The Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian the voice of the Jewish community of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Running title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Physical Description:
4 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 8, no. 41 (Dec. 24, 1982)-v. 11, no. 26 (Aug. 30, 1985).
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44606415
lccn - sn 00229548
ocm44606415
System ID:
AA00014310:00075

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
Ivoirt 0F
JEWISH
hunitv or
ISIACH
ewish floridian
VOLUME 10 NUMBER 31
PALM BEACH, FLORIDA
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 5,1964
PRICE 35 CENTS
Israel Imposes New,
harsh Economic Measures
iyGIL SEDAN
[DAVID LANDAU
ISALEM (JTA) -
Lrnment has imposed
L economic measures
I absorbing some $900
from the public sector
Jans of curbing infla-
I the double-barreled
|h that went into effect
l-iimeproperty tax and
subsidies for fuel and
lasic commodities that
[ices soaring has
fcder fire from some of
Country's leading
m.
but-back on subsidies
jfect immediately to
loarding for the High
is. The tax, which won
proval by the Cabinet,
jply to private cars,
Apartments where the
not the resident,
premises and
Tax collection
will be tightened and
loopholes closed, according to annual rate of over 400
Finance Minister Yitzhak percent is likely to exceed
Modai. 1,000 percent.
ACCORDING TO some
economists, however, the
measures will not achieve their
objectives unless matched by
the Si billion slash in
government spending vowed
by the Cabinet last week but
apparently not likely to
materialize in this fiscal year.
Moreover, the cuts in price
supports have the immediate
effect of further fueling in-
flation. And they are selective.
Many basics still benefit from
full subsidies, making it more
difficult for the government to
meet its Si billion savings
target.
The price of fuel went up by
30 percent overnight. The
prices of other government
controlled products rose by
18-55 percent. As a result,
economic experts say, in-
flation now running at an
At the same time, the
government is continuing to
support the price of bread by a
subsidy of 134 percent, eggs by
105 percent, milk by 103
percent, and frozen poultry by
97 percent. Even so, long
queues developed at super-
markets and gasoline stations
as the public rushed to stock
up on food and fuel before the
midnight price hike deadline.
THE ECONOMIC program
is one of the few areas where
the Labor-Likud unity
government is in substantial
agreement on goals. Premier
Shimon Peres told the Knesset
that the gravity of Israel's
economic situation is without
precedent. He defended the
new taxes against opposition
charges that wage earners are
being forced to bear most of
Continued on Page 7
1984 Campaign Tops
$5.5 Million
Over S5.5 million has been raised for the 1984 Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach County-United Jewish Appeal
campaign, announced Myron J. Nickman, president and
immediate past general campaign chairman. This is the
largest campaign amount ever raised by the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach County and represents a 25
percent increase over the prior year. Nickman stated that
the record setting results were brought about by the
"dedication and commitment of our campaign volunteers
who reached out to friends, colleagues and neighbors to
explain the role which Federation fundraising plays in
contemporary Jewish life, and how it supports programs
and human services for Jews at home and abroad."
Nickman noted that the people of Palm Beach County
have a generous appreciation for the needs of the poor and
elderly in Israel and other countries overseas. Campaign
workers have reported that there is also an increased
awareness of local needs and the necessity to provide for
the Jewish population here," he said.
Looking ahead to the 1985 campaign, Nickman stated
that there will be a special emphasis on the growth of the
Jewish community in the Palm Beaches and escalating
social service needs in Israel. "Our increasing Jewish
population means that many new demands are being
placed on our agencies for increased services. Last year we
opened the Boynton Beach branch office to serve the needs
of residents in that part of the county, while this year four
new campaign associates have joined the Federation staff
to reach out to an expanding population in the Palm
Beaches. We must respond to the increased need for
services here, as elsewhere, by raising our campaign to new
heights in 1985," concluded Nickman._______
Palm Beach Federation
Captures One of Eight Top PR Awards
aft*
*
jtS v .:
NEW YORK, N.Y. Gold
Awards, symbolic of excel-
lence in public relations, have
been won by the Jewish
Federations of Palm Beach,
Washington, Boston, San
Francisco, Rhode Island,
Rochester and New Orleans in
the 1984 competition spon-
sored by the Council of Jewish
Federations.
In making the an-
nouncement, Hap Levy of
Miami, chairman of the CJF
Public Relations Awards
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
BUILDING A COMMUNITY
The cover of the award
winning campaign brochure
depicts the mosaic of Jewish
life.
Committee, noted that this
year Gold, Silver and Bronze
Awards were given out in an
attempt to distinguish between
various levels of achievement.
Judging of the entries was
completed by a 35-member
committee comprised of
various representatives of
Jewish Federations from
throughout North America.
Individuals were prohibited
from judging any material
submitted by their own
Federation. Leah Siskin,
chairman of the Public Rela-
tions Committee for the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County, served on the
national committee.
Only eight communities in
North America were given the
top gold awards. The Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County being one of these top
communities, won for its
campaign brochure titled
"Building a Community." In
addition to the top gold
award, the Palm Beach Jewish
Federation won an additional
three awards, including a
bronze and two honorable
mentions for its "Share the
Vision" television spots, the
1984 Annual Report and the
Super Sunday live broadcast
on the Federation-sponsored
Continued on Page 15
Inside
Kippur
Many
Wki known facts
|n* Day of
^nt are highlight-
* 6
-paring
Sukkot
*'0u"g families
^outbuilding
Peace Road 'Long'
Reagan Repeats initiative' At UN
Jj 'heir homes
g[ up for this
"ort. Page 2
Ho
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS -
(JTA) Declaring that the
road to peace in the Middle
East is "long and hard," Pre-
sident Reagan told the General
Assembly Monday he is as
committed to his September I,
1982 peace initiative as he was
on the day he issued it.
"That initiative remains a
realistic and workable ap-
proach, and I am committed
to it as firmly as on the day I
announced it," the President
declared. He said that the
foundation of this plan
remains Security Council
Resolution 242.
Stressing the importance of
negotiations, Reagan, whose
speech lasted 25 minutes and
who referred to the Middle
East only briefly, said, "The
lesson of experience is that
negotiations work. The peace
treaty between Israel and
Egypt brought about the
peaceful return of the Sinai,
clearly showing that the nego-
tiating process brings results
when the parties commit
themselves to it.
"THE TIME is bound to
come when the same wisdom
and courage will be applied,
with success, to reach peace
between Israel and all of its
Arab neighbors, in a manner
that assures security for all in
the region, the recognition of
Israel, and a solution to the
Palestinian problem," he said.
The president added that the
Continued on Page 7


Pa$e 2 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, October 5,1984
Families to Construct Sukkahs in Observance of Commandm
.,..._. ,-_,._ ;.....;.w h n,n here. In addition to solving the The Mullen's children, Jewish Cornm,,
"Blessed are You, Lord our
Cod, King of the Universe,
who has sanctified us through
His-commandments and com-
manded us to sit in the
sukkah."
By LOUISE ROSS
Assistant News Coordinator
Several young families
living in the Palm Beaches will
be observing this "mitzvah"
during Sukkot this year (Oct.
11-18) by constructing their
own temporary dwelling.
Although their reasons for
undertaking this traditional
post-Yom Kippur activity is
basically the same, the struc-
ture itself comprises a variety
of materials and sizes.
Since Moshe and Marci
Adler bought their home three
years ago, they have been
building a sukkah at the side
of their house every Sukkot.
As a matter of fact, their
Sukkah from last year is still
standing because there was no
place to store it. So this year
they ordered a pre-fab wooden
sukkah that comes in a nice
flat box. "It's also larger than
our other one so we will be
able to fit in more guests,"
explained Mrs. Adler.
The Adlers like to construct
a sukkah because "it's one of
the things that you're sup-
posed to do that is fun to do.
It also helps bring the holiday
alive for our children. They
enjoy collecting the "skakh"
(covering for the roof) and
decorating with fruits and
vegetables," stated Mrs.
Adler. Since their son,
Michael will be sue during the
holiday, they are considering
having a party for him in the
sukkah when his class from
the Jewish Community Day
School comes to visit. The
Adlers other children are
Matthew, four, and Malka,
three and a half months.
Jay and Ronni Epstein built
their first sukkah after moving
into their home last year. "I
think it is a reminder of who
we are as Jews. We are
required to reenact historical
events, one of which is build-
ing a sukkah," Epstein said.
For his first effort at sukkah
construction, Epstein used a
wood frame attached to the
corners of the backyard fence
for stability. (When he was up
on a ladder hammering two
pieces of wood together, his
neighbor asked if he had a
building permit and was told
that it was unnecessary since it
was a temporary structure.)
Transparent plastic covered
the sides and palm fronds
served as the roof. "We hung
fruit and paper chains that the
whole family made. Actually
Gregg who is 14 and Jordan
who is 10 do most of the work.
Gregg's Bar Mitvah occurred
during Sukkot and we held
part of the celebration in the
sukkah," he said.
As the Sukkah was too
small to seat the entire family,
they fulfilled the command-
t ment by saying kiddush and
. the "ha-moui" over the bread
\ daily. "Since I am no longer a
! novice sukkah builder, I plan
to improve the design this
year," Epstein added.
Since moving to Florida
i three years ago, Arnie and
; Shirley Mullen nave built a
sukkah at their home. "It's an
- opportunity to be close with
family and friends and to have
our children become aware of
what our religion teaches by
: setting a good example.
"Ours is probably the most
untraditional approach
imaginable. Since we have
strong breezes where we live, I
built the sukkah out of PVC
pipe with nylon mesh woven
sides. On the top I use palm
fronds, the common covering
here. In addition to solving the
wind problem, this sukkah is
easy to store.
The Mullen's children,
Eddie, eleven, Geoff, nine,
and Cheri, six, attend the
Jewish
School.
*m
T.m.m unity
Continued on P,^ I
Jewish and Female-
Adrawledge your Impact!
Women React to Theme of JWA
"The evolution of the role of women
in Jewish life and the role of women in
our society are converging in ways that
are very exciting, lean't think of a more
timely theme for the Jewish Women's
Assembly than 'Jewish And Female:
Acknowledge Your Impact!'. Our basic
values are being threatened and this
year the issues before us have wide
ramifications for us as Jews and as
women."
Barbara Kaplan,
chairman Local Concerns
Task Force of the Community Relations
Council of the Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County
"I'm very enthusiastic about attend-
ing this year's Assembly. As women we
have to be more outspoken this year and
the education day is a wonderful
medium to let people know what is hap-
pening. Women can't be placid
anymore but must become involved in
and aware of the issues before us
locally, nationally and internationally. I
changed my Sisterhood's regular meet-
ing day so our members could attend
the Assembly because I felt it was
imperative that the Women's Division
reach as many women in the community
as possible."
Florence Sharpe,
president Golden Lakes
Temple Sisterhood
"I feel the theme of the Jewish
Women's Assembly is very appropriate
this year. Jewish women have become
caught up in the national trend to assert
their influence for the good of our
country and of mankind. The Assembly
will provide me with a forum on Jewish
issues both from a historical perspective
dJfc
<&

and a current standpoint. I hope to get a
clearer picture to determine where I
stand as a Jewish woman and what
action I can take in this critical year."
Suzanne Zeide,
resident of Lake Clarke Shores
and member of Hadassah and ORT
/ am looking forward to the Jewish
Women's Assembly to increase my
knowledge as a woman and as a Jew
about current issues. I personally feel
the woman has the responsibility to live
a Jewish life and to provide a Jewish
environment in the home for her family.
On the other hand, it is vital to be in-
volved as a woman in Jewish organiza-
tions and causes. Our children see me
(and my husband) as active participants
in the Jewish community and I believe
this encourages their involvement too. "
Margot Brozost,
co-chairman Women's Division
$125 campaign event
"lam very proud of being faj
in areas where being Jewish might i
been a problem to others, I consider
a challenge. Twenty years ago 13
permitted to apply for member*!
the Palm Beach County Board]
Realtors. Today I am the presided
that body. Many issues have svrfi
this year that every Jewish hJ
should know about. By listening
what the speakers have to sayatl
Jewish Women's Assembly, we i
privy to accurate, firsthand inform
that will inspire us to reconfirm.
commitment both as a woman andt
Jew."'
Rbo4i(
mem ber of W omen's Dh
Business and Prole
Womn'i(
Steering Com
"As a newly involved womt
Women's Division who will be all
ing the Jewish Women's Assemb.
the first time, I feel the time hast
for me, as a Jew and as a woma
learn about issues that will have a\
impact on our future. Jewish wa
can no longer be reticent in expn
their feelings on vital questions]
must come forward, and, through]
concerned involvement, translate i
convictions into action. I'm lo
forward to the Assembly to enh
my awareness on today's impot]
issues.''
JoanFn
business woman and resia]
of West Palm 1
WOMEN'S DIVISION
of rhe
JEWISH FEDERATION OF PALM DEACH COUNTY
proudly invites you ro rhe
SIXTH ANNUAL JEWISH WOMEN'S ASSEMBLY
HYATT PALM BEACHES
Sunday, October 26. 1984
9:45 AM 230 PM
LUNCHEON AND KEYNOTE ADDRESS
BELLA ADZUG
"WOMEN: A MAJOR POLITICAL FORCE IN 1964"
SESSIONS (choice of one)
"ISRAEU MOTHERS: SOLDIERS OF SACRIFICE"
DoroRorh
"THE POWER OF THE JEWISH VOICE"
Leslie L Levy
945 AM Registrorion
10:30 AM Sessions
$22.00 Regisfrotion Fee includes
Morning Coffee 6 Luncheon
Dierory Lows Observed
REGISTRATION FORM
Women s Oman. *wh FeoWonon of Wm Oeotf Couiy
501 S FtogtefOnwe Smw305
W Pdm Oeodv a 3M01
Nome------
(pteai*pnn)
Address
Lav
Fs
Telephone.
Orgonizorion.
.and Chapter.
Member of Business and Professional Women D Yes
Seoring Preference_____________________-------
Enclosed is my norvrefundoble check for $--------
($22.00 Per Person) payable to:
JEWISH FEDERATION OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
FOR THE
JEWISH WOMEN S ASSEMBLY
Sunday. October 28 .19*
Sessions hove limited seoring copooty My prefer**"
D -ISRAELI MOTHERS: SOLDIERS OF SAfl^'
DoroRorh
D THE POWER OFTHE JEWISH VOtCT
Leslie L. Levy
REGISTRATION CLOSED ON FRIDAY OCTOOE* 1"
SPACE LIMITED
CHILDCARE WILL BE AVAILABLE AT A rO*^
Yes I wouldlike ^^ehi-^rr-^'^'^


