMENDMENT I
EXEMPTION OF HOMESTEAD
AND PERSONAL PROPERTY
FROM FORCED SALE.
(Section 4 of Article X)
The provision in the current con-
stitution has provided that the only
individuals exempt from forced sale of
a homestead property must be the
head ol a household The provision has
worked against widowers, widows, or
single individuals who have no depend-
ents living with them. The change in
the constitutional language would allow
treatment of all homestead owners in
the same manner
AMENDMENT II
DISBURSEMENT OF STATE
FUNDS
(Section 4 of Article IV)
This proposed amendment will
eliminate the necessity for all payments
from the state to be made by check and
will allow electronic deposit of lunds
including direct deposit of payroll
checks for all state employees
AMENDMENT III
PROCEDURES OF JUDICIAL
NOMINATING COMMISSIONS
(Section 2 of Article VI
This amendment would ensure
that each ol the judicial nominating
commissions (JNCs). by court level.
svoulJ use unifoim rules of procedure
lor seeking and making nominations
I lie amendment would open up to the
Sunshine all ol the proceedings and the
records of the various nominating com-
missions The only portion which would
be closed to the public would be the
actual deliberations of the commission
Proponents' views
Other conditions notwithstanding,
a person should be entitled to exemption
from forced sale of a home. Irrespective
of whether or not the person hat
spouse and/or dependents living with
him/her.
Can eliminate paperwork and
move the stale Into the 20th century
technology Can allow transfer of Mat*
funds more quickly and efficiently
Would enable development of direct
deposit for payroll checks for stale
employees Removes archaic language
and requirements.
Opponents' vi,w,
** mm* oppc*^
AMENDMENT IV
SPEECH OR DEBATE
PRIVILEGE
(Section 2 of Article III)
Pass.sge of this amendment would
mean that any statements made by a
legiilatni related to legislative duties is
privileged and that legislators could not
be subpoenaed or ordered or ques-
tioned anywhere else with respect to
any statements that they have made
with respect to their legislative duties
Would put information in the
public arena prior to the nominating
process and would tend to eliminate
poorly qualified candidates Would
establish uniform rules of procedure for
JNCs by level, subject to repeal by the
legislature or the supreme court Each
JNC currently is a separate entity
Satisfies FTondians that government in
Sunshine applies to JNCs
Allows legislators to speak with-
out fear of later repnsals or legal action
Could create more open debating and
sharing of information
AMENDMENT V
ELECTION OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS
(Section I of Article VIII)
Tlie cur rent provisions ol the con-
stitution require that the county com-
missions may only have five members,
and these members must be elected by
the electors ol the entire county The
change in the constitution would pro-
vide that county commissions could be
either five or sewn members and county
commissioners could be elected as pro-
vided by law and would leave It up lo
the legislature to determine whether or
not the county commissioners would'
continue lo be elected by an entire
voting population ol a county or
whether member districts could be
allowed
AMENDMENT VI
ELIGIBILITY TO BE COUNTY
COURT JUDGE
(Section 8 ol article V)
At the present time, the constitu-
tion requires only that a person seeking
lo be come a county judge be a member
of the Florida Bar, unless otherwise
provided by general law This amend-
ment would require live years ol
membership In the Bar The exemption
lo the five year requirement would be
applicable only to counties having a
population of 40.000 or less
AMENDMENT VII
BONDS FOR STATE
CAPITAL PROJECTS
(Section 11 of Article VII)
The current constitution does not
require that capital outlay projects which
are to be paid for by state bonds be
specifically authomed by law The con-
stitution currently requires thai the total
outstanding pnncipal of stale bonds
issued under th Article shall never
exceed SO percent of the total tan
revenues of the slate for the preceding
wo fiscal years The amendment would
exclude from th.it SO percent figure any
lax revenues which are held in trust
under pros i*ions authorized in the con-
stitution
Additions. y, slate tones currently
must be pledged and told for only one
purpose, the amendment would allow
a combi nation of bonds for the purpose
of sale to obtain better interest rates
The present constitution prohibits
the repayment of bonds through slate
revenues if they are either stale lax
revenues or are rents or fees paid from
state tax revenues The amendment
would eliminate the prohibition against
payment of these bonds from rents or
fees paid for from lax revenues This
would presumably allow the state lo
issue bonds and pay (or those bonds out
of rental fees obtained from Male
agencies
AMENDMENT VIII
PUBLIC EDUCATION CAPITAL
OUTLAY BOND
(So. i.n <> ol Anle XII)
The present constitutional pro*
vis* mi indicates thai gross receipts taxes
can be levied pursuant lo the provisions
>f Chapter 20 1 Honda Statutes al the
time ol adoption ol the original amend
ineni lo the Article Since there will be
necessary changes m Chapter 203 re-
sulting in changes In the deregulation
of telephone services the constitutional
provision as H cartls now would not
perm* appropriate levy ol grots receipts
taxes The amendment is an attempt to
provide thai grots receipts taxes may be
levied according lo the provisions ol
Chapter 203. Honda Statutes, as the
chapter may be amended from time to
time
Authorization of five or seven
members creates more c it i r en access to
the commission and belter representa-
tion of the peoples' inters! Could allow
the legislature lo create possibility of
single member districts (SMDs) rather
than election by all voters Through
legislative enactment of SM0 require-
ments minority participation in local
government could be enhanced Could
reduce litigation In those counties where
districts have diluted the voting strength
of racial minorities
Could create better qualified
county |udges Would allow granting of
exemptions by general law
Allows bond issues lo be combined
lo obtain better market rale Allows
new funding sources to deal with needed
Improvements in state office buildings.
service buildings, stale infrastructure
and other capital Improvements Allows
greater flexibility for repayment ol bonds
a *^ 5^'bansler of -.
loss ollmereM dollar, Would S
change, In rule, ind procedun?, !
many agencies ol the stale
Lawyers may hesitate to say any
thing publicly about the judicial ctndi
date before whom they may later
appear Applicants might fear loss of
jobs and/or cases Applicants hesi-
tation lo be publicly interviewed might
cut down on number ol qualified can-
didates
Creates a broader speech and
debate pnvilege lhan thai available to
the U S Congress under the U S Con-
stitution Could allow legislators lo
slander or libel someone without op-
portunity for redress
Could create ward politics and
concern on the pan of individual com
mtsttoners with their district constituents
o< ly rather than with the interests ol the
county at Large The current system
works, there Is no need lo change No
evidence indicates that SMDs result in
greater minonty representation
Creates a double expenence r
quirement standard lor county judges
Would require county iudges lo have
same qualifications as circuit court
judgesmight diminish the number
applying or running for officenbich has
lower salary and prestige than circuit
court
AMENDMENT IX
CITIZENS RIGHTS IN CIVIL
ACTIONS
iSiiK-n 24 ol Article II
Tli* .liii-nJiiK-oi could allect
damage awards in civil litigation suits
No delendam would have lo pay
damages in excess ol the percentage ol
the Jelendanf > liability as determined
by a jury Any claims 'or pain and suf-
fering mental anguish loss of capacity
for enjoyment or punitive damages
would he lirruied lo 11(10000 the
amendment does not place any dollar
Unil on awardt lor economic damages
(e g medical expenses or lost wages)
Amendment is technical in nature
only Without the amendment, school
construction funds could be reduced
Will help meet construction needs based
on growth ol school population and
changes in educational programs
Would help lower malpractice
insurance rates Could result in lower
medical costs by eliminating 'defensive
medicine" the practice ol grvlng
extra and sometimes unnecessary diag-
nostic tests lo prole, I the doctor in
event ihete is a malpractice suit Could
serve lo stem the exodus ol doctors
Irom obstetrics field which has lost 25
percent of its specialists in recent years
and anticipates the lots of 2S percent
more within the next year or two
Professionals such as doctors
engineers, lawyers and architects have
lound themselves sued increasingly, as
they have Ihe "deep pocket of proles-
sioal kabilily insurance coverage The
amendment could decrease such tuitt
State would pay for newbuildings
through rent to itself rather than lo a
pnvate enlerpnse whx-h would not
lead lo any decrease in appropnations
for rental of space Could result M less
legislative accountability since the pro-
ject would not have lo be funded out ol
current operating budget Could result
in a new funding source (or turkeys
(capital projects HI legislators home
districts)
Could eventually result in higher
utJ.ryb.Us Hi** ""'""'!
eveniueUy raised .hey a-J bspts*;'
alorigtoc^un^sesarxdoVicu..
sumer tax
Amendment goes .ar *
medical maJpr.x-nce and seeks W ""
^,y.^ngh,o.fW.c,..H-
to seek lull redress lor mjunessu Ir-
as a result of negligence or wMukat
lessrsess of others P-^'"1f""^
servxre, Th.s no. the sort oH-P*
tKinlobewntleriint-.thecnnsMut.^
.,uchch.r>g.Sln.^e-^^^
K,^luUydeb..ed,,.o,.k^-.lK^
to vote inleltigenily The "
value ol money due to *""*,,.
rr-keseillWlXWcaponnon^
mic damages unrealistic T^
fi.ed turn haJ been set IS ***",_
inflation' HalV.. summary U<|u*r
misleading


