The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian the voice of the Jewish community of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Running title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Physical Description:
4 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 8, no. 41 (Dec. 24, 1982)-v. 11, no. 26 (Aug. 30, 1985).
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44606415
lccn - sn 00229548
ocm44606415
System ID:
AA00014310:00069

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)


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JEWISH
MMUNITY OF
fjUMBtACH
DUKTV
"Jewish floridian
VOLUME 10NUMBER 24
PALM BEACH, FLORIDA
FRIDAY, JULY 20,1964
PRICE 35 CENTS
Morse Geriatric Center
Celebrates First Year Anniversary
L year ago, on July 7,
[the doors of the Joseph
|or Geriatric Center of
[Jewish Home for the
h opened to receive its
Residents at the 120 bed
Id nursing facility on
Lill Road in West Palm
fh The Center's opening
tented the culmination
the community's
hnination and commit-
I to provide a quality
Ely and program to meet
[term nursing and health
(needs of the elderly.
1 celebration of the first
kersary of the Center's
Ling, residents and their
[lies were invited to a
te, outdoor barbecue
Lietc with music,
ftainment and decora-
I. The event took on an
[aiian theme as more than
] guests were welcomed
j the traditional leis by
Jbers of the Center's staff
n'd in Hawaiian shirts
Igrass skirts.
kpresentatives of the
ler's Board of Trustees,
Israeli
I Elections
existence ol a
Ithora of political par-
Is within Israel has
sated the emergence
\ single majority party
from special in-
m representation.
Rl this year be dif-
p? See Page 4.
[ropes Oldest
Jewish
immunity
hh history on the
"''otEviaspane
/'hen two centuries.
rp|fl*8.
pen Letter
elicits Help
NhernowlMngin
pwkifor
IN the com-
iW^PPIypreeeur.
T?**' dughter,
"*-See page 3.
staff and Resident Council
welcomed everyone and
extended wishes of continued
success and growth. During
the ceremonies, E. Drew
Gackenheimer, executive
director of the Morse
Geriatric Center, stated, "We
can all take pride in the
accomplishments of the
Center during its first year of
operation in providing quality
health care to our aged. The
demands for additional
services require our planning
for the future expansion of
this facility along with other
types of programs and
services to assist our growing
number of elderly. We look
forward to serving the com-
munity and knowing that we
may count on its continuing
support."
The Morse Geriatric Center
is a facility of the Jewish
Home for the Aged of Palm
Beach County and a bene-
ficiary agency of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County.
Over 300 guests participated recently in the
first year anniversary celebration of the
opening of the Joseph L. Morse Geriatric
Center. Residents and family members were
treated to a BBQ dinner, complete with
music and entertainment.
MORE PHOTOS ON PAGE 2
Katzir Reports KGB Was FirmBut Polite
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) Prof.
Ephraim Katzir, former Pres-
ident of Israel, and his wife,
Nina Katzir, were detained
for nearly 90 minutes by
KGB agents one of them
Hebrew-speaking in
Leningrad early last week
after they attempted to visit
the home of a Leningrad
Jewish refusenik.
He and his wife were
treated courteously but very
firmly, Katzir said, describing
the incident at an airport
press conference here. He
was Israel's fourth President,
having held office from 1973-
78. He is a biochemist by
profession, associated with
the Weizmann Institute of
Science at Rehovoth. He
spent two weeks in the Soviet
Union attending the Congress
of the European Federation
of Biochemists.
KATZIR SAID that more
than 100 Israeli scientists at-
tended the Congress in
Moscow, including Prof.
Michael Sela, president of the
Weizmann Institute, and his
wife. They received a warm
and even friendly reception
and were treated with the
same courtesy extended to the
other foreign delegations,
Katzir said.
He believes the local KGB
in Leningrad detained him
and his wife mistakenly and
went through with the inter-
rogation in order to cover
their error. But it was an
ordeal.
Katzir spoke to the press
during a brief stopover here
enroute to Boston where he is
to address a scientific
gathering at Harvard
University. Appearing calm
and relaxed, he explained, "I
had been given by an Israeli
family the name and address
of one of their relatives living
in Leningrad. On Sunday
(July 1) my wife and I took a
Continued on Page 12
Former President Katzir
Labor Problems Plague Israelis
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Labor strife that has plagued
Israel for the past week has eased somewhat but not all
of the public sector has returned to normal and threats
of strikes and work slowdowns persist.
Striking Electric Corp. employees were back on the
job Friday, restoring full power after a week pf sporadic
blackouts around the country. They apparently failed to
achieve any major benefits from their walkout.
Foreign Ministry staff, on strike since the beginning of
the month, obeyed a court order and turned to their
job. But about 300 of them sported buttons Proclaiming,
"I am working under the coercion of a back-to-woric
order."
STRIKING CLERKS of the rabbinical courts who
created havoc last week by refusing to issuem*"*
licenses or divorce decrees have also returned to work at
the urging of the Chief Rabbinate which promised to
help adjudicate their wage dispute. The rabbinical court
workers are demanding the same pay as civil court
clerks.
Life guards are back on the job on the Tel Aviv
beaches, just in time to cope with peak summer crowds.
The Haifa oil refineries are functioning after a four-day
work stoppage, but only with skeleton crews ordered by
the courts to fill tank trucks with fuel for delivery to
gasoline stations and factories.
Striking meteorologists have resumed their weather
forecasts, but only on a limited basis. Radios and tele-
vision screens came alive over the weekend as broadcast
journalists reached agreement with the State-owned
Broadcast Authority for a wage scale equal to that of
print journalists. But administrative employees of the
Broadcast Authority are continuing their sanctions and
many scheduled programs have yet to return to the air.
Continued on Page 12


r- M UH X. *
Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Friday, July 20, 1984
Anila Anton, president of the Center'sI
Resident Council, welcomes guests to the first |
anniversary celebration.
\ntoinette Kabaker [left], a member
of the Resident Council, presents E.
Drew Gackenheimer [right]. Center
executive director, a special award of
A Hawaiian fire eater entertains residents and their families.
Morse
Geriatric Center
Celebrates First Year Anniversai
i
o
I
i
%
^r
>!
> *'
Marilyn [.ampert, an officer of the Center's
Board of Trustees, extends best wishes from
the Board.
V
Attending the first anniversary celebration aad Neva
are [left to right] Margaret Morrell, Center manager,
social worker; David Katz, family guest;
Babceck, Center
res*"


Susan Simon Joins
JF&CS Staff
Friday, July 20, 1984 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 3
Jewish Family and
Li's Service of Palm
Pcounty. Inc., has
fV-ed the hiring of
|unSimon. MSW, as a
Jnber of the agency s
ifi staff. Miss Simon
Kume her duties July
cording to Executive
Lor, Stephen Levitt.
L Simon, a native of
Lon Park, N.J.. a
Cue of Syracuse Un.ver-
where she obtained a
li of ^cial Work
- and is a graduate of
' York University s
of Social Work
Iram.
kor to this appointment
C was a Social
Ubilitative Counselor and
I Treatment Specialist
Florida's Department of
and Rehabilitative
Miami, Florida.
with this agency she
-ted family therapy.
Susan Simon
individual therapy, parenting
skills training, play therapy
and crisis intervention. She
received additional training in
family therapy techniques at
the Children's Psychiatric
Center in Miami.
Susan joins the expanding
Jewish Family Service, which
offers comprehensive services
including a full range of
family and individual
therapy, groups, Jewish
Family Life Education, Quick
Response and crisis services
to the aged, home health aide
information and scholarships,
and the newly initiated career
guidance-vocational services.
Members of the community
interested in further informa-
tion about JF and CS services
should contact the agency at
684-1991. The agency is
located at 2250 Palm Beach
Lakes Boulevard, Suite 104,
West Palm Beach, Fla.,
33409 and is a beneficiary
agency of Jewish Federation
and United Way.
JCC Receives Two
New Buses From DOT
|r. Paul Klein, president
[the Jewish Community
Jier, has announced the
uisition of two new buses
une 26. This is a result
grant from the Depart-
kt of Transportation
bugh the Urban Mass
Importation Act in
exchange for two vehicles
awarded to the Center in late
1981. These vehicles are used
to transport the elderly and
handicapped. Operating
funds are supplied by the
JCC, the Jewish Federation
of Palm Beach County and
contributions from the parti-
Rabbi Eisenberg Honored
_ Sabbath morning, June
[a special Kiddush was
lered to Rubbi Emanuel
nberg of Temple Beth
of Lake Worth in
gnition of his 20th
Inersarv as spiritual
Icr.
ccording to Irving
per, a member of the
pd of Directors, the
lor addresses Rabbi
|nberg's 20 years as a
religious leader and
Jher, also his special
Iribution as a humanita-
1 in serving the wants and
h of the Jewish com-
>y as well as contribut-
|to the well-being of the
fe community as one of
[tadyand willing citizens.
uple Beth Sholom was
[first Jewish Synagogue to
"Ho being in Lake
some 30 years ago
Jin the efforts of a mere
pl of pious and
"ted Jewish families.
Eisenberg took over
Rabbinate in 1964 with
congregation numbering
I members. In the ensuing
PJS of Rabbi Eisenberg's
inmate, the congregation
llfown to approximately
u members.
Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg
"Rabbi Eisenberg brought
to Temple Beth Sholom a
sense of comfortable
togetherness, a one on one
association reminiscent of the
traditional synagogue so
many of the congregants were
accustomed to before coming
to Florida," stated Wolser.
Soviet J
ewry Task Force Action Alert
. *f Begun was sentenced
I nri?mhns in a kbor
I mo 0nBcgun is onc f
ish ,Wc"-known Soviet-
! ac 'v.s.s. He has been
ta ulmerous timcs on
Eon ?/S "ani-Soviet
FebrL Propaganda."
t ary..of 1984 e was
id" in nCOrrc've labor
,n perm, 600 miles
east of Vladimir, where he is
now imprisoned.
Write and cable: President
of the USSR, Konstantin
Chernenko, Kremlin,
Moscow, RSFSR.
Ambassador Anatoly
Dobrynin, 1125 16th Street.
N.W., Washington, DC
20036.
cipants.
According to Dr. Klein, the
buses that were exchanged
were inappropriately designed
for older adults. There were
high steps and low ceilings,
no grab bars and they were
not in compliance with the
grant originally presented by
the JCC.
"The comfort, safety and
dignity of older adults are the
primary concern of the JCC
and the buses were rejected
on this basis," stated Dr.
Klein. The JCC was asked to
use the buses until new ones
were available.
JCC transportation clients
are now using their new
turquoise buses. One vehicle
holds 16 passengers and the
other has a lift and is
especially equipped for two
wheel chairs plus ten pas-
sengers.
Persons are brought to the
Center each day for kosher
meals and senior activities. In
addition they are transported
to doctors' offices, social
service agencies, nursing
homes, hospitals to visit
spouses and shopping when
space is available. "The
JCC's transportation service
is the lifeline for hundreds of
older adults," stated Dr.
Klein.
The JCC provides many
services to persons 60 years
of age and older. They may
choose to join the many who
are participating in the
Kosher Lunch Connection
(hot kosher meals), recreation
and education, the JCC^s
activities. In addition the
Center delivers meals to the
homebound who are eligible
for the program. Discussion
groups, lectures, adult
education classes and trips
are scheduled throughout the
year.
For more information
about transportation and the
JCC senior activities, call
689-7703. Volunteers are
needed in all phases of the
JCC program and especially
in the meal program. Call
Marcie Frisch at the same
number to set up an interview
and become involved as a
volunteer.
An Open Letter
To The
Community
I am asking for your help in connection with my
daughter's family Reingold Bella.
We applied for a visa together in 1979, my husband
and I and the families of my two daughters, Polina and
Bella, and the grandfather of Bella's husband. My
husband and I, and the grandfather of Bella's husband
have received our visas in 1979 and we have repatriated
to Israel.
The families of my daughters were refused. The
reason for this refusal, as it was given by the official in
Minsk, was some nebulous words (of course not written)
about "security reasons" which we can imagine is the
military service of Bella's husband in 1973.
During this "military service" for a period of about
one year, he was working as a building engineer he
was building the usual houses in the same Belarusskaya
SSR and of course he had no approach to any classified
information.
After some complaints and official correspondence the
family of my elder daughter received permission to
emigrate and in 1980 they repatriated to Israel. My
youngest daughter's family is still refused in their natural
rights to live together with their close relatives in their
own country. My daughter is a pediatrician, her husband
is a building engineer. Their son was born in 1973.
Every half year they were trying again and again to
apply for a visa and every time they were receiving the
same answer a refusal.
They are living in unnatural conditions where they
cannot make any future plans, and what is more
important, they cannot give their son any kind of Jewish
education because it is impossible in the USSR.
Why must my grandson suffer, a boy who is only 10-
years old? I do remember how he was crying before my
departure asking me to take him with me.
Why the grandfather of my son-in-law who is very ill
and 80 years old must live under the burden of the
thoughts that he will die without seeing his grandson and
great-grandson.
My daughter has no relatives in the USSR.
All relatives of my husband (Bella's father) were
murdered by Nazis in Belorussia and he himself died,
when he was only 52 because of several wounds he
received serving in the army during the Second World
War.
My parents, brother and four sisters were murdered by
Nazis in the ghetto of Kehmelnik. I am one of few
survivors of this ghetto.
Why must I be separated from my daughter, son-in-
law and grandson?
1 appeal to you help us.
Yours sincerely,
MARIA OSOVSKAYA
Radak 28-23
Beer-Sheva, Israel
Write and cable: President of the USSR, Konstantin
Chernenko, Kremlin, Moscow, RSFSR. Ambassador
Anatoly Dobrynin, 1125 16th Street, N.W., Washington,
DC 20036. _____.
f\ Radio /TV Highlights ^
* MOSAIC Sunday, July 22 and 29, 9 a.m.
WPTV Channel 5 with host Barbara Gordon This
week's program is pre-empted. On Sunday, July 29, a
re-broadcast of a previous program will be shown.
* L'CHAYIM Sunday, July 22 and 29, 7:30 a.m.
WPBR 1340-AM with host Rabbi Mark S. Golub
The Jewish Listener's Digest, a radio magazine.
JEWISH MUSIC AND CULTURE HOUR
Sunday, July 22 and 29, 6 p.m. WHRS-FM Stereo 91
with host Dr. Simon Silverman.
SHALOM Sunday, July 22 and 29, 10 a.m.
WPEC Channel 12 (8:30 a.m. ON TV Channel 51) with
host Richard Peritz.
PARSON TO PARSON Sunday, July 22 and 29,
8:10 a.m. WCGY-850 AM Rabbi Samuel M.
Silver, Dr. John Mangrum and Father Michael Tschudi
hold interdenominational discussions.
VIEWPOINT Saturday, July 28, 7:30 p.m.
WPBT Channel 2 A panel discussion on current
South Florida issues with leading community religious
leaders from the Catholic, Protestant and Jewish faiths
is featured.
' Sponsored by the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County.


Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County fridajrt July.?P. 13ft*
Mini-Superpower's Former
President Detained in Moscow
In a Time Magazine essay on the
upcoming election in Israel, writer James
Kelly refers to Israel as a "mini-
superpower." For a country whose own
citizens fear that Israel's current
economic chaos makes them look like
what one of them in the essay called a
Banana Republic, this is an unusual if not
a contradictory view.
Reckoned in these terms, picture then
the sudden detention in Moscow by the
KGB of former President Jimmy Carter.
Or Gerald Ford. Or Richard Nixon. What
would be the reaction in our own country?
Worldwide?
These are important considerations,
because that is precisely what happened
to former Israel President Ephraim Katzir
and his wife early last week. Katzir, an
internationally-renowned scientist, had
gone to the Soviet Union to attend the
Congress of the European Federation of
Biochemists' meeting there.
True, Carter, Ford or Nixon would not
be padding about in Moscow attempting
to visit a controversial friend or relative
on behalf of a fellow-American who had
entreated them to do so. A polite view of
Katzir's decision to accept a similar
entreaty by some fellow-Israelis would be
that there is a decided air of informality
about the Israeli presidency, as well as
about the Presidents themselves. And so,
reasoned Katzir, why not?
Israeli Presidents after all occupy what
is at best a ceremonial office, and they
are most frequently chosen on the basis of
their distinguished credentials in such
fields as the arts and sciences, not
because of their political expertise. Of all
of Israel's Presidents, past and present,
perhaps only Yitzhak Navon had a nose
for things political.
So, off went Kazir to visit some Jewish
refuseniks in Moscow. Enter the KGB.
We are hard-pressed to believe the KGB
did not know who Katzir was above and
beyond his role as a distinguished
scientist. But even after Katzir identified
himself as a former President of Israel,
the KGB was not sufficiently impressed
to back off.
On the other hand, there was no
worldwide outcry of protest against
Katzir's detention. And certainly not one
in Israel. In fact, both Israel and Katzir
himself were careful this week to
emphasize that his Soviet inquisitors
treated both him and Mrs. Katzir
eminently courteously likely because of
what they knew about his identity from
the outset.
Plight of the Refuseniks
One thing for sure: the extent to which
the Soviets go to harass anyone,
including distinguished visitors, seeking
to establish contact with Jewish
refuseniks says something about the
official Soviet mentality these days so far
as the refuseniks' plight is concerned.
Still, it is a hard thing to bear the
detention of the former President of a
^-superpower. The KGB wouldn^h.ve
detained, as we say. the Jw^fjj
and Co. On the other hand. Carter and
Co. were not Presidents of the United
States only in the informal sense of their
office.
Nor are they so ideologically devoted.
a controversial cause as was Presides
Katzir when he went off to carry
messages of hope and greeting to
refuseniks in Moscow on behalf of .
his countrymen. 01*>nieof
Jewish floridian
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Tanen and Alin Wilensky Secretary Or Ehzaoeth S Shuiman Treasurer. Barry Berg Submit
material to Ronm Epstein Director of Public Relations. Ml Soutn Fiegiet Or. West Palm Beacn
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Parties Lining Up as
July 23 Election Nears
By SIMON GRIVER
Israel's two major
political parties, the ruling
Likud and the opposition
Labor Alignment. can
expect to win more than
75 percent of the 12
Knesset seats in the July
23 election. However, the
country's voting system of
proportional representation
will almost certainly
guarantee some of the
smaller political parties a
say in the running of the
government.
During 29 years of Labor rule,
and the subsequent seven years
of Likud administration, neither
party has ever been able to
muster an overall majority of 61
Knesset seats. Thus, smaller
parties have constituted a vtial
ingredient in coalition govern-
ments, often holding the balance
of power and able, therefore, to
exercise far more influence than
warranted by their relatively few
Knesset seats.
WHEN THE current Knesset
was dissolved, the Labor Align-
ment held 50 seats, and the Likud
only 46. Yet the Likud ruled
because most of the smaller
parties preferred to support it,
rather than Labor. The power of
the smaller factions was most
forcefully expressed over the
years by the four-man ultra-
Orthodox Agudat Israel faction.
It was emphasized when the
three-man Tami grouping with-
drew its backing of the Likud,
forcing the July election.
At the time of going to press,
some 30 parties were expected to
take the field for the coming
elections. Other than Likud and
Labor, a dozen of them have a
realistic chance of winning one or
more seats in the 11th Knesset,
to be voted into power on July 23.
These smaller parties represent
a diverse range of opinions, and
most prominent among them are
the religious factions. The
biggest of the religious parties
has traditionally been the NRP
(National Religious Party). The
NRP. led by Dr. Yosef Burg, the
present Minister of Interior, who
has served in virtually every
government during the last 36
years, is going through a dire
crisis. Its 12 seats in the 1977
election were halved to six in
1981, when the Moroccan-led
Tami Party was set up following
complaints that the NRP was
Ashkenazi dominated.
A FURTHER break away by
Rabbi Chaim Druckmann's more
extreme Matzad Party now
threatens to erode NRP support.
At this time, it is not finally clear
how the Orthodox parties will
line up for the election. Tami will
be out there in search of the
oriental religious (and non-
Orthodox) vote. The NRP is
struggling to maintain unity, but
some observers even see a possi-
bility of what they call the
'disintaRration process" gath-
ering momentum.
Others ask how the 'Jewish
underground" affair in Judea-
Samaria (the West Bank) and the
accusations by police against
Gush Emunim leaders like Rabbi
Levinger will affect voting habits
in religious and nationalist
circles.
If the Orthodox camp is
divided, ultra-Orthodox Agudat
Yisrael is facing similar
problems. They have four seats in
the present Knesset, and while
they have supported the govern-
ment, their non-Zionist principles
compelled them not to accept
cabinet portfolios.
But Agudat Israel has faced
the charge that it too is
Ashkenazi-dominated, and an
oriental group called the
Sephardi Torah Guardians
(which did well in Jerusalem's
municipal elections) is likely to
run for the first time. Poalei
Agudat Israel (the Labor-
oriented section of the party),
which takes a more pro-Zionist
line, held one seat in 1977, but
lost it in 1981.
ON THE right of the spectrum
stands Tehiya, with three seats.
This party broke away from
Menachem Begin's Herat in
1978. feeling that the peace
treaty with Egypt compromised
the principle of a Greater Israel.
While the party has since
rejoined the government, it
maintains a more militant stance
on West Bank settlement. Tehiya
has been beefed up for the July
election by an alliance with
former army Chief of Staff Rafael
Ki tan's "Tzomet" movement.
Eitan, who has called for the
immediate annexation of the
West Bank and Gaza, is popular
on the Right, but his seemingly
derogatory statements on West
Bank Arabs have angered more
Liberal circles. The ex-soldier is
not Orthodox, and it should be
remembered that many believers
in a "Greater Israel" share the
concept with Orthodox people,
but are not themselves religious.
On the extreme right is the
Kach Party of Rabbi Meir
Kahane. the American born
founder of the Jewish Defense
League Kahane espuses outright
deportation of Arabs who won't
toe his line, and would like to
introduce laws forbidding sexual
relationships between Arabs and
Jews.
DEFENDERS of Israeli
democracy are pleased to note
that Kach is unlikely to win a
single seat. One leading Israeli
jurist has expressed the view that
an Israeli wanting to apply the
Nuremberg race laws to the
Arabs has no right to run in
democratic elections.
Over on the left, the Israel
Communist Party and its allies
(the "Hadash" list) currently
holds four seats. Gleaning much
of its support from Iraeli Arabs,
the party toes the Soviet line (at
a time when many European
Communist parties are inclined
to distance themselves from
Moscow's views). Its traditional
anti-Zionist line repels Jewish
votes, but though Israeli
munists suffered many
over the years, its
standard-bearer represent
seemingly stable constitu
which is very active in
Knesset.
On the Zionist Left, Shu
Aloni's Citizens Rights Moi
ment, which has only her I
seat in the present Knesset ]
running a list whose top j
include Aloni herself in
place, and doveish person_
like Mordechai Bar-On and i
leader Ran Cohen (Sheli haTI
place in the present Kneasetl.
The CRM takes a strong |
against religious incursion:
the civil rights of Israel's i
majority (and its pu
naturally contains strong c
sentiments). A maverick oo I
left is Lova F.liav, a fa
secretary-general of the
Party, and Sheli leader,
peeved that Labor will not j,
him the chance of a Knesset i
THE CENTER hat
mavericks too. Former
Defense Minister EzerWei
is offering the electorate
Yachad (Together) Party,
grouping which has
compared by observers to
defunct Democratic Mov
for Change, which did well a t
Ninth Knesset, under arch
logist Yigael Yadin, now rel
from active politics.
Weizman, one the
popular and credible Isome i
charismatic) figures in Is
politics, has a good recordasi
Air Force commander
Defense Minister, but it ren
to be seen whether the votersi
see him as a viable altemativet|
the larger parties. The
major champion of the centerij
the Shinui party, with twos
Their leader. Prof A ran
Rubinstein, has a good reouH
tion as parliamentarian
libertarian.
This proliferation of part*]
encouraged bv Israels system!
proportional representatr-
through which the court
becomes one vast constitua
on election day. with the
Knesset seats divided
according to the votes cast
each party. Thus a party cmi
a foothold in the Knesset
winning a modest 0.83 percenM
the vote, or, in other
gaining about 17.000 baOott
THE SYSTEM has 1r*
supporters and critics J
scientist Hanoch Smith fc
status quo allows
ethnic and
groups to best express
Lives in a pluralistic **
considers the coalition
trading &#*
ing to the Jewish
and asserts that i
coalitions Israel has luw
had strong governments.
Opponents of the
the Committee of
Citizens, founcted by
Chaim Herzog before he
Head of State, argue W
Continued on P*5
the
diverse
system.
of Cob""
Friday. July 20, 1984
Volume 10
20 TAMUZ 5744
Number 24
During 29 years of Labor rule and 7 of
Likud, neither has mustered a majority