Jewish Community Center To Hold
Second Annual Dinner Dance
Friday, October 6,1984/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 3
L Second Annual Dinner
P 5 the Jewish Commu-
Kener of the Palm
ml will be held Saturday,
PS 7:30 p.m.. at the
V Hotel- This was an-
S#d by dinner dance
gfsons Dr. Jeffrey and
[Phyllis Pcnner.
L event is one of the
Cffundraising events for
10 Jewish Community
to. According to the Pen-
..T[,is was one of the
dm of last year's social
jar and we are looking
JJJ to having an even
L,erevent this year."
Lrvations can be made
'contacting the Jewish
nmunity Center at 689-
) The donation tor this
it is S60 per person.
wmmmmmm mmmm i
Dr. Paul Klein [left to right], president of the JCC, his wife
Carole, and Past Presidents ZeWa Pincourt and Larry Ochstein
attended the JCC's first annual dinner dance held last year.
rassroots' Teacher Training
t
Reorganized Into Jewish Teachers9 Institute
grassroots program of
Aer training, sponsored by
JJewish Education Corn-
ice of the Jewish Federa-
JofPalm Beach County, is
hinuing to reach out to the
fish community by
liding iraining which will
| to licensing tor Sunday
wl teachers. This year the
gram has been reorganized
| will be called the Jewish
letters' Institute, an-
[nced Nathan Kosowski,
hrman of the Jewish
Education Committee. Three
courses will be offered the first
semester beginning Oct. 24 at
the Jewish Community Day
School.
"The program will be
directed towards teachers who
are professionally trained but
need to increase their Judaic
knowledge and those teachers
already in Jewish education
locally who want to enhance
their professional skills,"
stated Kosowski.
"Introduction to Judaism,"
offering the basics of Judaism,
will be taught in conjunction
with the Palm Beach County
Board of Rabbis from 6:30
p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Four rabbis
from the community, coor-
dinated by Rabbi William
Marder of Temple Beth
David, will be the instructors.
Sam Steinberg, a nationally
known Jewish educator who
now lives in this area, will
Continued on Page 10
[F&CS Quick Response Program
Friendly Visitors Keep In Touch
ByLISAHANStR
icialloJewish Floridian
|hen Nettie and Morris
were out of town this
summer, they made
I) phone calls to some
U people in West Palm
!* They were calling
Its of the Jewish Family
[Children's Service to see
1 they were doing. The
ft along with several
compassionate people,
|*olunteered a few hours a
10 serve as Friendly
Visitors of the agency's Quick
Response Program.
The Jewish Family and
Children's Service established
the Quick Response Program
four years ago, partly in an
effort to match socially iso-
lated and lonely people with
trained volunteers who act as a
liaison to the agency.
Upon completion of a
training program held at the
Jewish Family and Children's
Service office, a Friendly
Visitor spends an hour once a
week at the client's home. The
volunteer reports back to Ned
Goldberg, Quick Response
Program manager, on
anything of concern, such as a
need for medical treatment or
depression. Mr. Goldberg and
other staff professionals then
deal with the problem or
contact family members when
necessary.
The Friendly Visitors have
learned the importance of
their work. Sometimes a
Continued on Page 10
/
rmnm raro
A HAPPtf MEW (/EAR
rum
.
*
New Years Greetings
From Hod Hasharon
This New Year's card was sent by the manager of the
Hod Hasharon Singers, Fred Bohn, to the members of the
Palm Beach County Jewish community. The singers, four
teenage girls, have represented Hod Hasharon, this
community's twinned Project Renewal neighborhood in
Israel, throughout that country and have made two trips to
this area, most recently last year.
Project Renewal attempts to upgrade the lives of the
residents in Israel's distressed neighborhoods. One of the
benefits of this effort has been the awakening and nourish-
ment of the cultural arts. The young adults, residents of
Hod Hasharon, have been encouraged to showcase their
talent which reflects their new pride in the neighborhood.
Bohn wrote: "It has been almost ten months since we
were in Palm Beach. We hope everyone is fine and wish
you a Happy New Year. May the year ahead be a year of
health, happiness and good fortune."
Sukkot Celebration
Slated For Single Parents
If you are a single Jewish
parent and you're looking for
an opportunity for you and
Chaplain Aides Conduct Rosh Hashanah Services
i
1,2" *id" of (te Jewlab Federation of Pain Beach
S U*u22l R,bN AtoB "" taTe i e.ts of the Lakeside Health Care Cealer joia la the Rosh
bl. J!%!!.* *rvke local "r,ta ho-e lo Ha^aaVservke coadacted by Caaplaia Aides Jalias Stela aad
*e Worth,*,
IkilZriGore** Bernke Schrekr coadact the ITI?!" taatifcer.
nS a.T|fcl ?* *""* hoaaat4t spoage cake aad *** t0,eller-
lC ?.^l *> Foi Litr0?*' ''" [left to right] Ha.aak J^Yai thTresideats took taras readiag parts of the service aad
, rL ." o| GoreMk m*A R.r.i ckr.Ur ,^aH tk# Dlessiag, /*""
'Peclal holiday treat.
your children to meet other
single Jewish parents and their
children this may be for you
"A Sukkot Celebration!"
Sunday afternoon, Oct. 14,
a Sukkot celebration is being
sponsored by the Palm Beach
County Board of Rabbis and
the Jewish Single Parents'
Task Force of the Jewish Fed-
eration of Palm Beach
County. An invitation is
extended to all Jewish single
parents and their families, to
dress casually and to come to
the Jewish Community Day
School on Parker Avenue.
The outing begins at 1 p.m.
with a kiddush with wine,
challah, apples and honey
under the Sukkah. A short
service with explanation about
the holiday and its symbols
will be featured.
Games for the parents
together with their children
will be offered to help
everyone mix and learn to
know one another. Door
prizes will be presented and
refreshments will be served.
The Board of Rabbis
believes that "A Sukkot
Celebration" at the Day
School, Oct. 14 from 1 to 3
p.m. is a wonderful way to
begin a new year.


D~.
Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, October 5,1984

i
r
t
r
C
r
I
Peres Says He Will Justify The Confidence Of The Nation
Editor's note: Simeon Baker
has just returned from a visit
to Israel. He conducted this
interview and one with Yit-
zhak Shamir just after the new
unity government took office.
By SIMEON BAKER
TEL AVIV (JTA)
Declaring that he is aware
the difficult tasks that
of
con-
front his government, Shimon
Peres, the new Prime Minister
of Israel, told me in an inter-
view that "I'll do my best to
justify the confidence of the
nation and to ensure that my
Cabinet will respect the will of
the voters."
Our interview took place in
Peres' office in Tel Aviv. He
was in a jovial mood despite
the long and arduous
the negotiation that Li
establishment of ag0vedrJ
of national unity. HC 21
his broad coalition 'd|
on the roots
UN Assembly Begins 39th Session
With Mideast Conflict As Dominant Theme
appeared
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS
(JTA) The 39th session of
the General Assembly opened
here seemingly in a con-
ciliatory mood in view of the
meeting between President
Reagan and Soviet Foreign
Minister Andrei Gromyko in
Washington.
But diplomats here said that
the issue of the Middle East
conflict will probably domin-
ate the meetings and discus-
sions of the General Assembly
this year as it has in past years.
According to diplomats,
Iran, Libya and Syria have
been engaged in intensified
efforts to deny Israel its
credentials when the Creden-
tials Committee presents its
report for General Assembly
approval. According to the
diplomats, the three extremist
countries have been lobbying
in various capitals, especially
among Moslem countries, to
join in a vote to suspend Israel
from the current session. If
Israel's credentials are denied,
ZOA Comdemns Saudi
Request For U.S. Missiles
NEW YORK, N.Y.
Alleck A. Resnick, President
of the Zionist Organization of
America condemned the new
Saudi request for 3,000 Side-
winder missiles in addition to
the Arab thirst for yet more
Stinger shoulder fired missiles.
Said Resnick, "Such
weaponry, added to an already
overflowing coffer of sohpis-
ticated American military
hardware in Saudi hands is a
clear and intolerable threat to
Israeli security. Addi-
tionally," he continued, "such
weapon sales have begun to
undermine the qualitative edge
of our democratic ally in favor
of an array of radical and
totalitarian Arab regimes.
U.S. complicity in this en-
deavor," said Resnick, "is
shortsighted and must, in my
judgement, be stopped."
The National Executive
Committee of the ZOA, meet-
ing in Detroit, also deplored
the cynicism expressed by the
State Department and by
certain members of the
Administration with request to
the consideration of the Saudi
Arabian request. "By
deferring this issue until after
the elections so as not to out-
rage the Jewish people,"
stated the resolution of the
NEC, "the Department of
State has shown a contempt
for the democratic process and
for the sensibilities of the
American Jewish com-
munity." The resolution went
on to ask the Congress of the
United States to review the
dangers inherent in further
U.S. Arms sales to Saudi
Arabia whenever the Saudi
request is formally presented.
8th Annual Barbeque
And Raffle
Planned At JCDS
it is in effect suspended from
the General Assembly.
TWO YEARS AGO, when
Iran started to push the move
to suspend Israel, it had only
eight supporting votes. Last
year the number of countries
joining Iran's motion rose to
43. According to Ambassador
Aryeh Levin, the acting
ambassador of Israel to the
UN, the number of countries
supporting the Iranian move
this year could increase to 48-
50.
But, Levin explained in a
briefing for Isreali reporters,
the Iranian move is expected
to be thwarted as it was last
year, by a motion to set aside
the Iranian request until the
end of the General Assembly.
The Iranian plan thereby
would be ignored by the As-
sembly. The set-aside motion
last year was introduced by
Norway and the motion this
year is also expected to come
from one of the Scandinavian
countries.
Meanwhile, the general
debate of the General As-
sembly opened Monday with
an address by President
Reagan. Foreign Minister
Yitzhak Shamir of Israel was
present during Reagan's
address.
SHAMIR WAS scheduled
to arrive here Sunday and to
remain in New York for 10
days to two weeks. He ad-
dressed the General Assembly
Oct. 3. During his stay in New
York, Shamir is expected to
meet with about 30 foreign
ministers from around the
world. These include Secretary
of State George Shultz and the
foreign ministers of Britain,
France and other European
nations as well as of countries
ot Atrica and South America.
The new Israeli Ambassador
to the UN, Binyamin
Netanyahu, was expected to
arrive in New York this week.
He will soon present his
credentials to Secretary
General Javier Perez de
Cuellar. The Israeli delegation
to the General Assembly will
be strengthened by seven more
members due here from Israel.
The President of Argentina,
Raul Alfonsin, who addressed
the General Assembly
Monday, will probably meet
next week with Shamir.
According to Levin, the
major Middle East issues will
be dealt with during the Pales-
tinian and Middle East debates
when the Palestine Liberation
Organization and Arab
countries will press again for
an international peace confer-
ence on the Middle East.
THE MIDDLE EAST also
will figure in the Security
Council when, on Oct. 19, the
mandate of the United
Nations Interim Force in
Lebanon (UNIFIL) comes up
for extension; and on Nov. 30
when the mandate of the
United Nations Disengage-
ment Observers Force
(UNDOF), which separates
Israeli and Syrian forces on
the Golan Heights, is also
scheduled for extension. The
mandates of both are expected
to be extended.
The major general issues at
this year's General Assembly
will be economic and disarma-
ment questions and the threat
of famine in Africa. "But the
most noisy debate and shout-
ing will take place about the
Middle East and Israel," one
diplomat remarked here.
*i
of the ]*
peop e and will Work f
SFei' ubndg,n8 the
which have
us."
In this connection pi
pointed out that he beb:ev,
democratic government!
on the decisions of
majority and on respect I
"M-n8hM,u0f ,he mN
MinewillbeagovernmeJ
rapprochement and good]
a government thai I
respect the religious public
its needs, refraining f|
coercion where we (
Instead, we must enlistud
standing and tolerance."
Peres added that his go
ment will maintain the sti
quo in religious affairs i
will ensure equal rights fa
citizens of Israel, regardk
religion, nationality or on
Turning to the very diffj
economic situation,
pledged to work for econtj
stability by building a mo
economy commensurate
the new economic era ml
world. At the same time!
made it clear that he will a
strengthen Israel's def|
forces, to implement
Camp David accords
resume the peace mome
with Arab countries.
have to ensure the securid
the settlements in the Gal
and to enable the IDF toe
home."
Peres also dwelt on|
future relationship betwe
government and large
organizations of the diasp
expressing understanding]
their importance and
vities. He stressed the
ficance of the world Zii
organizations, and foresail
epoch of fruitful coopen
with the World* Id
Congress, under the leade
of Edgar Bronfman,
ident, and Israel Sin1
executive director.
Premier expressed theopil
that the WJC plays an j
portant and positive
Jewish life.
Shamir Says Lebanese Premii
Takes Orders From Damascus
The Eighth Annual Bar-
beque and Raffle of the Jewish
Community Day School has
been announced by Dean
Rosenbach, president of the
board of directors, and
Lennard Kligler, vice president
in charge of fundraising. The
Barbeque and Raffle, which
will take place on Sunday,
Oct. 21, is a Day School tradi-
tion.
This year's raffle prize is
$10,000 worth of gold. "Gold
has been selected as the prize
by the Jewish Community Day
School's leadership because of
its symbolism of quality and
excellence, the bywords of the
school's educational
programs," stated Rosenbach.
Tickets, purchased for $100
each, admit participants to the
barbeque as well as providing
them with a chance to win the
$10,000 prize. Information
and tickets may be obtained by
calling the school office at
585-2227.
the
Vohum 1
By SIMEON BAKER
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
"The Lebanese government is
situated in Beirut but in fact it
takes orders from Damascus.
At the head of the government
is a person on whose shoulders
lies the responsibility for the
Cairo agreement of 1959,
which opened the gates of
Lebanon to murderous terror
and caused so many calamities
and tragedies to the people of
Lebanon."
This was stated by Deputy
Premier and Minister for
Foreign Affairs Yitzhak
Shamir, during an interview
with this writer in his office in
Jerusalem.
Referring to the "unbridled
campaign" of slander against
Israel on the subject of
southern Lebanon, which was
brought by Rashid Karameh's
government before the UN
Security Council, Shamir said
that the forces of aggression
and blind rejection of Israel,
represented by Syria and its
Lebanese proxies, nullified the
agreements between Jerusalem
and Beirut of last year. "Thus,
+ *** ?+' $ toward anarchy and terror in
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Number 81
Lebanon."
As to the withdrawal of the
Israeli forces from Lebanese
territory, the Deputy Premier
said that "Israel has no inten-
tion of partitioning Lebanon,
or to hamper the connection
between north and south
Lebanon. However, as long as
terrorist attacks continue, we
will have to take the necessary
measures to ensure the security
of our forces, to maintain law
and order.';'
Shamir, who was in a
relaxed mood and good shape,
made it crystal clear that
"contrary to Syria, which is
the only real occupying power
in Lebanon, Israel has every
intention of withdrawing its
forces from Lebanon," he
added. "But we will not sit by
and permit anyone to incite,
arm and direct terrorists to
mount attacks on Israel and
on its soldiers in Lebanon. We
will continue to protect our
interests to the best of our
capacity."
Enumerating the top of the
Israeli list of priorities,
tttttfcv4l .leader of the
TtVud, tuettf*rthe matter of
achieving security and stab]
for the Jewish State and si
Soviet Jewry. "We call a|
our Arab neighbors to
peace with us in good isnj
he said.
Shamir categorically de
Moscow's claims tnai
halting of the em.|
reflects a lack of des re (
par, of the Jews o
"Nothing could be "l
from the truth. Ck*I
440,000 Jews.in.JJ,
Union have indicated
willingness to leave,
them thousands ot w
families who to" great hardship. ne
sized.
in this connection
declared that "not on'
thousands of Jew
exit permits on the'J"
pretexts, but tensoftl
of others h.ve bee
even the possibiW,
ing for an exit vbs.
"arnl0fi
and V?*!?iC
ing of the Tf
view,
Jewry
to