Friday, October 19,1984 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 3
Community Relations Council
Chairman, Task Force Chairmen Named
Itnold Limpert (standing], general chairman of the 19S5
Irtish Federation of Palm Beach County-United Jewish Appeal
laapilen, addresses an early meeting of this year's Campaign
Icibiaei, which b being formed at this time. He highlighted the
Lowing needs of Jews in Palm Beach County as well as the
IwoHd over and in Israel and urged the cabinet to reach out to
gvolvt more community volunteers in the work of the cam-
Campaign Cabinet in Formation
Myron J. Nickman, pres-
ident of the Jewish Federation
of Palm Beach County, has
named Helen Hoffman to
serve as chairman of the
Federation's Community
Relations Council. In addition
Shirley Blonder will continue
to chair the Soviet Jewry Task
Force, Dr. Mark Rattinger will
assume the chairmanship of
the Israel-Mideast Task Force
after having served as co-
chairman last year, and
Barbara Kaplan has been ap-
pointed to chair the Local
Concerns Task Force.
In commenting about the
appointments, Nickman said,
"Helen and her three task
force chairmen all bring to
their positions a strong
commitment to furthering
community relations. Their
varied and in-depth expe-
riences coupled with their
abiding concern for the Jewish
community will continue to
serve them well as they seek
ways to enrich relations
among the different com-
munities locally, nationally
and internationally."
Helen Hoffman, who
chaired the Local Concerns
Helen Hoffman
Task Force last year, is a past
board member of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County and immediate past
president of the local Amer-
ican Jewish Committee. She
also is a founding member of
the Palm Beach County Ad
Hoc Coalition on Human
Services. Currently Mrs.
Hoffman is a professor at
Florida Atlantic University
Graduate School of Public
Administration. She formerly
was an assistant dean at
Rutgers Law School special-
izing in industrial relations
and has served as a labor arbi-
trator. She is a founding
member of the Women's
Rights section of the New
York Bar and founding chair-
man of its Rights of the
Mentally Handicapped sec-
tion.
Shirlee Blonder will be
chairing the Soviet Jewry Task
Force for the fourth conse-
cutive year. She is a member
of the Local Concerns Task
Force and the Methodist-
Jewish Dialogue committee of
.the Community Relations
Council. A board member of
the Women's Division of the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County, she will be
chairing the 1983 Women's
Division annual meeting. Mrs.
Blonder is a past co-chairman
of the $1,000 to $4,999
campaign event and served as
New Gifts chairman for
Women's Division last year.
In addition to her Federation
involvement, Mrs. Blonder is a
board member of the
American Jewish Committee
and the Anti-Defamation
w-' r'.
hie Campaign Cabinet met at the home of Arnold and Marilyn
ILimpert to continue planning for the 1985 campaign.
Shirlee Blonder
Dr. Mark Rattinger
Allweiss to Chair Chaplain Aides-Glasser to Co-Chair
Nthn Allweiss
Nathan Allweiss has accept-
d the chairmanship of the
Chaplain Aides of the Jewish
fweration of Palm Beach
J"my and Jeanne Glasser
s been re-named to co-chair
"e program, announced
Myron J Nickman, president
the Jewish Federation of
mI Beach County. Under
. J direction of Rabbi Alan
\tS\achaplain of the
J*n Federation of Palm
Sides CU",y' l-he .Chap18'0
Shabbat and the-holidays with
our Jewish nursing home
residents. Their commitment,
dedication and experience will
serve them well as they assume
their leadership roles this
year."
Nathan Allweiss, who
moved here from Los Angeles
six years ago, has been con-
ducting services at nursing
homes with his wife, Ida Mae,
for the last three years. A
founder of Congregation Beth
Kodesh of Boynton Beach, he
currently serves on its board.
He also continues his involve-
ment with the University of
Judaism (the West coast
branch of the Jewish Theo-
logical Seminary), having
endowed its Executive Wing.
Allweiss, who has been a
professional singer since child-
hood in addition to being a
manufacturer of ladies purses
and luggage, is the music
reviewer for the Palm Beach
Jewish World.
Jeanne Glasser, who has
served as co-chairman of the
Chaplain Aides since its incep-
tion, helped organize religious
services at the Darcy Hall
Nursing Home seven and a
half years ago with her
husband Lou, now deceased,
and Murray and Bea Kern.
Subsequently, this program
was expanded into the
Chaplain Aides when Rabbi
Sherman joined the Federa-
tion staff.
A member of the Soviet
Lam pert
Appointed
Jewry Task Force of the
Community Relations Council
of the Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County, Mrs.
Glasser served as the Federa-
tion's delegate to the Third
World Conference on Soviet
Jewry in Jerusalem in 1983.
She is a board member of the
Women's Division of the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County, Common
Cause and the Wcstlake Civic
Association and active with
the League of Women Voters.
She comes to this area from
Tyler, Tex., where she was a
high school German teacher.
Barbra Kaplan
League.
Dr. Mark Rattinger assumes
the chairmanship of the Israel-
Mideast Task Force after
serving as co-chairman with
Milton Gold last year. He also
serves on the Leadership
Development committee of the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County. He has been
active in organizing the local
chapter of the American Israel
Public Affairs Committee
(AIPAC) and is a member of
B'nai B'rith. At Cornell Uni-
versity, where he received his
medical degree, he was chair-
man of the finance committee
and a member of the Medical
Honor Society. He also par-
Continued on Page 6-
I holid
conduct Shabbat and
ay.services for residents
J "ursing homes and make
E visits to unaffiliated
ur n, PaUen,S in h0SP**'s.
h ig homes and correc-
"na' institutions throughout
"* community.
N'ckman hailed the ap-
JJ'ywt of Allweiss and
"Both MSe[ by commenting,
lCLNa,han and ^anne
their f; courless hours of
"me to share the joy of
Continued from Page 1
Beach County in 1976 from
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania,
has served as vice president of
the Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County and as associate
campaign chairman. He was
treasurer of Temple Beth El
for the past five years.
He has made several trips to
Israel and has recently
returned from a national
campaign chairmen's mission
to Israel and Poland.
Lampert is president of
Professional Planners, a life
and health planning Firm. He
is a life member of the Million
Dollar Round Table and a
member of the General Agents
and Managers Association of
Palm Beach County.
HOLD THE DATE!
SUNDAY MORNING, NOVEMBER 18,9:30 a.m.
Temple Beth El-Fread Sanctuary
EIGHTH ANNUAL MIDEAST CONFERENCE
Guest Speakers
THE HONORABLE MEIR ROSENNE
Ambassador of Israel to the U.S.
TOM DINE
Executive Director
American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC)
Sponsored by the Israel-Mideast Task Force
of the Community Relations Council of the
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County.
Jeanne Glasser


