The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian the voice of the Jewish community of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Running title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Physical Description:
4 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 8, no. 41 (Dec. 24, 1982)-v. 11, no. 26 (Aug. 30, 1985).
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44606415
lccn - sn 00229548
ocm44606415
System ID:
AA00014310:00072

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
THE VOICE OF
THE JEWISH
COMMUNITY Of
MLMBIACH
COUNTV
"Jewish floridian
VOLUME 10NUMBER 27
PALM BEACH, FLORIDA
FRIDAY, AUGUST 31,1984
PRICE 35 CENTS
Time Running Out
Labor Eyes Narrow-Based Coalition
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTAj-
rfiih Labor Party leader
feimon Pere>" 21-day period
Premier-designate now m
Is final week, party sources
ave let it be known that they
Win consider forming a
[arrow-based coalition
Lernmeni if the unity talks
Ijth Likud remain dead-
tcked.
These sources spoke of a
\ernmeni embracing Labor
A seats), Shinui (3), Citizens
lights Movement (3), Yahad
J), Courage to Cure the
Economy (1), Tami (1) and
rhaps Aguda Israel (2). In
ddition, such a government
tould benefit from the "pas-
,.\e support" of Hadash (4
leats) and the Progressive List
|or Peace (2).
LABOR WOULD form the
kovernment, according to
Jiese sources, in the anticipa-
that soon afterwards
Aguda and the National Reli-
gious Party (4 seats) would
join it, thereby giving such a
government a solid majority
of 61 seats in the 120-member
Knesset, plus the passive
support of six MKs represent-
ing Hadash and the Progres-
sive List.
The rationale behind what
appears to be deliberate leak
from the Labor Party seems to
be two-fold: to bring psycho-
logical pressure to bear upon
Likud in the unity talks; and
to encourage Yahad leader
Ezer Weizman and Courage to
Cure the Economy leader
Yigal Hurwitz to consider a
Labor-led government, even
though until now both have
rejected such a scenario out of
hand on the grounds that it
requires Communist backing
for such a government to
survive.
Labor's rationale in appeal-
ing to Weizman and Hurvitz is
that the deteriorating state of
the economy can no longer
tolerate the ongoing delay in
the creation of a government.
LIKUD, for its part, is
energetically propagating
media stories that it intends to
press President Chaim Herzog
not to give Peres a 21-day
extension when his first period
expires Sunday on the grounds
that his efforts seem un-
promising. Instead, Likud will
propose that Premier Yitzhak
Shamir be given the mandate
to form a government.
Likud sources making
public this account of their
party's tactics say they are
Continued on Page IS
GOP Platform
Jewish Concerns Receive High-Priority Treatment
DALLAS (JTA) The
Republican national conven-
opened here last week to
Inside
Back To School
JCCPreSchool Expan-
sion-page 3
Developing A Sense of
Community-page 5
Midrasha Offers New
Courses-page 3
| Hillel Program Coor-
dinator to Organize
PBJC-page8
renominate President Reagan
and Vice President George
Bush and to adopt a platform
that reaffirms the United
States "moral and strategic
relationship with Israel."
But while the Republican
Party continues to stress the
bipartisan support for Israel,
on domestic issues, the
platform, which is the most
conservative in recent history,
has some planks that have
long been opposed by most
American Jews, particularly
school prayer.
HOWEVER, the Republi-
cans, who have made no secret
that they expect to make
major gains in the Jewish
community this year, believe
the platform does contain a
major selling point, its strong
opposition to quotas;
especially since the Demo-
cratic candidate, former Vice
President Walter Mondale,
agreed to drop opposition to
quotas as a means of gaining
support from the Rev. Jesse
Jackson.
"Americans demand a civil
rights policy premissed on the
letter of Civil Rights Act of
1964," the Republican plat-
form states. "That law
requires equal rights; and it is
our policy to end discrimina-
tion on account of sex, race,
color, creed or national ori-
gin .. .
"Just as we must guarantee
opportunity, we oppose at-
tempts to dictate results. We
will resist efforts to replace
equal rights with discrimina-
tory quota systems and
preferential treatment. Quotas
are the most insidious form of
discrimination: reverse
discrimination against the
innocent. We must always
remember that, in a free
society, different individual
goals will yield different
results."
BEFORE DEALING with
the quota issue, the platform
includes the plank opposing
anti-Semitism. "The Republi-
Continned on Page 4
Temple Judea
To Build
Temple Judea announ-
ces the beginning of its
building campaign and
leases the architect's
""wings of its new
Gilding. See page 3.
The Graying Of Israel
New Challenges Ahead
. ...._...________;n..rn.cnld
Teen Splash
Jon't delay. Registration
5nk is located on page
2 lor H 2th graders to
Hjn up for community-
J"oe youth event on Sep-
tember 9.
By JAY EPSTEIN
We are all familiar with the many^^L^
left their homes and families in order to ^eatnmarginal
beinj faced with the challenges of an aging population.
This "youthful society" g*^jjggjlgltg
arrival in Israel of waves ***** Jffi*J$* sSd
included a large number of aduIt ^J y theend of the
with the aging of the original lettten by
1960's. As a result, the agedI popul*'" ^Jionwhen
over), which represented 4 percent of the PPJ ^
Israel became a state in 1948, i today i" P
projected to be 15 percent by the year 2000
"The myth of a ^g^T^*^*
recent article in the Jerusalem.Post, was tw had
to 35 years ago, l^.n0h*l^tthhtS grandparents. We
parents here, less than 10 percen naa g k ^ tQ
were a nation of immigrants and it was nwu
the fact that the young pioneer gets old."
This phenomenon presents yet another serious challenge
to the people of Israel. The "graying" of its population
has forced Israelis to re-examine and assess the current
range of social and rehabilitative services and the country s
effectiveness to handle future demand for service.
" Statistics show that, since 1948, Israel has witnessed an
increase in its aged population of nearly 500 percent. And
like the United States' experience, the fastest growing
group among the elderly are those 75 years and over -
oeoDle who require more medical, health and social ser-
vices, all placing a tremendous strain upon an already
suffering economy.
It appears that no one ever really plotted the statistics in
such a Say as to foresee that with goodf^"htth
care the young pioneer society of the 1940 s and 50 s
would all be over 65 in the 1980's. As a result there are not
enough hospitals for the infirmed aged, ambulatory elderly
are hard pressed to find a place that will accept them,
unless they have private means and in many cases, the
places available are far from family and friends As to
institutional care of the aged, conditions run the full gamut
Continued on Page 2


Page 14 The Jewish Floririi-n f p.w- uu ~... .
Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County /Friday, August 31,1984
i
p
prqected growth of israefc etierty (n thousands)
(CTtwi) '-IK\ ^?1
1960
1965
1970
1975
I960
1985
1990
1995
imi wan i oTf" iw3-v"oi. pv*lttnM*'ii'miTU>V"iri>ii*
New Challenges Ahead
Continued from Page 1
from good through fair, poor and shameful conditions
which exist in the United States and elsewhere as well.
Yet the challenge is being met.
In the forefront of services to the aged in Israel is the
Joint Distribution Committee (JDC). The JDC's activity
in Israel is only part of a worldwide program which has
provided aid to more than two million Jews in need in over
75 countries. The work of JDC is mainly supported by
funds from American Jewish Federations and Welfare
Funds through the United Jewish Appeal.
JDC's involvement with the elderly started in 1948 when
the influx of Holocaust survivors included a large
proportion of old people without families, many of whom
were sick and disabled. Malben JDC's first official
program in Israel initially set up old age homes in
various parts of the country.
During the late 1960's, it became obvious that the
existing social welfare system in Israel was unable to cope
with the growing number of elderly. JDC's response to this
emerging problem was to establish a planning and service
organization for the aged, and to help establish a research
institute.
In 1969, ESHEL The Association for the Planning
and Development of Services for the Aged was created
in an effort to establish a comprehensive network of
services for the aged covering every aspect from health and
welfare to leisure activities. In 1974, the Brookdale
Institute of Gerontology and Adult Human Development
in Israel was founded and currently devotes itself to
research, demonstration and education in the field of
aging. The Institute studies problems facing the aged and,
based upon its findings, initiates plans to establish, im-
prove and expand services and program throughout the
country.
ESHEL provides seed money for programs, services and
projects which include developing community services,
providing new housing for the infirmed and for the in-
dependent elderly, and training professionals and non-
professionals to work with the elderly.
In accordance with JDC policy, ESHEL phases out
financial and professional assistance over a three to four
year period as governmental and local authorities assume
administrative and fiscal responsibility, thus freeing funds
to establish new programs.
With likely cuts in government budgets, a continuing
rise in inflation, and the maze of political obstacles along
the way, the elderly find themselves one of the most
vulnerable groups within Israeli society today.
Planning for the future, when the future is so uncertain
and tenuous, is difficult to say the least. However, organ-
izations such as the JDC, ESHEL and Brookdale Institute,
along with the efforts of private individuals, have given the
aged a good fighting chance.
The dictates of caring for the aged are steeped in Jewish
law and tradition. Sharina this responsibility with the State
of Israel, jointly and as partners, are the Jews of the
Diaspora. Through our collective and unmitigated support
of Israel and of the Joint Distribution Committee, and
through the strength and quality of our own local Jewish
communities, we can meet the needs of our elderly and
help Israel meet her new challenges now, and for
generations to come.
Jay Epstein is Director of Development and Public
Relations of the Joseph L. Morse Geriatric Center. Mr.
Epstein attended the Jewish Agency meeting in July. While
in Jerusalem, he met with representatives of the Joint
..........v........ CflpjtiauwJ pp. Page 4r
Elderly find Place Among
The Young At JDC Housing In Israel
By DAVID HOLZEL
UJA Press Service
GILO, Israel "Here, sit
down, have a drink," Clare
dePicciotto, 81, said happily.
"Then we'll go outside. You II
like visiting here, but not as
much as 1 like living here.
She raised her eyebrows,
accenting the wrinkles around
her eyes.
She poured a Coke from her
refrigerator for herself and her
guest and began to tell her
story. Some of it was about
her early years in Paris, her
life with her husband in Egypt
and their arrival in Israel
1
M
Israel, and how his death in
1980 left her lonely.
But most was about her past
two years here at the Sheltered
Housing Project for Senior
Citizens in Gilo, a Jerusalem
suburb. "I am happy here."
she said. "I like being with
people my own age. who have
also lived a long time and
know what things were like
years ago. But I also like being
with the younger families who
live here."
Mrs. dePicciotto is one of
60 senior citizens in this
development, which helps
them maintain their
come.
Senior
ground
citizens live
tloor apartmet,
equipped with batK
handrails, emergency
mons buttons and
intercoms,
with
Young
children live
ments above.
sun
tWO-wj
farniB
m apanj
A doctor
nurse is always on call aj
there is a fully-equipped c3
on the premises. There is d
a recreational center
the Club Room.' Mnl
dePicciotto would rather m
about the Club Room.
"Look she says proudhI
entering the Club Room. "|,'J
957 wUS .he ez war pendence with special services so clean and airy. SR,
Jore was about their life in and rent based on their m- Prtmenis.#Sec the niceta.
Dr. Bensimon Joins Staff
At St. Mary's Hospital
E. Drew Gackenheimer,
Executive Director of the
Joseph L. Morse Geriatric
Center, has announced that
Dr. Jamy H. Bensimon, the
Center's Medical Director, has
been appointed to the staff of
St. Mary's Hospital in West
Palm Beach.
Following the appointment,
Gackenheimer stated, "We
are very pleased that Dr.
Bensimon, who has already
established an excellent
reputation with us, will be
receiving full admitting privil-
eges to St. Mary's. This will
significantly benefit our
Center as we may now admit
residents directly to St. Mary's
and thereby ensure the con-
tinuity of care provided by Dr.
Bensimon."
Dr. Bensimon is a graduate
of the University of Stras-
bourg (France) Faculty of
Medicine and the University of
Montreal (Canada) Faculty of
Medicine. He served his resi-
dency in internal medicine at
Notre Dame Hospital,
Montreal, and completed a
fellowship in cardiology at the
Montreal Heart Institute. A
Fellow of the Royal College of
Physicians and Surgeons of
Canada with certifications in
internal medicine and cardio-
logy, Dr. Bensimon's profes-
sional associations include
memberships in the American
Medical Association and the
American College of
Physicians.
He, his wife Rachel and
their three children reside in
West Palm Beach.
Dr. JiimyH. Bensimon
and comfortable chairs" Soi
of my friends play the pi,
here. We watch televij
together. You can cook hi
or wait with someone w|
your laundry is in the mac
next door."
Salaries, social activities!
special equipment for the U
lity are paid by Eshel, the)
sociation for Planning
Development of Services
the Aged, thanks in pan tot
more than $2 million alloc
to Eshel by the Joint I
tion Committee.
JDC supports $11.3 mil
worth of programs in
much of it targeted to helpt
aged, chronically ill, menu
and physically handicap
and others who are
advantaged. JDC has a Vk\
million budget for its work i
over 30 countries, virtuallyi
of it provided by Amerk
Jews through the UJA|
community campaign.
"Residents here comefra
manv lands, including Russia
Continued on Page 4
11 afo
V
ll t
Don't Forget
Dinner Program
September 5,1984
6:00-9:00 p.m.
at the
Royce Hotel
BUSINESS and
PROFESSIONAL
WOMEN'S GROUP
of the
WOMEN'S DIVISION
of the
JEWISH FEDERATION
of Palm Beach County
Guest Speaker
JULIE FELDMAN
Co-anchor reporter
WPTV. Channel 5
RSVP 832-2120
9-12th Graders
TRIP TO SIX FLAGS ATLANTIS
Date: Sunday. September 9th Cost: $8.25
Buses leave: 11.00 am Buses return: 5:00 pm
BUSES LEAVE FROM AND RETURN TO:
Jewish Community Center
2415 Okeechobee Blvd., WPB
689-7700
Check should be made payable to JCC
Mail registration slip with check by Sept. 3 to:
Lois J. Baird
630 U.S. Hwy #1-400
No. Palm Beach, FL 33408
Name.
Grade (Fall Ml.
Address.
Phone:.
Check enclosed for S_
I hereby give my son/daughter permission to g-o y 1
Six Flags Atlantis on Sept. 9. 1984. ^/fJT^*!
Council is not responsible for any accidents tw ^^i
cur during the trip. I give my permission for i ^i
in charge to take my child to the hospiw
should arise.
Parent's Signature.
Da*-
>>":':. v.v.v.v.v.v. ._________ mmmm-mvn^TtTSS^


