The Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian the voice of the Jewish community of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Running title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Physical Description:
4 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 8, no. 41 (Dec. 24, 1982)-v. 11, no. 26 (Aug. 30, 1985).
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44606415
lccn - sn 00229548
ocm44606415
System ID:
AA00014310:00067

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
THE VOICE OF f H A
THE JtW'SH
COMMUNITY OF
PALM BIACH
COUNTV
Jewish florid ian
vnillMP10-NUMBER22
PALM BEACH. FLORIDA
FRIDAY, JUNE 22,1984
PRICE 35 CENTS
Israel Money Woes to Hurt U.S. Aid Flow
By GIL. SEDAN
IjERUSAl .EM (JTA) -
Icretarv of Siate George
lulu has earned the Israeli
Lrnmcni thai without a
nificani effort to solve the
untn''- economic problems,
Ln ai the cos I of reduced
ling standards, U.S. aid to
f,e) could be endangered.
,t Minister Moshe
I ffho mei with Shult/
[ Washington lasl month,
Llosed the \merican view
[en he briefed the Cabinet
ndav on his latest visit to
I l.S. Ihc Reagan Admin-
bation seems most
kerned with Israel's
Jaring inflation rate. Israel
Idio repotted ihat Wash-
fclon has asked the.govern-
jjnt for a detailed plan of
L it intends to restrain
inflation.
In the Knesset, MK Amnon
Rubinstein of the opposition
Shinui faction, called for an
urgent debate over the Amer-
ican warnings and over the
surprise resignations of two
senior Treasury officials. Dr.
Emanuel Sharon quit as
director general of the
Finance Ministry last week.
Shortly afterwards,
Mordechai Frankl, senior
economic adviser to the
Ministry, stepped down amid
charges that the government
was abandoning its tough
anti-inflation policies to gain
the good will of voters in
next month's Knesset
elections.
SHARON WAS promptly
replaced by Nissim Baruch,
Premier Yitzhak Shamir's
Shultz Said to Have Warned Arens
Inflation Problem Must Be Solved
economic adviser. But the
two resignations exposed to
the public a growing sense of
uncase among some ranking
Treasury officials that the
government is indulging in
"election economics." Some
officials have charged that
election campaigns considera-
tions prevailed over economic
prudence when the govern-
ment recently agreed to
generous wage hikes for
regular soldiers and police-
men. They are expected to
trigger new wage demands
from other sectors.
The government meanwhile
was faced with an ultimatum
from Histadrut to resume
negotiations for new overall
wage agreements. The trade
union federation said it
would otherwise withdraw
from the collective bargaining
process and force the govern-
ment to deal individually with
each union representing its
employees. Baruch, the new
director general of the
Finance Ministry, is expected
to sit down with Histadrut
officials in the next few days.
Secretary Shultz
ten's B&P Mission to Israel
Ties Renewed With Jewish Homeland
ly LOUISE ROSS
issislanl News Coordinator
The upcoming Israeli elec-
lns. the economy and the
bt Bank settlements are
lemost on the minds of
laelis, according to thirteen
liincss and professional
In who recently visited that
Vntr\ on an eighl day fact-
ding mission sponsored by
Jewish Federation of
^m Beach ( ounty.
he misMo, |ej by Barry
h. Har\e\ (ioldberg and
" Siskin and staffed by
lui! Kleiner. campaign
Jcior, gave the participants
I opportunity u, meet with
fe horn all walks of
Fsociety from
P>Pn and Iranian
fpanis ,0 business
pro and politicians.
remission strengthened
Justness & Professional
f on (of the Federation's
m umPaign) started last
year by providing it with a
solid base of support," stated
Berg, an accountant. "This
has been the first of what will
hopefully be an annual B&P
men's mission to Israel. We
promoted a greater under-
standing within our
community of Israel's needs
and motivated people who
had previously not been
heavily involved in Jewish
communal activities to
become more involved."
Siskin, a business man who
has been to Israel several
times previously, felt a great
joy in leading this particular
mission. "It was enjoyable to
see the change in the six first
timers, to observe their reac-
tions and to see how they
accepted Israel with a dif-
ferent feeling than before,"
he said.