" I'agVi "The'Jewisii Flor'idian of Palm Beach County / Frklay, October^M984
Evangelical Church Offers Support
Continued from Page 1
friendship to us and we
warmly accept it. It is grati-
fying and fulfilling to see the
Jews and Christians united in
support of Israel but loyal to
their own traditions. We hope
that this beginning in one
church will spread to all the
Consul General of Israel,
Yehoshua 'I rigor, brings
greetings from the government
of Israel to the members of the
Calvary Temple.
-----------------Proclamation
Rev. David Ray Wilson reads
an apology to the Jews.
Be it known this day, in acknowledgement of the great
debt we as Christians owe to the Jewish people the world
over and through the love and support we wish to show
them, and in recognition of the Land of Israel as the
eternal and undivided possession and homeland of the
Jewish people as proclaimed by the God of Abraham,
Isaac and Jacob in His Holy Word.
We at Calvary Temple
PROCLAIM OUR SOLIDARITY
WITH THE JEWS
AS GOD'S ANCIENT CHOSEN PEOPLE
We realize that truly the time has come to favor Zion. Be
it known this day our lot is cast with Israel and her people
and we stand firm to never again be silent on behalf of the
"Apple of God's Eye."
We declare our love and our position with Israel to
bless, comfort and honor the eternal possession of God's
people and to stand in alignment and in covenant commit-
ment with the Jewish people worldwide.
To Israel With Love
in ihe past, we, like many "traditional Christians"
accepted false teachings concerning GOD'Scovenant
relationship with the Jews. We were wrong and ask
forgiveness for centuries of ignorance and arrogance.
AS COD has begun to place HIS SPIRIT within us
and allow us to touch HIS HEART, our eyes have
been opened to see and even experience the precious and
steadfast love GOD has for HIS beloved Israel.
We are undebted to you for our deep spiritual roots
and ackno wledge that our acceptance by the HOL Y ONE
of Israel is nothing less than a merciful gift. We are
blessed to be in the family of GOD.
Shalom
the
churches
County."
couraged
celebration
Participants in the program meet in Pastor William llnisky's
[left] study prior to the start of the ceremonies. They are [left to
right] Ann Lynn Lipton, Rabbi Alan Sherman, Dorothy
Apodaca and Rabbi Joel (ha/in.
Jewish floridian
o' Palm Beech County
Combining Our Voice and Federation Reporter
FPEOK ShOChET SUZANNE SmOCHET RONNi EPSTEIN
Ed vi(|P-s ine' Eiecutoe Editor News Coordinator
PuO"nedinieeiy October through Mid April B< Weeiy etunceot rear
Second Oass Pottage Paid at Boca Raton Fie USPS eOM030
PALM BEACH BOCA RATON OFFICE
336 N wv Spanish River Bivd Boca Raton Fit 13431 Ptione 30*2001
Mai- 0">ce 4 Plant '20 u 6ir St Miami Fi 33101 Pnone i 3734803
Postmeeter Return lorm UT lo Jewish FtorMUan P O ki 01 2*73 Miami. Fla 1)101
Adeniing Dilector Mad Leeser. Phone SM 'HI
Combined Jewish Appeal Jetumn Federation ol Palm Beach County, Inc. Officer* President
Myron j Nicuman. Vice President*. Peter Cummings Alec Engeistem Arnold Lampen. Barber)
Tanen tna Ainn Wnentky. Secretary. Or Elizabeth S Shuiman. Treasurer. Barry Berg Submit
material to Ronm Epstein Director of Public Relations. 501 South Fiagler Or West Palm Beacr
Fl 33401
a si- FiQ'id'en does not guarantee Kaenrutn or Merc andise Advertised
N RATES Local Area J4 Annual (2 ear Minimum |7 SO) or by membership Jewish
... iPa / .: "-Quest
Fridav October 19, 1984 23 TISHRI 5745
Vr.i,ime 10 Number33
in Palm Beach
Shertnan was en-
by .the evening's
and" felt it was a
very positive Step in improving
interfafth relations.
Since moving to this
community with its large
Jewish population, Unisky was
surprised at the few involve-
ments between the Christian
and Jewish communities.
During a recent trip to Israel,
he pondered about what his
church was doing to extend a
hand of fellowship to the Jews
in Palm Beach County. "As I
was praving. God spoke to my
heart and told me to do some-
thing. So 1 spoke with
Dorothy Apodaca, who
shared my feelings, and this
evening is the result," he said.
Mrs. Apodaca, chairman of
the Sukkot Feast, noted that
for the last three years Calvery
Temple has been holding their
own Feast of Tabernacles.
"We decided that since we
wantd to be educated about
the festival, what better way
than to make the event an
inter-faith occasion and learn
about Sukkot from the Jews."
During the year church mem-
bers meet regularly to pray for
the Jewish state. "We believe
that all people's destiny lies in
Israel. We have a great love
for her and the Jewish
people," Mrs. Apodaca said.
Ann Lynn Lipton, Jewish
education director of the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County, spoke about
the meaning and significance
of Rosh Hashanah, Yom
Kippur and Sukkot. As
Calvary Temple had con-
structed a sukkah on the stage
complete with fruits, veget-
ables and a palm frond roof,
she was able to point out the
various symbols as she talked
about them.
Rabbi Joel Chazin, spiritual
leader of Temple Emanu-El
and president of the Palm
Beach County Board of
Rabbis, gave the invocation
and later in the program called
out the notes as Rabbi
Sherman sounded the shofar.
Greetings from the govern-
ment of Israel were extended
by the Consul General of Isra
el for Miami and Puerto Rico.
Yehoshua Trigor pointed out
that Israel has had a difficult
time maintaining its existence.
"People who understand Isra-
el's mission must stand up and
speak so that Israel is not
alone. We appreciate people
like you who express solidarity
with Israel. We are a small
people and need your
strength," he said.
That feeling of oneness was
furthered by an evangelist
from the church who read an
apology to the Jews. The Rev.
David Ray Wilson asked for
forgiveness for centuries of
ignorance and arrogance of
accepting false teachings
about the Jews. He went on to
note the love God has for his
people Israel and expressed
indebtedness to Judaism for
Christianity's spiritual roots.
The director of the South
Florida Region of Bridges for
Peace told the audience that
this gathering was one that her
organization dreams of.
Lavonne Stiffler said, "You
people at Calvary are building
bridges to peace in Israel."
The organization is dedicated
to the building of sincere rela-
tionships between Christian
and Jewish communities,
while encouraging greater
concern for the people and
land of Israel. They sponsor
trips to Israel including the
one in which Pastor Unisky
participated.
Reactions to the outreach
effort on behalf of Calvary
Temple were positive among
many of the Jewish people
who attended. "When I heard
about the program I was con-
cerned about possible
proselytizing. However, after
attending I felt it was handled
quite nicely, we were made to
feel comfortable, and they
were quite genuine in their
efforts," commented Buddie
Brenner. Stuart ,
felt that anything
to try and undej
other is good,
break down fear]
and misundersta
said.
"A wonderful
how Toby Wilk cl
the evening, "it w|
if we keep this
reciprocate at
temples. They
gracious and
wonderful progra
with Israeli refrj
felafel, fruits and
impressed also
number of young
attended from
ties. There was a
siasm among all ol
C\ Radio/TV Highlights
MOSAIC Sunday, Oct. 21, 9 a.m. WPT\
5 with host Barbara Gordon A remote brJ
the Jewish Community Center's Camp Shalom.
* L'CHAYIM Sunday, Oct. 21, 7:30 a.m.
1340-AM with host Rabbi Mark S. Golub T||
Listener's Digest, a radio magazine. A heated]
debate between Democrat Howard Samuels]
undersecretary of Commerce in the John
ministration, and Michael Saperstein, former
President Nixon.
JEWISH MUSIC AND CULTURE HOUR
Oct. 21, 6 p.m. WHRS-FM Stereo 91 witH
Simon Silverman.
SHALOM Sunday, Oct. 21, 10 a.m.
Channel 12 (8:30 a.m. ON TV Channel 51) -I
Richard Peritz.
HERITAGE: CIVILIZATION AND THE
Monday, Oct. 21, 9 p.m. WPBT Channel 2 arl
Channel 42 THE SEARCH FOR DELIVER^
Focusing on the Jewish European experience, the
describes the flourishing Jewish communities if
and Western Europe and their interaction wit
tellectual, social, political and religious curr
surrounding culture the Renaissance, Reforr
Enlightenment.
Sponsored by the Jewish Federation o/Pflj
County.
Community Calendi
October 19
Simchat Torah Women's
"FressersII" 7 p.m.
American ORT -
October 21
UJA International Leadership Meeting in Soi
through Oct. 26 Morse Geriatric Center
Recognition Day 10 a.m. Jewish CommiJ
School 8th Annual BBQ Temple Israel Sister
a.m. Women's American ORT Wellington -[
sale 8 a.m. Temple Beth Sholom Men's Club
Congregation Aitz Chaim board 10 a.m.I
Beth El luncheon at Breakers honoring S
11:30 a.m.
October 22
B'nai B'rith Women Menorah board 10 a.ml
Family & Children's Service board 7:30 p.m.J
B'nai Jacob Sisterhood surprise luncheon
Hadassah Z'Hava board 10 a.m. Brandeis
Women Lake Worth Conference at
through Oct. 23 Jewish Federation Communitj
Council 11:30 a.m.
October 23
Jewish Federation Education Committee -
Congregation Anshei Sholom 1 p.m. Had
Vassill 12:30 p.m. Women's American OR f
Beach board 12:30 p.m. Hadassah Henrie
I p.m. B'nai B'rith Women Masada boar'
Temple Beth David Sisterhood paid up
social
me
October 24
Jewish Federation Public Relations Meeting -I
Jewish Federation Jewish Women's Assembly I
Meeting 10 a.m. Yiddish Culture Group ui
1 p.m. Pioner Women Ezrat membership w
Hadassah Shalom 12:30 p.m. National
Jewish Women Palm Beach luncheon
American Red Mogen David of Israel 1 p;m. J
- Chai luncheon-card party noon B nai
3196 board -7 p.m.
8:30
October 25
Jewish Federation Campaign Meeting
Hadassah Bat Gurion 10 a.m. Women s
ORT Haverhill noon Hadassah Ag
membership luncheon -12 noon Morse Oenaw
cocktail reception 5-7 p.m. Jewish i-eoei
paign Cabinet Meeting at Morse Geriatric
p.m. Hadassah Rishona paid up mi
Women's American ORT West Palm Beach -