Friday, August 31,1984 / The Jewiah Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 3
Presidents' Coffee to Preview
Jewish Women's Assembly
deoicted in the architectural rendering of Temple
noO sq ft. facility for which ground will be broken
k.r 10 shows the entrance on So. Congress Blvd. after
Ke^P,mBeach"Ud,tr,Um-
(emple Judea Launches
Building Campaign
tmple Judea recently
Led Us campaign to build
[permanent home on
kngworth Drive, south of
i West Palm Beach
Lorium. Temple President
T Jeffrey Faivus has an-
Led the date of Sunday,
I 30 for the ground-
Ling of the Temple's 20
Land square foot facility.
Lluded in the building are
Inctuarv with five hundred
>nent seats, a social hall
j-h will boost sanctuary
Eng to over one thousand
while seating up to three
hundred for a sit down dinner,
a theatrical size stage with
dressing rooms, a catering size
kitchen, a chapel, a bride's
room, and a Judaica shop.
The new building will feature
an administrative wing with a
general office studies for the
rabbi and cantor, a library,
and a lunch room. The reli-
gious school will have a
nursery school with play-
ground, eight classrooms, a
learning center with an office
Continued on Page 8
New Courses To Be
Offered At Midrasha
lew courses, additional
It) members and an in-
ked enrollment will mark
opening ol the hall
femster ol Midrasha-
lica High School on Sept.
] Foi ond year,
I. will meet at the Jewish
munitv Daj School, 5801
er Avenue, West Palm
In. However, after a
lev ol last year's students,
lime ha-, been moved to an
jer hour, 6 p.m.-8:30 p.m.,
correlate more favorably
the earlier start of the
: school day.
pn Lynn Lipton, Jewish
ation director of the Jew-
Federation of Palm Beach
Jity and director of the
\o\, noted that the
fasha Committee of the
ph Federation was pleased
I the day school had invited
|rasha back for a second
'We appreciate the
pious offer of their
lilies. The growth of eo-
lation in our community
(ng the various educational
utions is heartwarming
II certainly lead to
psed educational oppor-
[ties for our children,"
pdMs. Lipton.
kting time for the
F"ng day of school only has
been moved up to 7 p.m. to
encompass an orientation for
students. Parents are en-
couraged to join their children
Continued on Page 7
Adele Simon, education vice
president of Women's
Division of the Jewish Federa-
tion of Palm Beach County,
has announced that Blossom
Cohen has been named to
serve as chairman of the
President's Coffee. The
annual event, sponsored by
the Women's Division, will be
held on Monday, Sept. 17, 10
a.m., at the Joseph L. Morse
Geriatric Center's Lowe Audi-
torium, 4847 Fred Gladstone
Drive, West Palm Beach.
The coffee is held to honor
the presidents of all the
community's Jewish women's
organizations and to inform
them about plans for the
upcoming sixth annual Jewish
Women's Assembly, a
community-wide educational
day to take place on Sunday,
Oct. 28, 9 a.m.-2:30 p.m., at
the Hyatt Palm Beaches.
Mrs. Cohen stated, "At this
time of the year when newly
elected and returning presi-
dents begin their term of
office, we provide an oppor-
tunity for them to become
acquainted with one another
and for them to learn about
Women's Division's various
educational, outreach and
leadership development
programs. In addition, we will
preview our exciting Jewish
Women's Assembly for this
year to enable them to bring
back first hand information to
their organizations."
Mrs. Cohen, who has
resided in this area for the past
13 years, has continued to be
an active member of the
JCC Pre-School Expands
To Meet Demand
By LOUISE ROSS
Assistant News Coordinator
Why do parents travel great
distances to bring their
children to a small facility
located in back of McDonald's
Restaurant adjacent to a
shopping center parking lot?
If you are one of those parents
whose children attend the
Jewish Community Center's
Pre-School, the answer comes
easy.
"When my daughter
'graduated,' she was more
than ready to read, had a great
self image and knew about
Jewish history, customs and
ceremonies," stated Connie
Berry, chairman of the JCC s
Pre-School Committee.
Although her children are now
too old to attend the pre-
school, Mrs. Berry is still
involved because she is "very
appreciative of the great job
they did with my daughter, of
ample B'nai Jacob Founder Dies
:l Engelstein, a founder of Temple B'nai Jacob,
1 on Aug. 10 in West Palm Been. He was 81.
[Engelstein was born in Romania, living in the town of
prwoti until the outbreak of World War II when he was
Pted to the Transnistria Camp. After liberation and
hVs,'b"shment of the State of Israel, he emigrated there
C became one of the early settlers of Beersheba. He
FP" organize the first synagogue and was active in
'Png new arrivals get settled.
After his first wife died, Engelstein moved to Montreal,
Eft In 19?4 he was reunited with his family in West
IiTu Dung the last few years, his main involve-
F nas n with Temple B'nai Jacob.
irvHuin' who resident of Palm Springs, is
FJJed by his wife, Anna; sons Alec (Sheila) and Harry
nj, brother Baruch; and grandchildren Debra and
.(JJJ^^y*. Danny, Barbara, Bonnie and Sharon
the loving care they gave her
and, therefore, I want to see it
continue for the other children
of our community."
Due to the parent demand
for early childhood education
services, the staff of the JCC
has moved from the building
which houses the pre-school to
a trailer nearby to allow for
renovations of the current
facilities. The addition of
three classrooms will make it
possible to accommodate 24
more children on the opening
day of school Sept. 4. This will
bring the total enrollment at
the Okeechobee Blvd. site to
99 with a waiting list currently
numbering over 20 youngsters.
The Mother-Toddler program,
which involves 54 children
from 12 to 36 months old, will
still be held at Camp Shalom.
According to Jerry Melman,
executive director of the JCC,
this step was taken at a time
when plans for a new JCC
facility are in the beginning
stages because the JCC did not
Continued on Page 10
Jewish community. She is a
past president of Congrega-
tion Anshei Sholom Sister-
hood, having served in that
capacity for four years.
Currently Mrs. Cohen is a
board member of the Jewish
Community Center, co-
chairman of Soviet Jewry
Relations for Yovel Hadassah,
and an active participant on
behalf of Israel Bonds and the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County.
Reservations for the Presi-
dents' Coffee may be made by
calling Lynne Ehrlich,
Women's Division director, at
the Federation office, 832-
2120, by Sept. 3.
Blossom Cohen
The Educators' Council, composed of Palm Beach County
professional Jewish educators, held their first meeting recently
to plan for the coming year. Attending the meeting are [stan-
ding, left to right] Ruth Levow, chairman of the Educators'
Council and principal of Temple Beth El Religious School;
Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg of Temple Beth Sholom, Lake
Worth; Rabbi William Marder of Temple Beth David; Barbara
Steinberg, director of the Jewish Community Day School; and
Cissy Tishman, principal of Temple Israel Religious School.
Seated [left to right) are Sharon Friedman, coordinator of
Temple Beth David Religious School; Ann Lynn Lipton, Jewish
Kducation director of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County; Gail Kressal; director of early childhood education for
the Jewish Community Center; and Rabbi Steven Westman of
Temple Beth Torah.
Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg (right], spiritual leader of Temple
Beth Sholom of Lake Worth, and Temple President Ed
Passman [left] present a check for the proceeds of the 1984
Passover Yiskor appeal to Shirley Dellerson, immediate past
president of the Jewish Community Day School. Preceding the
Yiskor appeal, Barry Krischer, a past president of the day
school, discussed the Importance of the school's scholarship
fund, noting that the school has many single parent families
participating in Its program who have need for financial aid.
The congregation's response to the appeal made possible the
significant gift totalling nearly $3000.
alOMBia
,
%&gP
HOLD THE DATE
Sunday, October 28,1984
9:00 A.M.-2:30 P.M.
WHAT: Sixth Annual Jewish Women's Assembly
WHO: Jewish And Female
WHY: To Acknowledge Your Impact
WHERE: Hyatt Palm Beaches


Page 14 The Jewish Floridian nf P.U. n-
..*. />.
Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, August 31,1964
GOP Platform
Continued from Page 1
can Party reaffirms its support
of the pluralism and freedom
that have been part and parcel
of this great country. In so
doing, it repudiates and
completely disassociates itself
from people, organizations,
publications and those entities
which promulgate the practice
of any form of bigotry,
racism, anti-Semitism or
religious intolerance."
The Democratic Party failed
to adopt a similar resolution at
its convention or at the
National Comittee meeting
following the convention.
However, the executive com-
mittee of the National Com-
mittee, at the urging of
Mondale, approved such a
resolution two weeks ago in a
telephone poll.
On school prayer, the
platform says: "We have
enacted legislation to
guarantee equal access to
student facilities by student
religious diversity, we reaffirm
our commitment to the
freedom of religion and speech
guaranteed by the Consti-
tution of the United States and
firmly support the rights of
students to openly practice the
same, including the right to
engage in voluntary prayer in
schools."
THE REPUBLICAN plat-
form also favors a Constitu-
tional Convention to adopt an
amendment to the Consti-
tution requiring a balanced
federal budget, which the or-
ganized Jewish community has
strongly opposed.
The platform urges
Congress to pass the balanced
budget amendment, noting
that the Democrats oppose it.
"If Congress fails to act on
this issue, a Constitutional
Convention should be con-
vened to address only this
issue in order to bring deficit
spending under control," the
platform states.
Jewish groups have opposed
a Constitutional Convention
because they fear it could
begin rewriting the Consti-
tution, including the First
Amendment guarantees of
religious freedom which have
been so vital to Jewish security
in the U.S. While the Republi-
can plank underlines the word
"only" to stress that just the
budget restriction would be
addressed, some Constitution-
al experts have argued that a
Contitutional Convention
could not be limited to one
issue.
IN THE MIDDLE East sec-
tion, the platform stresses that
a strong Israel, aided by the
U.S., is "the main obstacle to
Soviet domination of the
region," and "the
sovereignty, security and
integrity of the State of Israel
is a moral imperative." The
platform contends that under
Reagan, the U.S. and Israel
"are closer than ever before."
The platform stresses that
"Jerusalem should remain an
undivided city," but it docs
New Challenges Ahead
Continued from Page 2
Distribution Committee and visited Bet Byer Home for the
Aged, a Joint Distribution Committee-sponsored geriatric
facility. The Byer Home will be the focus of a future article
in the Jewish Floridian.
AGING IN ISRAEL
FACTS AND FIGURES
Israel's population in 1981 was 3.9 million. 9 percent
were over the age of 65, as compared to 3.9 percent in
1950. Within the Jewish population, 9.7 percent were over*
65 in 1981 as compared to 3.7 percent in 1950.
The geographic distribution of the aged is
predominantly urban. 40 percent of the Jewish aged live in
three major cities, Tel Aviv-Yafo (18.7 percent) Haifa
(10.2 percent) and Jerusalem (7.8 percent). Only 7.5
percent of the Jewish aged live in Kibbutzim, Moshavim
and other rural settings.
95.6 percent of the aged reside in private households.
4.4 percent of the aged population reside in some long-
term care facility (this compares to 5 percent in the United
States).
Israel has a well-developed system of old age and
survivors insurance. Almost 50 percent of the elderly
receive supplemental benefits that generate a minimum
income somewhat above the "poverty line."
Access to health care in Israel is very good and
utilization very high, 95 percent of the population is in-
sured by one of the Sick Funds, mainly by the General
Federation of Labor which provides the bulk of am-
bulatory care for all populations.
Acute in-patient care is provided by the hospitals of
the Ministry of Health, the (Labor) Sick Fund, the
municipalities and the voluntary sector. Private hospital
facilities are few.
Source: "Aging in Israel, JDC Brookdale Institute of
Gerontology and Adult Human Development, Jerusalem,
1982.
the
Jewish floridian
of Palm Beecn Count,
ComDtn.ng Our Vo-Ct end *eOt'l.o" RepoMt f
f*tO* SHOCHtT SUZANNE SHOCMET RONN! fPST,N
EaiO'inOPuO'.*"*' E>KulivtEdilO' Not Coo.am.lo.
PuDI.nU <*!, OCIOO*' tmoufl" M.fl Apr,l S< Watt I, D4l.nct Ol M
Second Class Postage Paid ai Boca Raton fii USPSWW
PALM BEACH BOCA RATON Of FlCE
13* N W Spanish River Bird. Boca Raton. Fla JJ431 Pnone 38*200'
Mam 0" PoeimeeserReturn I MTt f Jala* 'Isnaisri. P.O. B tum, Mtawl Fla Mioi
Msoffle*m Osrocser Had Loam, Pfce MB- MM
Combined Jearian Appeal Jems* Federation ol Pelm Beech County, toe Officers President
Myron J Nictmen. Vice Preeieienis. Peter Cumnwnge. Alec Enoeiatein AmoM Lampen Barbara
Tenen and Alt.n V*lens*r Secretary. Or Elizabeth S Snuiman. Treasurer Barry Bern Submit
material to Ronm f pat tin Director of Public Relations. 501 South Flagssr Or, Weet Palm Beech
Jeoisn Fiondian noes not guarantee kasnruin ot Merc: endise Advertised
Si.eSCRiP'iON RATES Local Area U Annual (2 Tear Minimum %f Ml. or by membership Jewish
ui..|i,o"ot Peim Beacn Count, sot S Fiagier O West Palm Beech Fla jjaot Phone BM
not call it the capital of Israel
as does the Democratic
platform. The Republicans
also ignored the Democratic
call for moving the U.S.
Embassy in Israel from Tel
Aviv to Jerusalem.
The GOP Mideast platform
reads, in full:
"President Reagan's Middle
East policy has been flexible
enough to adapt to rapidly
changing circumstances, yet
consistent and credible so that
all nations recognize our
determination to protect our
vital interests.
"The President's skillful
crisis management throughout
the Iran-Iraq war has kept that
conflict from damaging our
vital interests. The President's
peace efforts have won strong
bipartisan support and inter-
national applause. And his
willingness to stand up to
Libya has made peace-loving
states in the region feel more
secure.
"THE 1979 Soviet invasion
of Afghanistan, which sur-
prised the Carter-Mondale
Administration, brought
Soviet forces less than 400
miles from the strategic straits
of Hormuz. The seizure of
American hostages in Iran that
year caught the United States
unprepared and unable to
respond.
"Lebanon is still in turmoil,
despite our best efforts to
foster stability in that unhappy
country. With the Syrian
leadership increasingly subject
to Soviet influence, and the
Palestine Liberation Organ-
ization and its homicidal
subsidiaries taking up
residence in Syria, U.S. policy
toward the region must remain
vigilant and strong.
"Republicans reaffirm that
the United States should not
recognize or negotiate with the
PLO so long as that organ-
ization continues to promote
terrorism, rejects Israel's right
to exist and refuses to accept
UN Security Council resolu-
tion 242 and 338."
IN ANOTHER section, the
platform says that "the Re-
publican Party commends
President Reagan for ac-
cepting the honorary chair-
manship of the campaign to
erect a U.S. Holocaust
memorial in Washington,
D.C. and supports the efforts
of the U.S. Holocaust Council
in erecting such a museum and
educational center. The
museum will bear witness to
the victims and survivors of
the Holocaust."
Support for Soviet Jewry is
reaffirmed at the end of the
section on the Soviet Union.
"We will press for Soviet
compliance with all inter-
national agreements, including
the 1975 Helsinki Final Act
and the UN Declaration on
Human Rights," the platform
states.
"We will continue to protest
Soviet anti-Semitism and
human rights violations. We
admire the courage of such
people as Andrei Sakharov,
his wife Yelena Homier,
Anatoly Shcharansky, Ida
Nudell and Josef Begun,
whose defiance of Soviet
repression stands as a
testament to the greatness of
the human spirit.
"We will press the Soviet
Union to permit free
emigration of Jews,
Christians, and
national minorities T
because the r*ft!i F*
Soviet emSireffiesf'
for the Pfmut,ere"rl
strengthen our nf
channels to encoura .^
their struggle ff$*
frdom, nationd
determination and pjjgj
"We are one big family," says Clare dePlcclotto, si*,
the senior citiiens and young families living in the Gilo SI
Housing Project near Jerusalem. The project, which
seniors maintain their independence, is aided by (he t
Distribution Committee, with funds raised in the UnJtedJe
Appeal-Federation campaign.
Elderly Find Place
from Page 2
see them later and
how good they are and L
smile. Some of us baby-sit.
"The young mothers
into our apartments and i
hello and see how we i
doing. We sit together in |
sun.
"It is good that there I
place like this for people!
me," she said. "I can sti]
things for myself, butlki
it is important to have oil
around." She paused. '"
have to keep going. It doesj
harder year to year."
Continued
Morocco, Rumania and
Turkey," said Uri Laor,
Eshel's director. "Many had
been living in dilapidated
housing, in Israel's develop-
ment towns, before coming
here."
Mrs. dePicciotto wasn't
interested in general state-
ments. "If you want to know
what it is like here, it is good,"
she interrupted. "We are one
big family. Some of us make
things (handicrafts) and give
them to the children. We go to
their school plays and they like
hearing us clap for them. We
On June 16 Leo C. Finkel (left), commander of GokkiCe
Post No. 501 Jewish War Veterans of the United >r
America, presented a check for $250 to Dr. Seymosri
[third from left], chief medical officer of ti
Administration Outpatient Clinic at Riviera Besch. II
will go toward educational tapes for veterans requinjl
therapy. David Kaplan [second from left], JWV Post*''
officer, and Morton Gordon [right], commander of
Broward-Palm Beach District Council, witness tlupro"
Also in attendance, but not pictured, were Rebi t-
chief Voluntary Service media representative of W "
Medical Center; Bobbie Wright, administrative <"''
VA Outpatient Clinic; and Marlene Kaiser, voW**'
specialist of the clinic.
/ RAVIOLI SAUTE SPECIAL N
I
fi 0>.' Ot ron Upon Request
Friday; Augur3i.r984
Volume 10
3ELUL5744
Number 27
I The Jewish Homemaker's Guide to Delicious Italian toW,
| Makes the Most of Chef Boy-ai^dee Cheese Ravioli.
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
L
vi cup chopped or wnoleamal 1 can<15 0r)Chef Boy-ar-dee
onora Cheese Ravx* > Tomato Sauce
vi cup chopped carrot, dash garlic sak
2 tabeeipoont butter or margarine 1 tabteapoon chopped freah
vpadrja*(10ox.)frotenwtnie parsley
freen beani. cooked and drained W cup water
1. Saute oraons and carrots an butter m mexhurn-sired
uucqan.
2. Add remaining mpefients; cover mvlmmcr tor
15nwute.5ervBs-4. a>v.*.v.%wsm