Goldberg, an accountant
and a first time visitor to
Israel, was greatly impressed
with the physical nature of
the country and the warmth
of the people. "I felt that I
belonged there," he said. "I
have a better perspective now
of what's happening and I
have been brought closer to
the people of Israel and their
needs."
Louis Silber, an attorney
who got in his morning
exercise by jogging up
Masada in a world record
time of 22 minutes, had been
to Israel before. He was
primarily interested in talking
with the people to better
understand the problems
confronting them.
"There is no question that
the people are much more
divided politically," Silber
said. He indicated that issues
such as the war and mas-
sacres in Lebanon, the
terrorist activity perpetrated
Continued on Page 8
Some of the participants in the Men's Business and
Professional Mission to Israel pause by a wall in Masada.
Pictured [left to right] are Barry Berg, Mission co-leader; Jay
lacknin, Phillip Siskin, mission co-leader, Sid Kulick and Bob
Gross.
Wy Birthday,
Marian
jwdiand family help
'"Wh birthday. Paga 3.
Volunteers
R*ognixed
i*,,,oluntttJra
5pplay
nrnia Company Loses Bid
U.S. Buys Israeli-Made Spy Planes
By London Chronicle Syndicate
WASHINGTON In a major development
which could have far-reaching implications for
Israeli military exports, Israel has managed to
outbid a large American arms manufacturer and
will be selling sophisticated reconnaissance aircraft
to the United States Navy and Marine Corps.
According to U.S. officials, the aircraft, known
as remote pilotless vehicles RPVs were suc-
cessfully employed by Israel during the war in
Lebanon in the summer of 1982 to destroy Syrian
surface-to-air missile batteries, as well as for other
military purposes.
The mini-RPVs carry a television camera which
provides information to a ground control station.
THE AIRCRAFT are very difficult to detect by
enemy radar because they are very small and con-
tain very little metal, as they are made of an ad-
vanced plastic material.
Releasing details of the sale. U.S. officials said
that Israel had managed to defeat an American
company, Development Sciences Inc. (DSI), of
California, which also makes a mini-RPV, known
as the Sky-Eye.
The American Navy and Marine Corps were said
to have decided that the Israeli version was
preferable.
For nearly 10 years, the U.S. Army has been
trying to develop its own more sophisticated mini-
RPV system the Aquila.
HOWEVER, a recent U.S. Government
Accounting Office report severely criticized the
project for incurring enormous cost overruns and
repeated delays. The Aquila is not now expected to
be operational until 1986 at the earliest.
Continued on Pae 4


ruuH /~/.

Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Palm *^ Ogmft Friday. June 22, 1984
Midrasha Holds
2nd Graduation
Citing an 80 percent
growth in enrollment and the
inclusion of the confirmation
programs of three synagogues
Karen Kosowski
as an integral part of the
curriculum, Ann Lynn
Lipton, Jewish education
director of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County, welcomed graduates,
parents and guests to the
second graduation of
Midrasha-Judaica High
School held recently at the
Merkaz of the Jewish Com-
munity Day School.
Dr. Paul Klein, chairman
of the Midrasha Sub-
Committee of the Jewish
Federation, challenged the
graduates to continue their
involvement in the Jewish
community by preparing
themselves to be the future
leaders. "The real challenge
for you is just beginning.
What you have started today,
by graduating, is just the first
Continued on Page 7



1 wF .. IIIMI li.



m
^r
1
m ^*r *
~-
I.../
Ann Lynn Liplon [right] %* *>*
presents the Midrasha Award J| JJ KSSftfiS
for Excellence in Literature aid gjjjg1* Fr.ti,
History to Mini Postal. Pa,m Beach Cu'y-
Eric Weiss, as
Mendele the book-
seller, wove the
story of "The
World of Sholom
Aleichem" through-
out the three-act
drama presented at
Midrasha graduation
by the drama class.
midrasha
judaica
high school
Palm Beach County. Florida
Dr. Paul Klein, chair__
the Midrasha Sub-coma*.
of the Jewish Federatioil
J Palm Beach County.
Melanie Schonberg
Sharon Slomowitz
Eric Matheson [left) receives the Midrasha
Award for Excellence in Judaic Studies from
Ann Lynn Lipton.