Friday, October 5,1984 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 5
Kennedy Criticizes View That Syria
Has Been Helpful' In The Mideast
Lff *Mlddle E,s,''
Ue Arab states.
The world knows the
U he told more than 500
fish leaders from the
BS States and Canada
[ding the 1984 Israel Bond
Gonal leadership conference
f the Park Plaza Hotel.
ISvria has been most helpful
Ytension and terrorism, to
Let adventurism and to the
Lin Lebanon. And anyone
[our government who thinks
mi has been helpful in any
other way deserves to be
switfly helped from office."
Kennedy was apparently
referring to a statement by
Assistant Secretary of State
Richard Murphy who told a
House Foreign Affairs sub-
committee last July that Syria
was playing a 'helpful role" in
Lebanon. He was immediately
criticized by some of the sub-
committee members. The
Conference of Presidents of
Major American Jewish Or-
ganizations sent a telegram to
Secretary of State George
Shultz also critical of Mur-
phy's statement.
Shultz, in his reply, af-
firmed that Murphy "did not
indicate any change in U.S.
letanyahu Named Israel's
New Ambassador To UN
ByDAVID LANDAU
|jERUSALEM (JTA) -
nvamin Netanyahu, the No.
dat the Israel Embassy
/Washington, has been ap-
Ued Israel's Ambassador
line United Nations and will
ad the Israeli delegation at
General Assembly under
fcputy Premier and Foreign
Lnister Yitzhak Shamir.
[Netanyahu will succeed
lehuda Blum, who last June
deluded six years as Israeli
xesentative to the world
dy. The appointment of
rtanyahu was announced
Ificially after the first weekly
MM meeting of the newly-
istalled unity government.
aing Cabinet Secretary Mi-
laei Nir said the appointment
las endorsed unanimously,
iving been submitted by
pur,
IN POLITICAL circles, it is
lelieved that Shamir was
krompied to appoint Netan-
phu by the young diplomat's
olitical patron and mentor,
Minister-Without-Port folio
Woshe Arens. It was Arens
M brought Netanyahu, then
13 years old, from an execu-
te position in industry into
le state service as minister in
Washington when Arens was
amed ambassador there in
1982.
News of Netanyahu's
r-'nding appointment to the
IN was made public, unoffi-
plly, in the wake of private
tonversations between Shamir
N Arens 10 days ago in
phich Shamir persuaded
Nns, against Arens' original
dilution, to serve in the
unity government as Minister-
Without-Portfolio. Arens had
been minister of defense in the
outgoing Likud government.
Born in Israel in 1949 and
educated in the United States,
Netanyahu is the younger
brother of Yonathan Netan-
yahu, the Israel Defense Force
commander who led and was
killed in the Entebbe rescue
operation in 1976. Binyamin
has been the organizer of
subsequent conferences and
publications on international
terrorism in memory of his
late brother.
NETANYAHU IS consid-
ered a rising star in the Herut
firmament, with a future in
politics if he chooses to go
into political life. According
to informed sources, though,
he has carefully developed
contacts over recent months
with Labor leaders now top
ministers in the hope of
attaining the UN post.
One disappointed hopeful is
foreign ministry legal adviser
and former confidant of the
late Moshe Dayan, Elyakim
Rubinstein. He claimed that
he was promised the UN
position by Shamir earlier this
year. Last week Rubinstein, in
a demonstrative act, formally
submitted his candidacy to the
ministry's appointments
committee.
But the committee's deci-
sions are in any event merely
recommendations to the
ministers who can ignore
them. And in practice, Shamir
pushed the appointment
through the Cabinet before the
Ministry committee dealt with
it at all.
Readers Writes
Greeting From
NTOR:
Mnto Floridian
*ish to share this letter
"your readers.
1 Schutzer, a long time
nt of our area, was very
^mental in the develop-
or many of our Jewish
"*. synagogues and
*wt.ons. He was the
Ek ,nd editor of our tint
H newspaper "Our
u Flondian.
inow living with his
gjfcNew Jenay. Foi-
rorthtNewYiw;
A New Year's
Sam Schutzer
Director, JCC Comprehensive
Senior Service Center
Dear Jean:
At 96 and sick I come to
make my donation to the
Center $25 for the many cour-
tesies extended to me. I can t
forget it. 1 still have my life
membership card and wish to
be remembered. Please see
that 1 receive the Center's bul-
letin and keep in touch. Please
remember me to Sam Rubin
and Jack Kant also to your
dear mother. Mrs. Kodish.
Beat to all for the New Year.
SAM
policy regarding either
Lebanon or Syria" and
recalled "only too well that
Syria obstructed imple-
mentations of the May 17
(1983) agreement between
Lebanon and Israel, and that
Syria's interest and ours were
in fundamental conflict during
that period." Shultz added
that "at the moment" Syrian
interests have led them to
support the "same goals" as
the U.S., "albeit for different
reasons than our own."
Kennedy, in his address to
the Israel Bond conference,
declared that "The key to
peace between Israel and the
Arabs has been within reach
for many years, and the Arabs
could grasp that key at any
time. Israel is ready now. Let
its enemies now take the
critical step back from the
brink of recurring conflict."
Kennedy, referring to the
new government in Israel,
said: "Today we all share the
high hope for the national
unity government that has just
been approved that
together Shimon Peres and
Yitzhak Shamir will achieve a
new spirit of cooperation
which can make Israel truly
invincible in the defense of
freedom and the pursuit of
peace."
Condemning the Soviets for
their actions against Jewish
dissidents, the Senators
declared: "Soviets may shut
down classes in Hebrew, or
confiscate books of Jewish
learning. They may imprison
Zionists, and persecute in-
nocent men and women whose
only crime is that they believe
in the God of their fathers.
But they can never kill the idea
of freedom."
He concluded: "We renew
our own resolve to advance the
cause of Israel for it is part
of the cause of America itself
of a world safe not only for
our own country, but for the
noblest and most decent
aspirations of human
existence."
The senator accepted the
Bond Organization's first
Harry S Truman Centennial
Award posthumously for his
brother, President John F.
Kennedy. The presentation
was made by Billy Goldberg of
Houston, National Chairman
of the Truman Centennial
Awards program. At an earlier
session of the four-day Israel
Bond conference Meir
Rosenne, Israel's Ambassador
to the United States, stated
that "the establishment of a
national unity government,
enjoying a very large majority
in the Knesset, will enable Is-
rael to solve its economic
problems, to ensure the
security of its northern border
and to proceed with the peace
process."
Rosenne declared that those
political prophets who
predicted that a divided Israel
could not be unified were
wrong. "There is no such
thing as good Israelis or bad
Israelis," he said. "There are
iust people who want to live in
a free land."
The unprecedented creat-
tion of a rotation system and
the full parity in the structure
of the government is the best
evidence of the large national
consensus in Israel and tnc
ability of the political leaders
of our country to place the
interest of the people above
any party considerations." the
Ambassador said.
o
Radio /TV Highlights
MOSAIC Sunday, Oct. 7, 9 a.m. WPTV Channer
5 with host Barbara Gordon.
' L'CHAYIM Sunday, Oct. 7, 7:30 a.m. WPBR
1340-AM with host Rabbi Mark S. Golub The Jewish
Listener's Digest, a radio magazine.
JEWISH MUSIC AND CULTURE HOUR Sunday,
Oct. 7, 6 p m. WHRS-FM Stereo 91 with host Dr.
Simon Silverman.
SHALOM Sunday, Oct. 7, 10 a.m. WPEC
Channel 12 (8:30 a.m. ON TV Channel 51) with host
Richard Peritz.
HERITAGE. CIVILIZATION AND THE JEWS
Monday, Oct. 8, 9 p.m. WPBT Channel 2 "The
Shaping of Traditions" This program takes the viewer
from the destruction of the Second Temple through the
rise of Christianity and Islam and finally to the emergence
of Judaism in Western Europe.
Sponsored by the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County.
Community Calendar
October 5
Hadassah Bat Gurion board 9:30 a.m. Yom Kippur
Eve
October 6
Yom Kippur Temple Beth David Break the Fast
October 7
Golden Lakes Temple Sisterhood board 10 a.m.
Jewish War Veterans No. 501 -10 a.m.
October 8
Jewish Federation Executive Committee 8 p.m. Temple
Israel-executive board 8 p.m. Hadassah Cypress Lakes
- 1 p.m. Congregation Anshei Sholom Sisterhood board
- 9:45 a.m. Jewish War Veterans Auxiliary No. 408 9:30
a.m. United Order of True Sisters No. 61 board meeting
10 a.m. regular meeting 1 p.m. American Red Mogen
David of Israel board 1 p.m. Congregation Anshei
Sholom Men's Club board 9:30 a.m. Women's
American ORT Palm Beach board
October 9 ,
Jewish Federation Endowment Fund Committee Meeting
8:30 a.m. B'nai B'rith Women Menorah noon
Pioneer Women Ezrat 1 p.m. Hadassah Lee Vassil -
board 10 a.m. B'nai B'rith No. 2939 7:30 p.m.
Women's American ORT West Palm Beach 12:30 p.m.
Hadassah Henrietta Szold board 1 p.m. Temple
B'nai Jacob Sisterhood board 10 a.m. B'nai B'rith
Women Masada 7:30 p.m. Jewish Community Center
- Sukkot family dinner and decoration of Sukkah Temple
Beth David Sisterhood board 8 p.m. Pioneer Women -
Theodore Herzl board -10 a.m.
October 10 .......
Rishona Chapter of AMIT Women 12:30 p.m. Yiddish
Culture Group Cresthaven -1 p.m. Women's American
ORT No. Palm Beach County Region board 9:30 a.m.
Congregation Anshei Sholom board 1 p.m. Pioneer
Women Cypress Lakes board 10 a.m. National
Council of Jewish Women Palm Beach board 10 a.m.
Temple Israel Sisterhood Sukkot dinner United Order
of True Sisters No. 61 race track Erev Sukkot
October 11
Sukkot
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Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, October 6,1984
little Known Facts About Yom Kippur
MINOR YOM KIPPUR
The Kabbalists of the 16th century of
Safad began the custom of fasting the
day before Rosh Chodesh (the new
month) as a minor Day of Atonement
(Yom Kippur Katan). Devout Jews still
fast, repent, and say penitential prayers
monthly although this fasting is not
mandatory.
Rabbi Isiaih Horowitz (1555-1630)
referred to Yom Kippur Katan when he
said, "Following the custom of the very
pious, one must repent and make resti-
tution in monetary and personal acts, in
order that he may enter the new month
as pure as a newborn infant."
THESHOFARAT
THE WESTERN WALL
It was customary for Jews in
Jerusalem to blow the shofar at the
conclusion of the Neilah service at the
Western Wall. However, in 1929 and
for many years thereafter, the Jews
were forbidden to conclude Yom
Kippur in this manner because Britain
bowed to Arab demands, to cease this
practice.
The worshippers, however, would
regularly defy this decree. It is noted
that in 1930 a Galil watchman, Moshe
Segal, was arrested by the British after
he sounded the shofar on Yom Kippur.
He was released after the chief rabbi of
Palestine threatened not to break his
fast until Segal was let go.
Every year after that people found
ways to sound the shofar although it
remained illegal. When Israel re-
3. Mahzor Germany. Early 14th century. University Library, Bres-
lau. See Chapter XI.
captured the Old City of 1m. ,
1967 soldiers assembL a la
sound the shofar. That year at,!?"tD
elusion of the Yom KipD'ur'^H
Moshe Segal was given tKj*
request of Menachem Begin ,0M
YOM KIPPUR LINKED
TO WEDDING DAY
Why is a wedding a happy eve, I
equated with Yom Kippur, adav
atonement? The answer lies in m
talmudic dictum that "when a ml*
marries his sins are forgiven-J
Matrimony is considered a road J
forgiveness and atonement. The fj
that the bride and groom fast on theirl
wedding day lends credence to M
connection. Additionally the bride-l
groom recites Viddui, the solemn Yoml
Kippur confession, in the afternooil
service on his wedding day. Wearinil
white as a symbol of purity is a custonl
of both brides and of people on Yoml
Kippur.
THE NUMBER TEN
The number ten, in the context L
Yom Kippur, symbolizes perfect hoi
ness. Recurrent uses of this numb
include the Ten Days of Repentu
which conclude on the tenth of Tish
(day of Yom Kippur); the recitation!
the Viddui (confession of sins) is i
ten times because, according to tradi
tion, the Temple high priest said tin
name of God ten times when he ask?
for divine pardon on Yom Kippur; m(
the Ten Commandments.
tl
n
tl
r
c
n
N