Update
Friday, October 19,1984 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 5
By TOBY F. WILK
Sign outside a medical
office in Tel Aviv reads:
"Doctor For Women and
Other Diseases."
1.0. Farben, the West
German chemical company,
wants the largest Swiss bank,
^the Union Bank of Swit-
^ zerland, to return a deposit of
100 million Deutschmarks
which were frozen after the
end of World War II because
l.G. Farben had actively col-
laboratred with the Nazis. The
company operated a huge
slave-labor-staffed plant at
Auschwitz death camp and
produced Zyklon B for the gas
chambers.
In Budapest, the Lutheran
World Federation met for the
first time to discuss "The
Church and the Jewish
People." Continuation of the
dialogue with the Jews was
endorsed. Last year, the
declarabion by Lutheran
theologians rejected Luther's
violent attacks on Jews. They
declared with deep distress street goes "underground"for
all occasions for similar sin over 500 feet, and is now lined
in the present or the future with luxury stores,
must be removed from our
churches."
Readers Write
A Resurgence Of Patriotism
EDITOR,
The Jewish Floridian:
In recent months, during the
political conventions and the
Olympics, the media reported
a resurgence of patriotism
sweeping the country. From
this, we can infer that there
had been a lessening of
patriotism through the years.
We Jewish War Veterans of
the United States of America
never lost this patriotism. Our
love for America manifested
itself in every boatload of Jews
i-that landed on these shores.
Our forefathers came here to
escape from bigotry, racial
intolerance, religious persecu-
tion and economic depression.
They came here to seek the
freedoms our beloved Consti-
tution and Bill of Rights
provided. Becoming citizens,
learning the language and
assimilating as Americans
were cherished ideals. The
American Flag the Statue of
Liberty were precious symbols
of the new found freedoms.
Unfortunately, some of the
non-Jewish immigrants
brought with them a mental
disease called bigotry. Our
forefathers had to fight this
insidious disease along with
their struggles to establish
themselves as respected
citizens. Theirs was a hard-
won patriotism. It is a terrible
experience to know that you
love your country and to have
an anti-Semite question your
patriotism.
Jewish War Veterans of the
United States came into being
because of such horrible
charges. From the Civil War
on to today we have avowed
and proven our patriotism by
deeds and records. In our new
shrine, Jewish War Veterans,
U.S.A. National Memorial,
1811 R Street, N.W., Wash-
ington, D.C. 20009, there are
archives for all Americans to
see, snowing ample evidence
that our patriotism has never
wavered. Our charter granted
by both houses of Congress is
a testimonial to our
patriotism.
LEOC.FINKEL,
Commander
Golden Century Post No.SOl
Jewish War Veterans USA
The Simon Wiesenthal
Center sent a congratulatory
message to President Mit-
terrand of France, saluting his
courageous humanitarian
gesture on behalf of Andrei
Sakharov and the cause of
Soviet Jewry by directly
raising the matter with Pres-
ident Chernenko at a state
banquet in the Soviet Union.
Sakharov, Shcharansky and
all the Soviet refusniks
represent the voice of freedom
that will not be silenced. All
people who cherish human
rights should intensify their
efforts to support our Soviet
Jews. There cannot be geo-
graphical limits to the scope of
our conscience.
Tel Aviv University
scientists have developed a
new way of generating nuclear
energy for non-military
purposes. The new method
requires thorium, a fuel more
plentiful than uranium.
The Cardo is a newly ex-
cavated and restored Roman
street running through the
center of Jerusalem. It is
attracting massive interest
from visitors and Israelis. The
rrooa
Another good reason
you should attend services
at temple or synagogue
this weekend.
This message brought to you by:
D)
Memorial Chapel inc.-Funeral Directors
Project Interchange is a
Washington-based national
program which arranges
intensive seminars in Israel for
the coming generation of U.S.
opinion leaders and public
policy makers. Participants
are provided with first-hand
exposure to the social and
political realities of Israel.
U.S. Congressional aides and
Hispanic-American political
and civil leaders are parti-
cipating and have been speak-
ing and writing about their
experiences. Prominent
Hispanic-American leaders are
helping to develop a national
Hispanic-Jewish dialogue at a
time when Hispanics are
growing in influence and
about to become the largest
minority in the U.S. One
significant development was a
letter from the Congressional
Hispanic caucus to Spain's
Prime Minister urging Spain
to consider formal relations
with Israel.
A public garden has been
dedicated in Melbourne,
Australia, in honor of Raoul
Wallenberg, the Swedish
diplomat who saved 100,000
Jews from the Nazis.
RELAX
The following advert ap-
peared in the "Australian
Jewish News": "Massage
come and have an expert
kosher massage with Anna." I
hope Anna's under super-
vision.
A Jewish news and public
affairs program telecast by
National Jewish TV made its
premiere. It is the only Jewfch
TV news-report commentary
of its kind in the U.S. and is
produced by Americans for a
Safe Israel.
Qroward
QAPER a
?ackaging
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Schwartz Brothers Forest Park Chapel
and Jeffer Funeral Homes are now represented
by Riverside in South Florida.
That means we have joined through our association with Riverside Memorial
Chapels in honoring The GUARDIAN PLAN- insurance funded prearranged funeral
And through Riversides seven chapels located in Dade, Broward and Palm Beach
counties, we'll continue to provide caring and economical services between South
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Call Schwartz Brothers at 532-2099 (Miami-Ft. Lauderdale) or 832-6360
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Call Jeffer at 534-9517 (Miami-Ft Lauderdale) or 655^010 (Palm Beach)
Schwartz Brothers Forest Park Chapel and Jeffer Funeral Hones honor
The GUARDIAN PLAN. fitt.
insurance funded prearranged funeral program
through their association with Riverside Memorial Chapels.
Sewn chapels in Dade, Broward and Palm Beach counties. Serving the New York Metropolitan area.
^^^