Friday, August 31,1984 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 5
,ter-Congregational Eighth Grade Program Formed
r local congregations
areta to combine and
? an inter-congre-
S education program
ith graders to be held at
lhtn,g ,-mm,inilV DaV
lition
[liam
education program
ftth (traders to
fwish Community Day
Li Wednesday evenings,
K o m. As of now,
Se Brth David. Temple
fa Temple Beth Torah
1 Temple Israel have joined
Liate the pilot program.
Etonlfdirectors'who will
timsier the program in
1,51 ,o himself, Rabbi
Marder of Temple
David stated, "By
bining our individual
1!0gue's programs, we can
I an exciting educational
:onment linking, at the
e time, the formal
lemic learning aspect as
as ,he informal affective
uing. Alone- wc -an l
He as exciting an environ-
,t due to the small numbers
ilhth graders in each con-
ation." The other ad-
Strators of the program
Ruth Levow, principal of
,n|e Beth El Religious
,0o|- Rabbi Steven
stman of Temple Beth
rah; and Cissy Tishman,
jcipal of Temple Israel
iigious School.
The concept for the inter-
igregational eighth grade
K about during informal
s among the four
icational directors at the
lular meeting of the
icators' Council, corn-
id of educators from area
...utions under the auspices
the Jewish Federation of
|m Beach County. "A great
it of cooperation and of
imunity is motivating us,"
Rabbi Marder.
If successful, the program is
seen as an introduction to
Midrasha-Judaica High
School, the community
program of Jewish education
offered for 9-12 graders
throughout the cooperaative
efforts of the Education Com-
mittee of the Jewish Federa-
tion of Palm Beach County,
local synagogues and the Jew-
ish Community Day School.
Other synagogues are beinR
invited to participate in the
eighth grade effort.
The schedule of the eighth
grade program will follow the
Midrasha calendar and, when
appropriate, will take ad-
vantage of special programs
and guest speakers planned by
the community Jewish high
school. "By using the facilities
of the day school simul-
taneously with Midrasha, we
will be providing a stimulating
f\ Radio /TV Highlights ,1^
MOSAIC Sunday, Sept. 2, 9 a.m. WPTV
Channel 5 with host Barbara Gordon Re-run The
Precious Legacy; Sunday, Sept. 9 Re-run, interview
with Sarah Tucker, wife of the late opera star Richard
Tucker.
L'CHAYIM Sunday, Sept. 2 and 9, 7:30 a.m. -
WPBR 1340-AM with host Rabbi Mark S. Golub
The Jewish Listener's Digest, a radio magazine.
JEWISH MUSIC AND CULTURE HOUR Sunday,
Sept. 2 and 9, 6 p.m. WHRS-FM Stereo91 with host
Dr. Simon Sifverman.
SHALOM Sunday, Sept. 2 and 9, 10 a.m. WPEC
Channel 12 (8:30 a.m. ON TV Channel 51) with host
Richard Peritz.
PARSON TO PARSON Sunday, Sept. 2 and 9, 8:15
a.m. WCGY 850-AM Dr. John Mangrum, rector of
St. David's Episcopal Church, and Rabbi Samuel Silver of
Temple Sinai, Delray Beach, will engage in a series of
discussions of "Religion in Politics, and Politics in
Religion."
Sponsored by the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County.
environment for the children.
Car pooling should be made
easier for parents and, in
addition, they will be able to
take advantage of an
educational course designed
for Midrasha parents which
will meet during the same
hours,"' Rabbi Marder said.
Although Ruth Levow will
be on hand Wednesday
evenings to handle some
administrative work, the four
principals will divide the
administrative responsibilities
of the program. Twenty-five
students are expected to enroll
in the first class. According to
Rabbi Marder, each
synagogue will use the
program and supplement it as
it sees fit.
Barbara Steinberg, director
of the Jewish Community Day
School, and Ann Lynn
Lipton, Jewish education dir-
ector of the Jewish Federation
of Palm Beach County, are
cooperating with the
synagogues in this pilot
project.
For more information,
parents may contact their
synagogue's rabbi or edu-
cational director.
NOTE
Political Reading Material and Advertising on this page is
not to be construed as an endorsement by the Jewish Fed-
eration of Palm Beach County.
i?^*%
SPONSORS
The GUARDIAN PLAN*.
insurance funded prearranged funeral program*
"So the people
you worry about
will have
less to
worry about!9
-Jerry Bunder
Call toll free
1-800432-0853
'An INSURANCE FUNDED prearranged funeral service
provided by Guardian Plans, Inc. (Florida) in conjunction with
Family Service Life Insurance Company (Forms Nos. 8/27/81/
9/1/81/010203-A/010203-B/01020&C) and participating Florida funeral firms.
EXPERIENCE IS THE ISSUE
ELECT
RICHARD I.
WENNET
Vote On Sept. 4
Punch #8
FOfc CIRCUIT JUDGE
GROUP 1
Palm Beach County
Non Partisan
CURRENT POSITION
Domestic Relations Commissioner
'5th Judicial Circuit Court
F0RMER ASSISTANT STATE ATTORNEY
felony Division, Prosecuting
L"e, 1st, 2nd and 3rd Degree Felonies
p0RMER TRAIL LAWYER-Private Practice
'Wig Civil, Divorce, Commercial
Kersonal Injury and Criminal Litigation
COMMUNITY SERVICE
Jewish Federation, Palm Beach County
Super Sunday Volunteer
Bd. of Dir., United Cerebral Palsy Assoc.
Bd. of Dir., Palm Beach County
Association for Retarded Citizens
Chairman, Eagle Scout Banquet Committee
PROFESSIONAL SERVICE:
The Florida Bar:
Board of Governors, Florida Bar
Young Lawyers Section
Chairman, Judicial Relations Committee
Chairman, Bridge-The-Gap Seminar Committee
Author & Seminar Speaker
(Continuing Legal Education)
Voluntary Bar Liaison Committee
Chairman, Judicial Clerkship Program
Palm Beach County Bar Association:
Board Of Directors, 1981-1982
President, Young Lawyers Section/NH-1W
Vice President, Young Lawyers Section 1980-1981
Secretary, Young Lawyers Section. 979-980
Treasurer, Young Lawyers Section, 1978-1979
AWARDS
Outstanding Service Award
Palm Beach County Bar Association
Award of Merit
Florida Bar Association
Outstanding Leadership Award
Young Lawyers Section, Palm Beach County
Association
MILITARY
Jewish War Veterans, Post 408
Lt. Commander, USNR
EDUCATION
Bachelor of Science
U.S. Merchant Marine Academy
Juris Doctor
U. of Miami Law School
ADMITTED TO PRACTICE BEFORE
THE FOLLOWING COURTS:
United States Supreme Court
Florida Supreme Court
United States Fifth Circuit Court
United States Eleventh Circuit Court
United States District Court
(Southern & Middle Districts of Florida)
United States Court of Claims
United States Tax Court
FOR CIRCUIT JUDGE
GROUP1
PALM BEACH COUNTY
NON PARTISAN
>- -


rage 14 The JewSHS!^
Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, August 31,1964
Organizations
in the News
AMERICAN JEWISH COMMITTEE
Hershel S. Kaplan, chairman of the Summer Series
Programs presented by the Palm Beach County Chapter of
the American Jewish Committee, has announced a change
in the scheduled date of the last program. The new date is
Sunday, Sept. 9, 7:30 p.m.
Ms. Faith Mesnekoff, active AJC member and attorney
in Miami, will speak about her trip to Germany. Ms.
Mesnekoff was a participant in an exchange PrSrarn
developed by the Konrad Adenauer Foundation and the
American Jewish Committee.
For reservation and additional information call the AJC
office.
B'NAIBRITH WOMEN
A regular meeting of Masada Chapter will be held on
Sept. 11, 7:45 p.m., at The American Savings Bank outside
the West Gate of Century Village.
The theme for the program will be "Getting To Know
You."
HADASSAH
Chaiwill hold a regular meeting in the Poinciana Room
of the Challenger Country Club on Wednesday, Sept. 19,
12 noon.
Ann Aronson, newlv elected president, will report on the
"Hadassah National Convention" held in San Francisco
in August.
Rabbi Alan Sherman, chaplain and director of the
Community Relations Council of the Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County, will be the guest speaker on the
subject of "Community Controversies."
The first general membership meeting of the Golda
Meir-Boynton Beach Chapter 1984-85 season will be held
on Thursday, Sept. 20, 12 noon, at Temple Beth Sholom.
315 North "A" Street, Lake Worth.
Dorothy M. Kaye, fund raising coordinator for Region,
will give an eyewitness report of the Hadassah Convention
which she attended in San Francisco in August.
The Lee Vassll Group of the Lake Worth Chapter will
hold its first board meeting on Tuesday, Sept. 11, at the
Sunrise Savings and Loan, Gun Road, West Palm Beach.
NOTE: On Sept. 10 at 1 p.m. there will be a Mem-
bership Tea at the home of Charlotte Resnick. Those
interested please contact Esther Marks.
The first meeting of the season will be held on Tuesday,
Sept. 18, 12:30 p.m., at Temple Beth Sholom, PLEASE
NOTE THIS CHANGE IN DATE. A special program, a
Variety Musicale, will be performed by members and
addresses a theme which concerns the total membership.
The Board of Lake Worth Chapter will meet on
Wednesday, Sept. 12, 9:45 a.m. at the Sunrise Savings and
Loan on Gun Club Road.
The delegates to the 70th National Convention will
report on the various seminars they attended and the
policies voted upon for the ensuing year.
Please note the date, which has been changed for this
month only due to Convention.
PIONEER WOMEN NA'AMAT
Golda Meir Club has planned a deluxe three day two
night Epcot trip Oct. 24-25-26.
Theodore Herzl Club will hold a regular meeting on
Sept. 6, 1 p.m., at the Lake Worth Shuffleboard Courts,
1121 Lucerne Ave.
The program will include an Israeli film, "Coming A
Long tj jewisH CIVIL SERVICE
N EMPLOYEES, INC.
The South Florida Chapter will be meeting on Sunday,
^J, 9 12 noon at the Florida Gardens Civic Center, 134
S Road Lake Worth (1-8 Mile East of the Florida
TuVnpfk? "Lake Worth Exit). Collation will be served
from noon to 1 p.m. when the meeting will commence
Dank J. Blackman, Esq. will be the guest speaker. He will
discuss hospital costs and the law "Consumer Health
Care."
ORT
The Atlantis Chapter will host a Champagne Luncheon
for prospective members on Tuesday, Sept. 4 11:30 a.m.,
at the home of Diane Kaufman (Mrs Richard) in Atlantis
For further information, call Sandy Singer (Mrs. Leonard)
or Sylvia Farber (Mrs. Milton).
Indian Spring Chapter will have a Chinese Luncheon
and Card Party, Monday. Sept. 10 11:30 a.mi at.the
Mandarin Manor, Woolbnght and Military Trail (Village
Square shopping mall), Boynton Beach.
WOMEN'S LEAGUE FOR ISRAEL
The Sabra Chapter will hold its next meeting on
Tuesday, Sept. 4, 1 p.m., at the Sunrise Saving's and Loan
Assn., on Military Trail and Gun Club Road.
On Sept 12, there will be a luncheon and card party at
Sizzler's Steak House, 1900 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd.
Guest speaker Rabbi Allan Sherman, chaplain and
director of the Community Relations Council of the
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County, will discuss
current events and Israel.
WOMEN'S AMERICAN ORT
The West Palm Beach Chapter will hold its opening
meeting of the season on September 11, 12:30 p.m., at
Congregation Anshei Sholom. Entertainment will be
pro\ ided by the Lyric Trio.
Workshops Of
To En,
session introduction .
Jewish andTaS19
County communal
formation will be shl
newcomers will havnS
Portunity to meet otiS
members of the comm,
The second worhi
called "The Divorce
Jive-" H is geared top,
information about the
process for those
separated and consi
divorce One session
10 will cover the emoi
and social experience
divorce and, in the secoi
sion on Oct. 24, a law
accountant will discuss'
and legal process.
The third workshop i
fered to parents with d"
under the age of 12,
a seven session worksi
improving parent-child
munications. It begioti
Tuesday Oct. 16 at 7:30p.
Preregistration is net
for all workshops. Fi
formation and regist
materials contact M
David, MSW 684-199:
Jewish Family and Chi
Service.
Sen. Chiles
Honorary Sponsor
Sen. Lawton Chiles, D-Fl.,
has been notified of his ap-
pointment as an "honorary
sponsor" of the America-
Israel Friendship League.
Welcoming the ap-
pointment, Chiles com-
mented: "On a personal basis,
anyone who has ever lost a
good friend knows how
devastating that can be. A
close relationship nurtured
over a long period of time can
never be replaced. This is the
kind of friendship Israel and
the United States have enjoyed
and we must work hard to
preserve it."
To foster understanding and
strengthen the American-
Israeli bond, AIFL helps
develop community-based
educational and cultural
programs focused on Israel,
programs involving Christian
and Jew ish Americans alike.
-NOTE-
Political Reading Material
and Advertising on this
page is not to be construed
as an endorsement by the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County.
ttSSuMem* KOSHER
THE FAMIW jw Room menm
Color TV ARefngerato.
Fully Air Conditions
Strictly Dietary U*$
Music- Enltrti.ni'J'
Social Programs-wi
Pool-Free Chaise "
Cater to ***
Rabbinical *
Resident Mishg'K"
0CEMFR0NJ
B0AR0MLK HOTEL
25h Street .Co.|.nsAve
Mtami Beach FU 33ii
Complimentary ice cream
served daily pools'
SUMMER SPEC.AL
4 DAYS/3 NIGHTS
$'
per person
able, occ to 12/1
Labor Day Weekend
w Available
(3t _____.CPORL(
78
RESERVE
NOW
FOR
HIGH
HOLY DA*
US-SHADOW nMrERSTAYS
>'
Robert
Gross
FOR
COUNTY
COURT JUDGE
Group 7
VOTE
September 4th
EDUCATION
Cl UMM| Law Mmt,
Ithacm. New York:
Juiis Doctor
WHMaau College B A Magna Cum Lawk
Honors: Phi Beta Kappa
Awarded Fulbright Fellowship
I >~.*.M| ftW| ,..
CRIMINAL JUSTICE EXPERIENCE
Assistant District AtMraey
Under Hon. Robert Morgenthau.
District Attorney's Office
Manhattan. New York
Asatstaat Stale Allorw,
Palm Beach County, Florida
Felony Division Chief. Deputy Chief.
Economic
Crime Unit. Legal Advisor. Condominium
Advisory Commission
CIVIL TRIAL EXPERIENCE
Tril Attorney
Moyle, Jones Flanigan. P.A
West Palm Beach. Florida
COMMUNITY ACTIVITIES
Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County. Member
Jewish Community Center.
Board of Directors ""
Instructor. Criminal Just****"^
Training. Pwi *<* Jusa*""*,
Palm Beach Regional Viiitim Nun"
Inc.. Board of Directors
Little League baseball coacs
PROFESSIONAL^'^
Palm Beach County Bar *"a*Q
Chaimum. County Court CM^,
National District Attorney" ^ .
Auction of Trial U**"0'^
American Bar Association
BAB MEMBERSHIP* fCc(
Florida; New York. V*"*+X
United SutesC^ofW^I
United SuiesDistnci Co-"-
of Florida