Friday, July 20, 1984 The Jewish Floridian of Palm.Bemeh County Page 5
Poll Shows Labor Still Leading Likud
By DAVID LANDAU
P days away, Likud
r.inues to trail the Labor
KSt bf a significant
K in rnost public
Kn noils. The latest,
Ched Fr^y in Yediot
F, showed Labor
G Knesset seats to
fa. Likud while the
L i, of "undecided"
Cs has dropped from 34
E ni in the third week of
C to 28 percent now.
rLikud politicians profess to
be undaunted and claim that
their own surveys show the
gap narrowing. This could
mean that even if Likud fails
to catch up with Labor, it
will poll sufficient votes to
prevent the Alignment from
forming a government. The
Laborites are not free from
worries. As front runners,
they sense the danger of
complacency and are warning
their supporters against
taking the outcome for
granted. Labor Party leaders
are stressing moreover that
Elections
Continued from Pag* 4 cndtl, this time the voters seem
imdi irovemments have to have the saine feeling. Again,
'' Snef and blackmailed how this will influence the ballot
"tiTminority factions. They anyone's guess.
ld like to see a system of
jvidual constituencies as in ______
i and Britain. Other lees ttflTl-
u suggestions include a r|**
anum percentage, possibly 3 -av^
pjt or 5 percent below which
^rty would not be entitled to
jrcsentation in the Knesset.
t debate and conjecture
ide the system remains as it is
| the July election. Bearing in
fed that most of the M)
bending groups and parties
k themselves divided into
feral factions, it seems that the
jj adage holds some truth
Id two Jews and they'll have
tee opinions. Depending upon
kir viewpoints, Israelis either
pdemn this splinter-group
totality as weakening Israel's
isic unity or praise it as a source
I strength within a pluralistic
A democratic setting.
|RECENTLY, there was, in
it, a demonstration outside the
sset in favor of changing the
Ktoral system. Though the
Dionstration may have been
kht and they may still be
even to be right, in the long run
I is other issues like galloping
Tition, the Lebanese War, and
i future of Israel (border and
ice prospects) which now
ate the public eye.
|It looks as if it is above all on
issues that the electorate
1 decide between the two main
I, Likud and Labor, and the
filer parties competing for
ies on July 23. And though the
liticians say every election is
Pin-Ups
I For Soviet
Activists
|ByHENRIETTEBOAS
AMSTERDAM (JTA)
I Mrs. |rma Wolf of
fjerdam has found a
Jel ay io ease the hard-
IP* or Jewish activists and
Fr dissidents in Soviet
fj11* and labor camps. She
fls lhem Picture postcards
I scantily dad young
men,
they need a much higher
plurality than the IS seats
indicated now in order to
form a stable government.
LABOR WOULD Like to
be able to establish a new
government without the need
for a coalition with the rel-
igious parties, or at least
without the more militant
ones. Labor's potential
partners on the left, such as
Shinui and the Citizens
Rights Movement, may balk
at joining a government
which includes the Aguda
Israel.
Labor analysts say that
anything below 50 percent of
the vote would seriously
impair Labor's ability to
form any government
inasmuch as the religious and
rightwing factions would
almost certainly continue
their alliance with Likud. A
36-37 percent margin, by the
same token, would put Labor
in a comfortable position to
form a Cabinet to its liking.
As the July 23 election date
approaches, the campaign has
heated up and there has been
considerable mudslinging by
both sides in their nightly
television electioneering.
LABOR RAN a film in
which two moshav farmers
accuse Likud of ruining the
country's agriculture. A
Likud film featured a woman
from the border town of
Kiryat Shemona describing
the constant shelling until the
Likud government ordered
the invasion of Lebanon two
years ago.
The woman, Shoshana
Peretz, claimed she was fired
from her teaching job
because she appeared in the
Likud film. Labor produced
a letter of dismissal dated
May 1, long before her
appearance, to discredit that
charge. These are picayune
matters, hardly related to
election issues. Labor's
campaign manager,
Mordechai Gur, called on his
Likud counterpart, David
Levy and on Supreme Court
Justice Gavriel Bach,
chairman of the Central Elec-
tions Committee, for a
meeting to "stop the deterio-
ration of the campaign."
The three were scheduled
to get together to reach a new
agreement for "clean elec-
tioneering." Both sides had
already agreed to avoid
personal insults but this often
has been honored in the
breach and Bach has been
forced to delete portions of
campaign films.
ft J ,uhps myraise th*
tir lhe Pnsoners. But
rJjWM. according to
Mo barter with guards,
"gn.ly nceded ex(ra
fy S! 0,her items that
K from PUrChaSC r
kaknT ou,s'de. The
no t ,he prisoners
V not forgotten, Wolf
GUARDIAN PLAN pi _^_
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Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Friday. July 20, 1984
Hero in Peace and War
Yigael Yadin Is Felled Suddenly At Age 67
TEL AVIV (JTA)
Yigael Yadin, a world
famous archaeologist who
also achieved prominence in
Israeli military and political
affairs, died suddenly June
28 at his home in Michmoret,
north of Netanya. He was 67.
Yadin served as Chief of
Staff of the Israel Defense
Force from 1949-52 and was
a deputy Premier in the
government of former
Premier Menachem Begin
from 1977-81.
The cause of death was not
immediately announced. His
brother, the actor Yossi
Yadin, said Yigael telephoned
him to say he was feeling ill
and wanted to be driven to
the Hedera hospital. "I told
him to get dressed while I
went to get the car. But I was
then told he had collapsed on
the lawn. We called a doctor
and rushed him to the
hospital where doctors made
every attempt to save his life,
but in vain," his brother told
the press.
Yigael Yadin won interna-
tional fame for his work on
the Dead Sea Scrolls, which
his father, the late Elazar
Sukenik, purchased from an
Arab goatherd following the
discovery in the Quarun
Caves shortly after World
War II. He was also
acclaimed for reconstructing
Herod's fortress at Masada
and his digs at Hazor.
Yadin was born in
West German Town Hosts
Jewish Survivors Who Fled Nazis
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) A
handful of surviving Jews
who once lived in the north
German town of Jever,
returned there on a visit last
month at the invitation of the
town authorities who paid all
expenses, including air fare
from far-off places.
Such projects are not
uncommon in West Germany
where Jews who fled the
Nazis between 1933-1945 or
survived the concentration
camps and later moved
abroad are invited to re-visit
their native towns, all
expenses paid.
BUT JEVER is a special
case. High school students
studying their town's history
during and after the Nazi era
discovered that no attempt
had ever been made to
uncover or inform its
inhabitants of the fate of
their one-time Jewish neigh-
bors, many of whom perished
in concentration camps.
The story of the persecu-
tion of Jews in Jever has
never been told or
documented and the students
were determined to correct
that historical omission and
force the inhabitants to
confront their past.
In 1982 they mounted a
special exhibition on the
persecution of Jews in Jever,
based on their own exhaus-
tive research. It opened on
November 9, the anniversary
of the infamous
"Kristalnacht" in 1938 when
Jewish property was
wantonly destroyed all over
the Reich and thousands of
Jews were sent to concentra-
tion camps.
LAST YEAR, the youths
decided to emulate other
German towns and invite the
Florida One of Three States Requiring
Disclosure of Foreign Donors
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Three states now have
adopted laws requiring public
universities and colleges to
report restrictions or
conditions accompanying
donations from foreign
countries and individuals in
excess of $100,000.
The states are Illinois,
Florida and New York, ac-
cording to the American Jew-
ish Congress. Illinois was the
first state to pass such a law.
On June 6, Gov. Bob
Graham signed into law a
similar measure for Florida.
Lawrence Shentz, president
of the AJCongress southeast
region, said the Florida
measure is aimed principally
at thwarting attempts by
Arab countries to unduly
influence teaching and
research or exclude Jewish
faculty members from the
grants.
Gov. Mario Cuomo signed
a disclosure law on June IS
which was drafted by the
Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith.
Phil Baum, associate exec-
utive director of the
AJCongress, said the Florida
law, which he said the
AJCongress helped to draft,
is part of a nation-wide effort
to blunt bids by Arab
governments who, he said,
have initiated a major anti-
Israel propaganda effort on
American campuses, He said
large gifts by pro-Arab
interests endanger academic
freedom and distort the
educational process.
He said other states
considering such legislation
include California, Mas-
sachusetts, Michigan. New
Jersey, Ohio and Pennsyl-
vania.
survivors for a visit. With the
help of older residents who
witnessed the events of the
thirties and forties, they
compiled a list of Jewish
survivors, now living in such
places as Melbourne,
Australia, Santiago, Chile,
San Francisco and Haifa.
They initiated a local fund-
raising campaign to pay
expenses. The town author-
ities demonstrated their good-
will by agreeing to bear most
of the costs. Of the 24
former Jever Jews known to
be alive, a total of 17
responses were received from
one-time residents of the
town, including their spouses.
They arrived in Jever to a
warm welcome and spent a
week there sightseeing,
meeting local inhabitants and
the students who initiated the
project. They were guests at a
reception at the town hall
and attended a theatrical
performance.
One of the returnees,
Lieselotte Spitzer, wrote
later, in a letter published in
the local newspaper: "It was
a nice dream. Jever was my
home town. It is there that I
spent the first 30 years of my
life, until it became impos-
sible anymore. We admire
these young people who made
possible the visit. This week
in Jever was an unforgettable
experience."
STATE OF
ISRAEL BONDS
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WERE SPECIALISTS IN
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Jerusalem in 1917. He earned
his Master's degree at the
Hebrew University in 1945
and a PhD in 1955 and,
between archaeological
expeditions, was a professor
of archaeology at the Hebrew
University since 1959.
He was a member of
Haganah, the underground
defense force of the Jewish
community in Palestine, from
1932 until the founding of
the State in 1948. He served
as chief of staff, chief of the
planning section and chief of
operations of Haganah
between 1940-1947. Before
his promotion to Chief of
Staff of the IDF, he served as
its chief of operations and
was a delegate to the Israeli-
Arab armistice negotiations
in Rhodes in 1949.
Yadin left the army in 1952
to devote his career to
archaeology and writing. He
entered politics shortly before
the 1977 Knesset elections as
leader of a new party, the
Democratic Movement for
Change (DMC), which took a
dove-ish position on many
issues. The fledgling party
won 15 Knesset seats in 1977
and seemed, for a time,
destined to become a signi-
ficant force in Israeli politics.
Although Yadin's
philosophy differed sharply
Ap"

with Begin's hard i.
agreed to join g-M
coalition on conditional
members of his i.. N
allowed to \J%
conscience on issm>< ; ,
the occupied BjS* ,
the status of rfi 4
accepted the Xfllftfel
Prime Minister. Dcpu,>l
Despite this, ,ne ,
proved to have li,,,^
on government nnii
Members became' *?
enchanted, the party snlh ,A
by the next elections i?'^
it had ceased to exist. ,J
Yadin a secular Jnr.
believed firmly that the BibI'
on the whole, was
accurate historical account
He told Hershel Shank'
editor of the Bibj j
Archaeological Review Z\
assertions which cuJ
archaeology disproves Z\
Bible are absolutely untrue.
On the other hand, Yadin I
was a vigorous opponent ofj
religious coercion. Last April f
he announced the formation
ol a new public body, the
Public Committee for the
Freedom of Science, Religion
and Culture in Israel
dedicated to fighting "theI
ever-recurring attempts at
religious coercion by those
who pretend to be guardians
of haiacha."
Who do^ou miss
who's 50 miles away?
Isn't that someone special who seems too close to in ^
tcx) far to visit, really worth a surprise chat now and Wow
remember with Southern Bell, 50 miles is only a short long
distance call away. ^ .u
In Florida, a 15-minute call this weekend within w:w <
dialed direct without the operator, costs no more than* '
till 5 p.m. Sunday. r
At that rate, you can visit long and warm. Anu
Make a short long distance call today.
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For direct dial rales to Alaska and Hawaii, check you' operator Hates sudf*-
ca