D..
Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, October 19,1984
Organizations
in the News
ASSOCIATION OF PARENTS
OF AMERICAN ISRAELIS
The Association of Parents of American Israelis will
meet at 1 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 21 at the Royal Palm Club
House at the intersection of US 1 and NE 22nd Ave.,
Boynton Beach.
The topic of the day will include welcoming all members
after a hot and rainy summer, much to talk about, joining
hands in friendship, and bringing friends.
BNA1BRITH
The next meeting of Yachad Unit No. 5231 will be held
on Wednesday, Oct. 24, 7:30 p.m., at Temple Emeth, 5780
Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach. Ruth Turk, columnist,
authoress, lecturer and teacher will speak on "Jews of the
Diaspora."
HADASSAH
Chai will hold a Luncheon and Card Party on Wed-
nesday, Oct. 24, 12 noon, in the Poinciana Room of the
Challenger Country Club. A fashion show will be
presented by "Evelyn" of Lake Worth. Donation is $13 to
benefit the Hadassah Medical Organization.
Sunday, Nov. 18 2 p.m. Movie "Sam's Son" starring
Anne Jackson and Eli Wallach, Lake Cinema III Jog
and Lake Worth Rd. Donation is $4. For more in-
formation call Ruth Siege! or Miriam Unger.
Thursday, Jan. 10, 1985 Luncheon and Theatre, 12
noon, "Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dream-
coat." Royal Palm Dinner Theatre. Royal Palm Plaza,
Boca Raton.
The Golda Meir-Boynton Beach Chapter will hold their
general membership meeting on Thursday, Oct. 25, 12:30
p.m. at Congregation Beth Kodesh, 501 NE 26th Ave.,
Boynton Beach.
LaVone Stiffler, representative for Bridges of Peace in
Palm Beach County, will discuss her recent trips to Israel
and Greece where she met with the Jewish people.
The first fund raising project is a Gala Luncheon and
Card Party scheduled for Thursday, Nov. 8, 12 noon, at
Benson's. Donation is $8. For reservations, contact Ruth
Sorocki or Edna Bienstock.
The Lee Vassil Group will meet on Tuesday, Oct. 23,
12:30 p.m. at Temple Beth Sholom, 315 No. "A" St.,
Lake Worth.
A dramatization of the Hadassah Convention dealing
with "Human Rights and Women's Issues" will be
presented by Goldie Bernstein, Pauline Coler and Dr.
Anne Harris.
Dr. Simon Godfrey, chief of pediatrics at Hadassah
University Hospital, Mt. Scopus, will be the keynote
speaker at a seminar at the Royce Hotel on Oct. 29, I p.m.,
for the Florida Central Region of the Hadassah Medical
Organization.
On Nov. 14 the Lake Worth Chapter will hold its
Education Day at Temple Beth Sholom.
Tikvah Chapter will sponsor two upcoming trips in
November. A week at the Regency Spa will be Nov. 4-11.
Call Regina Parnes for more information. A Thanksgiving
Weekend, Nov. 22-23, will take place at the Glatt Kosher
Sea Gull Hotel. For information and reservations, contact
Laura London.
Yovel Chapterwill hold its board meeting on Oct. 25, at
the Chase Federal Bank (Cross County Mall) at 12:30 p.m.
The chapter will host a lunch and card party at the
Captain's Galley restaurant on Monday, Nov. 5. After
lunch there will be prizes and surprises. Seating is limited
so make reservations soon by calling Ruth Heyman, Sadie
Knieberg, or Bernice Fink.
JEWISH WAR VETERANS
The Ladies' Auxiliary will hold its regular meeting on
Monday, Oct. 29, 9:30 a.m., at the American Savings
Bank, West Gate of Century Village.
The guest speaker will be Jay Epstein, director of
development and public relations of the Joseph L. Morse
Geriatric Center. His topic will be 'Caring for the Aged: A
Communal Responsibility and the Morse Geriatric
Center.'
WOMEN'S AMERICAN ORT
The next regular meeting of Mid-Palm Chapterwill be
held on Monday, Oct. 22, at Temple Beth Shalom.
The program for the day will be a film entitled "No One
Is A Loser Here."
Future special events will be:
Oct. 29 to Nov. 1 Regency Spa at Bal Harbour
Nov. 10 Arts and Crafts at Twin City Mall
Nov. 17 and 18 Arts and Crafts at Cross County Mall
Nov. 24 Matinee "Joseph and the Amazing
Technicolor Dreamboat," Royal Palm Dinner Theater,
>25 per person. For further information call Lee Levineor
With the opening program on Oct. 23, the Yiddish
Culture Group will be embarking on its 15th year of
continuous programming.
Pianists Helen Bernstein and Dora Rosenbaum will
combine and play four hands on the piano after which
Helen will play some solos.
Violin virtuoso Harry Levine will play classical and
semi-classical numbers. He will be accompanied on the
piano by Dora Rosenbaum. If time permits, executive
board member Sam Klein will read a Yiddish piece.
The dedication of a name for the book department in
memory of Gabriel Rabinbach and David Sorowitz will
open the meeting.
The Oct. 30, 10 a.m., program of the Century Village
Group will open with a film entitled "Nothing But The
Best." This film is being shown under the auspices of
Women's American ORT. Esther Sugarman, educational
chairman of the North Palm Beach County Region, and
Selma Kunin, co-chairman, will speak about ORT.
Charles and Alice Kurland, known as The Rocking
Chair Melodears, will entertain.
Programs are on Tuesday and start at 10 a.m.
Admission is free.
CRC
county,
numerous
PBreS Continued from Page 2
But for the time being, it is
not operational."
Peres stressed that "the
problem is not so much the
nature of the plan but the
necessity for a serious partner.
Finding the partner must
precede agreeing about a
plan."
He said discussions were
held with the administration
on renewing the peace process
with Egypt and Jordan. "We
have not given up hope," he
said. He said he believed in an
American expression,
"quitters are not winners, and
winners are not quitters,"
adding that by winning, he
means "winning a durable
peace in the Middle East."
Peres said he "welcomes"
the meeting between King
Hussein of Jordan and
Egyptian President Hosni
Mubarak. He noted it broke
the Arab boycott against
Egypt after it signed a peace
treaty with Israel, even though
it still maintains peace with Is-
rael and Israel has an embassy
in Cairo.
Peres noted that in his talks
with the administration, he did
not voice any obejetions to
United States arms sales to
Egypt because Egypt is at
peace with Israel. "The
problem really is not arms but
policies," he explained.
"If any Arab country is at
peace with Israel then the
supply of arms is not the real
problem. But if you supply
arms to a country that
maintains a state of
belligerency with Israel, the
arms is then a support of
belligerency instead of being a
compensation for a peaceful
process," Peres maintained.
Continued from p,,,^
ticipated in a Youne i
Leaders Mission toftM
Barbra Kaplan, who u
served as co-chairman of H
Local Concerns Task ?n
has also been a memberifi
Community Planning Com
mittee of the Federti^S
sa^ President of the p?'
Beach County Councoft\
Parent Teacher Oreani, e
and developed ff H
successful senior hi s2
volunteer program* **
She served 0n
advisory COm
mittee. for the paim B County Schools. Mrs. Kap
.s a found.ng board memVe
of the Jewish Communi
Center and Temple Judea and
a member of ORT, National
Council of Jewish WomT
Hadassah and Brandeis Uni'
versity National Women's
Committee.
The Community Relations
Council with its three task
forces formulates policies and
social action to combat and
prevent anti-Semitism and
assists in promoting equitable
treatment and improving
racial-religious understanding.
The Council deals with local!
state and national issues af-
fecting rights, liberty and
dignity of the Jewish people all
over the world.
With G.Washington's*Seasoning
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Friday, October 19,1984 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 7
. -r-

VANTAGE
THE TASTE OF SUCCESS
Great Taste
with Low Tar.
That's Success!
Warning. The Surgeon General Has Determined
Thai Cigarette Smoking Is Dangerous to Your Health.


8fl*"w-.0.?im.nMiwa<.|

i


D.
" J'age 4 "The Jewish Floridiaa of Plm H** Cnnnt*/ FVWUv fW/J-r JO <"U
Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, October 19,1984
Simchat Torah in
Poetry
HAKKAFOT
SAUL TCHERNIHOVSKY
There's crowding in the house of prayer,
There's light and warmth a-glowing;
The house is filled with festive folk.
All pews and aisle o'erflowing.
The tumult's great and loud the noise.
Against old men are crowding boys.
They even swamp the east wall.
Both girls and women stand penned top,
Each chair and bench invading.
With turbans, kerchiefs of all sorts.
And Sabbath clothes parading .
"Come, cantor, start," a voice rings clear.
And soon, behold! some boys appear,
ludeans captivating.
The vanguard marches leisurely.
In rhythmic measure pacing.
Each youth with flag whose gilded up
An apple red is gracing.
They raise their flags, they raise them 'loft,
\ nd sister calls to brother soft,
And brother calls to sister.
The cantor starts. Behind him trail
Old men (their hands they're clapping),
With Torah Scrolls close in their arms,
Encased in embroidered wrapping,
On whose gilded crowns bright, manifold,
The tiny tinkling bells of gold
Are ringing and are jingling.
The cantor struts, the cantor chants.
The choir raise their voices;
The treasurer and deacon sing,
The merry crowd rejoices.
Tra, ra, ra, ra, and bim, bim, bom
Both young and old are frolicsome,
The rabbi's no exception.
The Torah bearers slowly tread
Through crowds exultant, thronging.
Who stop them, and kiss ardently
The Torah with great longing.
"God grant you life this coming year!"
"Peace be with you, abundant cheer!"
The maidens, too, are shouting.
The house is filled with light and warmth
And mirth and laughter's buoyance;
One talks, one sings, one shouts: "Please, hush!"
Each count'nance beams with joyance.
The cantor sings as he marches on:
"Hosanna, Savior, Holy One!"
With all the crowd responding.
Translated by Harry H. Fein
Reprinted from Gems Of Hebrew Verse (Boston:
Bruce Humphries, Inc., 1940).
nint.1
Simchat Torah. By Jossi Stern. Color lithograph. Contemporary.
Begin Leaves
Hospital
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Former Premier Menachem
Begin left Shaare Zedek
Hospital after a three-day stay
during which he underwent
surgery for a prostate con-
dition. He appeared to be in
good health though wan, and
in good spirits.
P%
MOVING &
STORAGE
State Moving
Licensed & Insured
West Palm Beach
659-2222
Boca
428-8144
Ft. Lauderdale
563-5680
Anti-Smoking
Campaign
W ASHINGTON (JTA)
A reception was held at the
Israel Embassy last week for
Dr. E\erett Koop, the U.S.
Surgeon General, who left for
Israel to discuss means of co-
operating with Israel's anti-
smoking campaign. Koop,
who was invited by the Minis-
try of Health, will also discuss
bilateral cooperation in the
field of public health.
Dr. Alfred Munzer, a
Washington lung specialist,
Aho is active in the American
Lung Association and who
helped coordinate the event,
said there is a very high inci-
dence of smoking in Israel.
But he noted that an anti-
smoking campaign has been
active there and Israel recently
passed one of the toughest
anti-smoking laws in the
world, banning smoking on
buses and in most public
places.
While Koop has visited Isra-
el before, this is his first of-
ficial visit and he is the first
Surgeon General to go to
Israel, according to Munzer.