Florence Wacks [right] presents
Scholarship Award to Shin
Slomowitz on behalf of the Nitioi
Council of Jewish Women.
Community Graduations
JCC Pre-Schoolers
Receive Diplomas
Cameras clicked and VCRs
whirled as 36 pre-schoolers
from the Karen Orr Pre-
school of the Jewish Com-
JCC Pre-school gradaates
look apprehensive bat happy
as they begin their march to
I the itage for graduation
Z exercises.
munity Center wearing white
caps with tassels received
their diplomas recently
amidst an overflowing crowd
of proud parents and grand-
parents at the JCC. Gail
Kressal, pre-school director,
presented them with a
diploma, a kiss and congra-
tulations on achieving their
first educational plateau.
Earlier the graduates
showed their abilities by
singing four songs complete
with hand motions. In
addition a slide show was
presented by teachers Shirley
Duffy, Pamela Jamieson and
Beverly Roos highlighting the
children's participation in
activities throughout the year.
The 1984 graduating class
of the Karen Orr Pre-school
of the Jewish Community
Con tinned oa Page 4
The graduating class of 1984: seated [left to right] Seth Werlinsky,, Eric
Kuril, Gregg Tartakow, Mark Krischer, Brian Ray and Mark LeJbo*"-
Standing, second row [left to right] David Millet, Ala* Tebonl, Mark Kirsci.
Jeffrey Schimelman, Ronald Greenfield and Alan Pariser. Standing, rear ro
[left to right] Shnri Cohen, Jessica Roth. Rachel Pevsner, Kara Glkk
Tamara Virshnp.
JCDS Marks Graduation
and Award Night
Gail Kressal. JCC Pre-school director, congratulates each
youngster while presenting them with their diploma.
Graduates, parents, and
members of the general
community shared in the
graduation of the eighth
grade students of the Jewish
Community Day, School
Thursday, May 31, in the
school's Merkaz. In addition
promotion certificates were
awarded to the ninth grade
students.
Each graduate, presented
remarks pertaining to "The
Spirit Of Lire" Ruach Ha-
Chayim. The following
awards lor recognition were
presented to graduates who
were selected by the faculty
to meet the criteria of the
specific award.
HYMAN AND CAROL
ROBERTS AWARD for
Outstanding Scholarship in
Judaic Studies presented by
Dr. Hyman Roberts to Shari
Cohen; RABBI DR.
WILLIAM H. SHAPIRO
MEMORIAL AWARD for
Service to the Jewish People
and Scholarship in Jewish
and Secular Studies,
presented by Rabbi Joel
Chazin to Alan PtfJJ;
A. MORTON AWi
presented by M*
Morton; lor
Hebrew Language *
Achievement m
Krischer; for ,
Hebrew Language 1
Achievement J
for excelling iniMjjg
Kara Click; lor *
Mathematics M
Krischer; fj^sfcl
excellence in Crcau
- Mark Krischer.
C^Unued o.P*H


Women's Division B&P Group
Friday, June 22, 1984/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 3
Formulates Plans To
Involve More Women
Enthusiasm was the key
word as over 25 women met
for this vear's first Business
and Professional Women's
firoup Steering Committee
meeting held recently. The
,roup, representing women
aj,h varied occupations and
sponsored by the Women*
Division of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County, began to formulate
plans for the upcoming year's
activities under the chairman-
ship of Penny Beers,
Women's Division vice
president for B&P.
In commenting on the
success of the meeting Mrs.
Beers said, "I am very
pleased with the high level of
enthusiasm displayed at this
initial Steering Committee
meeting. The women are
anxious to takle the various
appointments that they have
been given for the year. We
expect a lot of creativity and
excitement for our meetings,
publications and events."
According to Mrs. Beers
great strides have been made
toward the main goal this
year of actively involving
more women in the activities
of the B&P Group by
broadening the base of the
Steering Committee. Sub-
committees have been formed
to bring more programs and
services to the members.
Among these are the publica-
tion of a newsletter three
times during the year,
participation in the Women's
B&P Mission to Israel
October 28-November 7,
active involvement in a
campaign event and the
compiling of a new directory
containing the women's
occupations for all the
members.