Friday, July 20, 1984 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 7
Israel's Black Hebrews
Higher-Ups Don't Know What To Do With Them
NEW YORK Over the
vears Israeli governments
vee tried to search for a
toward tne
have
.. nnliCV towaiu nic
B HeK living there,
Former Americans numbering
Sou 2.000. who entered the
oSry illegally and whose
Sidency is still d.sputed.
This is he m,aJr
conclusion of a new study
, released by the American
Jewish Committee
'The
Of ,he Black He-
brews in Israel An
lamination of the Complex
Issues Involved," by Dr
(ieorse E. Gruen, director of
the Israel and Middle East
Affairs Division of AJC s
International Relations
Department.
The Black Hebrews, who
originated in Chicago in the
1960's, advocate a messianic
form of fundamentalist
Judaism blended with Black
nationalism, claiming to be
the true descendants of the
original Israelite nation, ac-
cording to Dr. Gruen's
report.
"THERE IS little or no
evidence to suggest that
racism has played a part in
the proceedings of the
government regarding the
Black Hebrews," asserts Dr.
Gruen.
Nevertheless, he points out:
"The problem remains
unresolved. The longer the
unsatisfactory status quo is
maintained, the more
complex the problem
becomes."
According to his study, the
first 39 Black Hebrews
landed at Israel's airport in
1969 from Liberia, which
sough) to expel them after
the) had tried to resettle in
that country. The first group
was followed by others. They
were given tourist visas while
the rabbinic courts undertook
to discover whether or not
the) were authentically Jews
eligible for automatic
citizenship under the Law of
tReturn.
The city of Dimona in
southern Israel offered the
newcomers housing, clothing,
and language instruction,
primarily as a humanitarian
gesture.
In the report. Dr. Gruen
explains, "It was thought
that the dark-skinned Indian
and North African im-
migrants in Dimona would
find little different in their
.Black Hebrew neighbors."
He continues:
"Exceptional measures
were taken to aid the group,
largely because of Israel's
special sensitivity toward
persons who had suffered
discrimination and also its
concern to avoid any possible
suspicion of racism."
DR. GRUEN refers to Is-
raeli officials as saying, had a
similarly bizarre sect of white
Persons come with the claim
mat they were the original
and only true Israelites, they
*ould have been barred entry
a summarily deported.
In belief and practice,
however, the Black Hebrews
differed radically from their
uirnona neighbors, according
'o ur. Gruen's research: they
ast each Sabbath, observe
strict vegetarianism, do not
adhere to Talmudic Law. and
Practice polygamy.
In addition, he notes that
the group's leader, Ben-Ami
Carter, strenuously opposed
formal conversion to Judaism
by his members, as recom-
mended by Rabbi Dar'i of
Jaffa, who promised to aid
members interested in the
conversion process.
ACCORDING TO the
Gruen study, the rabbinic
authorities eventually ruled
that the Black Hebrews were
not Jews. The civil courts
nevertheless recommended
that those living in Israel be
allowed to remain.
From the 1981 findings of
a delegation of Black
American civil rights leaders
investigating charges of
racism against the Black He-
brews, Dr. Gruen quotes,
"The general agreement is
that the official difficulties
stem from deep-seated
religious, philosophical and
political differences. From all
the evidence we have heard,
including that from the Black
Hebrew community, we
conclude that official racism
plays no part in this sensitive
problem."
Within Dimona, the arrival
of additional illegal im-
migrants entering on
"doctored" or "recycled"
U.S. passports caused
problems of overcrowding in
the polygamous community
with its naturally high birth
rate, observes Dr. Gruen.
"Their refusal to use regular
doctors compounded health
problems resulting from strict
vegetarianism," he adds.
VARIOUS EFFORTS were
made to alleviate certain
aspects of the problem. In
1980, Jacques Amir, then
Mayor of Dimona, moved
the group to larger living
quarters, which the group
then restored.
The study also cites the
work of a Special Committee,
headed by David Glass, then
chairman of the Knesset's
Law Committee, which in
1980 issued a 147-page report
following a 20-month inves-
tigation of the group.
The central recom-
mendations of the Glass
Report, according to Dr.
Gruen, were these: that the
Black Hebrews be allowed to
stay, that the group be
granted legal status in ac-
cordance with the Law of
Entry into Israel, that an area
be assigned for the group to
establish its own community,
and that the preceding
recommendations be
conditional upon the cult's
agreement not to add new
immigrants from abroad to
their community.
"WHILE THE recom-
mendations were never
implemented by Minister of
Interior Joseph Burg, he also
did not adopt the draconian
legal alternative of expelling
all those who entered or
remained in Israel illegally,"
Dr. Gruen writes.
Since the Glass Report, the
Israeli authorities report
continued efforts of Black
Hebrews to enter the country,
according to Dr. Gruen, who
adds that the sect members
say their commitment to stop
illegal immigration depended
upon the Government's
implementation of the entire
Glass Report.
In addition, Dr. Gruen
cites the Interior Ministry's
reluctance to grant the group
permanent legal status
because of periodic reports of
members' criminal activities
in the United States. "There
have also been recurrent alle-
gations by defectors from the
Black Hebrews that the
discipline imposed by the
leaders of the cult on women
and children is harmful," he
writes.
THE ISSUE has resurfaced
Continued on Page 10
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Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Friday, July 20, 1984
Europe's Oldest Jewish Community Inhabits Greek Isle
By SHELDON KIRSHNER
CHALKIS, Greece
(JTA) Sixty miles north-
east of Athens, on the island
of Evia (or Euboea), is a
Jewish community that is the
oldest continuously-inhabited
one in all of Europe.
It is quite a distinction for
the 100 Jews of Chalkis, the
capital of this green, pleasant
island which has been ruled
by the Persians, Thebians,
Romans, Crusaders,
Venetians, Turks and Nazis.
But Leon Levy, the 48-
year-old president of Chalkis
Jewry, takes it all in his
stride. By now, he is ac-
customed to the Jewish
visitors from abroad who
come here to be at one with
history.
A merchant. Levy has no
idea how long his family has
lived in Chalkis (which is also
known as Halkida and has a
population of 60,000). But
Levy says the Jews here can
trace their roots back at least
2,250 years. Local records
indicate that Jews were
brought to Chalkis as
captives of Antiochus, but
some scholars believe they
arrived as followers of the
returning soldiers of Alex-
ander the Great.
Levy, whose family
survived the German occupa-
tion by going into hiding with
Christians, directs a traveler
to the town's museum. And
there, in an ancient tomb, is
a record of a conversation
between Caius, a Roman
emperor. and Philo of
Alexandria.
Philo, in reply to a
question from Caius,
observes that Jews can be
found on "the celebrated
islands of Evia, Cyprus and
Crete ." Caius' exchange
with Philo occurred around
the time of Christ.
In 1165. Benjamin of
Tudela, a noted Jewish
traveller, passed through
Chalkis and encountered
Jews. From the Middle Ages
to the 19th century, Chalkis
was often called Little Safad
because of the rabbinical
sages who studied there.
Chalkis' white-washed
synagogue, the foundations
of which go back some 1,500
years, has been rebuilt six
times. On Good Friday,
1845, a Christian fanatic set
fire to the building and it was
not reconstructed until 1849.
Strangely enough, the walls
of the synagogue, on Kotsou
St., are embedded with
ancient Jewish gravestones.
During the Venetian era, the
Italian overlords used the
Jewish cemetery as a quarry
to build castle walls.
Refuse nik
Sentenced To
Three Years
NEW YORK (JTA)
Zakhar Zunshain, a refusenik
for more than two years, was
sentenced to three years in a
prison recently on charges of
spreading lies about the
Soviet Union, the Student
Struggle for Soviet Jewry
reported. Zunshain was
arrested in March when he
and three of his friends
attempted to publicly protest
the denial of their exit visas
in front of the Bolshoi
Theater in Moscow.
And when the ruined walls
were demolished 23 years
ago, the stones were returned
to the Jews. They, in turn,
placed them into the
synagogue walls.
In the cool courtyard of
the synagogue is a 12th
century mikva, a very tiny
one, and on the far side of
the walled enclosure are
fragrant lemon and mandarin
trees. With Levy's permis-
sion, I pluck two bright
orange mandarins and eat
them. On major holidays,
when the citrus is blooming,
congregants pick them off the
boughs and nibble on them.
Chalkis" Jewish communal
center, adjacent to the mini
orchard, is small, and replete
with framed photographs of
Theodor Herzl, the Viennese
founder of modern political
Zionism; David Ben-Gurion,
Israel's first Prime Minister,
and three Israeli Presidents.
There are also WIZO
posters and a glassed-in map
of Israel on the wall. Inside
the synagogue, on a white
marble slab, are etched three
names: Ferdinand de
Rothschild, Damaskinos and
Gregorious.
Rothschild, of the famous
European banking dynasty,
berthed his yacht in Chalkis'
harbor in the late 19th
century. So impressed was he
by the durability and unity of
the Jews here that he donated
money towards the construc-
tion of a protective wall
around the Jewish cemetery.
Rustic in appearance, the
cemetery is filled with tomb-
stones, some of which are
extremely old. Beautiful red,
yellow and blue wildflowers
grow in the high grass, and
graceful pines and cypresses
abound throughout, forming
shady pathways.
Damaskinos, the Greek
archbishop during World
War II, is honored because
he tried but failed to
stop the deportation of Jews
to Poland's death camps.
Gregorious, Chalkis'
Monsignor when the
Germans marched in, is
remembered because he hid
the torah scrolls and other
religious artifacts in the crypt
of a church. In 1939, two
years before the Nazi
invasion, Chalkis was home
to approximately 250 Jews.
Unlike the majority of
their fellow Jews in Greece,
they spoke no Ladino, but
only Greek. Having settled in
Chalkis centuries in advance
of the Inquisition in Spain,
the so-called Romaniot Jews
of Evia had no knowledge of
Ladino, a jargon of
Sephardic Yiddish which
arose in the Iberian
Peninsula.
When the war broke out,
Elias Levy, Leon's aged
father, owned a dry goods
shop which Leon runs today
with his brother, Monos
(Menachem), who is 40.
Leon Levy was barely out
of diapers when Italy invaded
Greece, but he knows that
the first Greek army officer
to fall in battle was Col.
Mordechai Frizis, a Jew
whose family has lived on
Evia reportedly for 13
generations. A marble bust of
Frizis stands today in
Chalkis' Military Square.
The war was a terrible time
for the Jews, yet the Levys
were lucky. At first, Evia and
environs were under Italian
occupation a fortuitous
stroke because Italy did no
harass the Jews, nor attempt
to ship them off to
concentration camps. Later,
the Germans replaced tne
Italians, and the tragedy
began.
"When we learned that the
Germans had deported the
Jews of Salonika, we escaped
to the mountains and found
shelter with a priest," recalls
Levy. By war's end, the
Levys parents, brothers
and sister were in Athens,
under the assumed name of
Papadimitriou. A sympath-
etic policeman, Levy
explains, provided false
papers.
All told, the Germans
managed to kill two Jews
from Chalkis and about 25
from the vicinity, Levy says.
In the wake of the war,
120 Jews emigrated to Israel
and the U.S. The Levys
remained because they were
not as destitute as some of
their fellow Jews. Today, the
Jews of Chalkis are "strong
economically." Leon Levy
himself seems quite
prosperous, and his shop at
42 Kriezotou stocks men's
and women's garmentt a
rolls of cloth. Cnt$ **A
Intermarriage is sti
unknown phenomenon *J
hazzan conducts tL
services. On the major ho!
days, a rabbi from Atfi
leads the congregation in
prayer. A butcher in Athem
suppl.es Chalkis with kosner
meat. '"
Levy, the father of t*0
says that 10 Jewish students
from Chalkis study at univer
sities six in Greece and
four in Israel. Asked if
they'll return after their
graduation, Levy shrugs his
shoulders.
4tThe recipe for
Gulden's' Mustard
has been in my
family for years.
CHARLIE GULDEN
Broccoli Pa*ta Salad
S cupi cookrd spiral ptsU
I bunch steamed broccoli, broken inlo florets, stems cut
1 cup or desired amount CoMf n Vinaigrette Dressing
4 oo cubed leu cheese
2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
2 teaspoons chopped fresh basil
I tablespoon toasted pignoli nuts (optionalI
Gently toss together all ingredients except ptgndi nuts
Relngerate I 2 hours Garnish with pojnoli nuts Sen*
slights chilled Makes it servings
And these recipes
will be in your
family
for years, too! W
GoUen Vinaigrette
Dressing
IH rups vegetable oil
Vt cup cider or wine vinegar
2 tablespoons Guldens Spicy
Brown Mustard
I teaspoon ground black pepper
I teaspoon sat
H teaspoon granulated sugar
Vi teaspoon lemon )uicr
I minced garlic dove
Thoroughly rombinr all ingredients
Makes \Vi caps dressing
Memories are made with Gulden's.
Koaher- Parve
Catch
Star-Kist tuna in
natural spring water.
oo
Star-Kist
FANCY ALBACORE
SOLID WHITE TUNA
Star-Kist
CHUNK LIGHT TU|"
IN SPRING **!*!
"It's(Q)Kosher and
has half the calories
of tuna in oil. It's got
Like me!'
tat taste naturally
jgot
ally.