m
Miles of white sand beaches, heated
swimming pool, live entertainmer
lounge, tennis and golf nearby, be
trips available for sightseeng, fist
ing and shelling. Children 18 and
under FREE in room with parents
Children's meals at menu prices
Write of Cell for
RESERVATIONS
Toll Free Florida Walt* Line
1 (800) 282-3588
VANDERBILTINNontheGULF
11000 Guif Shore Drive, North, fteptaa. FL 33K3
1
I
Offer expires January 31, 1965
Discount Applies To Hotel Room Only.
Coupon cannot be used with other discount package
PRESENT THIS COUPON
AT DESK AT CHECK IN
KOSHER HOTEL
PALM BEACH
FLORIDA AREA
FREE INFORMATION BOOKLET
AN EXCITING NEW "TRADITIONAL"
KOSHER HOTEL
"OVERLOOKING PALM BEACH
on the INTRACOASTAL WATERWAY"
YEARLY AND MONTHLY RATES -
FULL INFORMATION WILL BE SENT TO YOU
AT NO COST
AND NO OBLIGATION
Call person to person, collect;
MRS. GINSBERG____________
(305) 655-8800
Or Write
PALM BEACH RESIDENCE HOTEL
100 DATURA STREET AT FLAGLER DRIVE
WEST PALM BEACH, FLORIDA
33401
ACT NOW SPACE IS LIMITEI


Friday, October 19,1984 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 9
i
jorNews
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
Warehouse Gets New Look
nfStfhf Stiap.iro- Chairperson warehouse and is fully knowl-
ot the Jewiah fnmm,,-;.., .j___u- _< ..
Center's
ation is available
kignated area for
tears of age or over
use public trans-
,'e take people to
I centers, doctors'
[ hospitals, nursing
I visit spouses, to
lice agencies and
Inters. There is no
(service, but partic-
cncouraged to
their fair share.
I great demand for
so please make
lations in advance.
Irmation and-or
call 689-7703
rough Friday.
hKOSHER
1CONNECTION
tments combine to
lot Kosher Lunch
at the Jewish
Center a success.
[mong these is the
io form new and
^dships.
veekday, seniors
intimate talk,
discussions, game
fisure and song.
[ities are followed
[kosher, nutritious
with warmth and
J by our dedicated
iThere is no set fee,
I are asked to make
(on each meal.
>me and join us.
lation and reser-
lich must be made
call Carol or Lil-
17703 in West Palm
(DELIVERED
(EALS
who are home-
Ineed a Kosher meal
for information.
in West Palm
19-7703.
EACH COUNTY
EDUCATION
CLASSES
begin Oct. 23
Ihere are no fees for
tes or pre-regis-
contributions are
Call 689-7703 for a
le of these classes as
le JCC sponsored
liscussion groups.
>ugh Movement
|d Winter season is
|nd you will want to
fest at the poolside.
se and dance class
It you in shape both
Mid mentally. It will
M. The course in-
i-up exercises for
[feet and body, and
to make you feel
imove gracefully.
fencing is taught to
[express your own
Jazz and Disco
[s a little fun in the
k end of the class
sessions in which
lie on subjects that
|h the class and in-
ky Thursday 9:15-
[hallenger Country
Hall (Courtesy of
(Country Club)
Jt lessons for $15.
fs go to the Jewish
'Center.
he is given by our
^ance Therapist,
Pen, 964-1455. All
Come and be
>"gh Joy Through
TRIM-MIAMI
Mst minute cancella-
fw spaces are avail-
able. Call Sippie at 689-7703
for information and registra-
tion. Cost is $145 per person,
double occupancy, including
tax and gratuities or $160 for a
single.
LUNCH AND CARD
PARTY
The Second Tuesday Coun-
the Jewish Community edgeable of its operation. An
warehouse Com- invitation is extended to the
mittee, is happy to announce community to visit the ware-
the appointment of Mrs. Ruth house which is located at 3420
uoidman as the new Manager W. 45th St., Unit 8, West
oi "s one More Time" Palm Beach, on Mondays
warenouse. through Fridays from 10 a.m.
Mrs. Goldman has been a t0 4 P-n. to say "Hello" or
long time volunteer at the Just browse.
Donations, which are tax
deductible, of furniture, ap-
pliances, automobiles,
jewelry, drapes, bric-a-brac
and art are cheerfully ac-
cepted.
Please call the warehouse at
471-1077, or the Center at 689-
7700 to arrange for free
pickup.
Toddlers 12-18 months,
together with their parents,
have an opportunity to enjoy a
group experience especially
cil is sponsoring a luncheon aes|8nea\'or their age group
and card party at the Oriental n, .H5l(!?ys and Thursdays,
A Time For Play
tunity for the children and the
parents to enjoy such activities
as creative movement, art,
music, physical and dramatic
play under the expert guidance
of a specialized instructor.
Call Gail Kressal at 689-
7700 for registration.
Express Thursday, Nov. 8 at
noon. Cost is $6 per person,
transportation is an additional
$1.50 per person. Everyone is
welcome!! Call Sabina, 683-
0852 for reservations.
Annual Thanksgiving Tur-
key Raffle is being held by
Second Tuesday Council. For
tickets call Sabina at 683-0852.
9:30-10:30 a.m. at Camp
Shalom (Belvedere Rd., one
mile west of the Turnpike)
under the direction of the
Early Childhood Dept. of the
Jewish Community Center.
The children as well as the
parents share and socialize
with new friends. This Early
Play-Group offers the oppor-
Babes In Toyland
The Early Childhood Dept.
of the Jewish Community
Center's unique program for
toddlers ages 12-24 months
and their parents, entitled
"Potpourri," meets Tuesdays
and Thursdays from 10:30-
11:30 a.m.
The
parents
children
enjoy a
and their
variety of
creative activities together
such as music, cooking, art,
creative movement, physical
and dramatic play under the
supervision of a trained
leader.
Enrollment is limited. Call
Gail Kressal at 689-7700 for
registration.
D0LPHINMANIA
WINNERS!
DolphNvnania is easy to play and n pssary Justp> up a
lw OOLPHINMANIA COLLECTOR CARO M GAME TICKET at your
nearest participating Puohi soa'cn ott the pri/e Don squares on the qame
ticket and you could become an INSTANT WINNER1H you 0on I nn
instantly YOU CAN STILL WIN oy collecting the perforated pwces on the
game ticket and placing men- l tne matrn,ng picture and number spaces
on the collector c arc
$500 $1,000
Agnei La Port*
Boynton Beach
Anthony V. Foy
Lantana
Irma Barg
Ft Lauderdale
Michael J. Mullar
Ft Lauderdale
Thomas McNeilly
Miami Shores
Marietta Dhaveloose
Pompano Beach
Carol* Butch
Plantation
Doreen Hobble
Sunrise
Motek Szulezteyn
Pompano Batch
Edwin Green
Vero Beach
Gary Baar
Tamarac
Jaan Prialipp
Tequeaia
Mildred Moorer
Miami
Evelyn Brenner
Palm Beach
Ton! Weeton
Miami Shores
where shopping is o pleasure 7 days a week
Publix Bakeries open at 8:00 A.M.
Available at Pubix Stores with
Freeh Danish Bakeries Only.
Plain, Light
Cake
$998
Available at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Baked Freeh Daily
In Our Bakery
Pumpernickel
Bread
Available at PuMx Stores with
Freeh Danish Bakeries Only.
Delicious Paetry Fitted
with Bavarian Cream
Napleons
2J9*
Available at All Publix Stores
and Danish Bakeries.
Maple Walnut
Coffee Cake.................^h*149
Chocolate ift^siM
Mini Donuts................... *lz"
Dasckxts
Bsf^b^PF^w**"^ *St M 4*jsf*A
Rum Rings.....................**"
Available at PubNi Stores with Freeh
Danish Bakeries Only.
Fruit Bar Cookies.........dozen 99*
Prices Effective
Oct. 18th thru 24th. 1984.
Quantity
Right* R***rv*d
^