Helping to make the B&P
Women's Group a most
viable organization this year
are the following sub-
committee chairpersons and
steering committee members:
Leslie Adams, member at
large; Roxanne Axelrod,
publicity; Toby Chabon, net-
working; Ellie Halperin, chair
designate; Melanie Coleman
Jacobson, campaign; Amy
Jonas, program; Lorie
Mesches, membership, Dr.
Norma Schulman, education;
Jill Shaw, membership,
Cheryl R. Simmons, news-
letter and Dr. Linda Werner,
networking.
Members of the Steering
Committee who serve on the
various committees are Judy
Adelson, Ruth Berman, Shari
Brenner, Nina Sue Brookner,
Linda Sue Chazin, Linda
Cohen, Rhoda Cole, Jacki
Dwoskin, Debbie Fields, Dr.
Florence Kaslow, Florence
Needle, Debra Levy Neimark,
Susan Wolf-Schwartz and
Robin Stein.
The B&P Women's Group
was created in order to meet
the growing needs of the vast
number of highly capable and
creative Jewish career women
now living in the Palm
Beaches. An opportunity to
network with one another is
provided at the regular
monthly meetings.
The opening dinner
meeting of the 1984-85 year
will be held on Wednesday,
September 5. Business and
professional women are
invited to call Lynne Ehrlich,
Women's Division director,
at the Federation office, 832-
2120, to have their names
added to the mailing list for
notification of upcoming
events.
Mb Halperin [standing, left]. Women's Division Business
ind Professional Women's Group chair designate, and Penny
J"* [standing, right], Women's Division vice president for
W, discuss plans for the upcoming year with members of
"(Meenag Committee at a recent meeting.
Th K,m.Jienlerl b,ows oat ,he ""dies
Snth r Kr,hday ,?ke as her daughter,
Ruth Bernbaum, [right] and her Jreat-
granddaughter, Sasha Skinner [left], help
her celebrate her 100th birthday.
First Centenarian Resident
Celebrates Birthday At Morse
By LOUISE ROSS
Assistant News Coordinator
Anna Bloom, who
celebrated her 100th birthday
June 10 at the Morse
Geriatric Center, recognized
everybody who came to greet
her. "She is in great shape,"
said her daughter, Esther
Barrish of West Palm Beach.
"She doesn't feel her age and
told me with a twinkle in her
eye, 'I think my children
were born before me.' "
Mrs. Barrish remembers
that her mother was a terrific
cook and great homemaker.
"She had great rapport with
all her children," related
Mrs. Barrish.
Kosowski Elected
To 3rd Term
As JF&CS President
The Board of Directors of
the Jewish Family and Chil-
dren's Service of Palm Beach
County, Inc., held their final
meeting of the year on Mon-
day, May 21. The officers
elected for 1984-85 were:
President, Nathan
Kosowski; First Vice Presi-
dent, David R. Schwartz;
Second Vice President, Linda
B. Kalnitsky; Secretary,
Suzanne Smith; Treasurer,
Charles B. Green.
Also elected for their first
full one-year term were:
Ellen Bovarnick, Martin
Farber, Richard Flah, Stanley
Hyman, Alfred Libby, PhD.
Elected for a two-year term
was:
Ruth Horen
In addition, three special
presentations were made.
Two board members, Ruth
Kirshner and Adele Sayles
finished 10 years of board
membership and were pre-
sented with plaques acknowl-
edging them as "Bonah
Kehillah" (community
builders)). "Their presence
on the JF & CS Board from
1974-84 contributed greatly to
the development of the
agency," stated Nathan
Kosowski, president.
Continuing his membership
on the board, but stepping
down after 10 years' service
in his capacity as treasurer,
was Harry Lerner. Lerner
was presented a plaque ac-
knowledging his dedicated
Mrs. Bloom turned 100 on
June 6 but since her birthday
fell on Shavuot, the party
was postponed until the
following Sunday. Relatives
came from all over the
country to share this day with
her including three children,
eight grandchildren and seven
great-grandchildren.
Her oldest granddaughter,
Cathy Leuchtman, was there
and so was her youngest,
Shasha Skinner, three, who
helped great-grandmother
blow out the candles on her
cake.
Mrs. Bloom, who was born
in Russia, came to America
with her family in 1902. Five
years later she married
Morris Bloom and lived in
Michigan until they retired to
Florida in 1949. Her husband
died six years later.