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baking pan C over with a towel and let ne until H doubles Brush with I egg volk and sprinkle wun y~rr
seeds Bake at 375" tor 50 minutes or until browned Dip in honeyfor wet New War


'
Friday, October 5,1984 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 7
Harsh Economic Measures
Continued
fwmPigel
Iburden.
stressed that the
L-rtv lax is being levied on
K y of personal assets
Rot be described as a
if" he poor. "According
kod i each asset will be
f 'a flat rate of two
1, of Us value. The value
brar he explained, would
Lrmined by such factors
E, age and market price.
L if 'he government is
Inared to tighten the
K belt, it is having
tailty with i,s own- L
or stumbling block at the
' is the Education
fotrv's budget. Modai and
Lion Minister Yitzhak
Eon agreed to bring their
lerences before a special
burial committee, headed
fperes, which would have
Ifinal say.
fHE MOST serious issue is
tther or not to continue
high school education.
r Education Ministry has
Used raising social in-
ince payments by 0.2
[Cent to fund free high
lool education or, alter-
Reagan
|Repeats
litiative
Continued from Page 1
lited States has been ta-
ped in peace diplomacy for
It decade that the Middle
pt conflict has been in exist-
"We consider ourselves
1 partner in the quest for
pee. The record of the 11
its since the October War
pm Kippur War) shows that
Itch can be achieved through
fcotiation," he said.
[Turning to the situation in
"anon, Reagan said that
tragedy" has not ended,
ailing that only last week
[despicable act of barbarism
[terrorists" against the U.S.
Wttsy in Beirut took place.
f President, noted that in
P3 the United States helped
N and Lebanon reach an
pment that could have led
'he full withdrawal of
iwi forces "in the context
\m withdrawal of all
forces" from
anon.
ft,the President pointed
ill a a8reement was
ttw.and "the long agony
Lebanese continues.
"ands of people are still
Pjom their homes by con-
IJ violence, and are
FJW; in their own coun-
[ 'he President called on
nno are concerned with the
15"!. of Lebanon "to
Jid this nightmare."
iri1KPre,Sident's addrs
* h[39th session of the
J Assembly's general
J-"speech, which was
2nSiV0d ,0 Nations
Jthe United States and
'et Union, was warmly
& Israel was repre-
iSakyiore,8n Minister
Uien Tamir and by
C shf ,he ,srael UN
" Shamir said in an-
l he lIe?Jortcr's Question
Nrk ?- Lof Reagan's
rgs n the Mideast until
| cnance to study the
natively, impose an overall
education tax.
As for the overall fiscal
budget, the various ministers
have been unable to agree so
far on a cut of more than $650
million, well short of the $1
billion goal. That cut,
moreover, will be spread over
an entire calendar year. The
savings realized in the present
fiscal year will amount to no
more than $300 million.
Senior economists advising
the government maintain that
even a $1 billion saving is not
enough to set the economy
straight. Prof. Michael Bruno
and Prof. Eitan Berglass
appeared before the Cabinet
to urge an $800 million cut in
government spending and a
$1.2 billion cut in subsidies
a total of some $2 billion.
They also recommended that
the government refrain from
imposing new taxes because of
their inflationary effects.
BUT THE government has
apparently disregarded their
advice and has taken a dif-
ferent tack. It has levied new
taxes and has shelved in-
definitely a wage-price-tax
freeze which labor and
management appeared only
last week on the verge of
accepting.
Bruno said in an interview
published in Haaretz: "I
believe that eventually reality
will impose on us the
demanded cuts. We had an
opportunity to cut the budget
in a controlled manner.
Eventually we will have to do
it in an arbitrary manner,
either because we shall not
receive the funds or because
the situation in the economy
will dictate the cuts which we
recommended."
In fact, the public may soon
take the lead in forcing the
government to take un-
palatable measures. Until
now, Israelis have been living
well. Cost-of-living increments
linked to the rising price index
have been a cushion against
inflation. But this is fast being
eroded. The COL increment
due on September salaries,
payable Oct. 1, will be 13.2
percent. It is estimated,
however, that wages will
decrease in value by about 10
percent in the next few months
because of the sharp rise in the
cost of basics.
BY AMERICAN and West
European standards, Israeli
prices are a bargain. A loaf of
ordinary bread costs 10 cents.
A liter of milk is 30 cents. An
egg costs seven cents. A kilo of
meat sells for $5.25 and a
gallon of premium gasoline is
$2.50. But the average Israeli
family must now spend $500 a
month to cover its basic needs,
according to the Central
Bureau of Statistics.
The new taxes will reduce
spendable income. The
Treasury expects to take in
about $150 million from
improved income tax
collections; $400 million from
the one-time levy on private
cars, boats and aircraft,
securities and business con-
struction; and $350 million
from reduced subsidies. Living
standards inevitably will
decline.
Does your cracker go to pieces
when it meets cream cheese?
It's easy to imagine spreading
delicious cream cheese on something
besides a bagel.
But it's a lot harder to do.
Croissants crumble. Chips chip.
And it's terrible to see what hard
cream cheese can do to an
innocent piece of toast. Just terrible.
The Spreadable Cream Cheese
k certified kosher
IaVEICXWTCMFTEE
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Temp Tee whipped cream cheese
is whipped.
So it's smooth and creamy, and
very easy to spread.
Even on something as delicate as
a potato chip.
Temp Tee whipped cream cheese.
It's bigger than the bagel.
Mr. Groer Kraft, Inc will reimburse
you for th face vedue of this coupon
plus < handling allowance provided
you redeemed I on your retail salts
of the named product(s) and that
upon request you agree to furnish
proof of purchase of sufficient prod
ud to cower aD redemptions Coupon
I
O Kraft. Inc. 1983
ioc
It void where taxed, prohibited, or
mulcted by law, and may not be
assigned or transferred by you. Cash
value 1/20C Customer must pay
applicable tax. For redemption, mall
to Kraft, mc. Dairy Group, PO Box
1799. Clinton, Iowa S2734
1M30Q 31771?


I>.
Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday. October 5,1984
I
9
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Survivors' Firsthand Experiences
Help Students Learn About Holocaust
By LOUISE ROSS
Assistant News Coordinator
As a direct result of the
Holocaust studies workshop
held for social studies teachers
recently by the Community
Relations Committee and the
Jewish Education Committee
of the Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County, Holo-
caust survivors Ed Lefkowitz
and Abe Birnbaum spoke to
an American government class
at North Shore High School
about their experiences. "I
don't think students under-
stand about what really hap-
pened during the Holocaust.
We bring our experiences to
the classroom so that they
shouldn't forget what hap-
pened. By telling about our
loss of freedom, they learn to
understand what they have in
this country," stated
Lefkowitz.
Tony Negyessy, who invited
the men to speak to his classes,
video taped their presentation
and subsequently showed the
tape to each of his classes that
day. "The children were awed
by what Mr. Lefkowitz and
Mr. Birnbaum told them
about the Holocaust. It was
totally out of the realm of
their experience. Maybe it'll
bring home to them that they
better learn about the pro-
blems facing us today and not
to be so lethargic about
them," he said.
received many commendations
for my work. 1 mentioned this
Lefkowitz explained to the t0 an $$ officer that this was
students that he was the same my payoff for being knowl-
age as they are now when he edgeable, experienced and
productive. He did not answer
but issued an order that the
800 men and 50 women on my
train who had worked in the
aircraft industry, were not to
be destroyed. Eventually we
were sent to a factory to do
similar work.
went through the Holocaust.
"At the outbreak of the war
the Germans came in, con-
fiscated our businesses, beat
us up and took away our
freedom. We were crammed,
hundreds of thousands of
people, into the l.odz ghetto in
Poland. My older brother and
I heard about people being
sent to concentration camps so
we decided to run away We
crossed over into the Russian
side of Poland and were cap-
tured by the Russians. 1 spent
five unbearably hard years in
Siberia before I escaped to
Poland after the war."
Birnbaum, on the other
hand, presented the per-
spective of persecution under
the German regime. "I lived in
Czespochowicz, Poland
before being sent by train to
the concentration camp at
Auschwitz. My first impres-
sions upon arriving there were
terrifying. As our train
proceeded into the camp, I
saw SS officers killing people
who had come in on another
train and afterwards throwing
them onto a truck. At that
time I thought 1 was a better
Jew because 1 had been a test
pilot for the Germans and had
G
\
I'll never forget that as we Ronni Epstein Heft),^director of public relations for the Jfe
irdi
ions f J
g marcnea to meir ucam. men ">" J""""*"" iucu presentation
We tried to see if we knew for the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach Counh. fZJ
anyone but you couldn't Productions is a^vjdeojirojJuctionjrompan) which specializes|
recognize them. The women
"I'll never forget that as we Konni hpsiein [ieuj. airecior oi puonc relations for the Ji
were being herded to another Federation of Palm Beach County, presents a special a*!
area we saw people who were Cliff Gordon and Barbara Gordon of Pegasus Productioi
being marched to their death, their assistance in the production of several video presents
commercials and documentary films.
Women's American ORT
Helps Drop Outs
Women's American ORT's Yehoshua the teachers, the
efforts to focus greater atten- atmosphere and above all, the
tion on helping young drop- principal,
outs in the poverty stricken Says Ari: "Beth Yehoshua's
Hatikvah quarter of Tel Aviv prjncjpai is completely dif-
to return to school and gain fercnl from any principal 1
useful trades are gaining
momentum in the organiza-
tion's 1300 chapters from
coast to coast. This was an-
nounced by Gertrude S.
White, national president of
Women's American ORT, at
the organization's head-
quarters in New York City.
This intensive campaign is
being mounted to help Israel
harness the invaluable poten-
tial of its most precious
resource the human.
Among the ORT-Israel
schools which cope with the
special problems of young
people who can not be ab-
sorbed into a regular school or
work situation is Beth
Yehoshua, located in the
Hatikvah quarter of Tel Aviv.
Typical of the students who
attend this special school,
which seeks out its potential
students in their homes, is Ari,
who is 15 '/ years old. He is a
pleasant, shy youngster from a
very poor home in a run-down
neighborhood of Jaffa. His
father died when he was a very
small child, leaving Ari's
mother and six brothers
destitute.
Ari spent many years of his
young life floundering, before
reaching Beth Yehoshua
several months ago. He was
sent there by a court order, in
coordination with the decision
of a probation officer, instead
of being sent to jail. Beth
Yehoshua aims at restoring
Ari's self-image and finding a
productive and rewarding
place in society for him.
Ari likes his chosen trade,
which is carpentry, la fact, he
likes everythin* about Beth
ever knew. He is firm and does
not readily give in. At first, I
wanted to quit school, but he
refused to hear of it and some-
thing in his manner made me
listen to him and stay. 1 am
tremendously happy that I
did."
had shaved heads, were like
skeletons and in place of
normal speech, could only
manage a croak. I couldn't
believe what I saw and
wondered on what planet I
was," Birnbaum said.
The last lime Birnbaum
spoke to students he explained
that under the German regime
it didn't matter if you were a
Jew, a German or a gentile.
"If you had an illness, you
would be destroyed. A beauti-
ful blond girl came up to me
afterwards and said, 'If I were
in Germany, 1 would be
destroyed because I have an
illness.' Although I tried to
reassure her that she has the
opportunity here to be cured,
the reality of life during the
Holocaust really made an
impression on her," he said.
Ann Lynn Lipton Jewish
Education Director, Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County, noted that in her
years of teaching both in
secular schools and in Jewish
education she has found that
the most significant factor in
helping young people under-
stand the horror of the Holo-
caust is through personal
stories of individuals who
survived. "While we under-
stand how difficult it is for
them to come forward and
describe their experiences, we
appreciate the contribution
they are making to the educa-
tion of our youth," she stated.
KOSHER HOTEL
PALM BEACH
FLORIDA AREA
FREE INFORMATION BOOKLET -
AN EXCITING NEW "TRADITIONAL"
KOSHER HOTEL
"OVERLOOKING PALM BEACH
on the INTRACOASTAL WATERWAY"
- YEARLY AND MONTHLY RATES
FULL INFORMATION WILL BE SENT TO YOU
AT NO COST
AND NO OBLIGATION
Call person to person, collect;
MRS.GIN6&ERG
(305) 655-8800
Or Write
PALM BEACH RESIDENCE HOTEL
100 DATURA STREET AT FLAGLER DRIVE
WEST PALM BEACH, FLORIDA
33401
ACT NOW SPACE IS LIMITEI
>-i.,u
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Friday, October 5,1984 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 9
MLGIVESYOU
MOTIONS
TOKVELLOVER.
$776*
KVELL OVER
OUR FARE.
This is the year of El Al Israel Airlines fabulous low, low round trip fare.
Let the people of Israel take you to the land of Israel.
Your vacation begins when you step on board. Your fare includes a delicious
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$111
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Plus three nights at the fabulous Laromme Hotel. V\fe also include two
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day, November 16,1984 thru March 15,1985. (Not available 12/24/84 thru 1/5/85.)
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transfer to and from the Ramses. Now you can have it all. Israel and Cairo in one magical trip.
Aft^ M He Between November 19,1984 and February 28,1985, El Al Israel Airlines gives
yQ ^\ / \ you its "Sunsation" vacation package to Israel. Package price includes round
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KVELL FOR and a Hertz Rent-A-Car for five days.
6 DAYS. Choose from the Basel Group Hotels, or for an extra srf&k* (ggg^
$100, the deluxe Laromme Jerusalem Hotel, the Tel Aviv or Jerusalem Hiltons. You Qfa**uUumm/
can always add extra days. (Not available 12/14/84 thru 1/5/85.)
For more information call your travel agent or El Al toll free at 1-800-223-6700.
For a free, detailed color brochure on our packages, write El Al Israel Airlines,
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. 'Package price based on purchase of round trip El Al ticket from U.S. to Tel Aviv. Price subject to change
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The airline of Israel
h^i.-
A lavish expression meaning to beam with pride and joy. Comity associated wim chUdien, gra^^



