The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian the voice of the Jewish community of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Running title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Physical Description:
4 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 8, no. 41 (Dec. 24, 1982)-v. 11, no. 26 (Aug. 30, 1985).
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44606415
lccn - sn 00229548
ocm44606415
System ID:
AA00014310:00076

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)


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Full Text
IKE OF
LlTY OF
htACrt
Jewish floridian
VOLUME 10 NUMBER 32
PALM BEACH, FLORIDA FRIDAY, OCTOBER 12,1965
mn.rilfit.lii
TS
lited Jewish Appeal
m

*P;
i
r
Poised For Campaign '85
social gap and providing equal educational op-
' all youngsters in Israel is a major concern of
i Appeal programs.
The United Jewish Appeal-
Community Campaign '85,
comes at a time of crisis for
Jews in many lands.
Here in the U.S. many Jews
suffer from a third year of
reduced federal and state sub-
sidies for human support
programs. Many heads of
households have lost their jobs
and have met unemployment's
grim companions: financial
strain, psychological distress,
family pressures. Many elderly
Jews have inadequate health
care, no recreation and painful
isolation. Promising
youngsters cannot finance
their own education or obtain
tuition aid elsewhere. Working
mothers have come to depend
on child care centers to help
them support their families
and, in thousands of cases,
have become their family's
sole support.
Campaign '85 will be geared
in large part to help these Jews
and will be conducted by 200
federations and 430 other local
Jewish community campaigns
in cooperation with the
national support UJA
provides.
Elsewhere, in lands of
distress, Jews continue to
struggle to survive and
survive as Jews. The gates of
freedom have virtually been
closed to Soviet Jews seeking
to emigrate, and those denied
permission to leave have fallen
on harder times because of
their love of Israel and
freedom. Jews in Moslem
countries worry every day how
their country's policies toward
Israel will be visited on them
and many of them, too, can
not emigrate. And in remnant
communities of aging Jews in
Rumania, Poland, Czechos-
lovakia and Hungary, Jews
look to Jews abroad for such
basic help as cash relief, food,
clothing, even cut lumber for
their stoves during cruel
winters.
Jews in more than 30
countries are helped by the
American Jewish Joint Distri-
bution Committee, which
receives nearly all its $43
million in income from the
UJA-community campaign.
Most UJA-community aid is
provided in Israel, especially
through the Jewish Agency, a
major instrument for the
miracles people think of when
Continued on Page 6
About United Jewish Appeal
"The history of the United Jewish Appeal is one of
unprecedented success in the annals of American
philanthropy, both in the amount of funds raised and in
the scope of voluntary activism it has been able to in-
spire."
This is Professor Abraham J. Karp, the prominent
historian, looking back on over 40 years of UJA.
The UJA was created in 1939 from the American Jewish
Joint Distribution Committee (JDC), United Palestine
Appeal and National Coordinating Committee for Aid to
Refugees as a direct response to the growing plight of
European Jewry, especially after Kristallnacht in Germany
Continued on Page 6
Shamir-Gromyko Meeting 'Remarkably Free of Polemics'
IAKRABI
- UTA) -
between Israel's
er and Foreign
tot
lout
m
I Jews who
ppression
kkot.See
igeTo
Faith
'synagogue
P*plores Juda-
I in today's
97
Closed
fN* Jewish
'Plm Beach
?closed on
11, Friday,
%. Oct. 18
ct 19 in
'theholi.
Hand
at
Minister Yitzhak Shamir and
Soviet Foreign Minister
Andrei Gromyko last week
was described as "remarkably
free of polemics" by a spokes-
person for the Israel Mission
to the United Nations. Shamir
himself described the 90-
minute meeting at the Soviet
Mission to the UN as "very
good, a very long discussion."
The meeting Tuesday
night, Sept. 25, which was
requested by Israel, was the
second meeting between
Shamir and Gromyko, who
met at the UN General
Assembly three years ago, and
the first high-level contact
between Israel and the Soviet
Union since then. Shamir and
Gromyko are in New York for
the 39th session of the
Assembly.
THERE HAS been no
official reaction in Israel to the
Shamir-Gromyko meeting.
But Premier Shimon Peres, in
presenting his unity gover-
nment to the Knesset on Sept.
13, urged Moscow to re-
establish diplomatic relations
with Israel. He said those ties
were "severed at a time of
anger" during the 1967 Six-
Day War.
According to Judith
Dranger, a spokeswoman for
the Israel Mission to the UN,
Shamir raised with Gromyko
the issue of Soviet Jewry and
asked that the Soviet
Continued on Page 4
'Mosaic' Opens New Season
United Way Featured On First Program
The new 1984-85 season of
"Mosaic," a TV program
sponsored and produced by the
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County in cooperation with
WPTV-Channel 5, will begin on
Sunday, Oct. 14 at 9 a.m. The
United Way of Palm Beach
County will be featured with host
Barbara Gordon. The Jewish
Federation is a beneficiary agency
of the United Way as are 46 other
organizations in the county.
Featured on the first part of the
program will be Douglas G.
Johansen, executive director of
the Chamber of Commerce of the
Palm Beaches and 1984 United
Way general campaign chairman,
and Larraine White, president of
her own hospitality consultant
service. They will discuss with
Mrs. Gordon United Ways
volunteer network that is instru-
United vyby
of Palm Beach County
mental in raising funds to serve
over 250.000 people m Palm
Beach County. United Way
reaches one in ever three people in
the community and has an-
nounced that its goal this year will
be to raise $2.7 million .
Appearing on the second
segment of the program will be
Barry S. Berg, CPA with Ernst
and Whinney, treasurer of the
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County and a member of the
budget and allocations committee
for United Way, and Joan D.
Bonifazi, chairperson of the
budget and allocations committee
for United Way. They will discuss
the allocation process and the
recent needs assessment survey
that was sent to 250 service
agencies in the area to determine
what services are priority. This
periodic survey is scheduled to be
completed by the end of
December.
Continued on Page 8


' '
Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, October 12,1984
I------
Women's
i
Division
Board
i
Orientation
%*
^
Women's Division of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County recently held an orientation for its board members.
Brenda Shapiro, community consultant from Miami and former
executive director of the American Jewish Committee for the
State of Florida, gave a condensed course on how one achieves a
Master of Board Activity (MBA). Women's Division's vice
presidents addressed the group about plans for the upcoming
year. Norman Schimelman, executive director of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach County, spoke about the increasingly
important role of Women's Division within the Federation
structure.
1
The principal speakers at the Women's DivL.
Orientation were (left to right] Adele Simon, WD aH
president; Sheila Engelstein, WD president; Brendi
community consultant from Miami; Norman Schin.
executive director of the Jewish Federation of Pii^l
County; and Barbara Goldberg, chairperson of the dj
pictured is Mollie Fitterman, leadership developing
president who was out of town, but was instrutne
overseeing the planning of the meeting.
Meeting With Shultz Centers On Gromyko
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA)
Foreign Minister Yitzhak
Shamir of Israel, emerging
from an hour-long meeting
with Secretary of State George
Shultz, said that Israel is inter-
ested in withdrawing from
Lebanon "as soon as pos-
sible" and as soon as satis-
factory security measures are
established. He said that the
issue of Lebanon was one of
several topics he and Shultz
discussed at their meeting at
the United Nations Plaza
Hotel.
Another issue he discussed
with Shultz, Shamir said, con-
cerned Israel's economic
situation and the recent
measures taken by the Israeli
government to improve the
country's economic condition.
The Shamir-Shultz meeting
lasted 60 minutes, 20 of which
the two diplomats spent alone.
They were joined for the
remainder by top aides.
According to Shamir's
spokesman, Avi Pazner, the
meeting was largely in
preparation for the talks that
were held in Washington
between Israeli Premier
Shimon Peres, Shamir and
Administration officials.
Pazner said Shultz opened
the meeting with Shamir by
thanking Israel for the con-
dolences it extended to the
U.S. after the terrorist attack
on the U.S. Embassy annex in
east Beirut last month and its
offers of medical assistance
for the injured. Shultz said
Israel was the only country to
offer such assistance.
SHULTZ ALSO expressed
great interest in the meeting
between Shamir and Soviet
Foreign Minister Andrei
Gromyko at the United
Nations. Shamir told Shultz
that Gromyko wanted to con-
vince Israel to join in an in-
ternational conference for
. peace in the Middle East.
He informed Shultz that he
had replied that Israel favors
only direct peace negotiations
with its neighbors. Shultz said
the U.S. is also opposed to an
international conference.
According to Pazner,
Israel's economic problems
were discussed in general
terms. He said details of this
matter and the issue of Israel's
request for further economic
assistance from the U.S. were
discussed at the meetings in
Washington.
Meanwhile, the spokesman
said Shamir met with
Richard Murphy, Assist-
ant Secretary of State for Near
Eastern and South Asian
Affairs, to hear his report of
his recent meetings in
Damascus and Beirut.
Another topic discussed by
Shamir and Shultz was
strategic cooperation between
Israel and the U.S. Pazner said
he could not elaborate.
In response to a question l>
the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency, Shamir said the
Reagan plan for Mideast
peace, which President
Reagan told the UN General
Assembly last week that the
U.S. was still committed, to.
was not discussed withSI
Shamir also met wii
Secretary General Javiei
De Cuellar and will
foreign ministers]
Singapore, Philippines,]
and Venezuela.
Don't miss out on this exciting opportunity to acknowledge your impact as a
Jewish woman facing the issues of today. Seating is limited, choice of workshop is
on a first come, first serve basis.
Jewish and Female-
Adrawledge your Impact!
0
MfW WOMEN'S DIVISION
of the
JEWISH FEDERATION OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
proudly invites you ro rhe
SIXTH ANNUAL JEWISH WOMEN'S ASSEMBLY
HYATT PALM BEACHES
Sunday. October 2fl. 1964
9:45 AM 230 PM
LUNCHEON AND KEYNOTE ADDRESS
BELLA ADZUG
"WOMEN: A MAJOR POLITICAL FORCE IN 1964
SESSIONS (choice of one)
"ISRAEU MOTHERS: SOLDIERS OF SACRIFICE"
Doro Rorh
"THE POWER OF THE JEWISH VOICE"
Leslie L Levy
9:45 AM Registration
1030 AM Sessions
$22 00 Registration Fee includes
Morning Coffee G Luncheon
Dietary Lows Observed
REGISTRATION FORM
301 S. rktgtm Orfce Su 305
VrP04m0aocr..aXM01
Nome___
(pleoiepnnf)
Address
Low
ft*
(*<
Telephone_________________________________
Orgonizorion____________________ond Chapter.
Member of Business ond Professional Women D Yes
Seotmg Preference-------------------,----------------
Enclosed is my non-refundable check for %
($22.00 Per Person) payable to:
JEWISH FEDERATION OF PALM DEACH COuW
FOR THE
JEWISH WOMEN'S ASSEMBLY
Sunday. October 28. 184
Sessions have limited seating capociry My preference
D "ISRAEU MOTHERS: SOLDIERS Of SACNFKl
Doro Roth
D "THE POWER OF THE JEWISH vOrCE'
Leslie L Levy
REGISTRATION CLOSED ON FRIDAY OCTOBER 0.
SPACE LIMITED
CHILDCARE WILL BE AVAILABLE AT A NOMINAL
Yes I would like childcore for.----------------.chilcKren). oo?