Mrs. Bloom continued to
live by herself in Miami
Beafh until she broke her hip
last year. Needing daily
therapy, she went to live in a
nursing center in Fort
Lauderdale which was the
closest kosher facility to West
Palm Beach. When the Morse
Geriatric Center opened last
year, she was one of the first
residents.
According to Mrs. Barrish
the move has been positive
for her mother. "She has
gained weight and is doing
fantastic. She enjoys it here."
Mrs. Bloom, who plays
games twice a week and
participates in many other
activities at the Center, is
very alert for her age. Her
only problem, her daughter
says, is that she is hard of
hearing and is confined to a
wheelchair since she broke
her hip.
Friends and volunteers of
the Center presented Mrs.
Bloom with a plaque in
honor of her special day and
she also received a birthday
card from President Reagan.
Florida senators and
congressmen sent her greet-
ings while Palm Beach
County Commissioner Peggy
Evatt stopped by to person-
ally congratulate her.
The celebration was
marked by champagne, hot
hors d'oeuvres, the chocolate
frosted birthday cake,
singing, dancing and the love
of all her relatives and
friends. The Center's first
100th birthday party will be
remembered for some time to
come.
I^rii. r*0men attended the first Women's Division BAP
htfrinrnmm",ec netting this year comprising the largest -. 4. a
"' Coramiuw in the history of the group. Continued on Page 6
West
Palm Beach
Community
Leader Dies
Joseph Molat
Joseph Molat, an active member of the West Palm
Beach community, died June 5 at his West Palm Beach
home. He was 89.
Throughout his retirement years, he was an active
member of over 40 communal organizations. He was a
board member of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County and the Joseph L. Morse Geriatric Center where he
was a member of the Admissions Committee.
In addition Molat was a board member of B'nai
B'rith Century Lodge of West Palm Beach, Cen Tech,
Century Village Visually Handicapped Club of which he
was a charter member, Century Village Yiddish Culture
Club, Palm Beach County State of Israel Bonds,
Congregation Anshei Sholom and the Palm Beach
County Blue Cross Blue Shield.
As a member of the Advisory Council for Bene-
ficiaries for Blue Cross Blue Shield, he initiated the
Molat Program which assists people in receiving the
maximum benefits to which they were entitled.
Molat was a former board member and patron of the
Continued m Page IS


Pa*e 4 Tbe Jewish Flnridien nf Palm tt-ri. County /Friday. June 22, 1984
Youth
**r
Second Part of A Series
The story of Youth Aliyah
echoes one of the most
dramatic periods in Jewish
history. Every upheaval in
the Diaspora, every wave of
immigration to Israel has
been addressed by Youth
Aliyah one child at a
time.
During its 50-year history,
Youth Aliyah has developed
and expanded its programs
and facilities with funds
received from the United
Jewish Appeal through the
Jewish Agency. Today, over
90 percent of Youth Aliyah's
$52 million budget comes
from UJA-commumiy cam-
paigns and from similar
campaigns conducted by
Keren Hayesod worldwide.
By RONNIE M. HORN
With the influx in 1948-
1950 of more than 6,000
youngsters from North
Africa, for example. Youth
Aliyah had to change both its
methodology and goals.
Parents still in reception
centers and ma'abarot (tem-
porary settlements) entrusted
their children to Youth
Aliyah for the head start they,
could not hope to give them
otherwise. Youth Aliyah was
no longer replacing a non-
existent family unit, but had
the delicate responsibility of
maintaining a link between
parents who retained their
old culture and children who
were becoming acclimated to
Israel's democratic and
technological society.
Traditonally reared in
strongly authoritarian set-
tings, Moroccan children
weren't prepared for Youth
Aliyah's democratic, group-
oriented style. Nor were they
or their families satisfied with
the program's emphasis on
collective life and agricultural
work. New teaching techni-
ques had to be devised to en-
courage increased self-discip
line and self-directed learning.
\i the same time, with
generous support recevied
from UJ \ campai
Hadassah, WIZO, Mizrachi
and Pioneer Women, the
program was broadened to
offer new educational and
career options. Equipment
was purchased, and courses
in industrial machinery, con-
struction, secretarial skills,
auto and aircraft, mechanics,
printing, physical education
and electronics were intro-
duced.