Organizations
in the News
AM IT WOMEN
Rishona Chapter is having a mini luncheon and card
nartv at the Century Village Clubhouse, on Sunday July
22 11 a.m. For tickets, contact Ethel or Lee.
AMERICAN RED MAGEN DAVID FOR ISRAEL
Netanya Chapter Board meeting will take place at
American Savings Bank, West Gate, Aug. 22, 1 p.m.
New officers elected for 1984-85 are President Harry
lerner 1st Vice President Edward Starr, 2nd Vice
President Louis Perlman, 3rd Vice President Sophie
Menschenfreund, Treasurer Murray Bernstein, Recording
Secretary Lillian Moskowitz, Corresponding Secretary
Blanche Leibowitz, Sergeant at Arms Murray Pikoff.
The existing Board Members were re-elected. The new
Board Members elected are Alex Kaplan, Morris
Waxman, Morris Weingard, Anna Goldberg, Ann Doft.
HADASSAH
A mini luncheon and card party will be held by
Tikvah Chapter on August 13. Call Emma for more
information.
Vovel invites the community to a day at the Royal
Palm Dinner Theatre. "No, No Nanette" will be
presented after lunch. The one price also includes
transportation, gratuities and tax. The bus leaves from
ihe West Gate (Carteret Bank) on Wednesday, Sept. 19
promptly at 10:30 a.m. Make reservations soon by
calling Lee Goldberg or Jeanne Tobin.
A lunch and card party will be held on Sunday, Aug.
12. Phone hostesses Lee Goldberg or Bernice Fink for
reservations.
WOMEN'S AMERICAN ORT
The Palm Beach Chapter is planning a lunch and
matinee at the Royal Palm Theater on Wednesday, Aug.
I to see the musical hit "Company." Call Phyllis
Gresser or Pauline Judd for reservations.
The West Palm Chapter will hold a Chinese
luncheon and card party at the Bird's Nest Two in
Drexel Mall on Wednesday, Aug. 1, 11:30 a.m. For
more information contact Anne Sporn.
JCC News
SINGLES ENJOY SUMMER FUN
The Jewish Community Center's Young Singles (ages
21-35) invite Young Adults to join them for Shabbat
Services at Temple Beth 1, 2815 No. Flagler Drive,
West Palm Beach on Friday, July 20, at 8 p.m. An Oneg
will follow.
Sunday, July 22 starting at 5 p.m. for outdoor fun, all
will meet at John Prince Park for barbecue dinner.
Donation for dinner is $4. Please RSVP 686-6126 and
ask for Sandy.
Friday, July 27 from 5:30 to 7 p.m. all will gather at
Cheers for a Happy Hour. Hot and cold appetizer buffet
will be available.
Help Wanted
The Palm Beach Board of Rabbis has job
opportunities for "Mashgichim" to supervise Kashruth
in establishments within our community. If you qualify
for this work and arc interested, please contact Rabbi
Joseph Speiser, 684-7750.
THE Am CONDITIONED
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Friday, July 20, 1984 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 9
New Prosthesis Repairs
Damage To Bone in Middle Ear
A newiy developed
prosthesis to replace a
damaged or destroyed stapes,
one of the bones in the mid-
dle ear, is offering restored
hearing to deaf people whose
disability is due to stapes
destruction. The prosthesis is
the work of Dr. Jacob Sade,
Professor of Otolaryngology
at Tel Aviv University's
Sackler Faculty of Medicine
and head of the University-
affiliated Department of Oto-
laryngology at Meir General
Hospital in Kf'ar Sava.
The prosthesis has already
been placed in the ears of 30
patients in Israel. In some
instances, hearing was
improved to such a degree
that a hearing aid was no
longer necessary. Dr. Sade
notes that the prosthesis
which he has developed is
limited to a specific operation
and is not a cure-all for all
causes of deafness .
The stapes, or stirrup, as
the bone is frequently called,
is one of three miniature
bones in the middle ear.
These bones transmit sound
waves from the eardrum to
the inner ear, where the
sound is subsequently
deciphered into words and
meaning. When there is
damage to the drum or one
of the bones, a hearing
impairment develops.
Surgeons have been able to
repair one of the bones, the
incus, as well as the eardrum
for some time now. While a
second bone, the hammer,
can be passed over, repair of
the third bone, the stapes,
has proved to be more
problematic. The prostheses
that were previously available
were either rejected by the
body or else extremely dif-
ficult to stabilize in the ear.
Dr. Sade's breakthrough
was the development of an
artificial stapes that obviates
these difficulties. Instead of
building a prosthesis solely
from bone which is hard
to stabilize or from plastic
which is rejected Dr.
Sade conceived the idea of a
two-part prosthesis. The part
touching the eardrum is made
from a minute particle snip-
ped from another tiny bone
in the middle ear, while the
section in contact with the in-
ner ear is made of either
teflon or ceramic. This latter
section fits into the bone
section through a hole bored
into it. The whole device is
only five millimeters long and
one millimeter wide. The
operation, performed by
microsurgery, lasts about an
hour.
Named "Tabor" by Dr.
Sade, after the Israeli
mountain, the prosthesis is
now being commercially
manufactured in the United
States.
Sara Dachbash, 68, of
Ramat Hasharon, had a
prototype of Dr. Sade's
prosthesis placed in her ears
10 years ago. She had been
deaf for two years. Mrs.
Continued on Page 11
SYNAGOGUE ON PREMISES
can SSSL 538-5731

mums niiumin. www w -
(On the Ocean at 43rt St.. Boonlwolk. Miami Baach
i-urn
"Every Del Monte' canned fruit
and vegetable has now been
certified kosher. Soon, all their
labels will reflect this fact. But
until they do, please accept the
Del Monte' shield of quality
as your assurance of kosher
certification.
Dcimontc
Rabbi Jacob Cohen
C 1983 D* Mont* Coipoiilmn


Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Friday, July
20, 1984
i recent Congregational Meeting, Temple Israel honored
those members of the Board of Trustees and Officers who are
retiring from service. With gratitude for their devotion to the
Temple Rabbi Howard Shapiro and Barbara Ackerman
presented certificates of appreciation. Pictured from left to
riaht are: Arthur Leibovit, Dr. Ray Preefer, Bruce Prince,
Joseph Cohen, Kurt Leighton. Also presented certificates, but
pictured are: Dawn Kapner, Buddie Brenner, Florence
no
Green berg. Dr. Michael Steiner, Robin Kandel.
At a recent Congregational Meeting on
Monday, June 11, Temple Israel elected a
new Board of Trustees and Officers. Seated
from left to right are: Marilyn Cohen, Vice
President; Barbara Ackerman, President;
Dr. Ilene Gerber, Secretary. Standing from
left to right are: Dr. Myron Kulwin, Dan
Forstein, Vice President; Warren Murray,
Judge Albert Silverman, Howard Debs,
Mark Feldmesser, Dr. Robert Wacks, Joel
Levine, Treasurer; Harvey Goldberg, Vice
President. Members of the Board and
Officers not pictured but elected are: Murry
"Jim" Brenner, Jean Cohen, Lillian
Dobrow, Abraham Gerber, Pearl Wiesen,
Richard Yosinoff, Wally Sherman,
President of Sisterhood; Stephen Goldstein,
President of Brotherhood; Eric Slepp,
President of Youth Group.
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Israels Black Hebrews
Continued from Page 7
in the news this year
following critical statements
by the new mayor of Dimona
and by Knesset Member Dov
Shilansky, deputy minister in
the Prime Minister's Office.
The American Jewish
Committee urged the Israeli
Government to disavow
Shilansky's statement that the
Black Hebrews "arc worse
than the PLO" and that the
Fully Air Condritonoo-
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group "won't be here very
much longer." Assurances
were given by Israeli Govern-
ment officials that there has
been no change in their
status, nor are there plans to
take imminent action against
them, as implied by Mr.
Shilansky.
The AJC has also urged
the United States Govern-
ment to facilitate the return
to this country of persons
who wish to leave or have
defected from the Black
Hebrew community.
"Following the Israeli
elections, the new
government should try once
again to work out a compre-
hensive, humanitarian and
equitable solution."
Wanted
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eskins
Hold Out Hope For Cure of Herpes?
Friday, July 20, 1984 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 11
k-r, Israel
om genital herpes
In to get their pre-
of Frone beta-
[ cream, produced
ler-Yeda pharma-
fnt in Nes-Ziona,
s important anti-
laiion the most
pical treatment for
relieving herpes outbreaks
is available to the public for
the first time thanks to the
joint efforts of Prof. Michel
Revel and his team at the
Weizmann Institute of
Science and pharmaceutical
chemists of Inter-Yeda, Ltd.
Frone cream, containing
New
isthesis
kinued from Page 8
said, "Following
lion in my ears, I
hear. 1 was embar-
I the time, when I
work or with my
One of Mrs.
's five children
"We felt very bad
I to shout at our
i We would have to
her, not once, but
Imes before she could
|nd us." Following
aiion, Mrs. Dachbash
hear again. Today,
faring is perfectly
Indeed, this
with Mrs. Dachbash
Irried out over the
le in a normal,
llional manner. Mrs.
kh. recalling the
Port of those two years
subsequent recovery,
fThank God for Dr.
beta-interferon extracted
from foreskin tissue cultures
via a Weizmann Institute-
developed process, was
recently approved for com-
mercial distribution by
Israel's Ministry of Health. It
is hoped that it will be
stocked shortly by all neigh-
borhood druggists in the
country. Permits for pre-
scription sale have also been
granted by the authorities in
Italy and Argentina, with ap-
plications having been sub-
mitted as well in West Ger-
many, Great Britain and else-
where.
WITH THE increased
escorted to Haifa on the basis availability of human beta-in-
of "intelligence information" terferon, a natural protein
in order to prevent terrorist produced by the body to
attacks on Israel. ward off viral infections, ac-
According to Arens, there ler?,ed clini"' tr'als ofH,he
was a link between that Israeli-manufactured drug
action and Israel's air and have been carried out locally
naval bombardment of fnd.in s.ev other countries.
Anarib island off the In ,srael- Inter-Yeda s Frone
northern Lebanese port of cream-.'" add,,10n '? ,,s Vse
Tripoli last week. The De- In 8",a> ^rpes, has also
fense Minister briefed lhe Pven. Active for relief of
committee on the interroga- facial herf and
lion of the four ferry passen- ,ne. .. extremely painful
gers still under detention in vari"lla zoster (shingles).
Israel. In the form of sterile
T, ,,____, drops, beta-interferon has
The ferry was a lowed o J successfully in
proceed to Be.ru kttwtt vira| Xtions of th/eye
all but nine of, s 63 passen- adenovirus (ship-
gers aboard. Of the nme five d zoster and as
were pleased and returned to J > J jn combination
Beirut by bus under the f ophthalmic
auspices of the International ";__
Red Cross.
ins Defends Israels
izure of Cyprus Ferry
JIL SEDAN
[UGH ORGEL
I] i M (JTA) -
[Minister Moshe
Idel'endcd the Israel
jure of a Cypriot
In the high seas and
ion of some of its
before the Knes-
bign Affairs and
lommittee.
the Panamanian-
It Blanco, enroute
Inaca, Cyprus to
ks intercepted and
Navy commander Zeev Al-
mog said that terrorists are
again preparing seaborne
raids on Israel and have more
sophisticated equipment at
their disposal than in the
past. He contended that
interception of a vessel on the
high seas was allowable under
international law on grounds
of self-defense.
He claimed that Libya and
Syria pose the greatest
dangers to Israel from the sea
because both have sophistic-
ated navies.
Meanwhile, Israeli officials
have emphatically denied
media reports abroad that
one of the detainees off the
ferry is the notorious interna-
tional terrorist known as
Carlos, believed to have mas-
terminded the massacre of
the Israeli team at the 1972
Olympic games in Munich.
herpes.
In June, a new application
for interferon therapy was re-
ported in the British medical
journal, The Lancet. Prof.
Revel, working with gynecol-
ogist, Prof. Alexander
Schonfeld, and his colleagues
at Beilinson Hospital in
Petah Tikvah and with Inter-
Yeda researchers, reports the
successful use of Frone injec-
tions to cure viral warts of
the genitalia, a sexually-
transmitted condition
affecting up to one percent of
all women in the U.S.
This figure represents
about half the incidence of
gonorrhea in that population,
but the warts caused by
papilloma virus and known
to doctors as condyloma
acuminata are more
resistant to cure.
IN A double-blind investi-
gation carried out on 22 in-
dividuals (mostly women, but
including some men), it was
found that for 80 percent of
condyloma patients, a single
series of 10 daily injections of
beta-interferon led to disap-
pearance of the warts within
five to six weeks. Moreover,
no recurrent lesions were ob-
served in the patients, some
of whom have been under
surveillance for over a year.
With standard treatments
using surgery or toxic
chemicals, such warts
commonly reappear within
six months.
In one Israeli trial on
genital herpes, 17 female and
two male patients were
treated intensively with Frone
cream. Ten of the partic-
ipants, with histories of re-
current viral breakouts, re-
mained disease-free for
periods of from six to 12
months, as compared with
the usual remission which
lasts for only a month or
two. In three other patients
the sympton-free period in-
creased between two- and
three-fold.
This work was carried out
by Prof. Rami Marcovici and
his colleagues at the Depart-
ment of Obstetrics and Gyne-
cology B in Haifa's Rambam
Medical Center. Dr. M.
Movshovitz of the Sheba
Medical Center near Tel Aviv
and Dr. M. Isacsohn of the
Shaare Zedek Medical
Center, Jerusalem, have also
achieved positive results using
Frone cream to treat genital
and facial herpes, as well as
shingles.
PROF. REVEL cautions
that, at this stage, topical ap-
plication of beta-interferon
should not be regarded as
cures for herpes, since a
residual viral infection appar-
ently remains in nerve ganglia
adjacent to the site of
eruption. But the extended
period between relapses and
the less severe and shorter
duration of subsequent
attacks which were observed
constitute a significant
advance in the control of the
disease.
Moreover, since herpes is
not transmitted to a sexual
partner when in remission,
anxieties are avoided. The use
of beta-interferon to treat
condyloma and herpes is
important also in that, ac-
cording to medical statistics,
patients suffering from these
infections are more likely to
contract cancers of the
genital tract. Control of these
viruses is therefore a highly
sought medical goal.
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-
I.-
\ f.4. %* i*
Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Friday, July 20, 1984
-%
Labor Problems Continue
Senior News
FROM THE JEWISH COMMUNrtY CENTER
Continued from Pag* 1
ISRAELI VIEWERS can
be certain only of electioneer-
ing. The Supreme Court has
ordered that the nightly half
hour allotted to the political
parties for their campaign
messages must not be inter-
rupted.
Meanwhile, some 60,000
government-employed engm-
TRANSPORTATION For more information, call
Transportation is available 689-7703.
in a designated area for per- NEW SUMMER PROGRAM
sons 60 years of age or over Quilling Classes with In-
who do not use public trans- struct0r, Eloise Heinser who """ ^^"Vemained on
portation. People are taken wiI| demonstrate how to s<*'al ^dispute with His-
to treatment centers, doctors creale invi,ations, greeting X,' and the government
offices, to hospitals, nursing cards and unique gifts that homes to visit spouses, to wiI1 last a lifctimc. classes ver a wage mj
social service agencies and b an Friday, July 13, 9:30 JSJStoacSoi
nutrition centers. There is no a m l0 ,,:30 am. Thc fec is refuse ,0 accep'- _.
fee fee for this service, but $2.5o per class and a kit may Clerks at the Israel uis-
participants are encouraged be purchased at the class, count Bank have threatened a
to contribute their fair share. Cau Marcie at 689-7703 for 24-hour strike this week and
There is a great demand for reservations and-or more in- junior high school teachers
formation.
Many groups and classes
will discontinue for the
summer. Please call 689-7703
to check if your class is
meeting.
WE GET LETTERS .
are warning of sanctions that
may delay the opening of the
new school year in Septem-
ber.
Haifa firemen returned to
work after the municipality
paid back salaries a month
overdue, and the Interior
June 16, 1984 Ministry promised that funds
To Whom It May Concern: would be transferred monthly
It is with deep gratitude to avoid a repetition of th
Foremost among this is the that j enclose this check to dejays. BM_m_nKnjpMn
opportunity to form new and tne jcc.
lasting friendships. A grea( wrher once said
Each weekday, seniors "He who finds a true friend,
this service, so make reserva-
tions in advance. For in-
formation and-or reservations
call 689-7703 Monday
through Friday.
HOT KOSHER
LUNCH CONNECTION
Many elements combine to
make the Hot Kosher Lunch
Program at the Jewish
Community Center a success.
seniors
gather for intimate talk,
educational discussions, game
playing, leisure and song.
These activities are followed
by a hot, kosher, nutritious
lunch, served with warmth
and hospitality by dedicated
volunteers. There is no set
fee, but persons are asked to
make a contribution each
meal.
Please come and join us.
For information and reser-
vations (which must be made
in advance) call Carol or Lil-
lian at 689-7703 in West
Palm Beach.
The following program-will
be held on July 20 Louis
Young on violin.
HOME DELIVERED
MEALS
Persons who are home-
bound and need a Kosher
meal may call for informa-
tion. Hot meals are delivered
each day for eligible home-
bound. Call Carol in West
Palm Beach at 689-7703.
SECOND TUESDAY
COUNCIL
Sabina Gottshalk, Chair-
person, announces that the
finds a treasure."
That's how I feel about the
JCC and in particular those
people in your Transporta-
tion Department. They are
kind and most compassion-
ate.
Thanks again.
Friendly,
Frances Green berg
For services to Claire R.
Rubenstein
Job Club
Formed
The vocational department
of Jewish Family and
Children's Service of Palm
Beach County, Inc. has
formed JobClubs to assist the
unemployed, underemployed,
displaced homemakers, and
recent high school and college
Second Tuesday Council will graduates find jobs. The Job
meet the first Tuesday of Club, which began July 16,
each month at 10 a.m. The will meet every Monday
next meeting will be Aug. 7. morning, from 10 a.m. to 12
RECREATION AND
EDUCATION
All paths lead to educa-
tional and recreational classes
at the Jewish Community
Center!!
The CSSC offers a variety
of classes, lectures, discussion
groups and social activities
made possible by many
community agencies and pro-
fessionals as well as
numerous volunteers. There
are no fees for most of these
activities, but participants are
encouraged to contribute
their fair share. Intergenera-
tional programs are planned
whenever possible.
TUESDAYS: Round
Table-Timely Topic Discus-
sions. Group Leader Sylvia
Skolnick 1:15 p.m. (1st
and 3rd Tuesdays for the
summer schedule.
WEDNESDAYS:
Filness-Over-50. Instructor,
Bea Bunze, 11:30 a.m.
THURSDAYS: Speakers
Club. President, Morris
Shuken, 9:30 a.m.
noon. Each group session will
deal with all of the aspects of
getting jobs, including skills
and resume writing, inter-
views, and the hidden job
market. There is no fee for
the group, but space is
limited. Register with Toby
Chabon, career and guidance
specialist, at 684-1991.
refusal to answer alarms led
to what could have been
disastrous.
A forest fire, not uncom-
mon in the dry season ap-
proached homes in a Mt.
Carmel suburb. Local resi-
dents attempting to fight the
blaze, called on the Hedera
Fire Department for heip.
The latter rendered assistance
for a time, but departed at
the request of the striking
local firemen. Only a shift of
the wind saved the homes.
The Electric Corp. strike
had more widespread reper-
cussions. Jerusalem and
Nahariya were almost com-
pletely without water because
the Mekoret water company
cannot operate its pumps for
lack of electric power. The
company was using emer-
gency generators to provide
some water to Jerusalem.
ELECTRIC CORP. resort-
ed to rationing power, black-
ing out certain areas of the
country alternately for
limited periods of time. This
brought near tragedy to the
Emek Hospital in Afule when
power was cut off without
warning and the hospital
staff was unable to start the
emergency generator.
Surgery in progress had to
be completed by searchlight.
Patients undergoing dialysis
were saved from death only
by the action of doctors and
nurses who operated the
blood-cleansing apparatus by
hand.
Meanwhile, Foreign Mini-
stry staff decided to tighten
the work sanctions they
began to apply more than a
week ago in a wage dispute
^^"^ MOTH t IIACMCIUI ^^^ '
Tin Only Glatt Koshtr Hotil In Tht Lincoln Road Aria
CELEBRATE THE SHEVU0T H0UDAYS
SPECIAL SUMMER RATES
TV in All Rooms Movits Free Parking
Entertainment Privata Beach Olympic Pool
Mashgiach and Synagogue on Premises
Reserve Now For The
GLATT
KOSHER
l>f:|,ljHIMr
Services Conducted by Prominent Cantor
Beautiful SUCCA On Premises
Phone:1-538-7811 \j:
ON THE OCEAN it lONi ST.. MIAMI BEACH FLA. 33)30
with the ministry. They have
halted altogether their
dealings with residents and
foreign visitors requiring
consular services and are
boycotting visiting VIPs.
Even the religious estab-
lishment has not escaped the
labor unrest. Employees of
the Rabbinical Councils in
various cities went on strike.
A near riot developed outside
the Tel Aviv council offices
when couples requesting
divorce were turned away.
Marriage certificates were not
being issued either, but the
newlyweds seemed less dis-
traught by the delay.
IN THE military sector,
6,000 employees 0f A
Rafael Weapons SL*
mem Authority an l0p'
that they wSjffS
day vacation- and threaten^
a longer strike this week
Talks broke down betw*
60,000 striking govern^
employed engineers and aca
demicians and Histadrut ami
government representative,
Their union has threatened to'
break away from Histadrut
because the trade union fed-
eration's recent wage agree
ment with the Treasury is ot
acceptable to them. The aca
demicians involved are in the
social sciences and humanities
faculties.
Katzir Reports
KGB Was Firm
Continued from Page 1
taxi and drove from our hotel
to the man's home.
"We entered the building,
and even before we entered
the elevator, three men in
civilian clothing barred our
way. One of them who
looked non-Jewish but spoke
Hebrew, showed us their
KGB cards and asked us to
accompany them to police
headquarters for inter-
rogation," Katzir said.
HE SAID he clearly
identified himself as Israel's
ex-President, but this made
no impression. He and his
wife were driven in a military
jeep accompanied by the
three KGB agents and several
armed soldiers to an official
building, about 10 minutes
drive from the building where
they were arrested.
They were asked to empty
their pockets, and Mrs.
Katzir had to show the
contents of her handbag. The
Hebrew-speaking KGB man
acted as interpreter during
their interrogation. The KGB
wanted to know what they
had been doing and with
whom they met since their
arrival in the USSR two
weeks earlier.
Katzir said the KGB seized
an album of photographs of
Israel, a book of Israeli songs
and some Israeli coins
intended as gifts for the.
Leningrad refusenik. The
own possessions, including
Jewish prayerbook, were
returned. Katzir would not
identify the refusenik.
AFTER NEARLY 90
minutes, they were told they
could return to their hotel,
and that same evening they
boarr'vU the night train to
Moscow together with Prof.
and Mrs. Sela.
Sela, who is presently in
Lille, France to receive the
Life Foundation Award for
his research in synthetic vac-
cines, told the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency that through-
out his two-week stay in the
Soviet Union he was warmly
treated. He said he invited a
high-ranking Soviet scientific
delegation to Israel as guests
of the Weizmann Institute.^
The Russians accepted, birt
no date was set.
KUTSHER
SUMMER OLYMPI
fjA flP In the resort world
U it takes a special quality J M
to excel. And you sense it 1 \ Vf
** in everything at Kutsher's! k fH
Here you don't have to wait
for your turn to play golf or tennis
or racquetball. And we also offer you
a thousand acres to explore, a "]0J>*"
or jog around...or fish. Plus three delicious
meals daily and everything else it taxes to
delight you-all enhanced by the Kutsner
quality that makes you feel like a winner.
-------GREAT STARS ALL SUMMER!
* LOU FMANA VIC MMO*
* WLLY CRYSTAL TOUT OBLAHOO
_______*jwvwwL____
TEE OFF TO WIN ^^
FREE KUTSHER'S AND HAWAII VACATIONS!
Call For MUM
MAURICE STOXE8 BA8KETBALL GAME: THE* AUG.
ON THE PREMISES: indoor iOutdoor *m
Mnatwe Golf MmWi CM) EiWCttt Can** >v?in5K)
A**** Tin ****** h ** Show t Day Camp ftght PaW Taan Programs
Kutsher's
Martina*. N. ** ltl T4 iOOO
MontlcaMo. Naw York 12701 (014) 704-MOO
CALL TOLL FREE: (800) 431-1273
vt.