Friday, October 12,1984 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 3
Sukkot Observances Under Oppression
, mpn,hers of the Palm Beach Jewish community take the op-
iSfvto celebrate Sukkot by ''breaking bread'' in their own or
f. lD\e"s sukkah, it is a time to also reflect on those who have
a e/this commandment under adverse conditions. Following are
S:'oto of how Jews observed the festival of Sukkot in other times,
I, other lands.
SUKKOT IN THE
HASSAG LABOR CAMP
Only a few people from the
Chenstochovcr ghetto
remained in the Hassag labor
camp (also known as the
slaughterhouse) that Sukkot.
The inmates, however, under
the noses of their guards,
stacked lumber against the
corner of a building to make it
appear as if it were being
stored there. Above the
sukkah walls, branches were
placed helter skelter to make
the roof appear as unobs-
trusive as possible. As the
Jews furtively entered and
exited the booth with their
crusts of bread, their thoughts
were of sukkahs that one day
would be built in freedom.
SUKKOT IN THE
WARSAW GHETTO
Octobers, 1939
Eve of Simchat Torah, 5700
The holiday is not
celebrated now as fear of Nazi
oppression is rampant. Each
da> brings more horrors than
the one preceding it. During
Shemini Atzeret (the eighth
day of Sukkot), 150 men were
taken from the synagogue as
they were saying morning
prayers and were herded into a
truck to be sent to labor
camps.
October 25, 1940
End of Sukkot, 5701
The courageous residents
celebrated Sukkot, not with
visible signs of the holiday,
but with an inner rejoicing.
Quiet, organized prayer
groups would say the blessing
over the wine. The Hasidim,
as was their custom, danced
and sang on Mila Street until
they were reminded that safe-
guarding their lives was also a
biblical commandment. Some,
in their ecstasy, continued
their celebration defying the
Nazi oppressors.
SUKKOTIN THE
SOVIET UNION
Soviet authorities arc espe-
cially uneasy about Jews cel-
ebrating Sukkot. The four
species palm frond, citron,
myrtle and willow remind
Jews of forbidden places
arousing these feelings in their
hearts. The lulav and etrog are
guarded in many communities
by the rabbi. No matter how
weathered and battered, they
re shaken proudly during
services.
in a small sukkah in Baku,
capital of Azerbaijan, a
precious bottle of "Carmel
Oriental" wine from the Holy
Land was somehow obtained
by the community's learned
leader. Wanting the two
hundred worshippers to have a
taste of this tiny bottle of wine
from Jerusalem for the
Kiddush, the elder of the
congregation poured a drop of
the Israeli wine into everyone's
cup of ordinary wine so that
the blessing could be con-
secrated.
Germany Flooded With Nazi Films
[BONN- Video cassettes of
Rwanda films made during
'Nazi era are flooding the
FBiOerman market. But the
formes say little can be
K about it because the
retailing the material
Pbonly for the purpose
scientific research."
Sukkot. By Reuven Rubin. 1926. Oil on canvas.
The police are trying to
trace the individuals or orga-
nizations responsible for the
cassettes, so far without suc-
cess. One police official said
the films contain subtle misin-
formation about Jews and, in
his opinion, are more
dangerous than direct anti-
Semitic propaganda.
May y0u Be Inscribed In The Book Of Lite
May Your Prayer For "Next Year In Jerusalem"
Become A Reality
Volunteers For Israel
Proudly Presents
New Three Week Program Beginning
November 1
TOTAL COST: $25 Registration Fee
Plus $478 Airfare via El Al
Round Trip From JFK Airport, N. Y.
Student Rate: $25 Fee Plus $423
five of Yourself to work in the Israel Defense Force
B help the State of Israel.
0*tAiatMft. 8322120.
Don't Forget
A Sukkot
Celebration
FOR
JEWISH
SINGLE PARENTS
AND THEIR
FAMILIES
Sunday, October 14,
1-3 pjn.
at the
Jewish Community
Day School
5801 Parker Avenue
West Palm Beach
Sponsored by the
Palm Beach County
Board of Rabbis and the
Single Parent Task Force
of the
Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County.
HOLD THE DATES
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18,1984, a.m.
Mideast Conference
Guest Speakers
The Honorable Meir Rosenne,
Israeli Ambassador to the U.S.
Tom Dine,
Executive Director
American Israel Public Affairs Committee
(AIPAC)

SUNDAY, JANUARY 27,1985,7:30 p.m.
Community Plea For
Soviet Jewry
Guest Speaker
Lynn Singer,
Past President Union of Councils
For Soviet Jews

JANUARY 16-17,1985
Catholic/ Jewish Dialogue
Community Wide Conference

All events are sponsored by the Community
Relations Council of the Jewish Federation
of Palm Beach County.


Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, October 12,1984
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Women Given Promise
A delegation of women from Jewish
organizations recently visited Washington
for a meeting with President Reagan at the
White House. They were promised that the
United States will oppose forcefully any
attempt to politicize and sidetrack the 1985
United Nations Conference, the third and
final conference in the UN Decade of
Women scheduled for Nairobi, Kenya, next
year.
The delegation was assured that the U.S.
will not stand idly by and permit the
conference to become a replica of the
previous Copenhagen or Mexico City.
meetings. It was at these meetings that
forums were created for anti-Jewish and
anti-Zionist pronouncements. Particulary,
it was at the conference in Mexico City
where the resolution equating Zionism with
racism was first formulated and approved
by delegates.
It was not, of course, until the General
Assembly approved the Mexico City
resolution that it gained international
notoriety and condemned forever the
United Nations as a corrupt. anti-Israel
world body successfully eliminating itself
from the pursuit for justice in the Middle
East conflict.
We think that a note of optimism is
needed in any discussion of the United
Nations and its host of conferences. Just
last summer, at a UN-sponsored meeting
on world population, delegates adopted a
resolution condemning Israel s settlement
policies on the West Bank, as if the one
thing had anythig to do with the other. The
UN has become a farce, but hope should be
held out that the Nairobi meeting will set
aside politics and stress the need to address
problems facing women throughout the
world.
Optimism or no optimism, it was to
clarify the position of the U.S. in Nairobi in
the event that optimism alone does not do
the trick that the women's delegation
visited President Reagan. And it is heart-
warming to recall that the President, as he
has stated repeatedly in the past, assured
the delegation that if Israel is forced to
leave the meeting, the U.S. will absolutely
reconsider its relationship to the world
body as a whole.
We hope the delegations worst fears
have been appeased. Still, it must be
remembered that, gearing up for the
Nairobi meeting, there was a recent
gathering of Jewish women in Paris at
which time participants literally resorted to
fisticuffs as they "debated a "worst case"
scenario in Nairobi in 1985.
What next?
Leo Mindlin
Too Much Self-Esteem Avoids the Issui
U.S. Given Documentation On Tiso
Government Collaboration With Nazis
B> DAVID rRIl DMW
U WilNGTON (JTM
An album documenting the
collaboration of the war-time
Tiso government in Czechos-
lovakia with the Nazis was
turned o^er to the United
States government Fnda>.
Martin Zapletal. of
Woodside. NY., a J.
Holocaust survivor from
Slovakia, presented the album
U Marc Palmer. Deputv \-
te for
European and Canadian
.monv ai the
State Department.
Palmer in turn gave the
album to Rabbi Sevmour
Siegel. executive director of
the U.S. Holocaust Memorial
Council, to be placed in the
Holocaust Memorial Museum
being planned for
\v ashington.
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--
Friday. October 12. 1984
Volume 10
16 TISHRI 5745
Number 32
ED CAPUTO is the poor
feUow-prindpal of Key Largo
ElemenUry School deep down
South Florida way who organized
separate religious instruction
classes for Catholic, Protestant
and Jewish students on the basis
that the Reagan Administra-
tion's equal access law gave him
the power to do so.
The American Jewish
Congress promptly jumped into
the breach. followed t>y the
American Civil Liberties Union,
to instruct Caputo and the
parents of children enrolled in
classes there, all of whom pur-
portedly adore him, that the
equal access law granted him no
such powers.
FIRST OF all. they told him.
the law applies to secondary
schools only Then, the law
restricts student-initiated
requests for meeting rooms to
a/rer-school exclusively not
during school hours taken away
from "enrichment" classes in
subjects such as art and music,
which is what Caputo's program
ordained-
Finally, even in the secondary
schools, where the law applies,
the meetings must be both vol-
untary and student-initiated, and
school employees and their
"agents.'' either administrative
or faculty or any other variety,
are expressly forbidden from
offering their services or. in fact,
their children to participate in the
meetings. "Agents" is inter-
preted to mean the parents them-
selves.
There are other aspects of the
equal access law which Caputo
has purportedly violated. What
makes it all seem so especially
bad is that Caputo is a born-
again Christian with a zealous
need to sermonize, and those with
a memory for the old separate but
equal doctrine in race discrimina-
tion will not now be far behind in
applying he doctrine to the
debilitating effect of non-
compliance on those children who
may be absent from attendance
at religious instruction classes.
SO. good for Mr. Caputo now
that he is in a peck of trouble,
right? Not so far as I am con-
cerned The issue is not that he
attempted, unwisely and admit-
edly ill-informed, to act as an
agent of President Reagan's mis-
placed fundamentalism.
That is not the issue because
Mr Reagan s fundamentalism is
more political than it is religious.
In the year of the Jerry Falwells.
the President has acted like any
other opportunist in playing
footsie with them
Mr Caputo's case is altogether
different In the 13-page speech
he delivered to the PTA of Key-
Largo Elementary School, where
he announced his religious
classes program and asked
members for their support.
Caputo declared that Our
schools are in moral decay.'' Asa
teacher, not of children but of
adults in a modern community
college state institution. I must
agree with him that this is so.
MR CAPUTO said The
forces of evil have shaken our
culture to its very foundations,
have bombarded us with lies and
deceptions that have paved the
way for the usurpation of our
children's minds."
To explain these lies, these
deceptions, these usurpations.
Mr. Caputo lectured the PTA
about the nation's drug problems
and about the decadence and
dangers of"immoral" television.
In my own classes. I see the
adult basketcase victims of both
these phenomena, when it is
almost too late to help repair the
damage so many of them have
suffered if not precisely in Mr.
Caputo's terms, which are too
prophetic for my taste
Nevertheless. Mr. Caputo
feared for the children in his
school befor* the unalterable
effect of American civilization
upon them. And so he tried, as he
understood the law, to ward off
as best he knew how, the dreadful
impact on them of ugly violence,
cress materialism and paralytic
hedonism before it was too late.
I CAN, with the beat of Mr.
Caputo's critics, charge that his
attempt to deal with these
dangers is in violation of the
separation of church and state
principle. I, too, can invoke the
anguish and anxiety brought on
in my heart by unbridled
Christian preachment that still
does not know its own Jewish
roots or acknowledge the debt
Christianity can never repay to
Judaism for its own blighted
existence.
But the basketcases in my
classes are mute testimony to
Mr. Caputo's genuine fears,
whether he expresses these fears
in mv terms or in his. To his
documentation of the nation's im-
morality, 1 can add illiteracy, a
growing absence of basic human
civility resulting from a process
of public education that is a sheer
joke and, in fact, an enveloping
pall of profound ignorance
tempered only by such informa-
tion in the form of "enter-
tainment" and ego-journal ism as
television and the Evening News
are likely to give.
What Mr. Caputo did not say,
but I am sure he knows it, and
perhaps thought it best not to
say so. is that these terrible
qualities in the American people
are the product of our failed
homes.
IT IS in the failed home that
parents do not communicate with
their children. It is in the failed
home where reading and genuine
conversation in a recognizable
language, not Sylvester
Stallonese, are rarely encouraged.
Ii is in the failed home that
materialism is exalted as a virtue.
It is in the failed home where
television is a surrogate for the
growing vacuum of parental
responsibility. It is in the failed
home from which daily come
youngsters to school, not for
education, but for baby-sitting
and. later, as a proving-ground
for me-centered experiments in
hedonistic self-destruction.
Surely, these are the stuff of
Mr. Caputo's nightmares, and at
least he tried something, any-
thing to put off the "suicide of
the soul, as one of his school
cafeteria posters put it. for the
little people in his charge.
IF THE parents of these little
people didn't object to Mr.
Caputo s poster as his private
definition of atheism, perhaps it
is because they had none better of
their own to advance or because
it would take thought and talk
and parental effort to suggest
something better. Or to challenge
Mr Caputo's right to deal with s
philosophical question in such
frankly personal, theological
terms.
Was Mr. Caputo wrong to offer
his program at Key Largo Ele-
mentary School? Yes, legally,
and for very good reason, as
history never ceases to teach us.
But he was not wrong in his fears
and. as an educator, not in his
assessment of the nation.
If the nation wants no more
such efforts in the name of equal
access that are contrary to the
law. then it must become civilized
again and parental into the dif-
ficult bargain. It must recapture
the spirit and the culture of the
country, which are now in the
hands of its uncivilized and
uneducated children who have
usurped them and debased them
and to whose crass taste and
crude ambition television and the
other media nevertheless pander
in our time as the tummum
bonum
The nation must civilize and
educate its children, or it may
well be destroyed by the
materialistic forces that
dehumanize them instead the
drugs and the television, among
other things. Mr Caputo told his
PTA about in order to justify his
action.
Jo do all of these th
nation must be -ble u7$A
Caputo and other school J
cipala like him what their d!
are-and.not to transcend i
For this, it must I*7m*uL
Ul the more cmtrtforW,
So long as Americans m*
Mr Caputo to the surrogiul
of baby-sitter, none of the*?
things will ever occur,
when a Mr. Caputo, wh
Key Largo or in Chicago
along to make them occur J
own way.
YES, Mr. Caputo was i
but he is a desperate man, i
one brief moment he b
parental to fill the ob
breach. 1 understand his dea
entirely. If Americans, like!
PTA at Key Largo Elem
School, prefer Mr. Cam
alternative, then fundament)
preachment is bound to be
the way of the land, the law<
land notwithstanding.
But if Americans are quid
reject his alternative on m
legal grounds then let them]
off their duffs and start ac
like proper parents, as painfi
their own inadequacies they U
come to enjoy as that may]
Simnlv being self-righb
about Mr. Caputo s fundam
ism while doing nothing _
his genuine concerns is no wi
deal with the problem her '
Shamir-Cromy.
Meeting
Continued from Page 1
government "let all those JJ
who wish to do so to movr
Israel."
Gromyko told Shamir.
the Soviet Union had alre
permitted many Jews to It
for Israel, the spokeswon
reported. Despite the abse
of diplomatic ties between
two countries, Jews haveb
leaving the USSR since IS
But the emigration of Jj
from the Soviet Union I
declined to a mere tricklej
the last two years.
GROMYKO reported
raised the issue of an inter)
tional peace conference onl
Middle East with the p!
ticipation of Israel, the Aj
countires, the Palestinians,*
United State- and the Soi
I nion. Shamir replied that!
rael favors dirc^i negotiant
as a wav to rea^h a solutionj
the Mideast, noting ij
negotiations have proved tol
more effective than cf
ferences in dealings bet*
Israel and the Arab county
In a televiMon mtervM
later Shamir said he explaiB
to Gromyko '.hat an J
national conlerence at j
time" will no. be use-
-because we prefer o
negotiations wi*
countries in the Midea
by one and we see the on
o bnng about such soj'.
is by the Camp V*u0
cords." ,i
He added that Israel*]
not have diploma reW'
with the Soviet inion.
therefore "we are no.
pleased b> this idea,
international conff
Sham.r said that *J
Gromyko that in JJ
of diplomatic ties I*" 1
not even d.scu>* the proP
diplomatic nes ^
Jordan and fc. )P' f ,
said h is ^,0 ocessl
Camp David P'