Since the late 1960's,
Youth Aliyah's major focus
has been on Israel's children
from disadvantaged neigh-
borhoods or from problem
and broken homes chil-
dren whose emotional, be-
havioral or learning diffi-
culties require extra support
before they can build produc-
tive, successful lives.
The Jewish Agency's con-
cern for Israel's disadvan-
taged found programmatic
expression as early as 1941,
when Henrietta Szold
U.S. Buys Israeli-Made Spy Planes
Continued
One American expert noted
that the successful Israeli
company, Tadiran, had
developed its mini-RPV
the Mastiff for some $35
million in the years
immediately following the
1973 Yom Kippur War.
The Pentagon has budgeted
about $106 million for the
Aquila project this year
alone.
Israel Aircraft Industries
also makes a mini-RPV, the
Scout, which is used by the
Israeli Air Force. The Army
uses the Mastiff.
IN RECENT YEARS,
Israel has been actively
promoting military exports to
the U.S., until now with very
little success.
In March, 1979, Ezer
Weinman, the then Israeli
Defense Minister, signed an
agreement with Harold
Brown, the then U.S.
Defense Secreatry, to
facilitate Israel military sales
to America.
Since then, the Americans
have given repeated
assurances that they would be
purchasing some $210 million
worth of arms from Israel.
Until recently, however,
Israeli officials have been
from Page 1
deeply disappointed at the
slowness of the process.
Well-informed U.S.
officials said that Israel had
some advanced, battle-tested
equipment in addition to
the RPVs which had
attracted considerable interest
at the Pentagon.
Pre-Schoolers
Continued from Page 2-
Center consists of the follow-
ing: Michael Adler, Raphael
Bensimon, Marci Brooke
Eric Cohen, Li/a Dardashti,
Timothy Fine, Seth Scherer,
Jonathan Goldberg, Heather
Greenhill, Darren Hirsowit/,
Joy Kahlenberg, Joel
Kaminester, Janine Katzen,
Marissa Ka>, Michael
Kennedy, David Klein, Laura
Klein, Alissa Koerner,
Matthew Kotzen, Matthew
Kwasman, Jamie Manners,
Aaron Moskowitz, Natasha
Rafi, Larry Schcin, Philip
Scherer, Seth Scherer, Adam
Schwartz, Sydney Schweiger,
David Shapiro, Jeffrey
Sheiman, Monica Shore,
Autumn Singer, Seth Smith,
Meghaan Wagner, Danny
Wolmer and Lauren Yeckes.
the
Jewish floridian
of Maim Beacn County
Combining Our Voice ano Federation Reporter
FREDK SMOCMET SUZANNE SMOCMET RONNI EPSTEIN
Editor and PuBiisher Eiecutie Editor News Coordinator
PuOiiahed Wfklf October througn Mid April Bi Weekly balance of year
Second Class Pottage Paid at Boca Raton. Fia USPS #069030
PALM BEACH BOCA RATON OFFICE
2200 N Federal Hwy Suite 206 Boca Raton Fia 33432 Phone 368 2001
Mam Office 4 Plant 120NE 6tn St Miami Ft 33101 Phone 1373 4605
PoetmaslerrWturnlorm 35'tto Jewish Fioridisn. P.O. Boi01 7J. Miami Fia 3)101
Aeverihwrhj Director Si.ci lesser Phone Set 1(62
_ Comomed Jewish Appeal Jewien Federation ol Palm Beech County, inc Oiticer j President Jeanne
""Levy Vice President!. Peter Cummmgs. Alec Engeisiem Arnold Lamped. Myron j Nickman Barbara
Tanem. Secretary Or Elizabeths Freilich. Treaiurer. Alwn Wilentky Submit material to Ronm
Epstein Director o' Public Relations. SOI South Fiagler Or. West Palm Beach, fl 33401
Jewish Floridian does not guarantee Kasnrutn ot Merc andise Advertised
SUBSCRIPTION RATES Local Area $4 Annual (2 Year Minimum 17 SOi or by membership Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach County SOI S FiagierD- West Palm Beach Fia 33401 Phone 832
2120 Oul Of Town Upon Request
organized Youth Aliyah's
"Town-to-Country" project.