tl
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Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, October 5,1984
Grassroots' Teacher Training f-

Continued from Page 3-
teach "Introduction to the
Bible" from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m.
Since the Jewish Teachers'
Institute will be meeting at the
same time as Midrasha-
Judaica High School, an
additional course has been
scheduled the second hour
specifically for Midrasha
parents. "Living with Your
Jewish Teenager" will con-
sider issues relevant to parents
of Jewish youth in the 1980's.
All three courses are open to
the general public as well as to
teachers in the community and
the parents of Midrasha
students.
The Institute will be
coordinated by Ann Lynn
Lipton, Jewish education
director of the Jewish Federa-
tion of Palm Beach County,
In Observance of Family
Sexuality Education Month
The Jewish Community
Center, a member of the
Alliance For Family Life
Education, takes part in
coordinating the 10th Anni-
versary and expansion of an
October event National
Family Sexuality Education
Week (NFSEW). For the past
nine years, one week in
October, and this year the
whole month of October, have
been set aside to support
parents as the first and
primary sexuality educators of
their children. The purpose of
NFSEW is to help community
institutions like PTAs, and
Health Agencies, to sponsor
special events encouraging
parents in their efforts to
provide accurate information
about sexuality to their
children. Working together,
parents and their communities
can provide the information
and skills necessary to prepare
today's young people to
become tomorrow's adults
and the parents of tomorrow's
children our future. The
JF&CS
Continued from Page 3
concern and closeness for the
clients develop. They may call
them at other times of the
week or even pick up a special
newspaper or magazine that
the client especially enjoys.
Mr. Stein, a volunteer, loves
the program. He also visits the
Morse Geriatric Center on
Saturdays. Mrs. Stein says,
"It is a very gratifying and
self-rewarding experience.
You give of yourself and make
others feel somebody cares
about them."
Libby Robins, another
trained volunteer, felt that
"the program was as impor-
tant to me as it was for the
clients who received the
service. You have to have
compassion for these people
because they have so many
problems."
Another volunteer, Evelyn
Goldkorn, enjoyed helping
people who are lonely because
she could cheer them up.
Criteria for becoming a
trained volunteer include
being a good listener, being re-
sponsible and mature, being
able to relate to others, and
having available a few hours a
week to visit a client. There are
at least IS people who have
served from one to four years
as volunteers.
The agency is currently
planning a reception for past,
present and future volunteers
at the Jewish Family and Chil-
dren's Service office on Tues-
day, Oct. 30, at 2250 Palm
Beach Lakes Blvd., Suite 104,
in West Palm Beach. For more
information about the recep-
tion or how to become a
Friendly Visitor, contact Ned
Goldberg at 684-1991.
public is invited to seven
events in Palm Beach County
beginning Oct. 10. For more
information contact the JCC,
686-7700.
who said, "We have tried for
the past few years to establish
a teacher training program
that would encourage people
to become licensed Jewish
educators. We feel this new
approach will encourage
teachers to work towards
licensing. In addition we have
noticed the desire on the part
of Midrasha parents to
continue their own learning
and feel that Wednesday night
at Midrasha can become a
center of learning for teens,
parents and teachers in an
environment which will
enhance their commitment to
Judaism."
For more information and-
or to register, contact Ms.
Lipton at the Jewish Federa-
tion's additional office, 655-
7706.

HM-/
The Temple Beth David choir,
under the directin of Cantor
Earl Backoff [left], debuted
during Sellchot service! held
recently. In addition
temple unveiled and dcdk
a plaque honoring bi
fund donors 198043.
D0LPHINMANIA
WINNERS!
Dolph.nmania is easy to play and no purchase S tx.Tess.iry Jusl pck up a
tree DOLPHINMANIA COLLECTOR CARD and GAME TICKET ,11 your
nearest pa'ticipaiing PuWu scratch oft the prize txi squares on Vie game
ticket and you could become an INSTANT WINNER' It you don I win
instantly YOU CAN STILL WIN by coHeclinq the ; tbe
game ticket and placmq them m the matchinq pelure ,in on the collector card
$500 $1,000
Alice Thomson
Miami
Kevin Rogan
Miramar
Stella Beavdin
Pembroke Pines
Olga Jausto
Lake Worth
Mary Louise Clayton
Delray Beach
Edward L. McGuigan
Pompano Beach
Herbert Skolnick
Pompano Beach
Nadean Vencill
Plantation
Dim.
$2,500
Toni Weston
Miami Shores
where shopping is o pleasure 7 days o week

Pubin Bakeries open al 8:00 A.M.
Available at Publix Stores with\
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Made with Wheat, Barley, Rye.
Millet, Oats and Corn, Only
70 Calories per 1-oz. Slice
Choice Grain
Bread
99*
16-oz:
loaf
N
Available at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Filled with Apples
and Cinnamon
Apple Streudel
$169
each
Available at Publix Stores with
Freeh Danish Bakeries Only.
Chocolate Cake Filled
with Cherries and Topped
with Whipped Cream
Black Forest
Cake
7-inch
ske
$yi29
A
Available at All Publix Stores
and Danish Bakeries.
An Old Fashion Favorite
Banana Nut Loaf...........each 99*
Danish Pecan Ring.......each$ 1"
Bran Muffins..............6 *, 99*
Prices Effective
Oct. 4th thru 10th. 1984
Available at Publix Stores with Fresh
Danish Bakeries Only.
French Stick
Baguettes.....................2 tor $1
Chicago Hard Rolls. 10 .or 99*
Choose from Peanut Butter or
Oatmeal Raisin
Cookies.........................*** 1
Fined with Assorted Fruit Flavors
Jelly Filled Donuts........east 30*



lanizations
in the News
HADASSAH
. Szold Group will hold their general meeting
!*hv Oct. 23,1 p.m. i attne auditorium of Lakeside
Btsday.Oct
Lillian Rd.
west of Congress Ave. in Palm
[couple
who volunteered their services for a month in
toaeliArmywi
relate their experience. There will also
Eker from the Israel Bond Office.
net 28 Shalom WPB Chapter will attend the an-
iJiewish Women's Assembly, sponsored by Women's
fcion of Federation, at the Hyatt. For reservations
E-tMaePodwol.
kvih Chapter is sponsoring a four-day three-night
nkseiving Weekend at the Sea Gull. Contact Laura
Idqn, f"nd raisin8 vice President, for more in-
flation.
NATIONAL COUNCIL
OF JEWISH WOMEN
kffchobee Section, will hold their general membership
Lg on Thursday, Oct. 18, 12:30 p.m. at the American
LsBank.Westgate.
L 8, 9, 10 are the dates for a trip to EPCOT. For
lier information call Ruth Straus Somerset 1-173 or
btineFoster Canterbury A-4.
NATIONAL JEWISH
CIVIL SERVICE
EMPLOYEES, INC.
jonlh Florida Jewish Civil Service employees will be
cting Sunday, Oct. 7, 12:30 p.m. at the Florida Gardens
He Association Center. The guest speaker will be the
torable Deputy Commissioner Louis J. Eassa who will
uss HMO vs. Medicare and Medicare supplemental
brance. Eassa is the representative-in-charge of the
Beach area for Bill Gunter, Florida's State
asurer, Insurance Commissioner and Fire Marshal. The
(lie is invited to attend this meeting. A question and
wer period will follow Mr. Eassa's talk. The chapter is
Insuring a three-day two-night Thanksgiving weekend
| to Venice Florida's Gulf Coast and a New Year's
[weekend trip to Cocoa for three-days and two-nights.
trip information contact Jeanette S. Levine.
lor information on the chapter and membership,
[tact Sid Levine, president, 2557 Emory Drive West -
|'C,' West Palm Beach, FL 33415.
WOMEN'S AMERICAN ORT
\k Hiverhill Chapter invites its members and their
dstothenext meeting, Thursday, Oct. 11, 12:30 p.m.,
he Sunrise Bank, Gun Club Road and Military Trail.
opening meeting will feature Helen Nussbaum as
[sispeaker. Mrs. Nussbaum will review a book entitled
wital Brief."
lidim Spring Chapter will meet Monday, Oct. 8, at
Royal Palm Clubhouse, NE 22nd Ave., Boynton
h, at 12:30 p.m.
fndyPlotkin of the Hibel Museum, will talk about the
sUdna Hibel, and the museum devoted to her work.
Jim of Poinciam Chapter's meeting will be held on
atthe Poinciana Lakes Clubhouse at 12:30 p.m.
Oct. 9, 12:30 p.m., a meeting of the West Palm
P Chapter will be held at the Congregation Anshei
^m. The guest speaker will be Thomas A. Kelly, editor
''Palm Beach Post.
|luncheon and card party will be held on Oct. 15,11:30
in,.DauPla.ln's Gal|ey- For reservation call Betty Gold
FoseRibach.
19 t /* Ch"P'will hold a rummage sale on
i,.Jo a,c merchandise, contact Sophie Farber,
ngtonG-223, Century Village.
w,apter wil1 be sponsoring a Thanksgiving trip to
%Pninu 22'24> Accommodations are at the
ifhsM^0^1- For reservations contact Ann Sporn,
KnN-327, Century Village.
WOMEN'S LEAGUE FOR ISRAEL
ktT,,.6.: lhe Stbr Ckapltr will sponsor a Mini
lr"thc Sunrise Savings and Loan Association.
Friday, October 5,1984 / The Jewiah Floridian of Pafan Beach County Page 11