\f\ Radio /TV Highlights $f
Ciir -Sunday, Oct. 14,9 a.m. WPTV Channel
l,M0Sh host Barbara Gordon The United Way is
"Ured on this first program of the new season.
ruiYlM -Sunday, Oct. 14, 7:30 a.m. WPBR
l,lCAHw with host Rabbi Mark S. Golub The Jewish
Biff's Digest, a radio magazine.
iqh MUSIC AND CULTURE HOUR Sunday,
: /Vm WHRS-FM Stereo 91 with host Dr.
14, o p."'-
nnnSilverman.
TuaiOM Sunday, Oct. 14, 10 a.m. WPEC
el 12 (8:30 a.m. ON TV Channel 51) with host
KdPcritz.
luPRlTACb CIVILIZATION AND THE JEWS -
Lc rRLClBI E OF EUROPE Monday, Oct. 15, 9
r WPBT Channel 2 and WHRS-TV Channel 42 -
?nlution of Jewish life in the turbulent Middle Ages is
kJiS from the nourishing of "Sephardic" Jewish
imrfin Muslim Spain to the deteriorating circumstances
fFurooean Jewish life that begins with the first crusade
kiflMand culminates in the expulsion of the Jews from
iesiern Europe in the 14th and 15th centuries.
, Sp0nsored by the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
lowty.
Community Calendar
ttober 12
kkot
^Community Center Second Annual Dinner-Dance
[tHyatt Hotel.
Egation Anshei Sholom Men's Club meeting 9:30
[m.and dance-collation 6 p.m.
|55 Cypress Lakes board 9:30 *-*%*"
wish Congress 12:30 p.m. Hadassah Lee Vassill -
pinch -card party Jewish Federation Womenis Division
tttcutive Committee 6 p.m. and Board of Directors
n Jewish Federation Community Relations Council
MM Jewry Committee Meeting 1:30 p.m. Women s
American ORT Palm Beach.
ctober 16 m
wish Federation Leadership Development Committee-B
,.. Congregation Anshei Sholom Sisterhood 12:30
fm. Pioneer Women Cypress Lakes 12:30 p.m.
Women's American ORT Boynton Beach 12:301 p.m.
Itmple Israel board 8 p.m. B'nai B'rith No. 3041 8
in. Women's American ORT Wellington 7:45 p.m.
B'nai B'rith Women Chai 7:30 p.m. Jewish Federation
uecutiveCommittee 7:30 p.m.
?ctober 17
t.-dish Culture Group Cresthaven 1 p.m. Jewisn
Federation Community Relations Council 12 noon
Worse Geriatric Center board 4:30 p.m. Pioneer
*omen Ezrat board -9:30 a.m. Women's American
RT Golden Rivers 12:30 p.m. Hadassah Chai -
wn Brandeis University Women Lake Worth board -
'0a.m.
oberlS
*emini Atzereth
o Israelis Killed, One
Soldier Wounded
In South Lebanon
MUGHORGEL
S A,VIV ~ ^raehs a soldier and a
of the Shin Beth
security services -
*!ed, and another
, *as bounded when
P came under fire
n ambush on the
'sector of the Lebanon
lW,r dea,hs brought
Kyu0llsincethcwar
"utr,o597dead
KO00 injured.
j' ^jdent occurred near
*TT on thc ean
nfhe Bekaa valley
ttn Sohmo r in {he
mi MWeek s massacre
'o'diers, members of
the South Lebanon Army
(SLA), and the village of
Rashaya where the Druze
soldiers killed by Shnte
Moslems earlier in the day had
lived.
The three Israelis are
believed to have been taking
part in investigations into
events and organizations in the
area. In all, two Israelis were
killed and 10 others wounded
in seven incidents in southern
Lebanon yesterday. In addi-
tion, six terrorists were killed
and two captured.
There were no casualties in
two incidents of light arms fire
against IDF and SLA patrols
Sunday near Jezzine and in the
center of Tyre.
Friday, October 12,1964 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 5
Peres Criticizes Husseins
Rejection of Israel's
Call For Peace Talks
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Premier Shimon Peres res-
ponded swiftly and sharply to
a speech by King Hussein to
the Jordanian parliament
rejecting Israeli peace over-
tures as "maneuver" and
"deception" and vowing that
Jordan would not forego a
single grain of soil in Arab
lands occupied by Israel.
"All who reject peace will
eventually have to pay the
price for their rejection,"
Peres declared in a statement
issued shortly after the Jor-
danian King spoke in Amman
where Parliament reopened
after its summer recess. He
stressed, however, that Israel
would "continue to believe in
peace and strive for peace"
despite Hussein's negative
statements.
PERES HAS invited
Hussein several times to enter
into peace talks with Israel
without preconditions.
Jordan's decision last week to
resume full diplomatic ties
with Egypt, broken when
Israel and Egypt signed their
peace treaty in 1979, was
widely viewed here as a pos-
sible prelude to Jordan joining
the peace process.
But those hopes seemed to
be dashed by Hussein's attack
on Israel and the United
States. He accused the latter of
contributing to Israel's obs-
tinacy by procrastination and
hesitation, and its reversal of
an earlier decision to sell
Jordan modern weaponry.
Peres declared that contrary
to Hussein's charge, Israel's
proposed peace talks with all
of its neighbors are "not a
tactical ruse" because peace is
a real and urgent need for all
Mideast nations.
REFERRING TO Hussein's
assertion that Jordan would
not give up "one grain of our
soil" on the West Bank, "not
a stone in our mosques,
churches and holy places,"
Peres said it was "inconceiv-
able" that Jordan's conditions
for peace talks are that all of
its demands be accepted
before the talks begin.
Peres reminded Hussein
that Jordan was the aggressor
in 1567 "out of the mistaken
assumption that it could force
'Israel'into defeat." He ob-
served that there are "no
prizes for mistakes and no
compensation for aggression.
Peace is not an act of charity.
Either both sides need it or it
cannot be attained."
There was disappointment
in some government circles
here over the harsh, un-
compromising tenor of
Hussein's speech, particularly
after Israel's new unity
government offered peace
talks without preconditions.
Only Sunday, Peres expressed
"hope" that the renewed ties
between Jordan and Egypt
"will contribute toward the
renewal of the peace process."
BUT SOME observers
seemed relieved that Hussein's
adamancy has ended, at least
for the time being, a con-
frontation between the Labor
and Likud components of the
unity government over the
framework of peace talks with
Jordan. Likud insists they
must be based exclusively on
the Camp David accords; the
Labor position is that negotia-
tions with Jordan need not
necessarily be limited by Camp
David.
"The GUARDIAN PLAN, program is
also an expression of lover
-Jerry Bynder
Yahrzeit is one of tin- most meaningful traditions to
lews Yahrzeit also reminds us of the realities of life. It
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Now Riverside sponsors a unique program of fam-
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""^utSof alljust as Yahrzeit is a symbol of our love
f family the Gl ARD1AN PLAN program is an expression of
ur concern that the people we worry about have less to
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Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, October 12,1984
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UJA
Continued from Page 1
they think of Israel's develop-
ment since 1948.
The Jewish Agency has been
at the cutting edge of Israel's
economic and social develop-
ment, but it is hard-pressed
financially and, more than in
recent years, new miracles will
depend importantly on
contributions from diaspora
Jews. It has just begun its
fiscal year with a $400 million
budget, bare bones for the
challenges it confronts.
The Jewish Agency is a
building in'Jerusalem but it is
really in the fabric of Israeli
life. It is in absorption centers,
preparing bold yet frightened
immigrants to better realize
their dream in their own land.
More than 1.8 million men,
women and children have
passed through Jewish Agency
absorption centers, including
18,000 last year alone, receiv-
ing food, clothing, shelter, job
training, Hebrew language
instruction and encourage-
ment. But the Agency needs
funds to meet the early needs
of the immigrants of 1985.
The Agency is out on
kibbutzim and moshavim,
those models of freedom and
independence that have
brought deserts to flower after
thousands of years of little but
shifting sands. The Agency
installs irrigation networks,
constructs storehouses and
hothouses, maintains fruit
orchards, plants trees, buys
farm tools, equipment and
livestock all to help farmers
and their families and to help
Israel achieve self-sufficiency
in food production in an
uncertain world. All this takes
millions, which must come too
from diaspora Jews, especially
How Many
Women Pilots?
The exact number of women
pilots is an issue that is still up
in the air, so to speak, but
overall statistics indicate that
the number is growing. The
United States Department of
Labor's 1983 figure, based on
a population sample of
60,000, shows 1,000 women
employed in private com-
mercial aviation. National
United States census of
population figures are similar,
showing 1,016 women pilots
and navigators in 1980, a
figure that reflects a 10 percent
increase over the 1970 figure
of 920.
Statistics supplied by the
Ninety Nines, an international
women pilot's organization
based in Oklahoma City, are
more specific. They say 800
women currently hold an air
transport license, the license
necessary to fly commercial
carriers. Nationwide, the
Ninety Nines estimate that
there are 45,000 women who
participate in some aspect of
aviation, from training as
student pilots to flying hang
gliders.
In the military, congres-
sional legislation still limits
women to flying non-combat
missions such as transport or
reconnaissance. In 1977, the
first year it accepted women
for pilot's training, the Air
Force Academy graduated 10
women pilots. Today, there
are 247 women in the Air
Force with flying status and 54
women are in training.
About The United Jewish Appeal
Continued from P,g,i
in 1938 when synagogues were burned and scores of Jews
were beaten and killed.
The UJA immediately became the central American
Jewish fundraising organization for the relief and
rehabilitation of Jews in Europe, immigration and set-
tlement in Palestine and Jewish refugee aid in the United
States.
Over the years, the UJA has contributed to the rescue,
rehabilitation and resettlement of more than three million
Jews, more than 1.8 million of them in Israel.
As Karp points out in his book To Give Life (Schocken
Books, New York, 1981), "The UJA has played a major
role in shaping the modern Jewish community m America
as well as in reconstructing Jewish life in post-Holocaust
Europe and sustaining Israel ."
The instrument for this aid is the series of annual UJA-
community campaigns. The campaign is a fundraising
partnership of the UJA and U.S. Jewish communities
630 in all, including 200 with federations.
The UJA provides national support for the campaign,
helps represent overseas Jewish needs and serves as a
central link between American Jewry and the rest of the
world Jewish family.
Federations represent and help meet Jewish needs,
provide local coordination and services, promote
leadership development and, perhaps most important, like
UJA they are supervised ultimately by volunteers
dedicated to their service, philosophy and objectives. The
UJA and local communities work together, in hundreds of
ongoing relationships, to help Jews at home and around
the world.
through the UJA-community
campaign in the United States.
The Agency is in Youth
Aliyah residences, helping
distressed teenagers to cope
emotionally, socially and
vocationally with contem-
porary life. It is on the tuition
lines at universities, in the
form of the check in the hand
of intellectually able but
financially needy students. It
is in the homes of immigrants
of years ago who are among
the minority still requiring
social welfare aid.
And the Agency is in scores
of Project Renewal neigh-
borhoods, staffing community
centers, day care centers,
centers for the elderly, job
training programs, providing
the social Renewal to help
neighborhood residents and to
improve social unity among all
the people of Israel.
The equivalent of 16 percent
of all human welfare spending
by the people of Israel comes
from the Jewish Agency,
which in turn is financed
primarily by UJA-community
campaigns.
These are thoughts in the
minds of American Jewish
leaders from across the U.S.,
as they try to think through
how to help every Jew under-
stand "kol yisroel arevim zeh
bezeh" all Jews are respon-
sible one for the other.
For information on how
Not since Noah's time has
something so tiny made it so big.
It's Tetley's tiny little tea leaves They've been making it btg in
Jewish homes (or years Tetley knows thai just as tiny lamb
chops and tiny peas are the most flavorful the same is true lor
tea leaves. That's why for rich, refreshing tea. Tetley bags
are packed with tiny little tea leaves Because tiny is tastier1
TETLEY
BAGS
K Certified Kosher
TETLEY. TEA "ita i* um*m>
Over the years, the UJA-community campaigns h
raised more than $6 billion, including $572 million in1
1983 campaign a record for a peacetime campaign yej
Communities allocate funds to the UJA, retainina
rest for health, education, social welfare, emplovme
assistance and other purposes.
Most funds allocated to UJA are applied in isriJ
through the Jewish Agency, which itself has been in
forefront of meeting Jewish needs for decades Th
Agency continues to help build Israel, mainly throw
UJA funds, in these areas:
e immigration and absorption;
e development of settlements within Israel's pre-19fj|
borders;
e education, especially higher education assistance id
promising students in need;
e Youth Aliyah residences for troubled teenagers;
social welfare aid to immigrants of years agowhoarj
in need.
The Agency also helps administer Project Renewal, J
comprehensive partnership of diaspora and Israeli Jews J
improve conditions and the quality of life in Israel']
distressed neighborhoods. The UJA helps provide fo
Project Renewal by raising funds in addition to the reguli
UJA-community campaign.
The other main UJA beneficiary organization is th
JDC, now in its 70th year helping Jews in Israel; remna
communities in Eastern Europe; Western Europe, An
lands, and elsewhere in Asia, Africa and Latin America.
you can become involved in
the 1985 Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County-United
Jewish Appeal cam pa
contact the Federation
832-2120.
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Friday, October 12,1984 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
rappling With Modernity
Page 7
in raging debates on 'Who is a
Jew* rather than on 'What is a
Jew.* Perhaps we should turn
to another question now,
rabbis. For him, the problem namely'Why is a Jew?' "
Gottschalk
..LISABILLIG
w YORK (JTAJ -A
outcry of one individual
against injustice but a plea for
S* Wsu?vival is all transmuted to "Is it good for freedom must be sacrificed f cir"c"umst'a"nces"are also eroding
^Sised by 150 rabbis the human race?" This
"?/, from the Unit- transmutation is imperative,
,nada. Israel and Meyer said, if Judaism "is not
to forget the message for
which it was chosen."
HE WARNED that "any
society that gives up on the
due process of law is doomed
to become a jungle, no matter
whether it speaks in the name
of 'American democracy,' of during the High Holy Days, ready to debate openly "and
'theTorah,' or whatever." He Some rabbis said they did not fearlessly those issues which
expressed concern about the want to inject religion into affect our common destiny,"
politics, but other rabbis said such
nee
llor
i was i
, Council of America s
.nual High Holy Days
x for Jewish lcade.r"
id at the Lincoln
tSynagogue-
ne of the gathering was
,o Our Faith:
in Judaism Responds
_ Evaluations
"Assessments." Rabbi
Michelman, executive
"president of the Syn-
Council, said the
was just the
"of a year of soul-
jg" meant to "comfort
isuirbed and disturb the
bic,'* with con-
ons between the Council
religious and lay
.'across the country.
iTHREE branches were
nted by the key rab-
speakers: Dr. Gerson
(Conservative),
of the Jewish
cal Seminary of
Dr. Alfred Gott-
j (Reform), president of
Hebrew Union College
i Institute of Religion in
k; and Dr. Emanuel
ban (Orthodox), presi-
[ofBar Ilan University in
hiGan. Israel.
each speaker
ached the topic of
nity through the filter of
licular affiliation, the
lems that persistently
centered around two
d interrelated issues.
is the rapidly
hing population of
an and world Jewry: in
U.S. the number of Jews
ined from 3.5 percent of
population to 2.7
at in one generation; and
i America the number
>s dwindled from
in 1959 to 480,000
ily. with only 75,000 of
"losses" attributed to
8 aliya, according to
alters. The second
is the religious and
Pal "polarization" of
t-da> Judaism, as Rack-
dit.
p ISSUES were
pt into sharp focus by
Marshall Meyer, who
W the Latin American
F'al Seminary in
P and served as its
Kf 25 years, and who is
/* president of the
I of Judaism in Los
* ho was guest
FJSyihe conference,
wwipassioned plea for
Argentina's fledgling
under President
"i by releasing the
K squeeze on its debts
,Un'led States and
vivid de^ription
tortures and/brutal
5 commuted^rbr years
"J'Ury jUIUas dlring
/hile the world
'.!" .He said these
c Political" only on
the sake of the group, for the powerful influence that
un,ty- Israel has had in sustaining
A NUMBER of speakers and ""'ting American Jews"
discussed the issue of church- wno today feel "a certain dis-
state separation in the U.S., an illusion... emotional fa-
issue which has dominated the l'8ue disaffection."
Presidential campaign. They He said he felt that Israel
questioned whether the mix of and American Jewry might
politics and religion should be well be "better served if
among the topics for sermons American Jews were more
w. who
was an out-
dlf,,he Argentine
>J ing the years of the
W ,uand who was
f1*0.,he Commission
,, ""appearance of
MfoL ecembcr Portly
i*22 was dected-
f huiVement in th
iff rights and
tbaTS01" not
m of n anguish
danger of "terror engulfing
the world."
His "diagnosis of life in Is-
rael and the diaspora today" is
that they are in a state "as
serious as in the year 70 CE,"
when the Second Temple in
Jerusalem was destroyed by
the conquering Romans.
A sub-issue of the
"polarization" of con-
temporary Judaism that
disturbed Meyer as well as
many other speakers at the
conference was, as Meyer put
it, the "theocratic threat of an
Israeli state where I and others
are not considered rabbis"
because they are Conservative
or Reform.
Even Rackman, who is
Orthodox, said he realized it
would be desirable for
"status" to be found in Israel
for Conservative and Reform
as "Israel's religious
it was unavoidable this year. establishment's refusal to give
Rabbi Joseph Glaser, recognition to Conservative
executive vice president of the and Rcform Judiasm."
Central Conference of Jews in the diaspora
American Rabbis, the "cannot go on living their
association of American Jewishness vicariously
Reform rabbis, who was through Israel, especially if the
chairman of the conference, in Israeli government at any
his summary of the themes of given time, through its legal
the meeting, referred to the apparatus, declares diaspora
"unhealthy and unholy mix of forms of Judaism as being
church and state," and said, illegitimate, alien, and
"We are in times of great therefore not to be
peril."
Rabbi Mordecai Waxman,
president of the Synagogue
Council of America, which
represents the rabbinical and
congregational agencies of
Reform, Conservative and
Orthodox Judaism, said that
"polarization did not exist in
the past to the extent it does
today." He said, "We engage
recognized,"
declared.
HE ALSO severely
criticized "Judaism frozen in
its shtetl garb" imbued with
"mindless traditionalism"
which can offer "a
momentary nostalgic high but
cannot answer the questions of
our young people today."
Dealing with the
diminishing number of Jews
around the world due, ac-
cording to some of the
speakers, to apathy and inter-
marriage, the tide could be
stemmed by encouraging
larger families. Gottschalk
said there is "a clear moral
imperative to rebuild and
reconstitute the Jewish
people's numerical strength.
Over a million and a half
Jewish children had their lives
cut off in the Holocaust .
Generations need to be raised
and nurtured in their
memory."
Waxman said that one
reason for the decline of the
number of Jews is that
Judaism today is a political
and social but not a "spiritual
community." At present, he
added, "People's need for
spiritual answers is not being
effectively met by Judaism."
Wishing all our friends a healthy
and happy New Year
Rhonda, Phil, Shona
and Karli Paston
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1- t
Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, October 12,1984
Organizations
in the News
AMERICAN JEWISH CONGRESS
On Monday, Oct. 15, 12:30 p.m., the first meeting of
the season will be held at the American Savings Bank.
Speaker Phil Sokol will address "Century Village Our
Town 1984." Its problems and some solutions will be
discussed.
The
B'NAIB'RITH
Haifa Lodge meeting will be held on Sunday
evening, Oct. 28, 7 p.m. at Congregation Beth Kodesh, 501
NE 26 Ave., Boynton Beach.
The program will include induction of new members,
Award of Honor to former Mayor Joe DeLong, and a
social evening with music.
A symposium on local and national events will open the
fall season of the Lt. Col. Netanyahu Lodge No. 3041 of
Palm Beach on Oct. 16 at the Palm Beach Ocean Hotel on
South Ocean Blvd. at 8 p.m.
Leading the discussion and presenting the views as seen
by the media will be the editor of the Miami Herald, Jim
Hampton.
Sharing the podium will be Martha Musgrove of the
editorial board of the Palm Beach section of the Miami
Herald.
The meeting is open to the public who will have the
opportunity to share their own current events opinions
with members of the media.
The October meeting of the Lodge No. 3016 will be held
at the Challenger Country Club in Poinciana Place on
Monday Oct. 15, at 7:45 p.m.
Jenifer R. Fischer, Hillel program coordinator for
Broward and Palm Beach Counties, will be the guest
speaker. The title of her talk will be "What the Hillel is
going on in our colleges?"
BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY
NATIONAL WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Palm Beach West Chapter's first meeting of the season
will be held on Monday.Oct. 22, 1 p.m., at Congregation
Anshei Sholom.
Me*mbers will meet the study group leaders and get
further information on the courses being presented this
year.
HADASSAH
Two luncheon-matinee theatre parties will be hosted by
Shalom West Palm Beach Chapter: Oct. 31, "No, No,
Nanette;" and Nov. 28, "Joseph and His Coats." Call
Lillian Schack or Ida Goetz.
Nov. 5 will be a Day at Calder Racetrack. For in-
formation, contact Gene Fermaglich.
The annual Holiday Bazaar and Flea Market at West
Palm Beach Auditorium will be held on Nov. 6, 10 a.m. to
4 p.m. Free admission and parking. For details, call Lillian
Schack.
Hadassah's 15-day Grand Tour of Israel will begin on
Nov. 12. Call Fran Berliner for more details.
Spend Thanksgiving with Shalom at the kosher Sea Gull
Hotel Nov. 22-25. For reservations contact Mac Podwol or
Martha Starr.
PIONEER WOMEN-NA'AMAT
Ezra! Club will hold a meeting on Monday, Oct. 9, 12:30
p.m. at Sunrise Bank, corner of Military and Gun Club
Road.
The program will feature a guest speaker from the
League of Women Voters.
A membership tea is being planned by membership
;hairperson Betty Gethins, and will take place on Oct. 24.
Theodore Herzl Club will hold a luncheon-card party on
Oct. 30, at the Oriental Express Chinese Restaurant.
Donation is $6.
A regular meeting will be held on Nov. 1, 1 p.m., at the
Lake Worth Shuffleboard Courts, 1121 Lucerne Ave. Dr.
Louis Kalansky will lecture on stress.
WOMENS AMERICAN ORT
The Royal Chapter will hold their first meeting of the
season on Wednesday, Oct. 17, 7:30 p.m., in the Village
Ha'l of Royal Palm Beach. Nathan Olefson, magician, will
perform.
Dec. 13-16 West Palm Chapter will hold a weekend at
the Lido Spa. Contact Ann Sporn.
The Golden Rivers Chapter will present a performance
bv the Habimah Players of "Survival," a musical
Continued on Page 15
Jw STATE OF ISRAEL
f&# bnw sunn
/ *T*fc.tt
*9tnur-
'Mosai
ic
Continued fronp^,
"Mosaic" will .
with the showing of CT1
Way campaignS" N
I he Winners *
Madden, "ffififta
character and courage ?
American people 1,
important role which i J,
Way plays in ff^
community together*' J
Mrs. Gordon. m
"Mosaic" brings t0
viewing audience a vari
number of subjects thai
relevant to the Jewish cm
munity. In addition to J
discussions and interviews!
Mrs. Gordon, document*
films which highlight t
program's subject are aired. I
Last year's programs i
eluded a segment on the Isn
Tennis Center, a live brol
cast from the Royce Hd
during the Jewish Federal]
of Palm Beach County's SuJ
Sunday fundraising drrl
interviews with Robed
Peters, James Roosevelt
artist Edna Hibel, and a pa
discussion on Jewish edu
tion.
Upcoming programs
feature Rabbi Howi
Shapiro of Temple Isn
discussing his trip to Russia,
remote broadcast from
Jewish Community Cente
Camp Shalom, the SinJ
Parent Task Force of
Jewish Federation of
Beach County, plus intervk
with prominent local, nation]
and international Jew|
leaders.