D~.
P;
Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Friday. October 19. 1984
Because Someone Cared
B> STEPHEN LEVITT
ACSW
A personal we* from
the Executive Director of
the Jewish Family
And Children 's Senice
iAll case names mentioned
n these articles are fictitious;
jlient information at Jewish
' rnily and Children's Ser\ice
held in the strictest con-
fidence/.
Recent reports coming from
the National Center for Health
Statistics continue to point out
the ever-present problems of
the large numbers of children
affected by divorce.
Final divorce statistics from
1981. the most recent fully
tabulated year available,
reveal that during that year
divorce increased for the 19th
consecutive year. The number
of divorces in 1981 as
1.213.000, rising from
1.189.000 in 1980. By way of
contrast, the number of
divorces in 1962. before these
most recent increases began,
was 413.000. By 19"2 the
number of divorces had
doubled to 845.000. It is
predicted that 1982 and IM3
ma> mark a levelling o\i for
the first time in 20 Nears or'the
if rate This is at-
tributed, in large part, to :he
Siephen Levitt
growing popularity of having
small families.
Another disturbing trend
shows that the rate of divorce
increases from the relatively
chilly climes of the northeast
as one progresses to the south-
west in California. Although 1
have no specific statistics for
Florida, other Sunbelt areas
are showing rates of almost "5
percent above the northeast, in
terms of the numbers of
divorces per thousand per
year.
The implications for
therapists who work with the
chilren of divorce are enor-
mous. The psychological
ramifications of a marital dis-
solution are still being re-
searched and debated.
Obviously, a poor attitude
toward marriage maj well be
an expectable by-product in
future generations of Amer-
icans and American Jews.
Disappointment, frustration
and resentment are difficult
enough to deal with in a secure
household as a child matures;
it mav well nigh be an impos-
sible task for some children
growing up in single parent
households. These data are
both sobering and useful in
helping us to become aware of
the enormity of the problem
we face today.
(The Jewish Family and
Children's Service of Palm
Beach County, Inc., is a non-
profit agency designed to meet
the social, emotional and
counseling needs of the Jewish
community of Palm Beach
Countv. Our office is located
at 2250 Palm Beach Lakes
Blvd., Suite 104. Our tele-
phone number is 684-1991.
The Jewish Family and
Children's Service is a bene-
fictarv agency of the Jeish
Federation of Palm Beach
County/.
"ira v\ idler, immediate past
president of Temple Beth Fl.
ill be honored at a
Testimonial Luncheon on
Snaday. Oct. 21. 11:30 a.m. at
tbe Breakers. W idler, in
addition to all the past presi-
dents of the congregation, will
be honored during Friday
evening sen kes at the Temple.
Oct. 19. 8:15 p.m. aid on
Satnrday morning. Oct. 20.
:30 a.m.
BUYING COLD & SILVER
Buying...
Scrap Cold
in anv form, any condition
Buying...
Coins-colds Silver
Collections & Accumulations
U.S. & Foreign
@ NORTH AMERICAN
RARE COINS.
x
2550 (HEECHOtS Ufl W PALI
684-1771
MOUtS ?JO ----fcOO bum.
O"- 1 1 i
Candle Lighting rime
Fri. Oct. 196:30 pi
Religious Directory
CONGREGATION ANSHEI SHOLOM 5346 Grov.
West Palm Beach 33409. PHooe 684-3212 RabbiT
Vander Walde. Cantor Mordecai Spektor Daily 8V)
and 7:30 p.m. Friday: 8:30 a.m.. 5 p.m and a late mill
8:15 p.m.. followed by Oneg Shabbat. Saturday 8-tt!J
7:30 p.m.. Mincha followed by Sholoah Suedos.
CONGREGATION BETH KODESH OF
BEACH: 501 N.E. 26 Avenue. Boynton Beach 33435*'
586-9428. Rabbi Avrom L. Draah. Monday g 30 ,
Thursday 8:30 a.m. Sabbath services. Friday 8:15
Saturday 9 a.m.
GOLDEN LAKES TEMPLE: 1470 Goiden Lakes Bh
West Palm Beach 33411. Phone 689-9430 Rabbi J0
Speiser Daily Services 8:15 am. and 5:30 p.m.
services Friday 8:15 p.m. Saturday 9 am.. 5 p m, Min
followed by Sholosh Suedos.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID: 4657 Hood Road. Palm
Gardens 33410. Phone 694-2350. Rabbi William Ma
Cantor Earl J. Backoff Sabbath services. Friday g ng
Saturday 10 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 2815 No Flagler Dr.. West
Beach 33407 Phone S33-0339. Rabbi Howard J Hii
Cantor i >hapiro. Sabbath service? Fridaj IS p.t
> 9:30 am Daily Minyan 8:15 am Sunday
. Holidays 9 am.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM \ \ jfaWf
Rabbi Ema: _- Ca
-day and Tl
a.m.
rEMPLE BETH SHOLOM enn G. &
Sabbath services Friday -'none!
TEMPLE BETH ZION: Lions Club. 700 Cameua Dr.. Royj
Palm Beach Mailing Address POBox 104. 650 Roval Pal
BhndU Royal Palm Beach. FL 33411 Sabbath Services Fr
p.m.. Saturday 6:45 a.m Rabbi Nathan Zekzer Phone
9122
TEMPLE BN.AI JACOB: 2177 So Congress An West K
Beach 33406 Phone 433-5967 Rabbi Dr Moms Silben
Sabbath services. Friday 6 p.m.. Saturday and Hobdays 9a.i
Mondav and Thursday 9 a.m.
TEMPLE EMANU EL 190 North Comty Road. Pahn Bead
3348C Phone 832-0004. Rabbi Jod Charm. Cantor Davij
Dardashti Sabbath services. Friday 8:30p.m.: Saturday9i
THE TREASURE COAST JEWISH CENTER -
-aham. 3257 S E Salerno Road. Port Salerno.
Abraham Rose. 1-2*7-8833 Services Friday e\ enmgs 8 p.m.
LAKE WORTH JEWISH CENTER >. Lukes In
Methodast ChaaM .Huo Road. Lake Worth Phone'
. -* 9 Friday night sendees S: 15 p m. Saturday. 9 a.m.
Orthodox
CONGREGATION AITZ CHAIM Century Village. WJ
Pa.rr. Beach Phone 6*9-4675 Sabbath servws 9 am antt|
pm Da_> service- 15 am and 6:30 p.m
Reform
CONGREGATION BETH ISRAEL: 1592 Fkoraatt. P.O.
857146 Port St- Lucae. FL 33452 Friday mght semnwf
Saturday moraang 10:30 a-m Phone 465-0977
THE REFORM TEMPLE OP JUPITER -TW^
juptter High School Mibtary Tiafl. Jup**r Mai**'
Phua 222. US No 1. Teqnwta 33458 Phone 4 -> "
Alfred L Fnedman- Sarnm Fnday 8 p*
TEMPLE BETH EL: 4600 Oleander Avenue. FortPkn*.!
BM Iffaana *r ~<_* Cantor Anne Najajnaa:
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM: St Hekas *"* ^
Avenue and Victory Blvd.. Veto BeaehSZSW;. "
address. P.O. Box 2113. Vert, Beach. FL 3J96MIU-
Stephen Adams. Phone 1 5994180.
TEMPLE BETH TORAH at S- Darid s *
Reuaac Foraat Hal Brrd and *'*
aach M-*-g addxnat PO Box i-0.
FL 33416 Fnday acmcaa M
roo
TEMPLE ISRAEL: 1901 Na Flagler Dr Wnt
-:-v,- Phone 833-8421. Rabbt Howard Sh
Soaxat Susan Wets* Sabbath serroea. Fnday 8 p av
TEMPLE JUDEA: at St Catherme s Graak Ortaachwl
Socanl Hall 4000 Waahaagton Rd-. at Soathert
Rabbi Joai L Levme Cantor Ana* Nearaam Maatn
S154 OtaaahuUa Bfcd. West Pahn Baeea. FL SS4*
52
EpaasocMl B
Watt Pahn
Phonr