WANTED
fer
r for Thrift Shop Jewish Community
Experienced in selling furniture and
*ith the public.
Jwith the public.
feaces required.
689-7700
Peres To Meet With Reagan In Washington Oct. 8
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Premier Shimon Peres will
meet with President Reagan in
Washington on Oct. 8, it was
announced recently. The
arrangements were concluded
at a meeting of Peres with
U.S. Ambassador Samuel
Lewis. Peres will also confer in
Washington with Secretary of
State George Shultz and their
talks are expected to focus on
economic matters.
Peres' two-day working visit
to Washington establishes the
time frame in which the new
Labor-Likud unity govern-
ment must set in motion its
economic austerity program.
Peres is expected to seek
Rabin Rejects Demands He Expel
Hostile Arabs From The West Bank
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Defense Minister Yitzhak
Rabin has flatly rejected
demands by West Bank set-
tlers that he expel from the
territory any Arab involved in
hostile acts against Jewish
settlers.
Rabin met with a delegation
of settlers Sept. 19. They
demanded tough action
against Arabs in the aftermath
of Tuesday's ambush of a
Egged bus south of Beersheba
in which four Jewish settlers
and the driver were wounded
by automatic fire. Two Arabs
in a car behind the bus were
also wounded. The bus was
bound for Kiryat Arba, near
Hebron.
Violence continued when
rocks thrown by Arab youths
smashed the windshield of an
Egged bus on the Ramallah-
Nablus roads, near the
Jalazoun refugee camp.
Stones also cracked the wind-
shield of an Israeli car near
Dahariye village. There were
no casualties in either incident.
Rabin told the settlers that
he had once favored expulsion
in such cases but has since
changed his mind.
additional large economic aid
from the U.S., beyond the
$2.5 billion the Reagan ad-
ministration has allocated in
outright grants for fiscal 1985.
The unity government's
economic program therefore
must be seen as viable in the
U.S. by the time Peres meets
with the President and
Secretary of State.
Lewis told reporters that
while Presidents campaigning
for reelection have little time
to see visiting foreign
dignitaries, Israel's "special
relationship" with the U.S.
made a difference in this case.
He said there was "great
receptivity" in Washington to
the new Premier and the unity
government.
Peres will be preceded to
Washington by Finance
Minister Yitzhak Modai who
will hold talks with top ad-
ministration officials later this
month. Modai and his
Treasury team met with a
delegation of the Manufac-
turers Association to enlist the
support of Israel industrialists
for a government-labor-
management "package deal"
to freeze wages and prices.
REGISTERED REAL ESTATE BROKER
Acre*geHome8LotaApartmentsIncome Property
232A Royal Palm Way Office: 665-7886
PALM BEACH, FLORIDA_________________________RES: 582-0184
GARDEN RAVIOLI
2 package* (K> ox. each) frozen
chopped broccoli
2 tablespoons grated Parmesan
cheese
Vt cup finely chopped onion
1 medium dove garkc. crushed
V> cup chopped red or green pepper*
1 tablespoon butter or
2 cans (15 ox each) Chef!
Cheese Ravioi in Sauce
I Trie Jewish Homemaker's Guide to Delicious Italian Cooking \
I Calls for Ckef Boy-unlee Cheese lUvioli. t^^=^^ I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
L
Cook broccoli according to package directions; drain wefl. Add
Parmesan cheese and mix well. Saute onion, garkc and peppers in
butter until lightly browned; combine with broccoli. Place Ravioh
in saucepan over low heat; stir occasionally until thoroughly
heated. Add half of the broccoli mixture to Ravioli; save half for
garnish. Arrange in shallow or 1 Vj quart serving dish. Garnish
edge with remaining broccoli. Serves 4 to 6.
BUYING GOLD & SILVER
Buying...
Scrap Cold
in any form, any condition
Buying...
Coins-Gold& Silver
Collections & Accumulations
U.S. & Foreign
H NORTH AMERICAN
Q3 RARE COINS,
INC.
2550 OKEECHOKE BLVD.. W. PALM KACN. FL.
684-1771
HOUR St ftJO .K.-feOO p.m.
Member ANA & Chamber of Commerce


D-~. t -
Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, October 5,1984
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Senior News
FROM THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
TRANSPORTATION
Transportation is available
in our designated area for
persons 60 years of age or over
who do not use public tran-
sportation. We take people to
treatment centers, doctors'
offices, to hospitals, nursing
homes to visit spouses, to
social service agencies and
nutrition centers. There is no
fee for this service, but parti-
cipants are encouraged to
contribute their fair share.
There is a great demand for
this service, so please make
your reservations in advance.
For information and-or
reservations, call 689-7703
Monday through Friday.
HOT KOSHER
LUNCH CONNECTION
Many elements combine to
make the Hot Kosher Lunch
Program at the Jewish Com-
munity Center a success. Fore-
most among this is the oppor-
tunity to form new and lasting
friendships.
Each weekday, seniors
gather for intimate talk,
educational discussions, game
playing, leisure and song.
These activities are followed
by a hot, kosher, nutritious
lunch served with warmth and
hospitality by our dedicated
volunteers. There is no set fee,
but persons are asked to make
a contribution each meal.
Please come and join us.
For information and reser-
vations (which must be made
in advance) call Carol or
Lillian at 689-7703 in West
Palm Beach.
HOME DELIVERED
MEALS
Persons who are
homebound and need a
Kosher meal please call for
information. Call Carol in
West Palm Beach at 689-7703.
PALM BEACH COUNTY
ADULT EDUCATION
CLASS
Classes will begin Oct. 23
this year. There are no fees for
Tennis Champ
Wins
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Aaron Krickstein, the 17-year-
old tennis sensation from
Grosse Pointe, Mich.,
defended his title here by
defeating Shahar Perkis, 6-1,
6-4, month to win the $90,000
Israel Grand Prix Tennis
Tournament. The victory was
on the same court where
Krickstein last year captured
the title of the Tel Aviv
tournament, his first inter-
national tennis victory.
QROWARD
QAPER *
QACKAGING
FREE DEUVIRY FLORIDA
PALM 1EACH 133-0211
(:]OW*R
IJAP6R i
(JACKAGING
Best Wishes For A
Healthy and Happy New Year
these classes or pre-
registration but contributions
are requested.
Following is the schedule:
Tuesdays Fitness Over
Fifty, 11 a.m. (will begin
earlier. Call 689-7703 for
information); Wednesdays -
Know Your Car, 9:30 a.m.;
Thursdays musical of the
80's, 1:15 p.m.; Fridays -
Writers Workshop, 1:15 p.m.
(Pre-registration required for
this class).
CLASSES AND
DISCUSSION GROUPS
Arts and Crafts Mondays,
2-4 p.m. Instructors: Lee
Blumenthal, Evelyn Katz.
Timely Topics Round
Table Discussion Tuesday,
11:15-3 p.m. Group Leader:
Sylvia Skolnik.
Speakers Club Thursday,
9:30-11 a.m. Morris Shuken,
president.
W
ss

O'
off
cP
PAIOPOl
DO YOU HAVE ANY
MATURED ISRAEL BONDS?
Search your vault for matured Israel Bonds yoi
may have overlooked or forgotten.
Matured Israel Bonds do NOT continue to
accrue interest for the Bondholder.
Only when Bonds that have reached maturity
are redeemed and reinvested promptly do the]
continue to help both you and Israel.
To reinvest Israel Bonds, contact the Israel
Bond office for Prospectuses and subscripts
forms:
Development Corporationfor Israel
STATE OF ISRAEL BONDS
2300 Palm Beach Lakes Boulevard, Suite 216
West Palm Beach, Florida 33409
686-8611
On the 36th Anniversary of the State of Israel,
We Wish All A Healthy and Happy New Year.
GERALD LESHER
SUt of Israel Bonds
U





lutstanding Teachers*
Additional Insight At CAJE Confab
Friday, October 5,1984 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 13
lain
LSJ lU Coordinator
opportunity to learn
fc fe current trends n
Pl education and to
W deas with educators
bl0nacco(rd,"g o two
Sanding teachers" from
area Shoshana Sharf
ir and Eleanor
t recently returned
t attending the annual
ft. in San Francisco.
F;ere awarded incentive
I lo go to the educators
[onion when they were
ijniad as "outstanding
religious school teachers of the
year" by the Educators'
Council of Palm Beach
County and the Jewish
Education Committee of the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County during Yom
Hamoreh (Teacher
Recognition Day) ceremonies
last May.
Ms. Newcorn, who teaches
at Temple Beth David, was
pleasantly surprised to see a
large attendance by lay leaders
involved in education in
addition to the expected
professional Jewish educators.
"The conference tried to
involve everyone who had an
interest in Jewish education.
Lectures and workshops were
geared to the lay leader as
well. Everyone in this com-
munity should know that they
can participate in this
stimulating conference," Ms.
Newcorn said.
As a teacher of 20 years of
classroom experience, Ms.
Sharf felt that the workshops
were good. "I was able to get
something from every one of
them. I use games to reinforce
what I teach, but even after 20
years of accumulating various
games, I still picked up many
more. This was very positive,"
stated Ms. Sharf, who divides
her teaching activities among
the Jewish Community Day
Continued on Page 15
'artner Connection Program At JCC
j Jewish Community
lier is announcing a new
Lam concept for Jewish
L called the "Partner
fcnection." Partner
jnection is a personal ad-
|jement column which will
_j in the Jewish Commu-
ICentcr's Singles Brochure
llished monthly.
is new program service
I created to meet the needs
four growing Jewish singles
wlation. It offers Jewish
iles the opportunity to
it new friends through the
onals.
Suggestions for Use
Treat this service as a
to meet a friend. Often
people expect too much and
are consequently disap-
pointed.
2. Arrange a first meeting
at a "safe" spot for a brief en-
counter: lunch or brunch at a
restaurant, an after work
drink at a favorite "watering
hole" or a racquetball game or
singles event.
3. Ifnewintown.tellus.lt
could be a good way to get a
feel for the community and
meet new friends.
4. Let people know of your
particular interests: that you
may need a bridge partner,
snorkeling buddy, Trivial Pur-
suit group, movie buffs,
camera lovers, etc.
5. Please let "Partner Con-
jrtugal Will Honor Commitment
To Open Embassy In Israel
visit Israel. Nunes heads the
Socialist faction in the Por-
tuguese parliament.
Jerusalem uta>
nier Shimon Peres has
pved personal assurances
i Premier Mario Suarezof
nugal that he will honor the
Mmment he gave Peres
ft time ago to open a resi-
Embassy in Israel when
Pes becomes Prime
MB,
pie message was delivered
' Jose Luis Nunes, a key
z political aide, who
Non Peres here. The Isra-
| Premier responded with a
invitation to Suarez to
|Begin Undergoes
Surgery
Jerusalem (jta)
m Premier Menachem
fi underwent surgery for a
Recondition at Shaare
IB Hospital and is recover-
lud feeling well, according
jiKKpital bulletin. His aide,
m Kadishai told reporters
Pile operation was suc-
Bflll.
fk W, was hospitalized
les which determined
he did not have a
pncy His surgeon, Dr.
C !arkas' hejd of the
gjw department at Shaare
'' sa>d his condition was
Kommon for a man of
m Sources close to Begin
F*1 hope that once he is
ft/?COVercd he would
om he self-imposed
J'onm which he has lived
E* resigned as Prime
to August, 1983, and
J^jng his long planned
7*'*^tiraiam +f.
* and redemption."
Peres and Suarez are both
members of the Socialist
International. Portugal and
Israel established diplomatic
relations in the 1970's.
nection" know about your
experiences.
TO ADVERTISE
Write a paragraph or two
(no more than 100 words). In-
clude information on yourself
and who and what you are
looking for. Send your ad with
name, address, and phone
number clearly printed with a
check (made out to the JCC)
for $2 to: "Partner Connec-
tion," c-o Jewish Community
Center, 2415 Okeechobee
Blvd., West Palm Beach, FL
33409.
All ads will be treated confi-
dentially. An ID number will
be substituted for your name.
TO ANSWER
Place your reply (replies) in
a sealed envelope(s) with
adequate postage for mailing.
Please put corresponding ID
number on each response. Put
responses in larger envelope,
adhere postage and mail to:
"Partner Connection"
Responses, c-o Jewish
Community Center, 2415
Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm
Beach, FL 33409.
To be put on the mailing list
for the singles Brochure or for
more information call Terrie
Lubin or Jerry Melman at 689-
7700.
Gulfside Getaway
5 Days, 4 Nights only $189.95
3 Days, 2 Nights only $99.95
Doubi* occupancy. Including iiih and gratultter
May lal through Oacambar 15th. 1*M.
gaaaKi W on 11*** r -
PACKAGE INCLUDES 4 MIGHTS 2 NIOHTS
Double room lor 2 paople 4 Nights 2 Nights
Continental break last lor 2 4 Mornings 2 Mornings '
Dinner lor 2 2Evanings 1 Evan.ng
VWolcoma Cocktail lor 2 in our Gangplank Lounga
Special Golf Discounts available.
Miles of whit* sand beaches heated swimming
pool, live entertainment in lounge, tennis and goll
nearby. Boat trips available for sightseeing, fishing
and shelling Children 18 and under FREE in room
with parents Children's meals al menu prices
Write or call for reservations...
(813) 597-3151
11000 Gulf Shore Drive North
Vanderbilt Beach Naples. Florida 33940
JCC News
FOR THE PURSUIT OF TRIVIA
AND FRIENDSHIP
The Young Singles(Age 21-35) of the Jewish Community
Center will be gathering together Sunday, Oct. 14 at 12:30
p.m. at Camp Shalom on Belvedere Road, one mile west of
the turnpike, for an afternoon of fun and trivia.
Bring yourself, a friend, your Trivia Pursuit Game if
you have one, lunch for one or more or something to cook
on the barbecue. Swimming, volley ball, tennis, baseball
and good old fashioned camaraderie will be available. We
will supply drinks, chips and ice cold beer.
The host for the day is Ron Warren and the fee is $3 for
JCC members, $4 for non-members.
Call Terrie at 689-7700 for registration and-or additional
information.
YOUTH TO SEE THE SEA
The Jewish Community Center's Youth Department has
arranged for two separate age groups (4th, 5th and 6th
Graders), (7th, 8th and 9th Graders), to visit Sea Camp
Jan. 2, 3 and 4, Wednesday through Friday during the
school Winter Recess.
Sea Camp is located at Newfound Harbor at the Marine
Institute in Big Pine Key, Fla.
Both swimmers and non-swimmers are invited to
participate in this unique opportunity to explore and learn
about our Marine Ecosystem while developing new skills
and making new friends.
All activities will be under direct supervision of the Sea
Camp instructors. The wonders and beauty of the sea will
be viewed while snorkeling over multi-typed coral reefs as
well as tropical areas and the shorelines. All will have
access to the Laboratory-Library Complex and research
equipment. Other activities include boat trips, arts and
crafts and camp fires.
Group size is limited. The cost including transportation
and food is $150 for JCC members and $175 for non-
members. A $50 deposit must accompany a reservation.
The deadline is Oct. 30.
For additional information and brochure please call
Terri Lubin at 689-7700.
CALLING ALL DECORATORS
Children of all ages and their friends and families are
invited to come to the Jewish Community Center, 2415
Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach, Tuesday, Oct. 9
from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. to join in the joy of decorating
the Center's Sukkah.
Bring a Kosher style dinner. Beverage and dessert will be
supplied. Bring fruit to hang in the Sukkah.
The evening will consist of the learning of this festive
holiday and its symbols, the Etrog and the Lulov.
No one is too young or too old to help prepare for the
celebration of the coming of Sukkot.
The fee for this event is $2 per JCC member family and
$5 per non-member family. Pre-registration is necessary.
Please call Harreen at 689-7700.
G'marHatimaTova
The American Friends
Of Tel Aviv University
James H. Nobil Lauren Azoulai
Chairman Executive Director
Boca Raton Chapter
Serving Palm Beach County ___
&
&
f
BREAKING"* A*