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Friday, October 12,1984 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 9
NJCRAC Cites Threat of Religious
In Strategy Plan For The Coming
Freedom
Year
NEW YORK (JTA) -
.-efforts to bring religion into
0Ur public life are intensifying,
are the efforts by some to
ILrifv the United States as
ffflstian country." the
National Jewish Community
Relations Advisory Council
,NjCRAC) charged in war-
nYng about the most serious
5*i in 20 years on BUI of
guarantees of
and
church
Right's
separation oi
The wai-
in NJCRAC's annual
The warning was ex-
pressed in NJCRAC's annual
"joint Program Plan for Jew-
mini i '"e--------------" ,
ish Community Relations
issued by the group.
The Joint Program Plan
represents the collective
Segy of NJCRAC's II
national and III local Jewish
community relations member
agencies, located throughout
the United States, and is used
by them as the basis for their
planning for the suceeding 12
months. The plan covers the
entire range of community
relations concerns.
Countering threats to
church-state separation, and
the religious freedom and
voluntarism that rest on that
principle, was urged as a
major priority for the coming
year in this year's documents.
NJCRAC asserts that
"maintaining a firm line of
separation between church
and state is essential to the
creative and distinctive sur-
vival of diverse religious
groups such as our own."
The Plan was issued on the
eve of the first of eight
regional "consultations"
NJCRAC is convening in the
next four weeks to mobilize
the Jewish community to
defend the church-state
separation principle.
Beginning in Hartford on
Sept. 13, consultations at-
tended by NJCRAC member
agencies will be held in
Houston, Atlanta, Los
Angeles, Philadelphia,
Chicago, Columbus (Ohio),
and Miami.
The attack on the separation
principle and religious
pluralism has been promoted
by the executive and legislative
branches of the federal and
state government and by
recent decisions of the
Supreme Court, the NJCRAC
planning document charges.
Anticipating the current
election-campaign debate on
[lie role of religion in public
Me, the NJCRAC strategy
Plan asserts:
"Of particular concern is
Je role played by the presi-
dent m advocating these
Mu*s The First Amend-
Jieni should inhibit the Presi-
"of the United States, in
J capacity as the Chief
Magistrate of the nation, in
j Jvocat.ng his religious beliefs
' Partisan televised sermon
W did to a convention of
!2SJUS ,^roadcasters and
L'2SS ?u.blic expression.
J ^ngu^hed from private
Prs,ons of religious piety,
J an act of religious
Jf e"ce> the PresidJnt of
J United States. It foster,
Wfr? f the United
USr? a chnan nation, a
^Pt.on that runs counter
Ucm; Const'tution. That
Kll0n *as reinforced by a
Sur, ,K10n of ,he Supreme
I2E. a1d Particularistic
L^ symbol of the creche
L secular national expres-
The NJCRAC Plan cites
three areas in which the attack
on church-state separation has
become most critical: govern-
ment sanction of religious
symbols, bringing religious
practices into the public
schools, and government aid
to religiously-related schools.
Recent court decisions that
allow government involvement
in the display of religious
symbols are cited by the
NJCRAC as representing "a
significant weakening of the
wall of separation between
church and state, and the
conception of an American
society in which the state is
neutral in regard to religious
beliefs, and non-belief."
The NJCRAC Plan
specifically focuses on the
Supreme Court's March,
1984, Lynch v. Donnelly
decision, which allowed the
city of Pawtucket, Rhode
Island, to use tax funds to
purchase and mount a nativity
scene as part of an official
Christmas display.
Noting the profound
divisions in the Supreme Court
on the issue, which split 5-4 on
the Lynch case, the NJCRAC
Plan calls on the Jewish
community relations field to
"engage in a more extensive
and systematic campaign to
challenge religion on public
property."
The threat of bringing
religion into the public schools
greatly increased during the
past year, according to
NJCRAC, with a "renewed
emphasis and increased ac-
tivity by advocates of religion
in the public schools with the
president taking a leadership
role in again advancing school
prayer, as well as a general
stance of injecting government
into the religious sphere."
The NJCRAC calls at-
tention to the vigorous drive to
pass a Constitutional Amend-
ment allowing prayer in the
schools, which failed to gain
the two-thirds Senate vote
needed in March. But such
efforts continued and a later
House vote, in July, resulted
in the passage of a measure to
allow "silent prayer" in public
schools.
NJCRAC firmly opposed
both "silent prayer" and
"moment-of-silence"
measures which are now
allowed in some form by
almost half of the states.
NJCRAC's opposition is
"based on the recognition that
the institutionalization of
prayer, in any form, spoken or
silent, fosters what in essence
is a religious exercise that in a
public school setting can have
a coercive effect on a school
child, and, at bottom, debases
distinctive religious expression
which is vital to maintaining
oarticuralistic religious
beliefs." The Plan adds,
"Paradoxically, what silent
prayer does is foster religious
indifferent ism."
The NJCRAC guide to
action is equally opposed to
"moment-of-silence"
measures, which have been a
legal subterfuge for the in-
troduction of prayer into the
schools, barred 20 years ago
by the Supreme Court."
The NJCRAC Program
Plan also warns of the "grave
potential" of so-called "equal
access" legislation as another
route to bring religion into the
public schools. Such a
measure, which would allow
private religious groups to use
public school facilities during
non-instructional hours, was
passed by Congress this past
July.
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T>-------
Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, October 12,1984
Dulzin: Reagan Has Asked 7 West
European Leaders to Help In Efforts to
Alleviate Plight of Soviet Jews
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
President Reagan has asked
seven top Western European
leaders to lend their help in
efforts to alleviate the plight
of Soviet Jews, it was dis-
closed here by Leon Dulzin,
chairman of the World Zionist
Organization and Jewish
Agency Executives.
Dulzin, just returned from a
meeting of the presidium of
the World Conference on
Soviet Jewry in London, also
disclosed that future appeals
to the Soviet authorities to
allow Jews to leave will be
based on "repatriation" to
Israel rather than family re-
unification which has been the
rationale until now.
Dulzin said that a senior
U.S. diplomat. Max Kam-
Peres Predicts The IDF Will
Leave Lebanon During 5745
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) A
flurry of diplomatic activity
over south Lebanon has
suddenly raised hopes here
that Israel soon may be in a
position to pull its forces out.
Premier Shimon Peres has
publicly predicted that the Is-
rael Defense Force will leave
Lebanon during the new
Hebrew calendar year, 5745.
The media are speaking of
partial pullbacks, new
deployment of United Nations
troops and undisclosed deals
with Syria. Such speculation is
given substance by knowledge
that the Labor-Likud unity
government has given top
priority along with the
economic crisis to with-
drawal of the IDF from
Lebanon.
The new government also
seems to have modified the
position long held by its
predecessor that any pullback
of Israeli troops must be
accompanied by the
simultaneous withdrawal of
Syrian forces from Lebanon.
Israel has suffered heavy
losses since it invaded
Lebanon in June, 1982. Last
week alone, two soldiers were
killed and 10 wounded in eight
incidents. Since the war began,
597 Israelis were killed and
nearly 4,000 were injured.
Indirect contacts between
Israel and Syria apparently are
underway, through the United
States. Richard Murphy, the
Assistant Secretary of State
for Near Eastern and South
Asian Affairs, flew here from
Damascus and conferred in
Tel A\i\ with Defense
Minister Yitzhak Rabin and
acting Foreign Minister Moshe
Arens. He also met with Peres.
Murphy was sent to the
Middle East to investigate the
terrorist bombing of the U.S.
Embass> annex in east Beirut.
According to the State
mm
Department, he is utilizing his
visit to confer with regional
leaders. He met with President
Amin Gemayel of Lebanon
and with Syrian President
Hafez Assad before coming to
Israel.
Rabin is reported to be
organizing and leading Isael's
policymaking with respect to
south Lebanon which involves
both Syria and the future role
of the United Nations Interim
Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL).
Rabin is known to favor a
broader role for UNIFIL in
terms of its geographical
deployment and its
operational responsibilities.
The Defense Minister does
not propose to rely exclusively
on UNIFIL to protect Israel's
northern border from terrorist
attacks or infiltration. He and
others in the government insist
that the Israel-backed South
Lebanon Army (SLA) remain
intact and in place, despite the
acute embarrassment caused
when SLA troops ran amok
and massacred 13 civilians in a
south Lebanese village
recently.
Rabin hopes that the SLA
can be deployed along a
narrow border strip while
UNIFIL expands its area of
operations northward and
eastward to fill the security
gap left by a departing IDF.
Officially, UNIFIL would be
policing all of south Lebanon,
up to the Israeli border, ac-
cording to the original terms
of its mandate laid down in
1978.
The Syrian side of the
equation is necessarily con-
cealed from public view, at
least at this stage. Government
circles here, and the Reagan
administration in Washington,
were hardly pleased by Deputy
Premier and Foreign Minister
Yitzhak Shamir's remark that
Israel had asked the U.S. to
mediate an agreement with
Syria.
Nevertheless, Shamir's
various statements in New
York, where he is attending
the 39th session of the UN
General Assembly, appeared
to signify some modification
of his earlier positions on
south Lebanon. He seems, for
example, to have abandoned
his deep distrust of UNIFIL as
an effective element in security
arrangements for Israel.
Israeli analysts say Syria is
willing to go along with strict
security arrangements for Is-
rael in south Lebanon if only
to get the IDF out.
These analysts note that
Damascus has never really
opposed security
arrangements in the south but
objected vehemently to
political ties between Jerusa-
lem and Lebanon or any other
benefits accruing to Israel
from its war in Lebanon.
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JUDY LEIBOVIT BIRNBAUM
pelman, the American ambas-
sador to the European
Security Conference, delivered
Reagan's letter to the
European statesmen, includ-
ing Prime Minister Margaret
Thatcher of Britain and Pres-
ident Francois Mitterrand of
France. Dulzin singled out
Thatcher and Mitterrand for
warm praise for their actions
and intercessions on behalf of
Soviet Jews. He said the
conditions of Jews in the
USSR are "growing worse and
their urgent plea to us is:
'Shake the world with your
public cry on our behalf." The
London conference, attended
by representatives of Jewish
communities throughout the
free world, expressed grave
concern over the deterioration
of the situation of Jews in the
Soviet Union.
Dulzin said there were good
grounds to expect that
Secretary of State George
Shultz would raise the issue of
Soviet Jewry with Soviet
Foreign Minister Andrei
Gromyko when they met at the
United Nations General As-
sembly in New York.
He said the Soviet position
on the matter has been contra-
dictory. Of late they have been
saying, "When other East-
West issues improve, this
matter too will improve." But
on other occasions the b*
simply deny that any PS
exists, Dulzin said. leDl
He announced that frftm
now on the key element t?
struggle for Soviet tft
the USSR and abroaj*J8ft
reparation, meaning the 12
of Jews to return to S
homeland, Israel. The nSS
fronteniily re-unification J2
decided because, among other
things, not all Russian Jew
seeking to leave have relative
in Israel. w
Dulzin claimed the repatria
tion theme would have "a very
clear connotation regarding
the noshrim" if and when the
gates of the USSR are re-
opened, which, he believes, is
possible during 1955
"Noshrim" U the term applied
to Soviet Jews who, after
leaving the USSR, opt to settle
in countries other than Israel.
According to Dulzin,
repatriation has persuasive
precedents in Soviet juris-
prudence. He recalled that in
1956, the Soviet authorities
allowed Polish Jews scattered
throughout the Soviet Union
to be repatriated to Poland -
from where many sub-
sequently left for Israel.
Similarly, the Soviets have in
the past granted the right of
repatriation to ethnic Ger-
mans, Spaniards and Greeks
living in the USSR, Dulzin
said.
"Em terribly sorry, but if youtt
called for reservations*^
doll
Someone figured driving 50 miles back and forth costs ZU
Jaw. But with Southern Bell 50 miles is only a short tongas-
tance call away. Which means in Florida, the most a >minu
call of 50 miles or so can cost is $1.52, dialed direct without tne
operator. Anytime day or night. ,
We figure it's a lot smarter to get on the phone for those
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Make a short long distance call torn
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li