. ,on^ ,__,_. __?J?_ ,Y .
Friday, August 31,1984 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 7
. 100 senior citizens attended a recent Friday Kosher Lunch
rlnneciion program which featured psychologist Dr. Robert K.
ikofrom who informed the audience of the benefits of therapy
hiihnut drugs. After the talk the group enjoyed a kosher hot
inch The Kosher Lunch Connection serves meals and provides
Vniertain merit and-or educational programs daily at the Jewish
Community Center under the auspices of the Comprehensive
Stnior Service Center.
* 4L
L,
I a?
Guest speaker Dr. Robert K. Alsofrom is shown with Carol Fox
[left], Kosher Lunch Connection site manager; and Jean Rubin
[right], director of the Comprehensive Senior Service Center.
mrnrr^ra a 8>Trrrrrmnnnnriiimi d'mnrmn-a-g0 8 a
$&
A-AAboT ANSWERfoNf
A Division of
A RING A-DING" ANSWERING SERVICE
Computerized Switchboard Live Operators
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UUJLB8 0 0 0 0 0 0 flfl a Q m I 0 g BOO OOOOOflpOOttOQQttQQQUg
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SUCCOTH PACKAGE
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Oct 10 to 14
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Tennis Facilities Sauna Handball Volleyball
Olympic Swimming Pool Full Block of Private Beach
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TV in All Rooms
APPROPRIATE ENTERTAINMENT
Daily Services in Oar
SPACIOUS 0CEANFRONT SYNAGOGUE
TNI MUITI MIL! ION 00UM K0SMEM
MOTH
w
GIATT
" Tit* Octan tam 10 4111 Si km It*ch
for Res. Phone: 1-538-9045 or 1-531-5771
your Hosts Michael Lafkowiti 4 Ales Smilow
New Courses To Be
Offered At Midrasha
r
. Continued from Page 3
to learn what they will be
studying. In addition, parents
will be given information
about special programs for
them which will be offered
during the same hours as
Midrasha.
This year conversational
Hebrew wil be taught by Gail
Rabinovitch, a newcomer to
the faculty, as a separate unit.
Stress will be placed on
strengthening the basic
conversational vocabulary
through a modified Ulpan
program to assist the many
youngsters who visit Israel in
the 11th and 12th grades.
Rachel Stein will continue to
teach the aleph bet and ad-
vanced classes of Hebrew
which will place more em-
phasis on reading and writing.
Those students who have
already visited Israel will have
an opportunity to come
together during one period to
continue their studies of Isra-
el, share their experiences and
plan community activities.
Ms. Lipton will conduct the
class. Hank Grossman, an
active community leader, has
offered to teach a short course
on public speaking for these
youngsters who are invited by
many community organ-
izations to talk about their trip
to Israel.
A new program for teaching
Bible with the assistance of
computers was developed over
the summer by faculty veteran
Jack Rosenbaum. His course
on Genesis will include a study
of Torah with special em-
phasis on creation, Noah and
Abraham.
"You are Jewish and
Special," a new course on
Jewish values, will enable
students to exDlore their
identity with special emphasis
placed on such Jewish issues as
personal commitment, dating
and marriage, social justice,
community involvement and
other questions that face
young Jewish adults.
Linda Chazin, who joins the
Midrasha faculty for the first
time this year, will teach
Drama Workshop. Students
will be exposed to a variety of
dramatic techniques and will
apply them to a Jewish theater
production.
Popular courses which will
be repeated from last year's
curriculum include Holocaust
Studies with Jack Rosenbaum,
Comparative Religion with
Skip Paille and Anti-Semitism
which will be taught by Gail
Rabinovitch. In addition, the
10th grade Confirmation
classes of Tempie Judea,
Temple Israel and Temple
Beth Torah will be taught by
those temples' respective
rabbis during one period of
Midrasha. The students will
then participate in the reRular
Midrasha curriculum for the
other two periods.
Dr. Paul Klein, chairman of
the Midrasha Committee,
reflected on the success of
Midrasha with this area's
teenagers. "We are pleased
that the youth of our com-
munity see Midrasha as an
integral part of their Jewish
life and come each week filled
with an enthusiasm to learn
and a desire to socialize with
other Jewish teenagers. The
atmosphere is uplifting and
the ruach (spirit) which is
created is most gratifying."
For more information and-
or to register, call Ann Lynn
Lipton at 665-7706.
NOTE
Political Reading Material
and Advertising on this
page is not to be construed
as an endorsement by the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County.
I would appreciate your vote in the Dem- jV
ocratic Primary on Sept. 4th for my re- jjp election to the Florida House of Represent- J
*^J atives, District 83. af*
ft Thank you very much for your support. K
L' !titm i<(y 5
4 'rtf'/nrSrn/fi/iw fo4ea*iob fy^einbtocA. j&
PO Pol A 'mmmmmtmm*mmx&
Catch o
Star-Kist tuna in
natural spring water.
"It's(Q)Kosher and
has half the calories
of tuna in oil. It's got
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ke me!'


age 14 The Jewish Floririi-n d.i~ d.u
Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, August 31,1964
Fischer Named Hillel Program Coordinator
The newly named Hillel
program coordinator for the
Broward-Palm Beach area sees
a lot of potential for organiz-
ing Jewish students at Palm
Beach Junior College since
students live off campus and
need more opportunities to
meet with one another. Jenifer
Fischer will be on campus
weekly to acquaint Jewish
students with the services
Hillel offers films,
speakers, social service out-
reach, programs on Israel.
Shabbat and holiday
programming and courses in
basic Judaism.
"I will set up a booth where
students congregate and I also
plan to have weekly picnics to
exchange information. The
students can bring their brown
bag lunch and I'll provide all
the trimmings," stated Ms.
Fischer.
"I see a lot of potential in
this area. Currently, students
want activities and don't mind
traveling to Boca or other
areas to get together with
other groups. They just need a
little help in getting started."
Ms. Fischer is working on
getting Hillel recognized as an
official campus organization
at PBJC. She projects the
Jewish student population at
the junior college to be in the
vicinity of 300. "I'm inter-
ested in having returning
students reach out to new
members We will have events
here monthly as well as parti-
cipate in Hillel activities
throuehout South Florida."
Temple Judea
Continued from Page 3
lor the educational dire.
and .i youth lounge. Outc
pla^a>. gardens, reception
area^ and a basketball court
planned. -\ spe<
ial hall will
he both an indoor and an
outdoor area tor cocktail
Designet Guatemalan
Victor Conen. I

-iimate conditii
important Biblical
.:;.- Spearheading the
buildinj instruc-
tion drive are temple \
Presidents Daniel Bakst anii
V% illiam Meyer and committee
member- Stephen Berger.
Steven Bruh. Arnold Chane.
Marvin Domb, Martin
Golden, Richard Hasner, Ira
Kuchler, Mai Levy, and Nancv
Mighdoll. Preston Mighdoll
has been named chairperson
of the congregational cam-
paign assisted by campaign
cabinet members Jack Ain-
bender, Myra Berger, and
Diane Mitchell.
Founding President,
Barbara Chane, Temple
Secretary Helaine Kahn, and
Temple Treasurer Rosalee
Savel are chairing the major
gifts party which will be held
at the home of Daniel and
Elaine Bakst on Oct. 13.
Groundbreaking ceremonies
will be chaired by Susan
Wilders. Temple member
Lynne Ehrlich is serving as
advisor to the campaign.
Rabbi Joel Levine and Dr.
Jeffrey Faivus are involved in
all phases of each event.
Since its inception three
years ago. Temple Judea has
grown to almost three hundred
families. The temple brochure
and membership information
are available by calling the
office.
Jenifer Fischer
stated Ms. Fischer.
The first major event for
students will take place at the
University of Miami Hillel
Foundation. Called "The
Partv of the Year," it will be
held'on Sept. 8. 9 p.m. Addi-
tionally, a leadership weekend
will be held on Singer Island
on Sept. 14-16 for those
selected to become Hillel
student leaders.
Ms. Fischer, a native of
Shaker Heights, Ohio,
graduated from Miami Uni-
versity in Oxford, Ohio with a
bachelor's degree in psy-
chology and religion. She
served as chairman of the
Student Activities Board of
Hillel. was parttime program
director for Hillel and vol-
unteered to help the United
Jewish Appeal campaign on
campus.
She recently returned from
10 weeks abroad with five
weeks spent in Israel on an
American Zionist Youth
Foundation leadership train-
ing seminar.
For more information
contact Ms. Fischer at Florida
Atlantic University's United
Campus Ministeries where
Hillel has an office or at the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County's Jewish educa-
tion office. 665-7706. The
Jewish Federation is providing
Ms. Fischer with office space
which she will use one day a
week.
Shoshana Sharf [Walner] [right], a teacher at
Community Day School, leaves for San Francisco where2
attend the Coalition for Alternatives in Jewish Ediir,,
[CAJE] Conference. She, along with Eleanor j9
Temple Beth David [not pictured], received grants to attend iL
conference when they were named 1984 "teachers of the m7
by the Jewish Educators' Council of Palm Beach Count*
Joining Ms. Sharf is Ruth Levow [left], principal of l2
Beth El Religious School, who attends the CAJE coafereaE
yearly. a
OOPS!
In the August 3, 1984 issue of the Jewish Floridian the
two names which headed the engagement announced
of Beth Aimee Kaye to Ronald Lee Levinson were in
correct. It should have read Kaye-Levinson. The Floridian
regrets the error.
Sf
m&*
K Certified Kosher
Now there's a great-tasting.
sugar-free drink for people who
want to look and feel their Pest
New Crystal Light" Drink Mix
rfs sweetened a whole new
way. so there's absolutelv no
saccharin and no socchonn
aftertaste Crystal Light comes in
lots of delicious natural flavore.
And there's just 4 calories a gloss
Try Crystal Light, ttll make
a Peliever out of you.
% 1904 Ganva FooOt Cwporwan


Friday, August 31,1984 / The Jewiah Floridian of Pahn Beach County Page 9
The surprising truth about
who's the lowest.
.i.i iiiimwnn
THE LOWEST
fn">g The Surgeon General Has Determined
1 C|garette Smoking Is Oangerous to Your Health.
SOFT PACK 100$ FILTER. MENTHOL: 3 mj. "tar". 0.3 mg. nJcotnw
iv. par cigaWM by FTC method
Conveimve ta level nHtects the Feb-84 FTC flaport
NOW THE LOWEST OF |U, BRANOS
I
S