.....
Friday, July 20," 198* The JewUh TToridiari of Palm Beach County Page 13
WHERE YOU BUY
YOUR TIRES MEANS
A LOT TO YOU
NORTON TIRE CO. IS
FLORIDA'S LARGEST:
30 DAY MONEY
BACK GUARANTEE
Sssvs sar- "i,,c,m
eluded
MICHELIN
DEALER
iFGoodrich
DEALER
IRELLI
DEALER
1
And here are 13 more reasons why our stores
are the best place for you and your car:
2
3
4
5
6
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED
That's not just words, we put it in writing
(read our 30-day money-back guarantee).
And if you're not satisfied with any
purchase from us, we'll do our best to
make it right.
EXPERIENCE & INTEGRITY
You'll like the way we do business. And our
experience and integrity will save you
money.
CERTIFIED MECHANICS
To better service you and your car, we have
expert mechanics, trained and certified by
the National Institute for Service
Excellence, available at our stores.
FREE 10-POINT SAFETY
CHECKUP No purchase necessary.
Drive in anytime and we'll check your tires,
alignment, balance, brakes, shocks, idler
arm, muffler, battery, belts and hoses. Free.
COURTEOUS TREATMENT
You can count on always receiving
excellent, prompt, courteous service at any
of our stores.
NO BAIT AND SWITCH
We carry complete inventories of all tires.
The low prices we advertise are always
backed up by an ample supply of the tires
in our ads.
7
9
WE SOLVE PROBLEMS
If you have a problem with any purchase,
contact the store manager where the purchase
was made. If he can't come up with a solution,
ask him for our special customer service
department number. Every possible effort is
made to keep our customers happy.
8 CLEANLINESS We offer clean, air-
conditioned waiting rooms for the convenience
of our customers.
HIGH-TECH EQUIPMENT
We have modem, up-to-date equipment.
Including the latest in hi-tech computer
balancing, hi-tech alignment and special tire
changing equipment for protecting mag
wheels.
CERTIFIED TIRE
SPECIALISTS Our stores are staffed
with tire specialists trained and certified in the
various features of each manufacturer's tires
and each automobile's specifications.
PURCHASING POWER
With 35 stores throughout Florida, we have the
strongest purchasing power of any tire
company in the state. That's how we are able
to offer you the lowest prices.
SIXTY YEARS UNDER THE
SAME FLORIDA MANAGEMENT
Since our first store opened in 1924. our
management policy has always been the same:
Give our customers quality products and keep
them happy.
10
fl
12
ANYWHERE, ANY PLACE, ANY TIME!
NORTON
,iMi:t vi,'-i
MICHELIN llRELLJ TIRE CQ
SAFETY CHECKS BRAKES EXPORTS
CERTIFIED MECHANICS WHOLESALE
SAHTY
CIHTW
IFGoodrich YOKOHAMA
ALIGNMENT BALANCING SHOCKS
FRONT END SERVICE LUBRICATION
. CORAL GABLES
B"d & Douglas Road 446 8101
NORTH MIAMI
13360N W 7thAve 681 8541
N MIAMI BEACH
'0ON6 163rdSt 945-7454
MIAMI BEACH
MS4 Alton Road 672-5353
SOUTH OAOE
W01S Dine Hwy 667-7575
. CUTLER RIDOE
?0390S Owe Hwy 233-5241
WALEAH/PALM SPRINGS MILE
1275 49th St 822 2500
MIAMI AIRPORT
N W 25 SI & MiUm Dairy Rd 593-1191
WEST MIAMI
Bud & Galloway Rds W*
KENDALL OR./HWATE SQUARE
13872 SWSBlh SI 387 0128
W.TAMUMI TRAIL
12520 SWn St 551-1141
HOMESTEAD
30100 S Federal Hwy 247 1622
HOLLYWOOD
497 S State Rd ? 987 0450
ALL STORES OPEN 7:30
MM
SI Rd 84iuSlwesl0lUniv Or 473-4700
hr.LAUDEROALE
1740E Sunrise BMJ 463-7588
PLANTATION
381 N State Rd 7 587 2186
PEMBROKE PINES
H wood Blvd lustwestoiUmv Or 435-1 JJ
TAMARAC
441 & V Commercial Blvd 735-2772
TAMARAC
N Umv Or & McMab Rd 721-4700
POM PA NO BEACH
3151 N federal Hwy 943-4200
OEERFIELD BEACH
2265 W Hillsboro Blvd 427-8800
DELRAY BEACH
llintonBtvd 272-1022
GREENACRES
3838 Jog Rd 968-1014
WEST PALM BEACH
515 South Owe 832-4181
LAKE PARK/N. PALM BEACH
532 N Lake Blvd 848-2544
TEOUESTA
Bridge Rd 4 Old Owe Hwy 746-9215
FT. PIERCE
2604 South 4th St 464-8020
VERO BEACH
75521st Street 567-1174
DAYTON A BEACH
907 Volusia Ave 255-7487
NAPLES
2065 E lamiamiTr 774-4443
FT. MVERS
15135 McGregor Blvd 482-8880
MASTERCARD-VISA


Pa8c 12 T** Jewish Floridian of Palm Mm*k n-----*_ ~j
Page 14 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Friday. July 20, 1984
Youth Aliyah In The Young State
This fourth part of a series
on Youth Aliyah spotlights
Eli Artzi, Director-General of
the Ministry of Immigration
and Absorption, who, as a
child, was helped by Youth
Aliyah.
In 1948, when Eli Artzi,
now Director-General of the
Ministry of Immigration and
absorption, first stepped onto
Israeli soil, he knew that he
was in Israel. But he was not
a part of Israel. That would
take longer.
Eli was born in Morocco.
His parents were sincere
Zionists and deeply devout.
As soon as the State of Israel
was established, they left
their prosperous business,
packed up and made Aliyah.
Eli was eight years old.
Longing for his comfortable
x home in Morocco, he found
himself in a crowded transit
camp near Jerusalem with
thousands of other North
African and Yemenite im-
migrants. Throughout his
childhood, Eli had heard his
parents talk of a Jewish
home in Zion. But this dusty
noisy place was not his idea
of Zion. And he couldn't
believe that it was his home.
Ii
a
C
01
g>
m
cc
fe
ni
ar
ac
en
th,
tic
wr
*
T
sic
Sk
am
sur

Fit
Be*
#
Ch
Shu
A year later, Youth Aliyah
arranged to take Eli out of
the camp to the Youth Aliyah
evaluation and orientation
center at Neve Hadassah. Eli
had never been separated
from his family. Now they
seemed as far away as his old
house in Casablanca. But
there were other nine-year-
olds in his group with the
same memories and feelings.
Together, they went off to
Nitzanim Youth Village near
Ashkelon.
"Nitzanim let me into
Israel," Eli says. "As an
educational instrument and
absorption framework, Youth
Aliyah has no equal."
Service in the IDF tank
corps and enrollment at
Hebrew University were the
next two steps in Eli's entry
into Israeli society. Graduat-
ing with a degree in Jewish
history and education, Eli
returned to Nitzanim as a
teacher and counselor.
Finally, as education director
there, he was able to analyze
the process that had shaped
his own life and to influence
that process for others.
"The children enter
Nitzanim knowing nothing;
they graduate five years later
as educated, responsible
citizens. I consider the work
of Nitzanim to be national
work of the first importance
_ quite literally, the saving
of souls."
As his career advanced, Eli
got the chance to see
Morocco again. From 1VC4-
67, while he was serving with
the World Zionist Organiza-
tion's Youth and Hechaiutz
Department in Paris, he
slipped secretly into North
Africa to make contact with
Jewish communities there.
While in Paris, Eli was also
able to earn a degree from
the Sorbonne.
In 1975, he returned to
Europe as Director of
Programs for Youth in
Europe and in 1980 was
appointed Director General
of WZO's Department of
Sephardic Communities.
Finally, in 1982, he was
named to head the Ministry
of Immigration and Absorp-
tion. It was the perfect
culmination ... a chance to
share his hard-won under-
standing of the long learning
and life-building process that
lets a newcomer "into
Israel."
Israel's Dollar Reserves Plunge
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA)
Israel's Dollar reserves fell by
$350 million in June, largely
as a result of heavy purchases
of foreign currency by the
public fearful of further
devaluations of the Shekel.
The Shekel was devalued
by 17.2 percent last month
and now stands at an official
rate of 236.40 to $1.00. The
Very good opportunity for permanent ex-
perienced live-in housekeeper (female). Must
be over 45.
GOOD HOME, GOOD SALARY.
Would like a cheerful, pleasant person with
knowledge of cooking one meal a day.
Would appreciate someone who has worked
for Jewish people (not Kosher) Must speak
English, with references. If interested please
call collect.
861-7592
Date of Birth: May 5,1971
Height: 5'-1"
Weight: 85 Pounds
Hair: Red/Auburn, Curly
Shoulder Length
Eyes: Grey
Complexion: Fair/Freckled
Build: Small
Other: Pierced Ears
PLEASE HELP
Ann Gotlib. a thirteen year old
Russian Jewish immigrant, was
abducted from Bashford Manor
Mall on June 1, 1983 in Louisville.
Kentucky. The first anniversary of
Ann's disappearance has passed,
and still there has been no sign of
her.
An ANN GOTLIB SEARCH
FUND has been set up by the
Temple Sisterhood to raise mone;
to run newspaper ads nationwide
with Ann's picture. The new ads
will offer a 116,000 reward "for
proven whereabouts only" of Ann.
ANN GOTLIB
People with information are asked
to write: P.O. Box 1467, Louisville.
K Y 40201. They can also call a toll-
free number, 800-342-0821.
Funds are desperately needed! WE
NEED YOUR HELP!
All donations are tax deductible
Contributions should be sent to;
ANN GOTLIB SEARCH FUND
5101 Brownsboro Road
Louisville. KY 40222
black market rate over the
weekend stood at 350 Shekels
to $1.00.
The government is expected
to take an "overnight loan"
from foreign sources, the
Jerusalem Post reported, so
that when official statistics
are released later this month
the foreign currency situation
will not appear too bad. The
Knesset elections are less than
two weeks off.
THE PUBLIC rushed to
buy Dollars and other foreign
currency before the Shekel
sank so low as to put them
out of reach. The buying
spree was financed in part by
the government's injection of
40 billion Shekels (about $169
million) into the economy in
June and partly by the
conversion of some 25 billion
Shekels ($106 million) of
private assets into Dollars.
According to Treasury
figures, the total monetary
infusion by the government
between January and June,
1984 was 190 percent higher
in real terms than in the same
period of 1983. The excess of
government spending over
revenue the national
deficit was about 280
percent higher.
72 Leave
USSR In June
NEW YORK (JTA) -
The National Conference on
Soviet Jewry reported that 72
Jews were granted permission
to emigrate from the Soviet
Union during the month of
June. The monthly average
over the past six months has
been 80 Jews, the NCSJ said.
Elkann
Re-elected
PARIS (JTA) Jean-*
Paul Elkann, 62, has been
reelected president of the
Central Consistory, France's
main Jewish religious organ-
ization.
Candle Lighting lime
Fri. July 207:53 pm
Fri. July 277:50 pm
a.m.;
p.m.,
Religious Directory
Conservative
CONGREGATION ANSHEI SHOLOM: 5348 Grove Sta*
West Palm Beach 33409. PHone 684-3212 Rabbi Ij*t
Vander Walde. Cantor Mordecai Spektor. Daily: 8:30 a.m,
and 7:30 p.m. Friday: 8:30 a.m., 5 p.m. and a lateservkj-
8:15 p.m., followed by Oneg Shabbat. Saturday: 8:30 a.m.
7:30 p.m., Mincha followed by Sholosh Suedos.
CONGREGATION BETH KODESH OF BOYNTON
BEACH: 501 N.E. 26 Avenue, Boynton Beach 33435. Pho^
586-9428. Rabbi Avrom L. Drazin Monday 8:30
Thursday 8:30 a.m. Sabbath services, Friday 8:15
Saturday 9 a.m.
GOLDEN LAKES TEMPLE: 1470 Golden Lakes Blvd
West Palm Beach 33411. Phone 689-9430. Rabbi Joseph
Speiser. Daily Services 8:15 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. Sabbath
services Friday 8:15 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m., 5 p.m., Minchi
followed by Sholosh Suedos.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID: 4657 Hood Road, Palm Beach
Gardens 33410. Phone 694-2350. Rabbi William Marder,
Cantor Earl J. Rackoff. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m.
Saturday 10 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 2815 No. Flagler Dr., West Palm
Beach 33407. Phone 833-0339. Rabbi Howard J. Hirsch,
Cantor Elaine Shapiro. Sabbath services Friday 8:15 p.m.,
Saturday 9:30 a.m. Daily Minyan 8:15 a.m., Sunday and
Legal Holidays 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 315 N. A Street, Lake Worth
33460. Phone 585-5020. Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg, Cantor
Jacob Elman. Services Monday and Thursday 8:15 a.m.,
Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 224 N.W. Avenue G. Belle
Glade 33430. Sabbath services Friday, 8:30 p.m. Phone 996-
3886.
TEMPLE BETH ZION: Lions Club, 700 Camelia Dr.. Royal
Palm Beach. Mailing Address: 640-101 Trail South. West
Palm Beach 33414. Sabbath Services Friday 8 p.m., Saturday
8:45 a.m. Rabbi Nathan Zelizer. Phone 793-9122.
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB: 2177 So. Congress Ave., West
Palm Beach 33406. Phone 433-5957. Rabbi Dr. Morris
Silberman. Cantor Gary D. Kessler. Sabbath services, Friday
8 p.m.. Saturday and Holidays 9 a.m., Monday and Thursday
9 a.m.
TEMPLE EMANUEL: 190 North County Road, Palm Beach
3.14K0. Phone 832-0804. Rabbi Joel Chazin, Cantor David
Dardashli. Sabbath services. Friday 6 p.m. through Aug. 31,
Saturday 9 a.m.
THE TREASURE COAST JEWISH CENTER Ben
Abraham: 3257 S.E. Salerno Road, Port Salerno. Rabbi
Abraham Rose. 1-287-8833. Services Friday evenings 8 p.m.
LAKE WORTH JEWISH CENTER: St. Lukes Uniud
Methodist Chapel, 165 Ohio Road, Lake Worth. Phone 433-
1869. Friday night serivces 8:15 p.m.. Saturday. 9 a.m.
Orthodox
CONGREGATION AITZ CHAIM: Century Village, West
Palm Beach. Phone 689-4675. Sabbath services 9 a.m. anoo
p.m. Daily services 8:15 a.m. and 6:30 p.m.
Reform
CONGREGATION BETH ISRAEL: 1592 FloresU, P.OBoj
857146. Port St. Lucie. FL 33452. Friday night services
p.m. Saturday morning 10:30 a.m. Phone 465-6977.
THE REFORM TEMPLE OF JUPITER-TEQUESTA: at St.
Jude Church (Parrish Hall) 204 U.S. No. 1 So.; mailing
address: Plaza 222, U.S. No. 1. Tequesta 33458. Phone 747
4235. President Jeanne Tarsches. Services the second ana
fourth Friday of every month, 8 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 4600 Oleander Avenue, Fort Pierce, FL
33450. Phone 461-7428. Cantor Anne Newman.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM: St. Helen s P^h Hai jSl
Avenue and Victory Blvd., Vero Beach 32960 mM
address: P.O. Box 2113. Vero Beach. FL 32961-2113. Rabb.
Stephen Adams. Phone 1-569-0180.
TEMPLE BETH TORAH: at St. David's in the Pine*
Episcopal Retreat, Forest Hill Blvd. and Welungton naw.
West Pabn Beach. Mailing address: P.O. Box 170M-JV5
Palm Beach, FL 33416. Friday services 8:15 p.m. w>
Steven R. Westman, Cantor Nicholas Fenakel. Phone TEMPLE ISRAEL: 1901 No. Flagler Dr.. West N>*S
33407. Phone 833-8421. Rabbi Howard Shapiro. Canton*
Soloist Susan Weiss. Sabbath services. Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE JUDEA: at St. Catharines Greek Orthodoj
Church Social Hall. 4000 Washington Rd.. at Soutne
Boulevard. Rabbi Joel L. Levine. Cantor Rita Shore -via "*
address: 5154 Okeechobee Blvd.. West Palm Beach, WH
33409. Phone 471-1526.
B^fl