Friday, October 12,1984 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 11
Israel's Two Chief Rabbis Say That
Reform Jews Are Jews Just Like Us*
for those in custody.
In this case, the suspects are
on trial and under remand.
The Chief Rabbis said they
were told that the chances of
furlough were slim. "But we
do not accept this distinction
on moral grounds," Shapira
said. "A man is held innocent
until proven otherwise."
Bv DAVID LANDAU
nttUSALEM (JTA) to-
SSo Chief Rabbis appear
"' extending an olive
CJeh to Reform JudalSm-
K lews are Jews, just
K- Rabbis Avraham
LfaandMordechaiEliahu
9 ajointRoshHashanah
l7 interview here with
Uentatives of the overseas
ish media.
The Ashkenazic and
tahirdic Chief Rabbis denied
Ke in any way 'fail to
sBr" tne Jewlshness of
1 Jtws. This was a
(jor departure
osition
held by many
Orthodox Jews here and
abroad.
The two Chief Rabbis also
contended that the con-
troversial "Who is Jews?"
issue was "wrongly por-
trayed" as one of
"recognition or non-
recognition" of other Jews.
The fact is, said Shapira, the
only issue at stake is the
conversion procedure prac-
ticed by Reform rabbis.
"We do not interfere or
comment on these rabbis'
activities in any other areas.
But in the matter of con-
version, Jewry is like a club.
You cannot join unless all the
rest of the membership agrees
Withdrawal Plan From
jbanon Seems Imminent
By JTA Services
I JERUSALEM Israel will
Kide in the next few weeks
Lite withdrawal of its forces
lorn Lebanon, Premier
fcjrnon Peres said in an inter-
L published here. He said
t withdrawal process itself,
fix begun, would take six to
inemonths.
[Peres told The Jerusalem
l ii was incorrect to speak
[negotiations between Israel
I Syria. The two countries
e reached tacit understand-
in the past when the
lans perceived it to be in
jr interest, and the same
nld be the case now with
to south Lebanon,
ssaid.
| Expectations of new activity
i the diplomatic front have
heightened by Jordan's
xsiablishment of full
iplomatic ties with Egypt,
oken when Egypt and Israel
Bed iheir peace treaty in
9. The Jordanian move is
ved to have been dis-
i at several unpublicized
Kings between Peres and
Egyptian Charge
fAffaires, Mohammed Bas-
uni.
I0NN The Jewish
'unity in West Germany
sharply critical of the
lion by a court in Zwei-
M, Saarland, that freed
and a woman accused
Rising and circulating a
*ibre parlor game in which
* representing Jews were
i.iodeath camps by a throw
toe.
m
woman, Ingeborg
Je. 30, received a nine-
,suspended sentence for
8 anti-Semitic pro-
Si und incitin8 racial
J"- Handwriting experts
* ratified during the trial
'"wasshe who addressed
"envelopes in which copies
MJ game were mailed to
H1 communities in West
TO and to local prose-
|J*m the acquittal of
EIL. 36-year-o'd former
C" cfriend- Har"-
H" F.'oehlkh. an
ar _! sympathizer,
oused the Jewish
'5dHhcre- Froeh,ich
fcS Cd as thc P"ncipal
C ft,n ? se. The
m 22-month prison
hC Le,COUrt found
K vdcnce. despite
m tha.hdm'ssion during
Kt he,admircd Hitler
pprmcipies of Nazism.
to the terms of your joining,"
Shapira said.
Eliahu said he considered
the demand for pluralism in
conversion as a contravention
of the spirit of unity. He
likened that spirit to the one
which motivated the creation
of a national unity govern-
ment and stressed that it
required further strengthening
in face of troubled times.
They explained why they
had petitioned the government
without success to
release 20 suspected members
of the Jewish terrorist un-
derground from custody to
allow them to spend the High
Holidays with their families.
According to the Chief
Rabbis, this was "in no way
out of the ordinary." They
said they frequently received
appeals before festivals from
the families of prisoners and
always responded by at-
tempting to secure furloughs
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D..
rage 12 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, October 12,1984
1,110 People Attend Conference
on Rescuers of Jews
nations.
Seventy-five of the rescuers
same point was
Shultz. He said the
of the rescuers
made
Princip
are bein
were present last night and upheld by Andrei Sakh7
Ani
they stood to loud applause who gave up a high r*
the Soviet Union to pl
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Secretary of State George
Shultz and Elie Wiesel, chair-
man of the U.S. Holocaust
Memorial Council, made the
same point during a ceremony
opening a conference called
"Faith in Humankind:
Rescuers of Jews During the
Holocaust" last week.
"What a terrible indictment
that hardly any rescuers are to
be found among the statesmen
and leaders of the period,"
Shultz told more than 1,100
persons at the Kennedy
Center. Wiesel noted that
among those who had the
"courage to care" there were
During The Holocaust
readings by Carol Kane and
Werner Klemperer, honored
few
few superior officers,
renowned writers, few in-
fluential politicians.
SHULTZ, who pointed out
that Nazi Germany ended the
belief that high education and
culture will prevent a country
from falling into racism and
barbarity, said: "It may be
that our real bulwark against
tyranny and evil is not high
culture but the good sense and
humane instincts of average
citizens who know the differ-
ence between right and
wrong."
The ceremony, which in-
cluded musical performances
by violinist Erick Friedman
and pianist Emanuel Ax, and
French Concerned About
New Right-Winger
the rescuers of Jews during the
Holocaust. Dr. John Silber,
president of Boston Univer-
sity, called them a "small light
in a vast darkness."
The two-day conference
sponsored by the U.S.
Holocaust Memorial Council
opened at the State Depart-
ment in which rescuers,
survivors and scholars
' remembered the events of
World War II and discussed
why a few people acted to save
Jews and most people did not.
DR. YITZHAK ARAD,
chairman of the Directorate of
the Yad Vashemi in Jeru-
salem, said the Yad Vashem
has discovered more than
5,000 rescuers and trees have
been planted in their honor at
the Holocaust Memorial as
"the righteous among the
while the chorus sang
Maamin."
1 illinian Gaffney of
Belgium, whose parents
rescued 30 Jews, said they had
believed it was "not only the
right thing but the only thing
to do." Her mother, Ger-
maine Belinne, is participating
in the conference.
Bayard Rustin, the civil
rights leader and a member of
the Holocaust Council, noted
that to rescue Jews required a
"small act." Wiesel added
that nations also could have
taken small steps, saying the
State Department could have
given more visas to Jews.
Wiesel stressed that "Jews
also tried to save Jews" and
tht the State of Israel demon-
strates to the world how a
country can "save communi-
ties from persecution and
death."
WIESEL SAID that while
the Holocaust was a "unique
Jewish tragedy, it has uni-
versal implications." The
Nation!
human rights vio
Soviet citizens who are adn
istenng the Aleksanl
Solzhenitsyn Fund for fanijj
of dissidents even thouR
means jail; the mother*
Argentina who protested ih
disappearance of their so,
and helped bring down tl
Argentine dictatorship; J
South Africans of all' racJ
who risk positions and lifeJ
"protest and expose thecrud
ties of apartheid."
While the Nazi genocidewj
"unique in the annals
human depravity," snu|i
said, "in every generationti
capacity for evil in the humj
spirit can be confronted
eventually defeated by jus
and by sacrifice."
Whether it is "SiatJ
sponsored terrorism, genocid
in Cambodia or anti-Semitisi
masquerading as anti-Zionist,
in the United Nations, il
legacy of the rescuers admol
ishes us all to stand up
fight back, "Shultz declared!
By EDWINEYTAN
PARIS (JTA) French
Jewry is seriously concerned
over the growing popularity of
Jean-Marie Le Pen and his
extreme rightwing National
Front Party which seems ideo-
logically akin to the Vichy
regime of World War II. But
the Jewish community should
approach this phenomenon
cautiously, according to Theo
Klein, president of the Repre-
sentative Council of French
Jewish Institutions (CRIF) in a
Rosh Hashanah eve interview
published in Le Monde.
"We have no sympathy with
Le Pen's policies, but we
refrain from intervening
constantly against him for one
reason, good or bad: By
heading the opposition against
Le Pen, the Jewish community
would serve his interests more
than it would do him a dis-
service," Klein explained.
He warned that an alliance
between Le Pen's National
Front and other opposition
parties would have very nega-
tive consequences. But French
opposition leaders have
assured him that such an al-
liance is out of the question,
Klein said.
Le Pen's party received a
substantial boost and won
respectability by its surpris-
ingly good showing in the elec-
tions last June to the Parlia-
ment of Europe, based in
Strasbourg. Klein described
the National Front as rem-
iniscent of certain politics that
were ascendant in France in
the period before the col-
laboration Vichy regime was
established and its ideas very
much like the ideas of those
who constituted the Vichy
government.
Klein attributed Le Pen's
popularity to his ability to
exploit people's insecurity and
economic tribulations. He is
unabashedly racist, though his
polemics have been directed
mainly against immigrants and
"guest laborers" who have
been a source of friction in
West European countries as a
result of job shortages.
Favor For Israel
WASHINGTON (JTA)
The Senate appropriations
committee has unanimously
adopted an amendment by
Sen. Alan Cranston (D.,
Calif.) that U.S. economic aid
to Israel never be less than the
total of the interest and prin-
cipal Israel pays the U.S. on its
annual debt. The rule has a
five-year limit.
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Irma Berg
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Anthony Y. Foy
Lanuna
Dorothy A. Thompson
North Lauderdale
Mary Louisa Clayton
Deiray Beach
Edward L. McGulgan
Pompano Beach
Hsrbsrt Skolnlck
Pompano Beach
Nadsan Vsnclll
Plantation
Ralph Alvarsz
Miami
$2,500
Ton! Waston
Miami Shore*
where shopping is a pleasure 7days o week
Publix Bakeries open at 8:00 A.M.
Only.
Pumpkin Pie
il49
Available at PubJU Stores with
Frssh Danish Bakerlee Only.
Prims of Apricot
Bear Claws
2.79
Available at Publix Stores with
Frssh Danish Bakeries Only.
Qrsat tor Sandwiches
Rye Bread
59*
AvaSabla at AM Publx Store*
and DsnishBaksriss.
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Coffee Cake.................e*ch*159
Plain
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Available) at Pubtix Storsa with Frssh
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Ssrvs Toasted with Jetty, Plain
English Muffins...........S3: FREE!
(When you buy one 6-ct. pkg. for 50e)
(Limit One Deal Pleaee)
Prices Effective
Oct. 11th thru 17th, 1984