Idle, underprivileged teen-
agers were taken from city
slums and overcrowded
immigrant settlements and
placed in healthy environ-
ments for learning and
growth.
To further meet the needs
of young .people whose recent-
immigrant or impoverished
and cultural!) limned families
still live ui development
(owns, Youth Aliyah lias
opened non residential
centers which provide a wide
variety ol vocational training,
social and cultural programs.
I here are now 21 commu-
nity-based centers rescuing
more than 2,000 youngsters
from aimless si reel lives, drug
involvement and the func-
tional illiteracy that makes
army service impossible and
forecloses career options.
Through the 1970's and
80's, the "face" of Youth
Aliyah has changed several
more times. We think of
9,000 children from the
Soviet Union, confused by
freedom and searching for
authentic Jewish roots; over
1,000 youngsters from Iran,
desperately worried about
families left behind and,
most recently, 400 Ethiopian
children, eagerly traversing a
centuries-long culture gap in
two short years.
No wonder Youth Aliyah
doesn't look its age. Its
image is always the face of its
newest student; its reality an
evolving, dynamic program.
Whatever needs emerge
among Israel's children,
whatever winds and currents
sweep across the Diaspora,
Youth Aliyah at 50 is ready
to be a secure home, an
avenue to self-fulfillment, an
enriched environment for
learning and growth.
The story of Youth Aliyah
will be continued in the next
issue.
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L'CHAYIM Sunday, June 24 and July 1, 7:30
m WPBR 1340-AM with host Rabbi Mark S.
Golub The Jewish Listener's Digest, a radio
magazine.
JEWISH MUSIC AND CULTURE HOUR -
Sunday, June 24 and July 1, 6 p.m. WHRS-FM
<-lere0 9i with host Dr. Simon Silverman.
SHALOM Sunday, June 24 and July 1, 10 a.m.
WPEC Channel 12 (8:30 a.m. ON TV Channel 51)
with host Richard Peritz.
INSIDE STORY Friday, June 29, 9 p.m.
WHRS-TV "Timmerman: The News from
Argentina." Timmerman visits editors and government
officials to assess the state of freedom of the press in
Argentina.
VIEWPOINT Saturday, June 30, 7:30 p.m.
WPBT Channel 2 A panel discussion on current
South Florida issues with leading community religious
leaders from the Catholic, Protestant and Jewish faiths.
* Sponsored by the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County.
Friday. June 22, 1984/The Jewish Fioridian of Pata'Beach County Page 6
1
Leaders from this area
receatly attended the Asso-
ciation of Jewish Family aad
Children's Agencies' confer-
ence la New York City.
Pictured above with Irving
Co ha [third from left], presi-
dent of the AJF and CA, are
[left to right] Esther
Kosowski; Nathan Kosowski,
president Jewish Family and
Children's Service of Palm
Beach County, Inc.; aad
Stephea Levitt, executive
director of JF aad CS.
State of Israel Bonds
Of Palm Beach County
Board of Governors
Extends sympathy to the family of
Joseph Molat
pioneer in the Israel Bond drive
in Palm Beach County.
Gerald Lesher,
Chairman
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Retirement
Lifestyle
Jewish Family and Chil-
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This workshop will consist of
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the final sesison. Workshop
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MSW. Pre-regist ration and
pre-payment of $15 is re-
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Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Friday. June 22. 1984
Anti-Terrorist Safeguards
Urged For Stingers


THE *IR CONDITIONED
NEW YORK The
American Jewish Committee
cautioned the United States
Government to devise strong
safeguards to assure that the
Stinger anti-aircraft weapons
the U.S. is selling to Saudi
Arabia do not fall into
terrorist hands.
In a statement issued by
Howard I. Friedman, AJC
National President, and Leo
Ne\as, Chairman of AJC's
International Relations Com-
mission, the human relations
agenc) stressed that it shared
the government's wish to
preserve freedom of shipping
in the Persian Gulf and to
protect internationally-needed
oil installations there. Never-
theless, the statement said,
the agency was "deeply
concerned" because of
"documented evidence that
previous American-supplied
arms to Saudi Arabia found
their way into the arsenals of
the Palestine Liberation
Organization."