North Palm Beach County region ORT Thrift Shop
wants your quality furniture (whether it's one
piece, a roomful, or a houseful, bric-a-brac, car-
pets, china and upholstered furniture,., (Any item
(that is in GOOD coi^i WQNL/f)
'We will pick up items^from, your home eatn a
tax deduction for yourself and monies for ORT.
,968-6804 833-9126 634 Clematis 8t.
v-


D~.
Page 14 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, October 5,1984
The Rabbinical Corner
DEVOTED TO DISCUSSION OF THEMES AND ISSUES RELEVANT TO JEWISH UFE. FAST AND PRESENT
Candle Lighting Time
flri. Oct. S6:43 PJ
Yom Kippur Belongs in the Synagogue
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RABBI JOEL L. LEVINE
Temple Judea
Our liturgy reminds us that
". in Your love, O Lord
our God, You have given us
this Day of Atonement, that
our sins may cease and be for-
given, and that ... we may
turn back to You and do Your
will with a perfect heart." This
New Year, as we begin to con-
sider carefully how we will
observe Yom Kippur, we need
to take advantage of the mood
created by the synagogue with
its moving liturgy and music.
This Yom Kippur, we need to
emphasize "Yom" which
means "day." We need to
remain in the synagogue
during the day. We need allow
the music and the liturgy to
help us search, to help us
discover, to help us find ways
to cleanse our souls.
Unfortunately in American
Rabbi Joel L. Levine
Judaism, many of us have
permitted ourselves to lose the
spiritual magic of Yom
Mar-.i Adler [right] and her two sons entertained friends
in their sukkah last year. This >ear they have bought a
pre-fab wooden sukkah for easier storage and larger
capacity.
Families to Construct
Continued from Page 2
will be visiting our sukkah
because it's the philosophy of
the school to make children
aware that individuals, in
addition to temples and the
day school, follow the
commandment to 'sit in a
sukkah' by building their own.
Weather permitting, the
Mullens eat meals in the
sukkah as it is quite large.
Every year they host an Open
Sukkah gathering lor their
friends so that they will be able
to fulfill the "mitzvah." "We
usually have in excess of one
hundred people including
children which contributes to
the family atmosphere of the
holiday." Mullen said.
Pre-fab wooden sukkot for
use next year can be ordered
from Craftwood Lumber
Company, 1590 Deerfield
Road, Highland Park, IL
60035.
M^vyiinwikir 0s
MOVING &
STORACE
State Moving
Licensed & Insured
Wast Palm Baach
659-2222
DISCOUNTS
Boca
428-8144
Ft. Laudardala
563-5680
Kippur. We arrive in time on
Yom Kippur morning to hear
the sermon, to taste instead of
to experience the Torah
Service, we walk around the
synagogue building and
grounds visiting with our
friends, we laugh, we gossip.
In the early afternoon, we
make a mass exodus from the
synagogue and lose the mood
of Yom Kippur completely.
Those of us who must say
Yizkor come for Yizkor.
Many of us return to
synagogue in time for the final
sounding of the Shofar.
Seriously, how then -can we
find the peace, the spiritual
peace to concentrate on our-
selves, what we must do this
coming year, what kind of
persons we must become,
which goals we need to focus
on?
Yom Kippur belongs in the
vynagogue! Yom Kippur is the
synagogue holy day par excel-
lence! This year, we need to
conceive of the synagogue as a
spiritual retreat from the
evervday, a spiritual retreat in
which we can think, in which
we can decide to act. in which
we can make decisions which
can change our lives. Every-
thing in the liturgy on Yom
Kippur has been designed by
our rabbis and sages for this
purpose. We need to feel in the
words of the "Lnetaneh
Tokef" prayer, "the sacred
power of this day." We need
to allow ourselves to feel the
words of the liturgy, the emo-
tion of the music.
Indeed, the Yom Kippur
liturgy is painful. It reminds us
of the sacrifices our ancestors
have made for the survival of
Judaism. It reminds us ol the
sacrifices we must make to
insure Jewish survival. The
liturgy rips our emotions apart
whiie it lists the sins we have
committed during the past
year. It reminds us of the
spiritual and emotional
rewards which we can receive
from making meaningful
changes in our lives. The
liturgy reminds us of our
responsibility as members of
the Jewish community.
A time to sit in the
s\ nagogue for a short time and
leave in order to laugh, look at
the clothes our friends are
wearing, to gossip, to go home
and engage in inappropriate
activities, to even go to busi-
ness out of our drive to be
successful? Is this not the
reason why many of us fail to
make changes Yom Kippur
after Yom Kippur? Is this the
reason why Yom Kippur has
become a social rather than a
supremely spiritual occasion
for millions of American
Jews?
Our liturgy tells us that God
is very patient. God waits until
the day of death for the sinner
to repent. Our tradition also
tells us that our goal in life is
not to die but to live! This
year, remain in the synagogue
on Yom Kippur. Allow the
liturgy and music to move you
to search your souls as you
have never searched your souls
before. Then as you hear the
final blast of the shofar, you
may truly look forward to a
new year filled with new life,
with new meaning, and with
new hope!
Religious Directory
Conservative
CONGREGATION ANSHEI SHOLOM: 5348 Gmv. a.
West Palm Beach 33409. PHone 684-3212 Rabh' l
Vander Walde. Cantor Mordecai Spektor. Dailv s-V i
and 7:30 p.m. Friday: 8:30 a.m., 5 p.m. and a late servi1
8:15 p.m., followed by Oneg Shabbat. Saturday 830
7:30 p.m., Mincha followed by Sholosh Suedos.
CONGREGATION BETH KODESH OF Rftwi*
BEACH: 501 N.E. 26 Avenue. Boynton Beach 334flfi d3
586-9428. Rabbi Avrom L. Drazin. Monday 830 ?
Thursday 8:30 a.m. Sabbath services, Friday 815 n
Saturday 9 a.m. p
GOLDEN LAKES TEMPLE: 1470 Golden Lakes Bl
West Palm Beach 33411. Phone 689-9430. Rabbi ,w
Speiser. Daily Services 8:15 a.m. and 5:30 p.m SabbtL
services Friday 8:15 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m.. 5 p.m., jfS
followed by Sholosh Suedos.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID: 4657 Hood Road, Palm
Gardens 33410. Phone 694-2350. Rabbi William Ma.
Cantor Earl J. Rackoff. Sabbath services. Friday 8 pj
Saturday 10 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 2815 No. Flagler Dr.. West Pal.
Beach 33407. Phone 833-0339. Rabbi Howard J. Hind]
Cantor Elaine Shapiro. Sabbath services Friday 8:15 pi
Saturday 9:30 a.m. Daily Minyan 8:15 a.m.. Sunday
Legal Holidays 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 315 N. A Street, Lake Wort
33480. Phone 585-5020. Rabbi Emanuel F.isenberg. Cantt
Jacob Elman. Services Monday and Thursday 8:15 7m\
Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 224 N.W. Avenue G. E
Glade 33430. Sabbath services Friday. 8:30 p.m. Phone1
3886.
TEMPLE BETH ZION: Lions Club, 700 Camelia Dr., R.,.
Palm Beach. Mailing Address: POBox 104, 650 Royal Pali,
Blvd.. Royal Palm Beach. FL 33411. Sabbath Services Friday]
p.m.. Saturday 8:45 a.m. Rabbi Nathan Zelizer. Phone 791
9122.
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB: 2177 So. Congress Ave., West
Beach 33406. Phone 433-5957. Rabbi Dr. Morris Silberman.l
Sabbath services. Friday 8 p.m., Saturday and Holidays 9a.m,|
Monday and Thursday 9 a.m.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL: 190 North County Road. Palm Beachl
33480. Phone 832-0804. Rabbi Joel Chazin, Cantor David!
Dardashti. Sabbath services. Friday 8:30 p.m.; Saturday 9a.m. 1
THE TREASURE COAST JEWISH CENTER Bail
Abraham: 3257 S.E. Salerno Road. Port Salerno. Rabbi|
Abraham Rose. 1-287-8833. Services Friday evenings 8 p.m.
LAKE WORTH JEWISH CENTER: St. Lukes UnitsJl
Methodist Chapel. 165 Ohio Road. Lake Worth. Phone 433-J
1869. Friday night serivces 8:15 p.m., Saturday, 9 a.m.
Orthodox
CONGREGATION AITZ CHAIM: Century Village, We
Palm Beach. Phone 689-4675. Sabbath services 9 am ana
p.m. Daily services 8:15 a.m. and 6:30 p.m.
Reform
CONGREGATION BETH ISRAEL: 1592 FloresU. P.0- Bj
857146. Port St. Lucie, FL 33452. Friday night services 8 p-a-i
Saturday morning 10:30 a.m. Phone 465-6977. j
THE REFORM TEMPLE OF JUPITER TEQ^S "
Jupiter H,gh School. Military Trail. Jupiter. Ma**
Plaza 222, U.S. No. 1. Tequeata 33458. Phone 747-4235. woo
Alfred L. Friedman. Services Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 4600 Oleander Avenue, Fort Pierce, FL
33450. Phone 461-7428. Cantor Anne Newman.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM: St. Helens Parish Hall |
Avenue and Victory Blvd., Vero Beach IB* .^3
address: P.O. Box 2113, Vero Beach, FL 32961-2113. Ra'|
Stephen Adams. Phone 1-569-0180.
TEMPLE BETH TORAH: at St. David's in *JJjl
Episcopal Retreat, Forest Hill Blvd. and Wellington nti
West Palm Beach. Mailing address: P.O. Box inm J
services 8:15 p.m- <
Palm Beech, FL 33416. Friday serview er_M
Steven R. Westman, Cantor Nicholas Fenakel. Hnow
2700. o^di
TEMPLE ISRAEL: 1901 No. Flagler Dr.. West W"S3
33407. Phoe* 833-8421. Rebbi Howard Shapiro, ^
Soloist Susan Weiss. Sabbath services, Friday p.m
TEMPLE JUDEA: at St. Catherine's Greek OrthttkaCborj
Social Hall. 4000 Washington Rd.. at SoatbaraWnj,.
Rabbi Joel L. Levine. Cantor Anns Newman. Madiar
5154 Okeechobee Blvd., West-Palm Beech, FL 334W
471-1626.