niorNews
She jewish coMMUNrrv ceito*
. TRANPORTATION
Transportation is available
1 1 designated area for
160 years of age or over
.' no. use public tran-
Kilion. We take people to
n" centers, doctors'
s to hospitals, nursing
'to visit spouses, to
service agencies and
EL centers. There is no
K this service, but parti-.
' are encouraged to
Sbute their fair share.
B is a great demand for
jtrvice, so please make
m reservations in advance.
E information and-or
Llions, call 689-7703
Lday through Friday.
I HOT KOSHER
J LUNCH CONNECTION
|Manv elements combine to
toe the Hot Kosher Lunch
JrMram at the Jewish Com-
Liiy Center a success. Fore-
Is! among these is the op-
Crtunity to form new and
king friendships.
lEach weekday seniors
L,cr for intimate talk,
fcicational discussions, game
hying, leisure and song.
best activities are followed
i a hot, kosher nutritious
jKh served with warmth and
jspitality by our dedicated
fclunteers. There is no set fee,
lit persons are asked to make
contribution each meal.
[Please come and join us.
x information and reserva-
jns (which must be made in
Evince) call Carol or Lillian
1-7703 in West Palm
HOME DELIVERED
MEALS
(Persons who are
lomtbound and need a
osher meal please call for
{formation. Call Carol in
fest Palm Beach at 689-7703.
LAW CLINIC DAY
Ask (he Counselor
Robert A. Bertisch,
executive director of Legal Aid
Society, and other staff
members will provide a free
law clinic on Oct. 17 from
1:30-4 p.m. at the Jewish
Community Center, 2415
Okeechobee Blvd.
The clinic is open to the
public for persons 60 years
and older. Persons needing
help with civil cases, small
claims court and consumer
problems are encouraged to
come and meet the counselors.
No appointment necessary.
CALLING
ALL POETRY LOVERS
For- people of all ages who
like to read, write, recite or
just listen to poetry, we are
planning a new and exciting
group. This group will mett
every two weeks at the JCC.
Members will actively parti-
cipate in reading and discuss-
ing poetry. For more informa-
tion call Sippi at 689-7703.
A TOUCH OF CLASS
Elderhostel, in cooperation
with Israel Study Tours, offers
two and three week programs
in ISRAEL. A variety of
courses is offered at several
distinguished institutions of
higher education. For more
information call Sippi at 689-
7703.
"SENIOR HAPPENING"
It's happening again this
year but this time it's in Holly-
wood at the Hollywood Beach
Hilton. Seniors from JCC's all
over Florida congregate for
fun and camaraderie and to
meet new friends from
throughout the state. The
Jewish Community Centers of
South Broward are our hosts
on Nov. 27, 28 and 29. You
will enjoy three fun-filled days
and nights if you will be with
us. Reservations must be made
immediately. Call 689-7703
for information and cost.
Friday, October 12,1984 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 13
Graham Claims Oppression Of Soviet
Jews Has Declined In Recent Years
By KEVIN FREEMAN government, he said.
Graham said that in ad-
dition to visiting the two syn-
agogues in Moscow and
Leningrad, he attempted to
visit synagogues in the
Siberian academic community
of Novosibirsk but was told by
officials they did not know of
any Jews living there or of any
synagogue.
NEW YORK (JTA) The
Rev. Billy Graham, just back
from a 12-day tour of the
Soviet Union, has said that
oppression of Soviet Jews has
lessened in recent years as
compared to the period im-
mediately following the
Bolshevik revolution and the
years of the Stalin regime.
Since the regime of Leonid
Brezhnev in the 1970's,
Graham said, "There seems to
be far less oppression" of
religious freedoms in the
Soviet Union. He added that
this "trend which started
under Mr. Brezhnev seems to
be continuing."
Asked specifically whether
he felt that oppression of the
Soviet Jewish community has
decreased since the Brezhnev
regime, Graham said, "I don't
know if there is more op-
pression or not in the Jewish
community."
The news conference at the
Hilton Hotel, attended by
dozens of reporters, marked
Graham's first full-scale
meeting with the press since he
returned from his second trip
to the Soviet Union in as many
years.
When he returned from the
USSR in 1982, Graham caused
considerable controversy in
religious circles when he in-
dicated that he thought there
was a "measure of religious
freedom" in the Soviet Union,
a position disputed by many
sources.
Graham said his most recent
tour of the Soviet Union was a
result of an invitation to him
by the Russian Orthodox
Church and the All-Union
Council of the Evangelical
Baptists of the U.S., which
includes a number of
denominations other than
Baptists. The visit was san-
ctioned by the Soviet
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In a statement distributed to
reporters prior to the news
conference, Graham noted
that he visited Jewish syn-
agogues in Moscow and
Leningrad, and "I talked with
several Jewish leaders in those
cities about their religious and
cultural life, aspirations and
problems. I talked with Soviet
officials about the possibilities
for more Jews to emigrate as
the number has decreased in
the last two years."
Graham said he raised the
issue of matters of concern to
the Christian and Jewish
community when he met
privately with Soviet officials.
He said he would not
elaborate on these private
meetings. It is understood that
the issue of Jewish emigration
was raised in these private
meetings.
Soviet Jewish activist
groups here and abroad have
persistently pointed to
stepped-up harassment and
persecution of Soviet Jews.
Emigration for Soviet Jews
has reached its lowest levels
since the mid-1970's, with
little indication of the
emigration doors being
opened to Soviet Jews in the
near future.
On the airplane back to the
U.S., Graham recounted that
he was told by an unidentified
passenger that there were in
fact Jews who resided in
Novosibirsk, many of them
Soviet scientists.
Rabbi Marc Tanenbaum,
the American Jewish Commit-
tee's director of international
affairs, told the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency following the
news conference, which he
attended, that Graham had
privately pressed the issue of
Soviet harassment and op-
pression of Jews and Jewish
emigration when he met with
Soviet officials.
As to why Graham decided
to back way from public
comments affirming Soviet
Jewish harassment when asked
Continued on Page 14
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D.
Page 14 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, October 12,1984
The Rabbinical Corner
DEVOTED TO DISCUSSION OF THEMES AND ISSUES RELEVANT TO JEWISH UFE. PAST AND PRESENT
Candle Lighting Time
Fri. Oct. 126:36
Joyful Celebration
By RABBI
AVROM L. DRAZIN
Congregation Beth Kodesh
of Boynton Beach
Our usual concept of
religion, and Judaism espe-
cially, is that of solemnity,
concern with sin, and some-
where to turn when we are
worried, anxious, troubled,
and do not know where else to
turn. This is especially true
during the High Holy Day
season when we seek
penitence, and try to find the
answer to the question in
Unsane Tokef, "Who will
live, and who will die?"
In fact, while religious ex-
pression may be associated
with a certain amount of
melancholy, the Talmud tells
us that this is not the ideal. We
are told (Shabbat 30b) that the
Divine presence is not found
among individuals who are
depressed. The ideal for living
Judaic norms should be in an
atmosphere of joy and should
engender feelings of joy.
One of my teachers always
emphasized the Biblical
Com mandment,
"V'Samachta B'Chagecha,"
"You shall rejoice in your
festival, and you should be
very happy." Just as we
observe the commandment to
be solemn and fast on Yom
Kippur, so are we obligated to
be joyful on the three
pilgrimage festivals.
What better time is there to
contemplate and implement
this imperative than on
Sukkot, for which the obliga-
tion to be joyful is repeated
three times in the Torah.
Following as it does closely on
the heels of Yom Kippur, it
gives us the opportunity to
contrast the true joy of daily
Judaism with solemnity of the
Ten Days of Penitence.
True joy, however, is not
easy, for Elijah, the Gaon of
Vilna, tells us that the obliga-
tion to experience the joys of
Yom Tov is the most compli-
cated commandment. It seems
that we are not allowed to be
upset, depressed, angry, or
have any other emotion that
diminishes joy.
Some commandments are
easily fulfilled with joy.-The
celebrations of Chanuka,
Purim, the Seders on
Passover, a wedding, a bris, a
pidyon ha ben, all have built in
happiness which is self
evident. It's easy to be happy
on such an occasion.
Somehow the Yom Tov of
Sukkot does not have the same
built-in happiness. For some
reason the Arba Minim the
Esrog, Lulav, Hadassim and
Aravot do not have the same
significance as the Chanuka
candles. Eating in the Sukka
does not seem to attract the
same joy as the Passover
Seder.
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We are, therefore, obligated
to go out of our way to create
an atmosphere of joy which
carries from the first candle
lighting on the eve of Sukkot
through the festivities of
Simchat Torah. The Torah
links joy with celebration
predicated on the assumption
that the unhappy, depressed
individual cannot be happy
about the world, and therefore
cannot be grateful to G-d for
being allowed to participate in
this world.
It is almost easier to be
caught up in the material type
of mitzvot, giving Tzedaka,
keeping kosher, and the other
tangible mitzvot, than it is to
become involved in the spiri-
tual joy of Judaism.
Just as we physically enter
the Sukka to celebrate G-d's
blessings, so must we immerse
ourselves in the joy of Yom
Tov, and thereby in the joys
that are inherent in Judaism.
Keith Evan Epstein
Bar Mitzvah
KEITH EPSTEIN
Keith Evan Epstein, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Howard Epstein
of West Palm Beach, will
become a Bar Mitzvah on
Saturday morning, Oct. 13 at
Temple Beth Torah. Rabbi
Steven Westman and Cantor
Nicholas Fenakel will of-
ficiate.
Keith, who is in the eighth
grade at Crestwood Middle
School, plays in the school
band. His hobbies include
computers, baseball and pistol
target shooting.
Graham
Continued from Page 13
by reporters at the news
conference, Tanenbaum could
only speculate. He suggested
that it is perhaps part of
Graham's concern that he
again be allowed to visit the
Soviet Union, a massive feat,
according to Tanenbaum.
The AJCommittee official
asserted further that Graham
has been a strong activist and
supporter on behalf of Soviet
Jewry. He said Graham did
make strong representations
on behalf of Soviet Jews when
he met privately with Soviet
officials.
Religious Directory
Conservative
a.m.;
p.m.,
CONGREGATION ANSHEI SHOLOM: 5348 Grove Suw
West Palm Beach 33409. PHone 684-3212. Rabbi bZ
Vander Walde. Cantor Mordecai Spektor. Daily: 8:30 a m
and 7:30 p.m. Friday: 8:30 a.m., 5 p.m. and a late service at
8:15 p.m., followed by Oneg Shabbat. Saturday: 8:30 a.m
7:30 p.m., Mincha followed by Sholosh Suedos.
CONGREGATION BETH KODESH OF BOYNTON
BEACH: 501 N.E. 26 Avenue, Boynton Beach 33435. PhoM
586-9428. Rabbi Avrom L. Drazin. Monday 8:30
Thursday 8:30 a.m. Sabbath services, Friday 8:15
Saturday 9 a.m.
GOLDEN LAKES TEMPLE: 1470 Golden Lakes Blvd I
West Palm Beach 33411. Phone 689-9430. Rabbi Joseph
Speiser. Daily Services 8:15 a.m. and 5:30 pro. Sabbath
services Friday 8:16 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m., 5 p.m., Mincha]
followed by Sholosh Suedos.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID: 4657 Hood Road, Palm Beach I
Gardens 33410. Phone 694-2350. Rabbi William Marder,
Cantor Earl J. Rackoff. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m! |
Saturday 10 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 2815 No. Flagler Dr., West Palml
Beach 33407. Phone 833-0339. Rabbi Howard J. Hirsch,
Cantor Elaine Shapiro. Sabbath services Friday 8:15 p.m.,
Saturday 9:30 a.m. Daily Minyan 8:15 a.m., Sunday and
Legal Holidays 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 315 N. "A" Street, Lake Worth I
33460. Phone 585-5020. Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg, Cantor
Jacob Elman. Services Monday and Thursday 8:15 a.m., [
Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 224 N.W. Avenue G, BelleI
Glade 33430. Sabbath services Friday, 8:30 p.m. Phone 996-1
3886.
TEMPLE BETH ZION: Lions Club, 700 Camelia Dr., Royall
Palm Beach. Mailing Address: POBox 104, 650 Royal Palm
Blvd., Royal Palm Beach, FL 33411. Sabbath Services Friday8
p.m., Saturday 8:45 a.m. Rabbi Nathan Zelizer. Phone 793-1
9122.
TEMPLE BNAI JACOB: 2177 So. Congress Ave., West
Beach 33406. Phone 433-5967. Rabbi Dr. Morris Silberman
Sabbath services. Friday 8 p.m., Saturday and Hobdays 9a.m..
Monday and Thursday 9 a.m.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL: 190 North County Road, Palm Beach
33480. Phone 832-0804. Rabbi Joel Chazin, Cantor David
Dardashti. Sabbath services. Friday 8:30 p.m.: Saturday 9a.m.
THE TREASURE COAST JEWISH CENTER Bra
Abraham: 3257 S.E. Salerno Road, Port Salerno. Rabbi
Abraham Rose. 1-287-8833. Services Friday evenings 8 p.m.
LAKE WORTH JEWISH CENTER: St. Lukes Uniud
Methodist Chapel. 165 Ohio Road, Lake Worth. Phone 434-
1869. Friday night serivces 8:15 p.m.. Saturday, 9 a.m.
Orthodox
CONGREGATION AITZ CHAIM: Century Village, We
Palm Beach. Phone 689-4675. Sabbath services 9 a.m. ana
p.m. Daily services 8:15 a.m. and 6:30 p.m.
Reform
CONGREGATION BETH ISRAEL: 1592 Floresta,, P.C Boxl
857146. Port St. Lucie. FL 33462. Friday night services b pm.
Saturday morning 10:30 a.m. Phone 465-6977.
THE REFORM TEMPLE OF JUPITER^^;
Jupiter High School. Military Trail. Jupiter. MaiUng
Plaza 222. U.S. No. 1. Tequesta 33458. Phone 747-4235. K*
Alfred L. Friedman. Services Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 4600 Oleander Avenue. Fort Pierce,
33450. Phone 461-7428. Cantor Anne Newman.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM: St. Helens P""almaUilJ
Avenue and Victory Blvd.. VeroBeach,32960
address: P.O. Box 2113. Vero Beach. FL 32901 :i
Stephen Adams. Phone 1-569-0180.
TEMPLE BETH TORAH: at St. David's inJ*2"J
Episcopal Retreat. Forest Hill Blvd. and Welungton m
West Palm Beach. Mailing addreea: P.O. Box I". .
Palm Beach, FL 33416. Friday services 8:15 P_m =n
Steven R. Westman. Cantor Nicholas Fenakel. Phone
TEMPLE ISRAEL: 1901 No. Flagler Dr..J^.'J'"^^
33407. Phone 833-8421. Rabbi Howard bnapiro.
Soloist Susan Weiss. Sabbath services, Friday P-"*
TEMPLE JUDEA: at St. Catharines Greek pJtiJKS!uuvard.
Social Hall, 4000 Washington Rd.. at Soatbtnwnm^i
Rabbi Joel L. Levine. Cantor Anne Newman. Mtuung -j^|
6164 Okeechobea Blvd., West Palm Beach. FL "
471-1626.