Page 14 The Jewish Floridian of P,i n___u n___^. ..
Page 10 The Jewiah Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, August 17, 1984
Jerry Melman, executive director of the Jewish Community
Center, discusses plans for the renovation of the pre-school
currently underway with Fran Witt, assistant director of the
JCC. They are standing on the steps to the trailer which will now
house the JCC staff.
Youngsters who attend Camp Shoresh, the pre-school division
of Camp Shalom, cool off from the summer heat in the JCC s
"swimming pool."
JCC Pre-School Expands
To Meet Demand
Continued bom Page 3
want to lose any more children
to a non-Jewish environment.
"The people in this com-
munity have a deep commit-
ment to Judaism and with so
many new people moving into
the West Palm Beach area, we
had no other choice but to do
what we've done," stated
Melman.
The commitment began in
1962 when the Jewish Federa-
tion of Palm Beach County,
prior to the establishment of
the JCC. founded a pre-school
at Camp Shalom in response
to the needs of area residents
for a Jewish early childhood
education program. The
school continued in operation
for 16 years.
When the JCC opened its
doors in 1974, it also began a
pre-school. The two schools
merged four years later into
the present JCC Pre-School
which receives funds for its
operation from the Jewish
Federation.
The pre-school has grown
steadily as parents have
recognized the superior quality
of instruction provided for
their children in a Jewish
atmosphere. The foundation is
being laid upon which the
future of this Jewish com-
munity is being built.
For information contact
Gail Kressel, early childhood
education director, at the
JCC, 689-7700.
'hi Only Glatt Kosher Holii In Thi Lincoln Raid Am
CELEBRATE THE SHEYUOT HOLIDAYS
SPECIAL SUMMER RATES
TV in All Rooms Movies Free Parking
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GLATT
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Services Conducted by Prominent Cantor
Beautiful SUCCA On Premises
Phone:1-538-7811 \^
ON THE OCEAN n IQth ST MIAMI BEACH FLA J31M
Baer Heads Florida Area Cabinet For American
Associates Ben-Gurion University of the Negevj
James B. Baer has assumed Chamber of Commerce and United Health FoUbh
the Presidency of the Florida Founding President of the South Bend.
Area for the American
Associates Ben-Gurion
University of the Negev and
leads a full campaign cabinet
across the State of Florida for
this the youngest, most
pioneering of Israel's Univer-
sities, according to Robert
Arnow, President of AABGU.
Jim Baer is a Founder and
immediate past President of
the South County Jewish
Federation. For many years,
he was a Federation Leader
and a Synagogue Leader in
South Bend, Indiana. Since
coming to Florida in 1976, Jim
has almost singlehandedly
organized the South County
Jewish Community.
He has served as a Vice Pre-
sident of the Palm Beach
Federation and was a foun-
ding father of the South
County Jewish Federation. He
was a Vice President of the
South County Jewish Com-
munity Day School and was
one of its Founding Fathers.
He is President of Temple
Beth El in Boca Raton. He is
Chairman of the Florida
Association of Jewish Federa-
tion, on the National Board of
the Council of Jewish Federa-
tions and has served as State
Chairman of Missions for the
United Jewish Appeal.
Currently, he is serving as
Project Renewal State
Chairman.
Jim has also been Chairman
of many National UJA
missions to Israel and devel-
oped his love of Ben-Gurion
University and friendship with
Shlomo Gazit during his many
visits to Ben-Gurion Uni-
versity. Jim serves on the
Board of the Boca Raton
United Way and in past years
in South Bend, Indiana was
President of the Junior
NOTE
Political Reading Material and Advertising on lk
not to be construed as an endorsement hv th. l->
era lion of Palm Beach Coun ty. Jewai
&$$
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icK*
&
w>
0*

V
1 O -. M
Wald
man
HOTEL
STRICTLY KOSHER CUISINE u Supervision
RESERVE NOW FOR THE HIGH HOLY DAYS
12 Days and
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Sept 26 Oct. 7
$320
per person
double occ
INCLUDING
MEM.S
SPUTSTAY
7 Days & 61
Sept. 26 Sept U{
Oct 5 Od. 7
Room at
Aflonflc
Towers*
meals at
WoWmon's
SERVICES CONDUCTED BY RENOWNED CAHTOtl
s23a
. TV IN EVERY ROOM e CHAISE e LOUNGES e PRrVATEfl
FREE! e POOL APPROPRIATE ENTERTAINMENT
SYNAGOGUE ON PREMISES
For Reservations Phone 1 -538-57311
(On the Octon at 43rt St. Boardwalk. Miami Beodi)
BUYING GOLD & SILVEI
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Buying...
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2550 OKEECHOBEE BLVD.. W. PALM BEACH. Ft
684-1771
HOUIS: 9:30 a.m.-6:00 p.m.
Membc ANA & Chamber ol Commerce
I


Friday, August 31, 1984 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page
Because Someone Cared
L.following lit |""-
,TI Sien by Eatew Top-
teiuh Family .-dCW-
KISvlce of Plm Beach
CljE Stephen Levitt'.
ffiwlll resume In sub-
let lse-
lull case names mentioned
\tst articles are fictitious;
^information at Jewish
bi and Children's Service
Kid in the strictest of
Jtfidence).
L a mental health profes-
Lal 1 have always been
Crested in improving com-
I "aliens within fam.hes^
la parents and parents
{"often asked me for an ef-
,ive strategy to transmit
leas religious traditions,
Lral traditions and values
their children and grand-
irildren. Effective inter-
Lerational communication
L be difficult under the most
[ealcircumstances. However,
i a resort and retirement area
kh as the Palm Beaches,
there most ol the residents are
fccent transplants from other
teas, and who are thousands
If miles from their families for
lost of the year, distance can
[lav a key role in disrupting
family communications. This
listance factor often makes it
ifficult for children and
Irandchildren to communicate
frequently on a face-to-face
lasis. Also, because visiting is
lo special, due to the planning
Ind expense involved, many
Unwarranted stresses are
placed on family members
Participating in the visit. These
llresses can raise anxiety levels
Vnd be instrumental in
abotagingthe visit.
We, of course, can try to
Leduce the importance of these
lace-to-face meetings by using
bther methods of communica-
ting between them. For
example, one can use the tele-
phone, a tape recorder or write
letters to communicate with
Jour loved ones. It seems to me
(that all of these methods are
beneficial in improving com-
munication within families,
(and should be utilized. But we
nust remember that these
methods arc substitutes and do
not have the impact of a face-
jto-face visit. It is during
Ipersonal visits that we can
clarify and fully express our
attitudes, ideas and feelings to
|our families.
The creative use of leisure
Eugene Topperman
time between parents and
children, the grandparents and
grandchildren, can be an
effective method of passing
along ideas, attitudes and
traditions. In my own case, I
remember a visit I had with my
grandfather when I was about
six years of age. He had been a
photo engraver for a large city
newspaper. He wanted to
explain to me what he had
done for a living and to ex-
plain the photo engraving pro-
cess, which involves the use of
reversed images. In order to
do this he took a blank piece
of paper, a wax candle, a
newspapaer cartoon and a
spoon. Her rubbed the candle
over the blank piece of paper,
coated it with wax, put the
cartoon on the treated paper,
picture side down and then
rubbed it with the spoon.
When he removed the cartoon,
a mirror image appeared on
the paper. This to me was
magic.
Looking back now, I realize
that my grandfather wanted to
explain to me the kind of work
he did, perhaps to bring me a
little closer to him and his
professional world; also to
enhance his own self-image. In
reality, however, 30 years after
this event occurred, the
memories that I have for my
grandfather and his work are
warm, positive ones.
The point is that if a person
is creative, with some fore-
thought an adult can create a
simple play activity that can be
used as a forum to express
ideas and attitudes. Recently,
my wife and I were eating in a
fast food restaurant. We
observed a girl sitting with her
family and playing with her
Cabbage Patch doll. Initially
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A warm, caring environment
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'Individual attention in small classes
Close involvement of parents and Rabbi
* Dedicated professional teachers
United Synagogue Curriculum
Full Bar/Bat Mitivah program
ALAN H niMMTvrQ TOR INFORMATION RABBi J0ELCHAZIN
PRESCIDENTNGS 832-0804 EDUCATIONAL DIRECTOR
190 N County Road, Palm Beach, FL. 33480____________
she got a high chair, put a bib
on the doll, began to talk to it
in a positive, maternal way
and then began to feed it. A/i
of this was done while her
parents and siblings (ap-
parently impervious to her
positive role play) ate and
spoke among themselves. Yet
it was apparent to me that in
this family, the attitudes
toward motherhood were
communicated in a positive
way. By mimicking her
mother's behavior, this child
was refining on valuable life
skills that she had learned
through face-to-face contact.
In my second example, a
Cabbage Patch doll was used
to show the positive role of
parenting; simple stock dolls
can be made, and with a little
creativity, dressed in costumes
at holiday time to explain Jew-
ish traditions and history. The
transfer technique that my
grandfather used can be
adapted by the use of appro-
priate printed materials and
enhanced by having the child
write in or verbalize the
dialogue that they feel should
go into the transferred pic-
tures. By expanding upon this
dialogue we can transmit the
appropriate ideas and values
to our children and grand-
children.
As adults we often forget
that by using less but by letting
the child use his imagination,
they often can and will have a
better time. If the child has a
better time, it appears to me
that he is more likely to retain
what is taught, and therefore
our traditions, ideas and atti-
tudes are more likely to be
retained in a positive way. The
important thing to remember
is to try to create fun and
enjoy your family's visit.
The Jewish Family and
Children's Service of Palm
Beach County, Inc., is a non-
profit agency of Palm Beach
County. Our office is located
at 2250 Palm Beach Lakes
Blvd., Suite 104. Our tele-
phone number is 684-1991.
The Jewish Family and Chil-
dren 's Service is a beneficiary
agency of the Jewish Federa-
tion of Palm Beach County.
-NOTE
Political Reading Material and Advertising on this page is
not to be construed as an endorsement by the Jewish Fed-
eration of Palm Beach County.
VOTE Sept. 4th
Circuit Ct. Judge PllflCh 86
7 year record of Honesty, Fairness,
Hardwork & Tough on Crime
,
MarayFkw


Page 14 The Jewish Floridian of pi n.a. r>___- .
Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, Augu8t3M984
Senior News
FROM THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
Wedding Announcement
we thank you for your con-
siderate service and to tell you
how good it feels to know that
there are people like you who
care for people like us.
Verv sincerely yours,
Jacob and Sadie Doroshkin
WE GET LETTERS. .
1 want to express special ap-
preciation to Carol Fox and
her staff of the Kosher Lunch
Connection.
She was most helpful and
gracious in helping a friend of
mine, who is in very poor
health, to receive kosher meals
delivered to her home daily.
The Hot Kosher Lunch
Connection is a most worth-
while Community Program
and appreciated by all attend-
ing seniors.
Sincerely,
Jean Gross
TRANSPORTATION
Transportation is available
in our designated area for
persons 60 years of age or over
who do not use public tran-
sportation. We take people to
treatment centers, doctors'
offices, to hospitals, nursing
homes to visit spouses, to
social service agencies and
nutrition centers. There is no
fee for this service, but parti-
cipants are encouraged to
contribute their fair share.
There is a great demand for
this service, so please make
your reservations in advance.
For information and-or
reservations, call 689-7703
Monday through Friday.
HOT KOSHER
LUNCH CONNECTION
Many elements combine to
make the Hot Kosher Lunch
Program at the Jewish Com-
munity Center a success. Fore-
most among this is the op-
portunity to form new and
lasting friendships.
Each weekday, seniors
gather for intimate talk,
educational discussions, game
playing, leisure and song.
These activities are followed
by a hot, kosher, nutritious
lunch served with warmth and
hospitality by our dedicated
volunteers. There is no set fee,
but persons are asked to make
a contribution each meal.
Please come and join us.
For information and reserva-
tions (which must be made in
advance) call Carol or Lillian
at 689-7703. in West Palm
Beach.
HOME DELIVERED
MEALS
Persons who are
homebound and need a
Kosher meal please call for
information. Call Carol in
West Palm Beach at 689-7703.
Palm Beach County Adult
Education Classs
"Fitness Over Fifty" will be
officiated each Tuesday at 11
a.m. beginning Sept. 11. Join
the many who are learning to
improve their lives with the
great techniques provided by
delightful Bea Bunze, Adult
Education Instructor.
FUTURE PROGRAMS
"Energy and Aging."
Thursday, Sept. 6 at 11 a.m.
Florida Power and Light's
Rita Craig returns to the JCC
with important information
on how to handle your
"energy" situation.
Everyone is invited to at-
tend. Persons who wish to
remain for a hot, Kosher
lunch, please call Carol at 689-
7703 for a reservation.
Stepping Into The Holiday
Spirit: Thursday, Sept. 13,
1:15 p.m. Cantor Elaine
Shapiro once again will share
with us thoughts and melodies
of Rosh Hashana. Holiday
refreshments will be served by
the Second Tuesday Council.
WE GET LETTERS
July 30,1984
Jewish Community Center
2415 Okeechobee Blvd.
W. Palm Beach, FL
Ladies and Gentlemen,
I feel I should write to tell
you how kind, helpful and
considerate your bus drivers
and office personnel are.
In my.wife's name a Segal of Palm Beach Gardens,
Fla.
The double-ring candlelight
ceremony at the Richfield Re-
gency in New Jersey was per-
formed by Rabbi David Lapp
of New York and Cantor Fred
Bernstein, grandfather of the
groom.
The new Mrs. Segal is a
graduate of the University of
Florida with a Bachelor of Sci-
ence degree in Psychology.
The bridegroom k .
graduate of the u "M
Florida with BachJC*
ence degrees in*d
and Chemistry and< .
tending the iin, no%'
Florid! Gr^SS
his Doctorate inB^
sftrlivin* 8
M,
Mr. and Mrs. David Segal
BORN-SEGAL
Abbey Ann Born, daughter
of Dr. and Mrs. Joseph Born
of New Jersey and Boca
Raton, was married on July 8
to Mr. David Michael Segal,
son of Mr. and Mrs. Emanuel
Congregation Beth Kodesh
501 N.E. 26th Ave., Boynton Beach, FL 33435
Rabbi A vrom L. Drazin
Castor Arthur B. RoeenwaMer
Come Join Us
High Holiday Tickets Available!
Call
586-9428
whefe shopping is a pleasure 7doys a week
Available at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Hamburger or
Hot Dog Rolls
59
fret
pkg.
jl.
Available at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Filled with Cinnamon
and Apples
Apple Fritters
Available at Pubix Stores with
Freeh Danish Bakeries Only.
Fined with Custard and Iced
with Creamy Chocolate
Available at All Pubix Stores
and Danish Bakeries.
Assorted Cookies........ *J $1"
Bran Muffins
6-ct.
box
99*
0
Yj~.
i
Blueberry, Lemon or Cherry
Cheese Coffee Cake... easn $169
Topped with Luscious Meringue
Lemon Meringue Pie.... as* $139
Powdered Sugar
MiniOonuts...................'JJ 99* JL
M
A Delicious New Treat
. Hawaiian Sweet Bread 2!' 99*
Available at Publix Stores with Fresh
Danish Bakeries Only.
Plain or Seeded, Sliced or Unsaced
Italian Bread................. 59*
Chocolate _.__.____
Ripple Cake..................W
Prices Effective
Aug. 30th thru Sept. 5th. 1984
^5o56e6o666WooooooeTnnnniWoTRnnnni
FREE! WEDDING
CAKE ORNAMENT
V.lu.d up to SI 500 with IWt
Coupon and tho SSfSeasaOfanr
tSsS Tor or L.ror Woddlno*
(Coupon C.pko. W.d S.PO0. 1W4)
(V.ro Boach to Homtd Only)
(Ono coupon por Horn SBfSfcSMM
I
A^..-.