Friday, October 19,1984 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 11
iagogue News
TEMPLE BETH EL
SISTERHOOD
lv Sisterhood is hosting the
21 Branch board
Son Thursday Oct. 25,
Boa.m., at the temple.
I Marsha Pollack, Florida
Cheast president, and Gail
K ''orida Sou,hcas,i
Eh Fund chairperson will
l the guest speakers at the
lotah Fund workshop at 10
In Lunch will be served at
Inoon. Donation is $5.
[The 1 Pm- orientation
Irkshop will include social
Ln, programs, Jewish
ting,'publicity, etc.__________
A film "The New Library"
of the United Synagogues of
America Theological Semi-
nary will also be shown.
Members and guests invited.
For further information call
833-0339.
TEMPLE ISRAEL
For the past several years, in
the tradition of Sukkot, the
temple as a congregation has
taken the message of Sukkot
and translated it into action. It
is the only synagogue that
participates in the Food
Pantry Program of CROSS
an interfaith outreach project
of the Methodist church. That
program provides food to
those who are in need. There
are several locations in the
county where people who
require a supplementary and
temporary infusion of food
can go and seek assistance.
Transients, the elderly, and
families not yet receiving wel-
fare are the recipients. These
recipients are qualified needy
by Health and Rehabilitative
Service. Temple Israel takes
care of the Food Pantry needs
for the months of October and
April (the months in which
Sukkot and Pesach fall).
Temple members have been
asked to bring canned foods or
boxed goods such as baby
foods, canned juices, fruits,
vegetables, rice and macaroni.
smple Israel Adult Education Programs
__ I in till r^_ _:...- _< i_i_
On Wednesday evenings,
ginning Oct. 24, two courses
. be offered from 7-8:15
[in. at Temple Israel.
JThe courses are "Hebrew
kr Beginners," taught by
Horns Friedman; and "Com-
uter Literacy," taught by
pavid Draluck. "Hebrew for
ginners" is designed to give
he student the tools to read to
Hebrew of the synagogue
rrvice in an easy and relaxed
iy. Friedman has developed
special and unique way to
ach Hebrew and feels "no
(it is too young or too old to
am how to read the most an-
ient of Jewish languages."
"Computer Literacy" is
signed to give the student an
nderstanding and hands-on
erience of the newest of
Inguages the language of
rcomputer.
The cost for "Hebrew for
winners" will be the cost of
ke books; the cost for "Com-
Wer Literacy" is a $25 regis-
lation fee. For more informa-
pn concerning these courses
pd for advanced registration,
T the temple office.
|A new format for Sunday
forning Adult Education
ries has been announced.
tinning on Sunday, Oct. 21,
l Series will be held on a
pee a month basis, generally
the first Sunday of every
Jonth. The theme for the year
The World Surrounding,
p the discussions and pre-
pations will pivot on the
[oblems and challenges of the
^es in which we live. The
^nations will begin on
Kt| of the Sundays with a
cture-discussion at 10 am.
P a gala brunch to follow.
F wst of the brunch is $3
'Person.
|Hading off this new Series
Deaths
mm
hifmL Sir*,,0fd K ,43' c*n,ur*
QJ"M Palm Bcacti. Riverside
W Chpei, west Palm Beech.
OONtR
C 2L*.^ c#n,ur
''* Plm Beach.
l,CH*NSOMN
HtaVLiS Poftct L* St.,
*iih1 !ch R|wHt Guardian
w,lome, wt Palm Beach.
*w.rB.G.r"n Fu~r-
ITT
S!l*i|!l:lAc.R0idW..UI
H^T"1* Memorial Chap*!
" ^ner.i Home. West Palm

" C".pei. west P.im Beach.
is Helen Hoffman, chairper-
son for the Community Rela-
tions Council of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County. Ms. Hoffman is on
the faculty of the Graduate
School of Public Administra-
tion in the College of Business
at Florida Atlantic University.
She is a graduate of Columbia
School of Law and the Former
Assistant Dean of Rutgers
School of Law in Newark,
N.J. Ms. Hoffman's topic for
the morning will be "The
Jewish Stake in the Presiden-
tial Election." As the former
president of the American
Jewish Committee of Palm
Beach County and a member
of NACRAC, Ms. Hoffman is
eminently qualified for this
presentation. Because of the
timely nature of this topic, this
first Adult Education Brunch
will be held in conjunction
with the regularly scheduled
Sisterhood meeting.
Jean Cohen, adult educa-
tion chairperson for the
temple, has extended an in-
vitation to all interested mem-
bers of the community to at-
tend. Reservations are a must
and may be made by calling
Temple Israel.
The painting, "The Menorah," by artist Irving Shapiro was
presented to Congregation Anshei Sholom in memory of Joseph
Molat at a testimonial tribute to him recently. Pictured [left to
right] are Dora Goldman, Esther Molat (wife of Jopseh],
Harold Kliman and Maynard Kliman, the family of Joseph
Molat. Sol Ganeles, vice president of Congregation Anshei
Sholom, and Victor Duke co-chaired the tribute.
THE LAW FIRM OF
LEWIS, VEQOSEN AND ROSENBACH, P.A.
251 Royal Palm Way
Palm Beach, Florida 33480
669-3300
Takes pleasure in announcing that
EDWARD Q. FITZGERALD, JR.
has become a Shareholder in the Firm
and
JAMES E. JACOBY and BRIAN L BROWNE
have become associated as Attorneys
with the Firm
LAWRENCE M.ABRAMSON
BRIAN BROWNE
EDWARD Q. FITZGERALD, JR.
JAMES E. JACOBY
STEVEN 0. MARCUS
ALFRED 0.MORICI
DEAN J. ROSENBACH
DEAN VEQOSEN
SUSAN WILLIAMS
as well as detergents and
personal hygiene products
each time they come to the
temple during the month of
October. Non-members are
invited to participate also.
LAKE WORTH
JEWISH CENTER
The temple invites the
community to participate in
the Mitzvah of a Siyum
Ha'Torah, a dedication and
presentation of a Sefer Torah
by Jack and Birdie Gould to
the temple on Sunday, Nov. 4.
The procession and presen-
tation will begin at 1:30 p.m.
followed by the concluding
ceremony at 4:30 p.m. The
event will be held at the Poin-
ciana Challenger Club, Poin-
ciana Drive, Lake Worth.
Lynn Ehrlich, director of
Women's Division of the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County, will be guest
speaker at the Lake Worth
Jewish Center services on Fri-
day, Oct. 19.
Her subject will be "The
Changing Role of Women in
Jewish Communal Life."
TEMPLE JUDEA
Susan Domb and Helaine
Kahn will observe their Adult
Bat Mitzvah ceremonies at
services Friday, Oct. 19 at 8
p.m. Rabbi Joel Levine and
Cantor Anne Newman will
officiate.
Susan and Helaine will be
the first adults of Temple
Judea to observe their Bat
Mitzvah ceremonies on the
pulpit of the congregation.
They have studied with Rabbi
Levine as students in the Adult
Bar-Bat Mitzvah class. Susan
will be twinned with Arkady
Semenovich Ainvarg, an
engineer who is married and
lives in Kiev. His visa applica-
tion to leave the Soviet Union
was refused because the
government claimed he had
access to secrets. Helaine will
be twinned with Lev Raizin, a
technician, who is married and
lives- in Orgeev, Borglavana.
He has a son and a brother in
Israel. His visa application
was refused for reasons
unknown. Twinning certif-
icates will be presented to
Susan and Helaine by Douglas
H. Kleiner, Temple Judea
Social Action chairperson.
Both Susan and Helaine
have been active in all aspects
of Temple Judea since its
founding three years ago.
Susan has served as an officer
of the Sisterhood. Helaine is
presently secretary of the
Board of Trustees and will be
teaching Adult Beginning
Hebrew this fall.
The congregation is invited
to the oneg shabbat sponsored
by the Domb and Kahn
families. The Junior Oneg will
also be part of the evening.
Temple Judea's Adult Bar-
Bat Mitzvah Class is held
every Monday evening except
the first Monday of the month
from 8-9:30 p.m. at the temple
office, 5154 Okeechobee
Blvd., Suite 2B. Classes for
new Adult Bar-Bat Mitzvah
students will begin on Nov. 12
Beginning Hebrew classes for
adults begin Tuesday, Nov. 13
at the temple office from 7:30-
9 p.m.
Sisterhood
The paid-up membership
supper meeting for the Sister-
hood will be held on Monday,
Oct. 22, 6 p.m., at the North
County Senior Citizen
Building.
The program will be an
original skit, written and di-
rected by Fran Golden. Penny
Beers will do the narration.
The skit, entitled "Sing a Song
to Sisterhood," stresses the
importance of Sisterhood to
the temple.
Participants include the
rainbow singers, Edith Gru-
shaw, Evelyn Gats, Virginia
Crane, Dora Richards,
Dorothy Shuken and May
Pitkin.
MEMORIAL CHAPELS
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in the finest of Jewish tradition.
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Jack Weiss
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to home full-time or part-time.
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627-2277


D..
1 S rr*i

Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, October 19,1984
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