Friday, October 12,1984 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 16
Synagogue News
Temple Judea's Sukkot and ticipate in the Yizkor
Simhat Torah Services, call Memorial prayers which will
the Temple office. The public be included in the Oppressed
is invited to attend and to par- Jewry Observance.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID
Th, festive holiday of Suk-
ij which in ancient times
KrkedThe harvest season in
fid and was celebrated by
S I St Parades in the
Sent Temple in Jerusalem.
ay. Oct. 12 with regular
| Stov (Holiday) Services at
lOa.m.
I on Friday evening, Oct. 12,
Lom. an evening Service
r Shabbat and Holidays will
? held. This is the Inter-
Jedfate Service Shabbat
I chol-Ha-Mo ed.
The closing days of Sukkot,
Sb'mini Atzeret, which service
ncludes the Yizkor
(Memorial) PM***"" fj
U on Thursday. Oct. 18, 10
am That same evening at
17-30 p.m. a family service
celebrating Simchat Torah, a
nyou' and happy holiday, will
be celebrated by singing,
dancing, carrying the scrolls of
I ^e Torah in processions
around the synagogue and
children marching with flags.
A continuation of this holiday
celebration will be concluded
the following morning by
another Family Service held
Friday, Oct. 19, 10 a.m.
Regular Shabbat evening serv-
ices will be held on Friday,
Oct. 19,8 p.m. and Saturday
I morning, Oct. 20,10 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
The Sisterhood will hold a
I luncheon and card party on
Wednesday, Oct. 24, 12 noon,
in the Social Hall, at 315 N.
"A"Street, Lake Worth.
For ticket information,
contact Gert Shepard or Hilda
Jell.
TEMPLE JUDEA
The temple will conclude the
Festival of Sukkot beginning
ith Sabbath services, Friday,
Oct. 12 at 8 p.m. Rabbi Joel
L. Levine and Cantor Anne.
Newman will officiate. Rabbi
Levine will speak on
"Reflections on Sukkot"
emphasizing the Sukkot theme
| of the fragility of life.
Simhat Torah Services are
Ifor Wednesday, Oct. 17 at
P30 p.m. at St. Catherine's
| Cultural Center. The Religious
Area Deaths
InUMIERG
JWWun (Popp. Bill), n, of SooMlMt
12*2fcVUi|. We Palm Baach.
11-IM Glrteru nd Funeral Chapal
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fifeCh "" pl*nChapel, We.t
Son
I^WHo^T Rlvenw. Guardian
Mon> *e.t Palm Beach.
School children will partic-
ipate with Rabbi Levine and
Cantor Newman in the proces-
sion of Torah Scrolls. The
Vlasim Torah Scroll will be in-
cluded in Temple Judea's
fourth annual Oppressed
Jewry Observance which con-
cludes the Simhat Torah
Service. Members of the con-
gregation participate in this
moving ceremony as they hold
Yahrzeit lamps memorializing
oppressed Jewry of the past
and the present. The Vlasim
Torah Scroll will link the con-
gregation to the oppressed
Jewish community of Eastern
Europe during the time of the
Holocaust. The Vlasim Torah
Scroll was donated by Richard
and Debra Holtsberg in
memory of Richard's father,
Herman Holtsberg.
The Sisterhood will distrib-
ute flags to all children who
attend the Simhat Torah
Service and will sponsor a
festive oneg following wor-
ship. In order to enable
families with small children to
attend, services will conclude
at approximately 8:45 p.m.
For more information about
Temple Judea Holds
Groundbreaking Ceremony
HAS READING BECOME DIFFICULT?
WHEN CHANGING EYESIGHT MAKES THE
PRINT IN THE AVERAGE BOOK TOO HARD TO
READ, MANY BOOKLOVERS GIVE UP READING.
WITH THIS IN MIND, THE SARAH AND ELI
TAYLOR COLLECTION OF LARGE PRINT BOOKS
AT TEMPLE ISRAEL LIBRARY HAS BEEN
ESTABLISHED. READING MATERIALS INCLUDE
THE HUMOR OF SAM LEVENSON; NOVELS BY
SUCH POPULAR WRITERS AS CYNTHIA
FREEMAN, BELVA PLAIN AND NOAH GORDON;
MYSTERY STORIES BY H. KEMELMAN, TO NAME
ONLY A FEW. ALSO TO BE FOUND IN THIS
SPECIAL COLLECTION ARE LARGE PRINT
BIBLES, PRAYERBOOKS AND JEWISH HISTORY.
THESE SPECIAL BOOKS, AS WELL AS THE
EXTENSIVE JUDAICA COLLECTION, ARE
AVAILABLE TO ANYONE IN THE COMMUNITY.
COME IN, BROWSE AND BORROW ON MONDAY,
FRIDAY AND SUNDAY MORNINGS AT TEMPLE
ISRAEL LIBRARY, AT 1901 NORTH FLAGLER
DRIVE IN WEST PALM BEACH. FOR FURTHER
INFORMATION CALL THE TEMPLE OFFICE.
Temple Judea recently held a groundbreaking ceremony to kick
off its building campaign. The congregation has grown from 12
founding families to 300 families in three and a half years. Land
has been purchased on So. Chillingworth Drive near the Palm
Beach Mall for construction of a temple. Burning the mortgage,
the balance of which was underwritten by the board prior to the
groundbreaking ceremony, are [left to right] Jerome Skalka,
honorary board member, the congregation's first treasurer and
a member of the original steering committee which founded the
temple; Rosalie Savel, treasurer of Temple Judea; and Dr.
Jeffrey Faivus, president of the temple.
OrganiZatiOnS Continued from Page8
narrative that tells the story of the Jews of the 20th century
and their struggle to stay alive, on Nov. 10, 8 p.m., at the
Crestwood School in Royal Palm Beach.
Tickets are $5. For reservations send check made out to
Golden Rivers ORT to: Rose Berkow, 150 Lake Meryl
Drive, Apt. 250, West Palm Beach, Fla. 33411, or Mimi
Davis, 256 Lake Meryl Drive, West Palm Beach. Fla.
The Haverhill Chapterinvites its members and friends to
participate in "Fressers Frolic, II" to be held on Oct. 19, 7
p.m. A feast plus a program featuring Bob Michaels,
writer for the Post, will be held at the North County Senior
Citizens Center on Northlake Blvd. Reservations will be
limited. Call Shirley Kimmel for tickets. Donation is $5 per
person.
A general membership meeting will be held on Thur-
sday, Oct. 25. 12 noon, at the Sunrise Bank on Gun Club
Road and Military Trail. West Palm Beach. A "Surprise
Program" is in store.
The Palm Beach Chapter will hold its regular meeting on
Oct. 15, I p.m., at Temple Beth Sholom, 315 North A
Street in Lake Worth.
Ray Huard, political reporter with the Miami Herald,
will speak on the upcoming national election.
YIDDISH CULTURE GROUP
With the opening program on Oct. 23. the Ceatary
Vyiage Group will be embarking on its 15th year or
continuous programming. **
Pianist. Helen Bernstein and Dora Rosenbaum will
combine and play four hands on the piano after which
Helen will play some solos.
Violin virtuoso Harry Levine will play classicalI and
semi-classical numbers. He will be accompan.ed on the
pTno by Dora Rosenbaum. If time permits, executive
board member Sam Klein will read a Yiddish piece.
The dedication of the book department in memory of
Gabriel Rabinbach and David Serowitz will open the
program.
The Congregation watches as Congressman Tom Lewis [second
from left] turns over a shovelful of dirt to symbolize the
groundbreaking for Temple Judea. Joining in the festivities are
Dr. Jeffrey Faivus [left], Susan Wilders [third from left],
coordinator of the groundbreaking ceremony; Rabbi Joel
Levine [fourth from left], spiritual leader of Temple Judea; and
Barbara Chane [right], founding president.
MEMORIAL CHAPELS
Serving the greater Florida area
in the finest of Jewish tradition.
WEST PALM BEACH 689-8700
DELRAY BEACH 278-7600
5411 Okeechobee Boulevard
Jack Weiss
Manager
PRE-ARRANGED FUNERALS AVAILABLE THRU
GUARANTEED SECURITY PLAN
-
Palm Beach County's only combined All-
Jewish Cemetery and Funeral Chapel NEEDS
YOU.
Earn a substantial income working close
to home full-time or part-time.
Call Elaine Schimek
627-2277