Friday, August 31,1984 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 13
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BECAUSE SO MUCH IS RIDING ON YOUR TIRES. CFRVICE
P-METWC TUBELESS MM %
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165-13 MX 40.95
175-13 42.95
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165-14 48.95
175-14 47.95
185-14 54.95
165-15 45.95
165 70-13 MXL 39.95
175/70-13 MXL 47.95
185 70-13 MXL 49.95
195/70-14 MXL 58.95
XZX TUBELESS WHITE WALL
SIZE PRICE
P155.80-13 37.95
P165/80-13 44.95
PI 75-75-14 58.95
TRX BLACKWALL
220/55-390
180/65-390
85.12
WHITE
101.31
SIZE PRICE
P185/80-13 54.95
P185/75-14 58.95
P195/75-14 59.95
P205/75-14 63.95
P215/75-14 69.95
P225/75-14 75.95
P205/75-15 65.95
P215/75-15 68.95
P225/75-15 70.95
P235/75-15 73.95
MICHELIN
ALL SEASON
RADIAL
DELIVERS UP TO
60,000
MILES
ieptrtdDf M tie. ou line
SIZE
P185
75-14
P195
75-14
P205
75-15
P215
70-15
P215
75-15
P225
75-15
P235
75-15
PRICE
:= F? -=
69.95
73.95
81.00
83.20
84.60
86.95
94.95
IMPORT TRUCK
185 4 6 v 64.23
NORTON TIRE CO s LIMITED WARRANTY
30 DAY MONEY
BACK GUARANTEE
, ItlMiny retson you are not completely satisfied witti any new
HHenoci cat tire you buy from Norton Tire Co 'etum it.
along mth your original invoice, within 30 days ol Hie dale ol
wcliaie and your money will bt refuaded in hill no ques
lum asked1 Road hazards and commeicial vehicles ei
eludes
CERTIFIED
MECHANICS
IN EVERY STORE .
Most ol our mechanics have been f
TESTED and CERTIFIED by the National
Institute tor Service Excellence They
are available at any ol our stores listed
below
PLEASE NOTE:
If you are not satisfied with
any service work or quotes,
call 593-7040 for a free
consultation and explanation
with our chief mechanical
supervisor Curt.
OIL CHANGE,
FILTER & LUBE
UPT0 5QTS OF
PREMIUM OIL
FOR GAS OR
DIESEL ENG
NEW FILTER
COMPLUBE
/
FOB MOST US
PASSENGER CARS *NO LIGHT TRUCKS
f e w a
DISC
BRAKE
SPECIAL
nstall new disc pads Re-
surface rotors Install new
seals Repack bearings
Check calipers Check
system Inspect master
cylinder Add fluid as re-
quired Adjust and bleed
as required Check and ad-
just rear brakes Road test
30,000 Mile Limited Warranty
EXPERT WORK ON DRUM BRAKES
NORTON,
THE TIRE
IISCOUNTERSf
WITH
INTEGRITY
AIR CONDITIONING
CHECK-UP
ALL 370mfc5 OrcN < .30 A...
70 SERIES
P185/70B-13
P195/70B-13
P205/70B-14
f P215/70B-14
P225/70B-14
P235/70B-14
P225/70B-15
P235/70B-15
PRICE
51.21
55.77
57.51
59.13
61.14
62.61
68.51
P205/60B-13
P225/60B-14
P235/60B-14
P245/60B-14
P275/60B-14
P235/60B-15
P265/60B-15
60.60
62.21
64.62
72.13
65.43
74.28
BF Goodrich ALL-TERRAIN
LIGHT TRUCK TIRES
SIZE
27x850-14
4 PI,
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30x950-15
4 PI,
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31x1050-15
4 PI,
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32x1150-15
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Rated
33x1250-15
6 Pi,
Rated
PRICE
59.94
73.04
79.87
85.54
101.59
Noi All L Tiuck sizes available al an stores
IFGoodrich
UFESAVERXLM
STEEL BELTED RAW AL
WHITEWALL
SIZE
P155/80R13
P165/80R13
P175/80R13
P185/80R13
P195/70R13
P205/70R14
P175/75R14
P185/75R14
P195/75R14
P205/75R14
P215/75R14
P225/75R14
P195/75R15
"P205/75R15
P215/75R15
P225/75R15
P235/75R15
PRICE
44.33
46.05
47.77
49.05
49.90
55.92
49.16
51.52
55.92
58.37
59.46
63.54
58.71
60.75
63.01
65.37
70.09
10 POINT SAFETY SERVICE CHECK
TIRES ALIGNMENT BALANCE
BRAKES IDLER ARM MUFFLER
SHOCKSBELTS HOSES BATTERY
ALL STORES OPEN 7:30 AM
CORAL GABLES
Bird & Douglas Road 446-8101
NORTH MIAMI
13360 N W 7th Ave 681-8541
N MIAMI BEACH
1700 NE 163rd St 945-7454
MIAMI BEACH
1454 Alton Road 672-5353
SOUTH DAOE
9001 S Dixie Hwy. 667-7575
XM~, SUTLER RIOQE
HMO S Dixie Hwy 233-5241
HIAl.EAH/PALM SPRINGS MILE
1275 49th St 822-2500
MIAMI AIRPORT
N W 25 St & Milam Dairy Rd 593-1191
WEST MIAMI
Bird & Galloway Rds 552-6656
MNOALl M./HNMTE SQUARE
13872 S.W. 88th St 387-0128
WTAMIAMI TRAIL
12520 S W 8th St. 551-1141
HOMESTEAD
DAVIE
St Rd 84 iust west of Univ Dr
473-4700
FT.LAUOEROALE
1740 E Sunrise Blvd 463-/588
PLANTATION
381 N State Rd 7 587-2186
> PEMBROKE PtNES
POMPANO BEACH
3151 N Federal Hwy 943-4200
< DEERFIELD BEACH
2265 W Hillsboro Blvd. 427-8800
DELRAV BEACH
1 Linton Blvd. 272-1022
GREENACRES
3838 Jog Rd 968-1014
Hllywd Blvd. iust west ot Univ Dr. 435-1383
r. Wiffiui 771 4700 m51 Southwn Bwd- 793-"15
N Unrv Dr 4 McNab Rd 721-4700 ^ pMM ^^^
515 South Dixie 832-4181
30100S Fe 497 -'y,^^^ ^^P-nmrnerdBlvd 735-2772
If
LAKE PARK/N. PALM BEACH
532N Lake Blvd 848-2544
TEOUESTA
Bridge Rd & Old Dixie Hwy. 746-9215
FT PIERCE
2604 South 4th St 464-8020
l VERO BEACH
755 21st Street 567-1174
DAYTON A BEACH
907 VoUisia Ave 255-7487
'NAPLES
2065 E TamiamiTr. 774-4443
FT. MYERS
15135 McGregor Blvd 482-8880
MASTERCARD* VISA


Uu r>-
Page 14 The Jewish Floririi-n of P.u
Page 14 The Jewish Floridisn of Palm Beach County / Friday, August 31,1984
High Holy Day Committee formed At Temple Israel Candle Lighting Time
Iti. Aug. 317:21
In response to a growing
and more involved congrega-
tion, Temple Israel has formed
a new High Holy Day Com-
mittee to make preparations
for the up-coming High Holy
Days.
Historically, the congreg-
ants of Temple Israel have
participated in the High Holy
Day Services in a variety of
ways. This year, the High
Holy Day Committee is
preparing an even more
comprehensive congregational
involvement program. Over 75
congregants will participate in
the Rosh Hashanah and Yom
Kippur Services. Unique
among this list are three
people who, in response to an
article by Rabbi Shapiro in the
Temple Bulletin, have vol-
unteered to read the Torah for
Rosh Hashanah and Yom
Kippur. Dr. Leland Heller,
Jeffrey Frank and Dr. Richard
Shugarman have been working
in conjunction with Rabbi
Shapiro and studying the ap-
propriate Torah portions for
Rosh Hashanah and Yom
Kippur. The Haftarah
(prophetic portions of the
Bible) are also being worked
on over this summer by
Howard Debs, Sandra Watts
and Harold Sedarbaum.
Temple Israel will be
holding Rosh Hashanah
Services on Wednesday
evening, Sept. 26 at 6:30 p.m.
or 9 p.m., and Thursday
morning, Sept. 27 at 10 a.m.
family Services for Rosh
Hashanah will be held Friday
Evening Sept. 28 at 8 p.m. Kol
N'idre Services will be held
Friday, Oct. 5 at 6:30 p.m. or
9 p.m. and Yom Kippur
Morning Services will begin on
Saturday, Oct. 6 at 10 a.m.
Children's Services for Yom
Kippur will begin at 1:30 p.m.
in the Sanctuary on Saturday
afternoon, Oct. 6. High Holy
Day tickets are available from
the Temple office. Member-
ship in the congregation,
however, includes High Holy
Day tickets. Membership
information is also available in
the Temple office, at 190
North Flagler Drive. West
Palm Beach.
Bar/Bat Mitzvah
AYAL GOLDSTEIN
Ayal Goldstein, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Abraham Goldstein
of West Palm Beach, will
become a Bar Mitzvah on
Sept. 8, Saturday morning, at
Temple Beth El.
\yal, who is in the eighth
grade at the Jewish Com-
munity Day School, is inter-
ested in computers and loves
to listen to hard rock music.
TAMAR BLEIMAN
Tamar Beth Bleiman,
duaghter of Dr. and Mrs.
Michael Bleiman of Jupiter,
will be called to the Torah on
Saturday morning. Sept. I, at
Temple Beth David. Tammy
will also participate in the
Fridav evening services, Aug.
31 Rabbi William Marder and
Cantor Earl Rackoff will
officiate.
Tammy is in the eighth
grade at Jupiter Middle School
where she is a flutist in the
Advanced Band. She is a
member of Temple Beth
David's Youth Group.
Tammy likes swimming,
gymnastics, is an avid reader
and also plays the piano.
Tammy will be sharing her
Bat Mitzvah with her Soviet
twin. Edda Zamanskaya of
Novosibirsk. USSR.
Area Deaths
CUTLER
Theresa L.. 81. of Dover B-32S. Centur>
Village. West Palm Beach. Riverside
Guardian Funeral Home. West Palm
Beach
MASH
Louis A.. 76. of 341 Sheffield North. On
tury Village. West Palm Beach River-
side Guardian Funeral Home. West
Palm Beach
FEINGOLD
Silvia. 84. of 1S15 S Flakier Drive. West
Palm Beach Riverside Memorial
Chapel. West Palm Beach
FLETCHER
Harry L 79. of Cambridge E. Century
Village. West Palm Beach Levitt Wem
Palm
Plan

Tempfe JBetfi "David
*bsr Tiood J\oi\d
PaCm Beach Gardens
>"
Now Accepting 'REGISTRATION" For Its
Religious School
Professionally Staffed and Directed
Grades K-2, Sunday Only
Grades 3-7.2-Day a Week. 5 Hr Program
Curriculum of Hebrew & Heritage Studies
Bar/Bat Mitzvah. Confirmation
Religious School Starting Sun. Sept. 9
For Details & To Register
Call Temple Office
694-2350
iRabbi William Marder tmmmmmmmmmmmmm^ Cantor Earl Rackoff N
stein Guaranteed Security Plan Chapel.
West Palm Beach
KATZ
Stella. 70. of 130 Sunrise Avc
Beach Riverside Guardian
Chapel. West Palm Beach
KLEIN
Morns, of 2511 Dudley Drive W West
Palm Beach Riverside Guardian
Funeral Home. West Palm Beach.
OPPENHEIMER
Leopold. 82. of South Garden Drive.
Lake Worth. Levitt Welnsteln Guaran
teed Security Plan Chapel. West Palm
Beach
PREMAN
Certrude. 78. of Berkshire Century Vil-
lage. West Palm Beach III
:. and Funeral Chapel-
Palm Beach
RALSTON
Miriam B 78, ol 1431 N n Hlvd
. Riverside Quardlau