Friday, October 5,1984 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 16
s
lagogueNews
foiti Kippur, Sukkot Services Slated
i TEMPLE BETH EL
L Sisterhood's next
E, w be held on Tues-
P, 6, 8 p.m., at the
15 S ner Hall. Rabbi
P]k Hirsch will review
O^-^e Rabbi's Life
B' bv Marilyn Green-
tr he Outsider" by
tf Fast. Cantor Elaine
So *iH Iwd community
gdaysinging.
Laments will be served
a Deaths
K 7j of Delray Beach.
"it Guardian Plan Chapel, Weat
, tt, of 2M Sulky Way, Weal
, BMdi Rlverilde Guardian Plan
j,Wet Palm Beach.
, tl of Ent Hampton H Century
Weit Palm Beach. Levlt
__ Guaranteed Security Plan
iLWett Palm Beach.
HEN
B of Norwich C-B8. Century
Weit Plm Beach. Rlverilde
Plan Chapel. Weat Palm
|UIEK
, M. Century Village, Weat Palm
LevlttWelnsteln Guaranteed
1 Plan Chapel.
, 71, of Waltham Century
,.. Weit Palm Beach Menorah
u and Fune ral Chapel.
CHITZ
i 79, of 2815 N.E. Flrat Court,
Beach. Riverside Guardian
Chapel, West Palm Beach.
RKOWITZ
1,71, of Sheffield I Century Village,
Pilm Beach. Levltt-Welnteln
teed Security Plan Chapel. Weat
n Beach.
MERCHICK
, ot 100 Lake Frances Drive.
Palm Beach. LevlttWelnsteln
inteed Security Plan Chapel, Weit
iBuch
i A, 81, of 738 A Nantucket Circle.
i Worth. Riverside Ouardlan Plan
I. Weat Palm Beach.
WON
prt. 77, of Dorchester E, Century
Weat Palm Beach. Levitt-
Guaranteed Security Plan
PlWest Palm Beach.
mop*
to. 81. of U Lakeann Drive. West
Beach LevlttWelnsteln
"teed Security Plan Chapel. West
"Beach.
wit of Ownership, Management
FOrculatlon (required by 39 USC
' TlUe of publication:
Floridian of Palm Beach
Publication No. 088030 2
J fling: Sept. 30, 1984. S -
"* of Issue: Weekly mid-Sept.
JmldMay. Bl-Weekly balance of
h Z n ,MUM Pul>"h am Annu> subscription
aJ?5J ~ ^""on of known
I km Uon: M6 Spanlah River
Jgj Boca Raton. FU. 8MU. B -
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CONGREGATION
BETH KODESH
The congregation of
Boynton Beach will usher in
the Yom Kippur with Kol
Nidre services at 7 p.m.
Friday, Oct. 5. Rabbi Avrom
L. Drazin will chant the liturgy
and discuss "A Special Kol
Nidre Plea." Cantor Arthur
Rosenwasser will chant the
liturgy.
Yom Kippur Service will be-
gin at 9 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 6.
The Yizkor Memorial Service
will be recited at 11:30 a.m.
Rabbi Drazin will ask "What
Is Life?" Seating for the
Yizkor Service will be avail-
able to the general public on a
limited basis.
Mincha (afternoon) Service
will begin at 5 p.m., followed
by the Neilah (closing) Service
at 6:30 p.m.
CONGREGATION
BETH KODESH
The Sisterhood Will hold
their meeting at the new
temple on Tuesday, Oct. 9,
12:30 p.m.
Louise Shure, regional di-
rector of Palm Beach
County's Anti-Defamation
League will speak about anti-
Semitism.
Sisterhood meetings will be
held the second Tuesday of
each month (instead of the
first Tuesday).
TEMPLE BETH EL
All past presidents of
Temple Beth El in West Palm
Beach are to be honored the
weekend of Oct. 19-20. After
Friday evening services, which
will commence at 8:15 p.m. on
Oct. 19, there will be an Oneg
Shabbat. On Saturday, Oct.
20, services will start at 9:30
a.m., to be followed by kid-
dush.
In addition to the above, all
past presidents will be ac-
corded honors during the serv-
ices, and appropriate recog-
nition for thier contributions
to the congregation will be
given.
The climax of this weekend
will be a Testimonial Lunch-
eon to honor immediate past
president, Sam Wadler. This
will take place on Sunday,
Oct. 21, 11:30 a.m., in the
Venetian Ballroom of the
Breakers.
The committee headed by
Max B. Shapiro and Dr. Peter
D. Wunsh are responsible for
all arrangements.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
The Sisterhood of Lake
Worth will hold a regular
meeting on Wednesday, Oct.
10 in the Social Hall, at 315 N.
"A" St., Lake Worth. Coffee
and cake will be served at
12:30 p.m., followed by the
meeting at 1 p.m.
Sisterhood and guests will
be entertained with classical
selections on the piano by
Fannie Greenberg followed by
a singalong.
TEMPLE ISRAEL
On Wednesday evening, Oct.
10 at 7 p.m., Temple Israel
will usher in the Festival of
Sukkot. The evening will begin
with the children of the Reli-
gious School finishing up the
decoration of theSnkah. This
year the theme of the Sukah
will be "Sukkat Shalom a
Sukah Dedicated to Peace."
According to Rabbi
Shapiro, Temple Israel is
joining Reform congregations
all over the country who are
decorating their Sukah with
symbols of peace, to be re-
minded of the responsibility to
work for peace and to support
a sane nuclear policy. The
Sukah itself is a symbol of
peace and the word Sukah is
mentioned in the Hashkiveynu
prayer: "Blessed is the Lord
whose Tabernacle (Sukah) of
peace is spread over us, over
all His people, Israel, and over
Jerusalem."
Immediately after the final
decorations, the congregation
will assemble in the Sanctuary
for a brief Sukkot Service, in
which the new children of our
Religious School will be
consecrated.
On Thursday morning, Oct.
11 at 10:30 a.m., First Day
Sukkot Services will be cele-
brated with a Kiddush to
follow in the Sukah. Services
are open to all.
Temple Israel has an-
nounced the first in its Adult
Education Series for the year
5745. Linking with the Public
Service Television broadcast
of "Heritage, Civilization and
the Jews," Rabbi Howard
Shapiro and Ceceil Tishman
will co-teach a course on
Jewish History and how it has
affected and been affected by
the civilizations in which it has
lived.
The course will be offered in
the Temple Library each night
of Heritage's broadcasting at 8
p.m. There will be a preview
and review of the issues that
will be presented that evening.
At 9 p.m., the class will watch
the TV presentation together.
Mrs. Tishman and Rabbi
Shapiro have collated support
and enrichment material that
will go along with the themes
of each individual broadcast.
"A uniquely enriched and
exciting educational experi-
ence will be experienced by all
who attend," stated Rabbi
Shapiro.
"Heritage, Civilization and
the Jews" spans 19 countries
and 29 locations on four
continents. It has been six
years in the making and is the
only television series on the
history of the Jewish people.
For more information on the
course, call Temple Israel. The
course will be continuing for
the duration of the telecast,
for anyone interested in par-
ticipating.
TEMPLE JUDEA
Rabbi Joel L. Levine will
consecrate the new students of
Temple Judea's religious
school at Sukkot Family Wor-
ship, Wednesday evening,
Oct. 10, 7:30 p.m., at St.
Catherine's Cultural Center,
the corner of Southern Blvd.
and Flagler Drive. Cantor
Anne Newman will chant the
music.
Sheree Friedlander will
assist Rabbi Levine and
Cantor Newman in the conse-
cration ceremonies. Mrs.
Friedlander is the new director
of education of Temple Judea.
Participating will be Aimee
iLevitt, chairperson of the
School Board. Mrs. Levitt will
note that this year has been a
year of extraordinary growth
as enrollment now numbers at
over 100 students. The conse-
crants will receive small Torah
Scrolls and bags of Sukkot
candy courtesy of the Sister-
hood.
Rabbi Levine will blend
portions of Temple Judea's
new intergenerational family
ritual into the service. October
birthday celebrants will be
blessed. Parents and their chil-
dren will participate in the
ritual of blessing. Building the
Sukka is an annual project of
Temple Judea's Senior Youth
group led by President Sam
Goodstein and Youth Advisor
Susan Wolf-Schwartz.
Members of the community
are invited to attend the
service and oneg shabbat fol-
lowing sponsored by the Sis-
terhood. For more informa-
tion, call the office.
Outstanding Teachers
Continued from Page 3
School, Temple Beth El and
Temple Judea.
The participants were free
to choose their interest areas
from among a wealth or
programming. Publishers of
educational materials gave
workshops with many
practical ideas. "We were
exposed to sophisticated,
effective material that had
been tested in the classroom
and that was available for our
use. 'Secrets of Being a Master
Teacher' and 'Making
Learning Fun as well as
Effective' were also most
interesting and useful," Ms.
Newcorn said.
In addition to extensive
lectures and workshops, the
1800 educators and lay leaders
were treated to Israeli dancing
and folk singing, dramatic
presentations and a cantorial
concert. A resource center, the
CAJE Curricular Bank, had
on display material available
for the educators' use. In
addition, other educational
materials were exhibited and a
computer center was open.
Although Ms. Sharf was
most impressed with the
amount and quality of the
information presented, she felt
there was not enough time for
exchanging ideas among the
teachers. "I was always afraid
1 would miss something. There
was something going on at
every moment. I would like to
see shorter lectures and more
time for discussing the subject
matter presented. When you
are teaching a long time,
things tend to get routine.
Having an opportunity to
meet with so many other
teachers opens your mind to
different approaches," she
said.
Ms. Newcorn agreed that it
was a wonderful refresher
course. "I can't wait to go
back next year."
PR Award
Continued tram Page 1
TV program, "Mosaic."
Over the past seven years
the Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County has captured 14
national public relations
awards, including this year's
awards.
AU awards will be presented
to Federation representatives
at the 53rd General Assembly
of the Council of Jewish
Federations Nov. 14-18 in
Toronto. Rohni Epstein is
director of the Public Rela-
tions Department, Louise
Ross is the assistant news
coordinator for the Jewish
Floridian, and Nettie Berk is
the public relations coordin-
ator.


n-----*
* n%*
Page 16 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, October 5.1984
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VANTAGE
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That's Success!
Warning: The Surgeon General Has Determined
That Cigarette Smoking Is Dangerous to Your Health.
9 mg. V. 0.7 mg. ncotns w. pw ogwrni. fTC Rtport FEB. '84.
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VOLUME 10 NUMBER 31
PALM BEACH, FLORIDA
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 5, 1984
PRICE 35CENTS
Israel Imposes New,
Harsh Economic Measures
IrvGIL SEDAN
Ydavid LANDAU
USALEM (JTA) -
Jvernment has imposed
K(w economic measures
V absorbing some $900
I from the public sector
|eans of curbing infla-
te double-barreled
:h thai went into effect
Mimeproperly tax and
{subsidies for fuel and
basic commodities that
]rices soaring has
nder fire from some of
ouniry's leading
Us.
Icut-back on subsidies
Iffect immediately to
hoarding for the High
fs. The tax, which won
jproval by the Cabinet,
Aply to private cars,
apartments where the
lis not the resident,
is premises and
Its. Tax collection
swill be tightened and
loopholes closed, according to annual rate of over 400
Finance Minister Yitzhak percent is likely to exceed
Modai. 1,000 percent.
ACCORDING TO some
economists, however, the
measures will not achieve their
objectives unless matched by
the SI billion slash in
government spending vowed
by the Cabinet last week but
apparently not likely to
materialize in this fiscal year.
Moreover, the cuts in price
supports have the immediate
effect of further fueling in-
flation. And they are selective.
Many basics still benefit from
full subsidies, making it more
difficult for the government to
meet its SI billion savings
target.
The price of fuel went up by
30 percent overnight. The
prices of other government
controlled products rose by
18-55 percent. As a result,
economic experts say, in-
flation now running at an
At the same time, the
government is continuing to
support the price of bread by a
subsidy of 134 percent, eggs by
105 percent, milk by 103
percent, and frozen poultry by
97 percent. Even so, long
queues developed at super-
markets and gasoline stations
as the public rushed to stock
up on food and fuel before the
midnight price hike deadline.
THE ECONOMIC program
is one of the few areas where
the Labor-Likud unity
government is in substantial
agreement on goals. Premier
Shimon Peres told the Knesset
that the gravity of Israel's
economic situation is without
precedent. He defended the
new taxes against opposition
charges that wage earners are
being forced to bear most of
Continued on Page 7
1984 Campaign Tops
$5.5 Million
Over $5.5 million has been raised for the 1984 Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach County-United Jewish Appeal
campaign, announced Myron J. Nickman, president and
immediate past general campaign chairman. This is the
largest campaign amount ever raised by the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach County and represents a 25
percent increase over the prior year. Nickman stated that
the record setting results were brought about by the
"dedication and commitment of our campaign volunteers
who reached out to friends, colleagues and neighbors to
explain the role which Federation fundraising plays in
contemporary Jewish life, and how it supports programs
and human services for Jews at home and abroad."
Nickman noted that the people of Palm Beach County
have a generous appreciation for the needs of the poor and
elderly in Israel and other countries overseas. Campaign
workers have reported that there is also an increased
awareness of local needs and the necessity to provide for
the Jewish population here," he said.
Looking ahead to the 1985 campaign, Nickman stated
that there will be a special emphasis on the growth of the
Jewish community in the Palm Beaches and escalating
social service needs in Israel. "Our increasing Jewish
population means that many new demands are being
placed on our agencies for increased services. Last year we
opened the Boynton Beach branch office to serve the needs
of residents in that part of the county, while this year four
new campaign associates have joined the Federation staff
to reach out to an expanding population in the Palm
Beaches. We must respond to the increased need for
services here, as elsewhere, by raising our campaign to new
heights in 1985," concluded Nickman.________________

Palm Beach Federation
Captures One of Eight Top PR Awards
NEW YORK, N.Y. Gold
Awards, symbolic of excel-
lence in public relations, have
been won by the Jewish
Federations of Palm Beach,
Washington, Boston, San
Francisco, Rhode Island,
Rochester and New Orleans in
the 1984 competition spon-
sored by the Council of Jewish
Federations.
In making the an-
nouncement, Hap Levy of
Miami, chairman of the CJF
Public Relations Awards
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
BUILDING A COMMUNITY
The cover of the award
winning campaign brochure
depicts the mosaic of Jewish
life.
Committee, noted that this
year Gold, Silver and Bronze
Awards were given out in an
attempt to distinguish between
various levels of achievement.
Judging of the entries was
completed by a 35-member
committee comprised of
various representatives of
Jewish Federations from
throughout North America.
Individuals were prohibited
from judging any material
submitted by their own
Federation. Leah Siskin,
chairman of the Public Rela-
tions Committee for the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County, served on the
national committee.
Only eight communities in
North America were given the
top gold awards. The Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County being one of these top
communities, won for its
campaign brochure titled
"Building a Community." In
addition to the top gold
award, the Palm Beach Jewish
Federation won an additional
three awards, including a
bronze and two honorable
mentions for its "Share the
Vision" television spots, the
1984 Annual Report and the
Super Sunday live broadcast
on the Federation-sponsored
Continued on Page 15
Inside
Kippur
Many
fcknown facts
'me Day of
"^nt are highlight-
Q6 6
sparing
Sukkot
J',0ung families
about building
Coheir homa
port. Page i
Peace Road 'Long'
Reagan Repeats 'Initiative' At UN
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS -
(JTA) Declaring that the
road to peace in the Ml East is "long and hard,' Pre-
sident Reagan told the General
Assembly Monday he is as
committed to his September 1,
1982 peace initiative as he was
on the day he issued it.
"That initiative remains a
realistic and workable ap-
proach, and I am committed
to it as firmly as on the day I
announced it," the President
declared. He said that the
foundation of this plan
remains Security Council
Resolution 242.
Stressing the importance of
negotiations, Reagan, whose
speech lasted 25 minutes and
who referred to the Middle
East only briefly, said, "The
lesson of experience is that
negotiations work. The peace
treaty between Israel and
Egypt brought about the
peaceful return of the Sinai,
clearly showing that the nego-
tiating process brings results
when the parties commit
themselves to it.
"THE TIME is bound to
come when the same wisdom
and courage will be applied,
with success, to reach peace
between Israel and all of its
Arab neighbors, in a manner
that assures security for all in
the region, the recognition of
Israel, and a solution to the
Palestinian problem," he said.
The president added that the
Continued on Page 7