Friday, July 20, 1984 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 15
iagogue News
i
<-

[recent Service of Confirmation, held on
Iliy evening, June 8 at Temple Israel, the
Lbers of the 10th grade were confirmed.
tiured, seated from left to right are: Brad
(ill, Judv Preefer, Melissa Kramer, Barry
\nt. Pictured, standing from left to right
Eric Slepp. Todd Shugarman, Rabbi
Howard Shapiro, Louis Okun, Jonathan
Glassman. Members of the Confirmation
Class wrote their own Service of
Confirmation in honor of- Shavuot and
conducted the Service in the midst of a
joyous and welcoming congregation.
TEMPLE ISRAEL
[)n Friday evening, July
Temple Israel will hold a
nmer Shabbat Dinner for
ispectivc members in
Lari/berg Hall at 6 p.m.
Libers of the Membership
Immittec and Officers of
1 Temple will be present to
Jkwer questions concerning
Imbership in Temple Israel.
Ibbi Howard Shapiro will
the blessings to welcome
bbbat and Susan Weiss,
ntorial soloist, will lead
Jkiddush and singing.
\itendance at the Shabbat
liner is b\ invitation only.
l\ou are interested in par-
Ipating, call the Temple
|icc for further informa-
kfter the Shabbat dinner,
nmer Services will be held
the Sanctuary. Rabbi
Howard Shapiro and Susan
Weiss wil be officiating and
during the service, Lauren
Lindsay Fishbane will receive
her Hebrew name.
TEMPLE JUDEA
During services on July 20,
Rabbi Joel Levine will pre-
view the "Elections in
Israel." Rabbi Levine will
discuss the two major
political parties, the Labor
and Likud and the new
Yachad party led by Ezer
Weitzman. He will suggest
how each political party
would affect the direction of
Israel's economy, relations
with the Palestinians, and
empathy towards minority
groups within Israel.
During services on July 27,
Rabbi Levine will offer a
modern interpretation of
Tisha B'Av, the traditional
Archaeologists Exploring Herod's Port Conclude
They Built Them Better In The Old Days
By HUGH ORGEL
EL AVIV (JTA) -
la-diving archaeologists
]"ing the submerged an-
port of Caesarea, south
|aifa, say it is a model of
w construction that
|d do credit to present
engineers. They also
t" it is older than the
years usually given it.
cent finds by the Inter-
Shamir
[Loses Voice
JUSALEM (JTA) -
s electioneering
*d to a whisper when
Principal campaigner.
Yitzhak Shamir,
"ly lost his voice.
wtly due to the strains
mPf'gn oratory. On a
?,,r!fh Tikva- hc was
("udible. Aides said the
*as soothing his
crds with tea and
: "as no time" to see
tier
pet
University and International
Caesarea Ancient Harbor
Excavations Project have
confirmed the existence of a
port which predates by at
least 200 years that built by
King Herod between 21 and 9
BCE. Herod, surnamed "The
Great," ruled over Judaea
from 37-4 BCE under Roman
tutelage.
THE SMALLER and older
port discovered by the
archaeologists is believed to
have served a Greek settle-
ment dating back to the
Second Century BCE.
Experts suggest that because
of the preexistence of a port,
Herod chose the site to build
his grand harbor named in
honor of the Roman
Emperor, Caesar Augusts.
Prof. Robert Hohlfelder of
the University of Colorado,
an associate director of
CAHEP, suggested that
Herod's decision may have
been partly political. He
wanted to build a facility
which was not in Roman-held
territory for the benefit of
gentiles on the same scale as
his construction for the Jews
in Jerusalem, Hohlfelder
said.
Herod's harbor is believed
to have been the first man-
made open seaport in the
world. Its construction was
completed in about 10 years.
There are two massive
breakwaters running out to
sea, forming a shelter that
could contain up to 300
ships. One of the breakwaters
was used for loading and
unloading cargoes and had
warehouses on its 70 meter
wide top.
DR. AVNER RABAN, of
Haifa University's Center for
Maritime Studies, said that if
the builders of Haifa port in
the 1930's and the port at
Ashdod in the 1950's had
used the same silt control
methods as HerodIs
engineers, many of tne
problems that plague those
ports today would have been
avoided.
Herod's men built a series
of cross channels to admit
silt-free sea water to the port
area.
Israel Is Life
Justin is the first place winner in the primary grade
category in the Israel Is Life Essay Contest sponsored by
the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County and the
Jewish Community Center in honor of Yom
Ha'Atzmaut, Israel Independence Day. Justin was a
student in the second grade at Temple Beth David
Religious School when he submitted this winning essay.
By JUSTIN MAZER
Israel is a very little piece of land and other people are
trying to take it over. The Israeli people are trying real
hard to save it. The boys and girls work very hard in the
army.
Hitler killed 6,000,000 Jews. I don't know how many
are left. Israel is so, so, so important to Jewish people.
It is our freedom.
In Israel, Jewish people can do so many things. Some
examples are studying the religion and sleeping without
thinking someone is going to kill them. No one will call
them names like "Jewish head" or "stupid Jew." No
one will be mean to you or throw things at you. Israel is
a special land for Jewish people all over.
Area Deaths
CHALSON
Carl, 83. of Normandy B-6S. King*
Point, Delray Beach. Riverside
Guardian Funeral Home. Weat Palm
Beach.
COHAN
Louis A., of Wellington K-282. Century
Village, Weat Palm Beach. Riverside
Guardian Funeral Home, Weat Palm
Beach.
COHEN
Max, 78. of Salisbury B-28, Century
Village. West Palm Beach. Riverside
Guardian Funeral Home, Weat Palm
Beach.
COHN
Harry, 8S. of 3400 N.E. First Lane,
Boynton Beach. Riverside Guardian
Plan Chapel. Weat Palm Beach.
GROSSMAN
Jennie, 88. of 117 Lake Frances Drive.
wiaTpalrn Beach Rlveralde Guardian
Plan Chapel, West Palm Beach.
day of mourning for the des-
truction of the first and
second Jerusalem Temples.
Since Tisha B'Av is observed
during the summer months,
this holy day rarely has the
same impact as other holy
days in the Jewish calendar.
Rabbi Levine will offer sug-
gestions on how the modern
Jew can meaningfully observe
Tisha B'Av.
Religious School registra-
tion is now open at Temple
Judea for students, four
years old through 10th grade.
Sheree Friedlander, Temple
Judea's new Director of
Education will be pleased to
explain the Temple's experi-
ential approach. Susan Wolf-
Schwartz is the new Youth
Director of Temple Judea.
More information about the
youth program is available
from the Temple office.
TEMPLE ISRAEL
RELIGIOUS SCHOOL
Would like you to consider joining their
teaching staff if you are an adult who has had
I experience dealing with teenagers.
IThis would be teaching on at 7th grade level
leach Sunday morning from 9:30 to noon.
I Knowledge of Hebrew is not required, but the
I unique ability to RELATE TO and have a
RESPECT FOR young people is a must.
Call Ceceil Tishman at 833-8421 for an ap-
Ipointment.
MON.-FRI. CHARLES L. OPPENHEIMER JR. CF.
8:30-5:30 n.a.r.d. certified fitter
SATURDAY LISA DOWN, R.N.
8:30-4:00 enterostomal therapist
ESTABUSED
1917
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One Phone Call Can Arrange For Any
Convalescent Equipment, Patient Aid, Health
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WE DELIVER
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TOTAL CARE is Simple and Direct...
The Only Number You Ever Need To Call
832-0100 WE BILL MEDICARE DIRECT
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VA/dri^OiT MEMORIAL
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FUNERAL DIRECTORS SINCE 1M>
7240 NORTH FEDERAL HIGHWAY- BOCA RATON
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Panei 12 Th .Towi.k v\~ia:___*_, _
Page 14 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Rprh p~*-. >^-J- *.....
Page 16 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Friday, July 20, 1984
VANTAGE
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That's Success!
Warning: The Surgeon General Has Determined
That Cigarette Smoking Is Dangerous to Your Health.

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9 mg. "tar" OJ mg. ntcotmt ML par cgjreite. FTC Report FEB. "84.


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