REISFIELD
Herbert Of BoyntOI)BMCfl RlV<
Guard raj Home West Palm
Beach
SATTY
Nathan. S3, of Century Village Waal
Palm Beach Levitt-Weinsteln Guaran
teed Security Plan Chapel
SCHWARTZ
Philip. 81. of Century Village. West
Palm Beach Levitt Welnsteln Guaran-
teed Security Plan Chapel
WEISS
Eva. 6. of South Hampton B. Century
Village. West Palm Beach Levitt -Weln-
steln Guaranteed Security Plan Chapel.
West Palm Beach-
WOLF
Sidney. 80. of Stratford B. Century
Village. West Palm Beach Riverside
Guardian Funeral Home. West Palm
Beach
-JOIN OUR TEMPLE JUDEA FAMILY-
HIGH HOLY DAY TICKETS AVAILABLE
Open House Friday, September 7 at 7:00 p.m.
Innovative Religious School Social Groups For All Ages
Full Youth Program Adult Education Area
Bar & Bat Mitzvah For Children Programming
And Adults Confirmation
FUTURE
HOME
FAMILY SABBATH SERVICE FRIDAY AT 7:30 PM
St. Catherine's Cultural Center, Southern Blvd. & Flagler Drive
Rabbi Joal Levin* Cantor Ann* Newman Dr. Jeffrey Falvus, President
Share* Friadkandar, Educational Director Annia Lynn Bormt*\ High H^ Day Cantor
471-1526
Groundbreaking September 301
Fri. Sept. 77:14
Religious Directory
Conservative
CONGREGATION ANSHEI SHOLOM: 5348 Grove Sum
West Palm Beach 33409. PHone 684-3212. Rabbi if
Vander Walde. Cantor Mordecai Spektor. Daily: 8:30 a.m.
and 7:30 p.m. Friday: 8:30 a.m.. 5 p.m. and a late serviceat
8:15 p.m., followed by Oneg Shabbat. Saturday: 8:30 a.m.
7:30 p.m., Mincha followed by Sholosh Suedos.
CONGREGATION BETH KODESH OF BOYNTONI
BEACH: 501 N.E. 26 Avenue, Boynton Beach 33435. PhoJ
586-9428. Rabbi Avrom L. Drazin. Monday 8:30 an.;
Thursday 8:30 a.m. Sabbath services. Friday 8:15 p.nj
Saturday 9 a.m.
GOLDEN LAKES TEMPLE: 1470 Golden Lakes Blvd
West Palm Beach 33411. Phone 689-9430. Rabbi Joseph
Speiser. Daily Services 8:15 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. Sabbath
services Friday 8:15 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m., 5 p.m.. Mincha
followed by Sholosh Suedos.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID: 4657 Hood Road. Palm Beach |
Gardens 33410. Phone 694-2350. Rabbi William Marder,,
Cantor Earl J. Rackoff. Sabbath services. Friday 8 p.m.j
Saturday 10 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 2815 No. Flagler Dr.. West Pa
Beach 33407. Phone 833-0339. Rabbi Howard J. Hinch. |
Cantor Elaine Shapiro. Sabbath services Friday 8:15 p.m.,
Saturday 9:30 a.m. Daily Minyan 8:15 a.m.. Sunday and)
Legal Holidays 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 315 V A Street. Lake Worth I
33460. Phone 585-5020. Rabbi Emanuel Kisenberg. Cantor
Jacob Klman. Service! Monday and Thursday 8:15 a.m., |
Friday B:15 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 224 N.W V.nue G, Belle]
Gladi Sal.hath services Friday. 8:30. p.m. Phone 99^ j
TEMPLE BETH ZION: Lions Club. 700 ( amelia Dr.. Ml
Palm Beach. Mailing Address: POBox 104. 650 Royal Pahs
Blvd.. Royal Palm Beach, FL 33411. Sabbath Sen ices FndayJl
p.m.. Saturdav 8:45 a.m. Rabbi Nathan Zelizer Phone "93-1
9122.
TEMPLE B'NAl JACOB: 2177 Bo Conj West:
Palm Beach 33408. Phone 438-6067 Rabbi Dr. Morris
Silberman. Cantor Gary I). Kessler. Sabbath service*, Friday
* p.m.. Saturday and Holidays 9 a.m.. Monday and Thursday
y ...m.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL: 190 North County Road. Palm
33480. Phone 8320804. Rabbi Joel Chazin. Cantor David|
Dardashti. Sabbath services. Fridav 6 p.m. through Aug. 31,
and 8:30 p.m. afterwards; Saturday 9 a.m.
THE TREASURE COAST JEWISH CENTER -
Abraham: 3257 S.E. Salerno Road. Port Salerno.
Abraham Rose. 1-287-8833. Services Friday evenings 8 p.m.
LAKE WORTH JEWISH CENTER: St. Lukes Uniud
Methodist Chapel. 166 Ohio Road, Lake Worth. Phone w
1869. Friday night serivcea 8:15 p.m., Saturday. 9am.
Orthodox
CONGREGATION AITZ CHAIM: Century V^***- JJ^I
Palm Beach. Phone 689-4675. Sabbath services 9
p.m. Daily services 8:15 a.m. and 6:30 p.m.
Reform
CONGREGATION BETH ISRAEL: 1592 '"^'J^",]
857146. Port St. Lucie. FL 33482. Friday night servK-
p.m. Saturday morning 10:30 a.m. Phone .
THE REFORM TEMPLE OF JUPITER JEQUESTA^
Jude Church (Parriah Hall) ** "? No." *, % Til-
address: Plaza 222, U.S. No. 1. Tecgiesta 33458. Pbo J
4235. President Jeanne Tarsches. Servwes the seconu
fourth Friday of every month, 8 p.m. ^ i
TEMPLE BETH EL: 4600 Oleander Avenue. Fort P*rc*
33450. Phone 461-7428. Cantor Anne Newman. J
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM: St Helen' P**"",3
Avenue and Victory Blvd.. Vero Beach WW, -jj
address: P.O. Box 2113. Vero Beach, FL 329M'
Stephen Adams. Phone 1-569-0180. I
TEMPLE BETH TORAH: at St. David's intta I
Epiaoopal Retreat. Forest Hill Blvd. and *$, w-t
West Palm Beach. Mailing addreee: P.O. Box 17W. ^
Palm Beach. FL 334l6\Friday aerviees 8:i& P^ &
Steven R Westman. Cantor Nicholas Fsnakal. P
2700. Waat pjta M
TEMPLE ISRAEL: 1901 No. Flagler Dr.,wen ^^
33407. Phone 833-8421. Rabbi Howard Shapiro.
Soloist Susan Weiss. Sabbath services. Friday J. ^
TEMPLE JUDEA: at St. Catharine's *3*Z?%&M
Social HalL 4000 Washington Rd., at S*"*^..&+
Rabbi Joal L. Levine. Cantor Anne Newman ^3, fta*
6164 Okeechobee Blvd.. West Pahn Beach, FL mw.
47M638.
....


^day7August3M9847TheJ^
iagogue News
judge Fine to Be Honored At Temple Judea
L Edward I ine will be
JS ai Temple Judea
K*rvices. Friday Aug.
I especial i>me of 7:30
la, St. Ca.her.ne s
L Center, the corner of
I Blvd. and Flagler
/Rabbi Joel Lev.ne and
IrAnne Newman will ot-
|.e Fine served for two
las the religious school
Lion a voluntary basis,
his busy schedule,
.Fine spent countless
ladministering the school
I as supervising Sunday
|ng and Wednesday
L. sessions. He also
I seventh-eight grade and
l out with beginning
L judge line attended
frous county-wide educa-
seminars and intro-
i many innovations into
pool.
nard Goodstein, im-
Lte past religious school
Cittee chairperson, will
j as coordinator of this
^1 tribute. Participating
Goodstein are Rabbi
le and Temple president,
J Jeffrey Faivus. Judge
| wife. Marcy, who is a
ber of the Temple's
J of Trustees and editor
lie Temple Bulletin, will
[him as a pulpit guest
with their sons, Andy
fimothy.
part of this service,
hie Judea's new inter-
national family ritual will
Included. Grandparents,
Its, children including
pay celebrants of all ages
tarticipate.
Ic membership committee
]ed by Candy Fischer has
ped an Open House which
beheld at 7 p.m. prior to
following regular Temple
fca Sabbath Services,
ky, Sept. 7 at 8 p.m.
bresentatives of the
|ple Sisterhood,
fierhood, XY and ZClub,
I Timers, Young Couples
Singles, Youth Group,
I Membership committee
pe present to answer ques-
1 Prospective members
|have the opportunity to
informally with Rabbi
Levine, Cantor Anne
Iman, Educational
Por Sheree Friedlander
Vouth Director Susan
If-Schwartz. Temple
Idem Dr. Jeffrey Faivus
[members of the Board of
Itees will answer questions
[' the congregation and
fading plans. A model of
fongregation's permanent
ill be on display.
[ regular oneg shabbat
Mored by Sisterhood
"i services on both
W- During the sermon,
i liI* ,he special junior
I shabbat will be held. For
I information, call the
p office.
CONGREGATION
BETHKODESH
If Holiday services wUl
Fducted by Rabbi Avrom
f win and Cantor Arthur
I Kosenwasser. Rosh
ponah services will be held
[Jursday, Sept. 27, and
UnS"28-Yom Kppur
n. ^ begin on Fridy
K Oct. 5 and will con-
n Saturday, Oct. 6.
Provisions have been made
for the seating of non-
members. Seats are available
by calling the temple office.
The Sisterhood will hold
their first Fall meeting at their
new temple, 501 NE 26th
Avenue, Boynton Beach, on
Tuesday, Sept. 11,12 noon. A
program has been arranged to
welcome all summer vaca-
tioners.
A Theatre Party will be held
at the Royal Palm Dinner
Theatre in Boca Raton, Sept.
30, 4 p.m. The play is "No-No
Nannette." Price of $28 in-
cludes full dinner and gratui-
ties. Limited number of tickets
available. Call Betty Roth or
Rose Greenberg.
A card party and luncheon
are planned for Wednesday,
Oct. 17, 12 noon, at the
temple. For tickets call Goldie
Brodsky.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
The Sisterhood will hold its
first meeting of the season, on
Wednesday, Sept. 12, 1 p.m.,
in the Social Hall, at 315 N.
"A" St., Lake Worth. Prior
to the meeting, coffee and
cake will be served at 12:30
p.m.
An informative talk will be
given by a representative of
the Telephone Company.
LAKE WORTH
JEWISH CENTER
For the High Holy Days,
Rosh Hashanah and Yom
Kippur services will be held at
the Center's birthplace in the
Challenger Country Club in
Poinciana Place.
Congregation President,
Janet Schwartz, announces
that Rabbi David Shapiro and
Cantor Paul Stuart will lead
the services. The five day
schedule is as follows: Rosh
Hashanah eve: Wednesday,
Sept. 26, 7 p.m.; Rosh
Hashanah First Day:
Thursday, Sept. 27,8:30a.m.;
Rosh Hashanah Second Day:
Friday, Sept. 28, 8:30 a.m.
Yom Kippur Kol Nidre:
Friday, Oct. 5, 7 p.m.; Yom
Kippur: Saturday, Oct. 6 -
Sachrit, 9 a.m. Yiskor, Noon
- Mincha and Neila, 5:30 p.m.
Tickets for the entire ob-
servance are available to all
members of the congregation
which now numbers 250 as
part of the annual dues of $75
per person. Non-members
may purchase tickets at $60
each for the remaining limited
seating.
For reservations or further
information, call Janet Sch-
wartz or Martha Freedberg.
Time
Running Out
Continued from Page 1
confident that Weizman,
Hurwitz and the NRP leader-
ship can be wooed into a
narrow-based Likud govern-
ment once Peres has "wasted
three weeks" in fruitless ef-
forts to form a Labor-led
administration.
There have been no indica-
tions so far from Weizman
that he is prepared to consider
either Labor's or Likud's
scenarios. Both Yahad and the
NRP, in all their public state-
ments, arc standing firm in
their demand for a unity
government. Herzog, himself,
said, when he named Peres as
Premier-designate, that the
nation desires a unity gov-
ernment.
MEANWHILE, Labor and
Likud negotiators were to
meet in Jerusalem for another
session of the foreign policy
working committee, following
exchanges of angry recrimina-
tions last Thursday and
Friday.
Children from Temple Beth David greet their spiritual leader,
Rabbi William Marder, and his wife, Mimi, on their return from
Israel. The children are [left to right] Kelly Landwer, Philip
Stein, Amy Stein and [front] Daniel Landwer. Rabbi Marder,
prior to his trip to Israel, took a month long sabbatical leave to
study at the Graduate Department of the Jewish Theological
Seminary of America in New York.
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB
2177 So. Congress Avenue, W.P.B., Florida 433-5957
HIGH HOLIDAY SERVICES
Conducted by
RABBI DR. MORRIS SILBERMAN
and
CANTOR ZOLTAN FENAKEL WITH CHOIR
Rosh Hashana Sept. 27th and 28th
Yom Kippur Oct. 5th Kol Nidre
Oct. 6th Yom Kippur
SANCTUARY SEATS AVAILABLE
Tickets obtainable in Temple Office
9 to 12 weekdays or
Call Alexander Walkes 968-9393
Beth Zion Religious School
A Conservative Synagogue
Accepting Registration
Accredited Religious School
Call
Rosalind Pomerance, Director 798-0278
Ellen Brown
793-1354
Helen Schwartz
793-6375
/
Re-Elect JUDGE F1DL
DOUGLAS
The Experienced Judge. For 24 Years.
Achievements and background of Circuit Court Judge Paul Douglas
First elected as County Judge (Probate) in 1960.
Became a Circuit Judge Probate Division, by
Constitutional Revision in 1972. _.. .__
Practicing attorney in West Palm Beach-11 years,
(prior to election as Judge in 1960)
Author of the first Juvenile and Domestic Relation
Court in Florida.____ ~ ,.
Testified as an expert on Probate & Guardianship
matters in the Florida Legislature.
Charter member and Past president of the Palm
Beach Psychiatric Clinic which was the county s first
treatment facility for acutely ill "^J""*
Actively supported the creation of the PB. County
Childrens Home and served on its Board ot
PasTviS President of the Florida County Judges
Association.
Past President-elect of the Palm Beach County Bar
Association.
Attended the National Judicial College in Nevada as
a student and as a lecturer.
Completed special courses for Judges at Harvard
University.
Qualified in all areas of the law and presently the
most experienced Judge in Florida on Probate
matters.
BornLake Worth, Florida.
Married, 2 grown daughters, 2 grandchildren.
Veteran of World War H-United States Air Force.
Attended University of Florida and Stetson
University Law School, Class of 1950.
Member of Holy Trinity Episcopal Church.
Vote Sept. 4 Circuit Judge Group 4
N. M. Adv
& ttU:oxfcs2K*>te.ytoKv
.*<-* V*.