Da^ 1 j m .
I 1 4 f*l
Page 16 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, October 12,1984
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Full Text
: voice or
[JEWISH
IMUNITY Of
llM BtACri
En
"Jewish floridian
VOLUME 10 NUMBER 32
PALM BEACH, FLORIDA FRIDAY, OCTOBER 12,1985
BififiaMJMH
Inited Jewish Appeal
Poised For Campaign '85


r<
the social gap and providing equal educational op-
iii) for all youngsters in Israel is a major concern of
Jewish Appeal programs.
The United Jewish Appeal-
Community Campaign '85,
comes at a time of crisis for
Jews in many lands.
Here in the U.S. many Jews
suffer from a third year of
reduced federal and state sub-
sidies for human support
programs. Many heads of
households have lost their jobs
and have met unemployment's
grim companions: financial
strain, psychological distress,
family pressures. Many elderly
Jews have inadequate health
care, no recreation and painful
isolation. Promising
youngsters cannot finance
their own education or obtain
tuition aid elsewhere. Working
mothers have come to depend
on child care centers to help
them support their families
and, in thousands of cases,
have become their family's
sole support.
Campaign '85 will be geared
in large part to help these Jews
and will be conducted by 200
federations and 430 other local
Jewish community campaigns
in cooperation with the
national support UJA
provides.
Elsewhere, in lands of
distress, Jews continue to
struggle to survive and
survive as Jews. The gates of
freedom have virtually been
closed to Soviet Jews seeking
to emigrate, and those denied
permission to leave have fallen
on harder times because of
their love of Israel and
freedom. Jews in Moslem
countries worry every day how
their country's policies toward
Israel will be visited on them
and many of them, too, can
not emigrate. And in remnant
communities of aging Jews in
Rumania, Poland, Czechos-
lovakia and Hungary, Jews
look to Jews abroad for such
basic help as cash relief, food,
clothing, even cut lumber for
their stoves during cruel
winters.
Jews in more than 30
countries are helped by the
American Jewish Joint Distri-
bution Committee, which
receives nearly all its $43
million in income from the
UJA-community campaign.
Most UJA-community aid is
provided in Israel, especially
through the Jewish Agency, a
major instrument for the
miracles people think of when
Continued on Page 6
About United Jewish Appeal
"The history of the United Jewish Appeal is one of
unprecedented success in the annals of American
philanthropy, both in the amount of funds raised and in
the scope of voluntary activism it has been able to in-
spire."
This is Professor Abraham J. Karp, the prominent
historian, looking back on over 40 years of UJA.
The UJA was created in 1939 from the American Jewish
Joint Distribution Committee (JDC), United Palestine
Appeal and National Coordinating Committee for Aid to
Refugees as a direct response to the growing plight of
European Jewry, especially after Kristallnacht in Germany
Continued on Page 6
Shamir-Gromyko Meeting 'Remarkably Free of Polemics'
[YITZHAK RABI
YORK (JTA) -
fling between Israel's
Premier and Foreign
|Sukkot
fithout
Jdom
'how Jews who
sr oppression
Sukkot. See
I
Henge To
'r Faith
"al synagogue
6Jil in today's
Closed
of the Jewish
JJIPalm Beach
J*f* closed on
ft?* 11. Friday,
"JJ.0ct.i9in
aW the noli-
IS** and
Minister Yitzhak Shamir and
Soviet Foreign Minister
Andrei Gromyko last week
was described as "remarkably
free of polemics" by a spokes-
person for the Israel Mission
to the United Nations. Shamir
himself described the 90-
minute meeting at the Soviet
Mission to the UN as "very
good, a very long discussion."
The meeting Tuesday
night, Sept. 25, which was
requested by Israel, was the
second meeting between
Shamir and Gromyko, who
met at the UN General
Assembly three years ago, and
the first high-level contact
between Israel and the Soviet
Union since then. Shamir and
Gromyko are in New York for
the 39th session of the
Assembly.
THERE HAS been no
official reaction in Israel to the
Shamir-Gromyko meeting.
But Premier Shimon Peres, in
presenting his unity gover-
nment to the Knesset on Sept.
13, urged Moscow to re-
establish diplomatic relations
with Israel. He said those ties
were "severed at a time of
anger" during the 1967 Six-
Day War.
According to Judith
Dranger, a spokeswoman for
the Israel Mission to the UN,
Shamir raised with Gromyko
the issue of Soviet Jewry and
asked that the Soviet
Continued on Page 4
'Mosaic' Opens New Season
United Way Featured On First Program
The new 1984-85 season of
"Mosaic," a TV program
sponsored and produced by the
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County in cooperation with
WPTV-Channel 5, will begin on
Sunday, Oct. 14 at 9 a.m. The
United Way of Palm Beach
County will be featured with host
Barbara Gordon. The Jewish
Federation is a beneficiary agency
of the United Way as are 46 other
organizations in the county.
Featured on the first part of the
program will be Douglas G.
Johansen, executive director of
the Chamber of Commerce of the
Palm Beaches and 1984 United
Way general campaign chairman,
and Larraine White, president of
her own hospitality consultant
service. They will discuss with
Mrs. Gordon United Way's
volunteer network that is instru-
United V\fay
of Palm Beach County
mental in raising funds to serve
over 250,000 people in Palm
Beach County. United Way
reaches one in ever three people in
the community and has an-
nounced that its goal this year will
be to raise $2.7 million .
Appearing on the second
segment of the program will be
Barry S. Berg, CPA with Ernst
and Whinney, treasurer of the
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County and a member of the
budget and allocations committee
for United Way, and Joan D.
Bonifazi, chairperson of the
budget and allocations committee
for United Way. They will discuss
the allocation process and the
recent needs assessment survey
that was sent to 250 service
agencies in the area to determine
what services are priority. This
periodic survey is scheduled to be
completed by the end of
December.
Continued on Peaje 8


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