Page 14 The Jewish PUm... ~ o-i_ r_. ~
Page 16 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, Auguat3M984
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Full Text
Friday, August 31,1984 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 5
ir-Congregational Eighth Grade Program Formed
local congregations
U gr < combine a"d
["an inter-congre-
K education Program
Ehth graders to be held at
Rlish t-ommunity Day
Wednesday evenings,
om. As of now,
II Beth David, Temple
K, Temple Beth Torah
Ijernple Israel have joined
Kiate the pilot program.
Lkiflf for the
tonal directors who will
inisier the program in
K to himself, Rabbi
f Marder of Temple
David stated. By
fcining our individual
Cogue's programs, we can
! an exciting educational
Wment linking, at the
time, the formal
fmic learning aspect as
|as the informal affective
ling. Alone, we can t
V as exciting an environ-
fdue to the small numbers
khth graders in each con-
ation." The other ad-
Lators of the program
Ruth Levow, principal of
le Beth El Religious
Col; Rabbi Steven
(man of Temple Beth
In and Cissy Tishman,
fcipal of Temple Israel
ious School.
;he concept for the inter-
national eighth grade
about during informal
among the four
itional directors at the
Jar meeting of the
cators' Council, com-
d of educators from area
lutions under the auspices
he Jewish Federation of
Beach County. "A great
of cooperation and of
unity is motivating us,"
Rabbi Marder.
If successful, the program is
seen as an introduction to
M idrasha- Judaica High
School, the community
program of Jewish education
offered for 9-12 graders
throughout the cooperative
efforts of the Education Com-
mittee of the Jewish Federa-
tion of Palm Beach County,
local synagogues and the Jew-
ish Community Day School.
Other synagogues are being
invited to participate in the
eighth grade effort.
The schedule of the eighth
grade program will follow the
Midrasha calendar and, when
appropriate, will take ad-
vantage of special programs
and guest speakers planned by
the community Jewish high
school. "By using the facilities
of the day school simul-
taneously with Midrasha, we
will be providing a stimulating
f\ Radio/TV Highlights Jff
* MOSAIC Sunday, Sept. 2, 9 a.m. WPTV
Channel 5 with host Barbara Gordon Re-run The
Precious Legacy; Sunday, Sept. 9 Re-run, interview
with Sarah Tucker, wife of the late opera star Richard
Tucker.
L'CHAYIM Sunday, Sept. 2 and 9, 7:30 a.m. -
WPBR 1340-AM with host Rabbi Mark S. Golub -
The Jewish Listener's Digest, a radio magazine.
JEWISH MUSIC AND CULTURE HOUR Sunday,
Sept. 2 and 9, 6 p.m. WHRS-FM Stereo91 with host
Dr. Simon Silverman.
SHALOM Sunday, Sept. 2 and 9, 10 a.m. WPEC
Channel 12 (8:30 a.m. ON TV Channel 51) with host
Richard Peritz.
PARSON TO PARSON Sunday, Sept. 2 and 9, 8:15
a.m. WCGY 850-AM Dr. John Mangrum, rector of
St. David's Episcopal Church, and Rabbi Samuel Silver of
Temple Sinai, Delray Beach, will engage in a series of
discussions of "Religion in Politics, and Politics in
Religion."
Sponsored by the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County.
NOTE
Political Reading Material and Advertising on this page is
not to be construed as an endorsement by the Jewish Fed-
eration of Palm Beach County.
m
environment for the children.
Car pooling should be made
easier for parents and, in
addition, they will be able to
take advantage of an
educational course designed
for Midrasha parents which
will meet during the same
hours,"' Rabbi Marder said.
Although Ruth Levow will
be on hand Wednesday
evenings to handle some
administrative work, the four
principals will divide the
administrative responsibilities
of the program. Twenty-five
students are expected to enroll
in the first class. According to
Rabbi Marder, each
synagogue will use the
program and supplement it as
it sees fit.
Barbara Steinberg, director
of the Jewish Community Day
School, and Ann Lynn
Lipton, Jewish education dir-
ector of the Jewish Federation
of Palm Beach County, are
cooperating with the
synagogues in this pilot
project.
For more information,
parents may contact their
synagogue's rabbi or edu-
cational director.
SPONSORS
The GUARDIAN PLAN*.
insurance funded prearranged funeral program*
"So the people
you worry about
will have
less to
worry about!9
-Jerry Bynder
Call toll free
1-800432-0853
'An INSURANCE FUNDED prearranged funeral service
provided by Guardian Plans, Inc. (Florida) in conjunction with
Family Service Life Insurance Company (Forms Noa. 8/27/81/
9 1 HI '010203 A.010203 B'010203-C) and participating Florida funeral firms.
EXPERIENCE IS THE ISSUE
ELECT
RICHARD I.
WENNET
Vote On Sept. 4
Punch #8
FOR CIRCUIT JUDGE
GROUP 1
Palm Beach County
Non Partisan
CURRENT POSITION
Domestic Relations Commissioner
'5th Judicial Circuit Court
F0RMER ASSISTANT STATE ATTORNEY
felony Division, Prosecuting
Llfe..ist, 2nd and 3rd Degree Felonies
| FJRMER TRAIL LAWYERPrivate Practice
'fyng Civil, Divorce, Commercial
"rsonai Injury and Criminal Litigation
COMMUNITY SERVICE
Jewish Federation, Palm Beach County
Super Sunday Volunteer
Bd. of Dir., United Cerebral Palsy Assoc.
Bd. of Dir., Palm Beach County
Association for Retarded Citizens
Chairman, Eagle Scout Banquet Committee
PROFESSIONAL SERVICE:
The Florida Bar:
Board of Governors, Florida Bar
Young Lawyers Section
Chairman, Judicial Relations Committee
Chairman, Bridge-The-Gap Seminar Committee
Author & Seminar Speaker
(Continuing Legal Education)
Voluntary Bar Liaison Committee
Chairman, Judicial Clerkship Program
Palm Beach County Bar Association:
Board Of Directors, 1981-1982
President, Young Lawyers Section 19B1-19B2
Vice President, Young Lawyers Sec ion 19^-1981
Secretary, Young Lawyers Sec ion. 979-980
Treasurer, Young Lawyers Section, 1978-1979
AWARDS
Outstanding Service Award
Palm Beach County Bar Association
Award of Merit
Florida Bar Association
Outstanding Leadership Award
Young Lawyers Section, Palm Beach County
Association
MILITARY
Jewish War Veterans, Post 408
Lt. Commander, USNR
EDUCATION
Bachelor of Science
U.S. Merchant Marine Academy
Juris Doctor
U. of Miami Law School
ADMITTED TO PRACTICE BEFORE
THE FOLLOWING COURTS:
United States Supreme Court
Florida Supreme Court
United States Fifth Circuit Court
United States Eleventh Circuit Court
United States District Court
(Southern & Middle Districts of Florida)
United States Court of Claims
United States Tax Court
FOR CIRCUIT JUDGE
GROUP1
PALM BEACH COUNTY
NON PARTISAN
* .


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Page 14 The Jewish Floridian of p-i.
U-L. O...
Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, August 31,1964
GOP Platform
Continued from Page 1
can Party reaffirms its support
of the pluralism and freedom
that have been part and parcel
of this great country. In so
doing, it repudiates and
completely disassociates itself
from people, organizations,
publications and those entities
which promulgate the practice
of any form of bigotry,
racism, anti-Semitism or
religious intolerance."
The Democratic Party failed
to adopt a similar resolution at
its convention or at the
National Comittee meeting
following the convention.
However, the executive com-
mittee of the National Com-
mittee, at the urging of
Mondale, approved such a
resolution two weeks ago in a
telephone poll.
On school prayer, the
platform says: "We have
enacted legislation to
guarantee equal access to
student facilities by student
religious diversity, we reaffirm
our commitment to the
freedom of religion and speech
guaranteed by the Consti-
tution of the United States and
firmly support the rights of
students to openly practice the
same, including the right to
engage in voluntary prayer in
schools."
THE REPUBLICAN plat-
form also favors a Constitu-
tional Convention to adopt an
amendment to the Consti-
tution requiring a balanced
federal budget, which the or-
ganized Jewish community has
strongly opposed.
The platform urges
Congress to pass the balanced
budget amendment, noting
that the Democrats oppose it.
"If Congress fails to act on
this issue, a Constitutional
Convention should be con-
vened to address only this
issue in order to bring deficit
spending under control," the
platform states.
Jewish groups have opposed
a Constitutional Convention
because they fear it could
begin rewriting the Consti-
tution, including the First
Amendment guarantees of
religious freedom which have
been so vital to Jewish security
in the U.S. While the Republi-
can plank underlines the word
"only" to stress that just the
budget restriction would be
addressed, some Constitution-
al experts have argued that a
Contitutional Convention
could not be limited to one
issue.
IN THE MIDDLE East sec-
tion, the platform stresses that
a strong Israel, aided by the
U.S., is "the main obstacle to
Soviet domination of the
region," and "the
sovereignty, security and
integrity of the State of Israel
is a moral imperative." The
platform contends that under
Reagan, the U.S. and Israel
"are closer than ever before."
The platform stresses that
"Jerusalem should remain an
undivided city," but it does
New Challenges Ahead
Continued from Page 2
Distribution Committee and visited Bet Byer Home for the
Aged, a Joint Distribution Committee-sponsored geriatric
facility. The Byer Home will be the focus of a future article
in the Jewish Floridian.
AGING IN ISRAEL
FACTS AND FIGURES
Israel's population in 1981 was 3.9 million. 9 percent
were over the age of 65, as compared to 3.9 percent in
1950. Within the Jewish population, 9.7 percent were over"
65 in 1981 as compared to 3.7 percent in 1950.
The geographic distribution of the aged is
predominantly urban. 40 percent of the Jewish aged live in
three major cities, Tel Aviv-Yafo (18.7 percent) Haifa
(10.2 percent) and Jerusalem (7.8 percent). Only 7.5
percent of the Jewish aged live in Kibbutzim, Moshavim
and other rural settings. '.
95.6 percent of the aged reside in private households.
4.4 percent of the aged population reside in some long-
term care facility (this compares to 5 percent in the United
States).
Israel has a well-developed system of old age and
survivors insurance. Almost 50 percent of the elderly
receive supplemental benefits that generate a minimum
income somewhat above the "poverty line."
Access to health care in Israel is very good and
utilization very high, 95 percent of the population is in-
sured by one of the Sick Funds, mainly by the General
federation of Labor which provides the bulk of am-
bulatory care for all populations.
Acute in-patient care is provided by the hospitals of
the Ministry of Health, the (Labor) Sick Fund, the
municipalities and the voluntary sector. Private hospital
facilities are few.
Source: "Aging in Israel, JDC Brookdale Institute of
Gerontology and Adult Human Development, Jerusalem,
1982.
Jewish floridian
FREDK SMOCMfT
ta to' and PuDi>sner
0' Hum Beacn County
Combining Our voice and Federation Reporter
SUZANNE SmOChET
Eecui.e Edito'
BONNI EPSTEIN
News Coo'dmaio<
PuOiitned Wee*ir Octooe> tnrougn Mid Apm e Wtt.i, balance o> year
Second Cian Pottage Paid at Boca Raton Fia USPS eorwoxi
PALM BEACM BOCA RATON Of FiCE
M N W Spanish Rive/ Blvd Boca Raton. Fla 33431 Phone MB-2001
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PeelmesMc Return lorrr. Mrs te Jewish FtarUsM, SO si 01 2*71. Wan Fla 1J101
AOtHsMs, Otrector sMeci Leeee. Phene WIH2
Combined Jawish Appeal Jswisn Federation of Palm Beach County. Inc Otficare Preside"!
Myron J Nickman. Vice PresuJenle. Peter Cumminga. Alec Enoeletein. Arnold Lampsfl Barbara
Tarter) and Alvm MMeneky. Secretary. Or Elueoeth 3 Snulman. Treasurer Barry Berg Submit
material lo Ronm Epstein. CXractor o PuMIc FaHaliona. 501 South Fiagler Or.. Wast "arm Beach
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Jewish Floridian does not guarantee Kasnrutn oi Merc sndiss Advertieed
SUBSCRIPTION RATES Local Area 14 Annual |2 Year Minimum IT 90) or by membership Jewish
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i'Vi Ou1 O' Town upon Request
rrtday; Atfgit-rSI.-W** ''''" 3ELULB744
Volume 10 Number 27
not call it the capital of Israel
as does the Democratic
platform. The Repubhcans
also ignored the Democratic
call for moving the LU.
Embassy in Israel from lei
Aviv to Jerusalem.
The GOP Mideast platform
reads, in full:
"President Reagan's Middle
East policy has been flexible
enough to adapt to rapidly
changing circumstances, yet
consistent and credible so that
all nations recognize our
determination to protect our
vital interests.
"The President's skillful
crisis management throughout
the Iran-Iraq war has kept that
conflict from damaging our
vital interests. The President's
peace efforts have won strong
bipartisan support and inter-
national applause. And his
willingness to stand up to
Libya has made peace-loving
states in the region feel more
secure.
"THE 1979 Soviet invasion
of Afghanistan, which sur-
prised the Carter-Mondale
Administration, brought
Soviet forces less than 400
miles from the strategic straits
of Hormuz. The seizure of
American hostages in Iran that
year caught the United States
unprepared and unable to
respond.
"Lebanon is still in turmoil,
despite our best efforts to
foster stability in that unhappy
country. With the Syrian
leadership increasingly subject
to Soviet influence, and the
Palestine Liberation Organ-
ization and its homicidal
subsidiaries taking up
residence in Syria, U.S. policy
toward the region must remain
vigilant and strong.
"Republicans reaffirm that
the United States should not
recognize or negotiate with the
PLO so long as that organ-
ization continues to promote
terrorism, rejects Israel's right
to exist and refuses to accept
UN Security Council resolu-
tion 242 and 338."
IN ANOTHER section, the
platform says that "the Re-
publican Party commends
President Reagan for ac-
cepting the honorary chair-
manship of the campaign to
erect a U.S. Holocaust
memorial in Washington,
D.C. and supports the efforts
of the U.S. Holocaust Council
in erecting such a museum and
educational center. The
museum will bear witness to
the victims and survivors of
the Holocaust."
Support for Soviet Jewry is
reaffirmed at the end of the
section on the Soviet Union.
"We will press for Soviet
compliance with all inter-
national agreements, including
the 1975 Helsinki Final Act
and the UN Declaration on
Human Rights," the platform
states.
"We will continue to protest
Soviet anti-Semitism and
human rights violations. We
admire the courage of such
people as Andrei Sakharov,
his wife Yelena Bonner,
Anatoly Shcharansky, Ida
Nudell and Josef Begun,
whose defiance of Soviet
repression stands as a
testament to the greatness of
the human spirit.
"We will press the Soviet
Union to permit free
emigration of Jews,
Christians, and ,
Mtiontl minorities fa
because the iW rH
strengthen our 'J*
channels to encouranJ
their struggle f0r *
determination >nd ,4,,'
"We are one big family," says Clare dePicciotto, m
the senior citizens and young families living in the Gilo Sk
Housing Project near Jerusalem. The project, which i
seniors maintain their independence, is aided by t,e.
Distribution Committee, with funds raised in the L'aitedJn
Appeal-Federation campaign.
Elderly Find Placel
from Page 2
see them later and
how good they are and 1
smile. Some of us baby-i]
"The young motheni
into our apartments uij
hello and see how it I
doing. We sit together )
sun.
"It is good that there j
place like this for people!
me," she said. "I can in
things for myself, but IL,
it is important to have oi
around." She paused.
have to keep going. It dot
harder year to year."
Continued
Morocco, Rumania and
Turkey," said Uri Laor,
Eshel's director. "Many had
been living in dilapidated
housing, in Israel's develop-
ment towns, before coming
here."
Mrs. dePicciotto wasn't
interested in general state-
ments. "If you want to know
what it is like here, it is good,"
she interrupted. "We are one
big family. Some of us make
things (handicrafts) and give
them to the children. We go to
their school plays and they like
hearing us clap for them. We
On June 16 Leo C. Finkel [left], commander of CohW
Post No. 501 Jewish War Veterans of the Unite*
America, presented a check for $250 to Dr. Sey"0"1"
[third from left], chief medical officer of
Administration Outpatient Clink at Riviera Beach, i"
will go toward educational tapes for veterans r'1u"J5
therapy. David Kaplan [second from left], JWV Po""L.
officer, and Morton Gordon [right], commander on-
Broward-Palm Beach District Council, "''"'"'"'/fit
Also in attendance, but not pictured, were ReM ^jTj
chief Voluntary Service media representative of new-
Medical Center; Bobbie Wright, administrative oinj
VA Outpatient Clinic; and Marlene Kaiser, vobuw
specialist of the clinic.
RAVIOLI SAUTE SPECIAL N
/ HAV1UU 5ALIL SffcClAJL ^-------------------------- 1
I The Jewish Homemaker's Guide to Delicious Italian Gw
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2 taVseipooni butter or margarine
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15rrj*Tute*Serve$4._____