"in announcing the sale of
400 mobile Stinger missiles."
the AJC message continued,
"the State Department
declared that "Saudi Arabia
has agreed to strict safe-
guards to insure the security
ol the missiles.'
"We call upon the
Administration to devise
practical. on-the-ground
arrangements to monitor
Saudi compliance with these
pro\isions."
Nathan Kosowski [left], pres-
ident Jewish Family and
Children's Service, recognizes
Harry Lerner for his ten
years of dedicated service as
treasurer at the final meeting
of the board of directors of
the JF and CS.
Adele Sayles [left] and Ruth
Kirshner received plaques
which designated them as
community builders for their
committed service which
contributed greatly to the
development of JF and CS.
Kosowski Elected
Continued from Page 3
and unceasing service to the
agency.
Other members of the
1984-85 board are: Ann
Blicher, Evelyn Blum,
Lyncttc Feldman, Osna
Goodlricnd, Murray Kern,
Staci Lesser, Rose Schwartz,
Dr. Norman Silversmith,
I enora v\ alkover.
I he agencj 's first meeting
lor Us upcoming fiscal year
will be Sept. 17.
At the same time, AJC
also urged the Administration
to "reexamine its policy of
repeatedly acceding to
massive Saudi arms requests
without any reciprocal action
by Saudi Arabia to support
American efforts to bring
peace and stability to the
Middle East."
The statement also admon-
ished the government not to
provide Saudi Arabia with
the bomb racks it has
requested for F-15 aircraft.
"Not only would this be in
violation of express assur-
ances provided to the U.S.
Congress," the statement
said, "but it would convert
the F-15 from a defensive
fighter to an offensive
bomber. enabling Saudi
Arabia to escalate the Persian
Gulf conflict, or, moie likely,
to strike against Israel."
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Midrasha Graduation
Friday, June 22, 1984/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 7
Educator of the Year.
in keeping Judaism strong,
Ihe said.
Ms Lipton notcd that
lalt'hough the graduation class
IS ,984 was small, it had a
' deal of quality. "You
lour years ago to
that make^
Isiaried
Ifornc the road
Kasha *hat it is today,
|she stated.
Accepting their diplomas
Nathan Kosowski,
the Education
of the Jewish
were Karen
Melanie Ann
and Sharon
Wendy Wagner
attend graduation
her diploma
Continued from Pag* 2
Slomowitz by Mrs. Florence
Wacks, NCJW scholarship
chairperson.
Esther Zaretsky, who has
taught Jewish Law at
Midrasha since its inception,
was recognized as Midrasha
"The World of Sholom
Aleichem," directed by
Midrasha drama instructor
Gary Kessler with a cast of
Midrasha drama students,
made its debut. The three-act
drama is written by Arnold
Perl and produced by special
arrangement with the
Dramatist Play Service, Inc.,
New York, NY.
Student actors included
Paul Tochner, Kim Kapncr,
Barry Grant, Eric Slepp,
Alissa Debs, Mitch Levy,
Shoshie Chazin, Julie
Sakson, Rachel Pomerance,
Karen Kosowski, Steve
Jacoby, Randy Leipzig,
Robin Kandel, Roneet
Weingarten, Melanie
Schonberg, Jason Glick,
Edward Steinhoff, Robert
Kirschner, Julie Littky, Jill
Cohn, Merrie Burman, Jeff
Tochner and Jennifer
Friedman.
Backstage assistance was
provided by Edward
Steinhoff, Jill Cohn, Orit
Sacks, Jennifer Friedman,
Eric Weiss, Jason Glick, Julie
Sakson, Shoshie Chazin and
Gail Moir.
Ifrom
chairman 01
Icommittee
Federation,
Kosowski,
ichonberg
Blomowitz.
jld not
and received
fterwards.
k|s Kosowski,
aledictorian of the 1984
-North Shore Community
liifh School class, served as
lu-ar hook editor and presi-
dent of the Keyettes. In
Edition she was active in the
Perish community as youth
Coordinator for Super
Sunday, involved in all
privities at Midrasha,
Counselor at Camp Shalom
tnd went on a USY
ilgrimage to Israel last
kummer. She will be
Emending the University of
Pennsylvania-
Ms. Schonberg graduated
Ifrom Forest Hill High School
nhcre she was on the Student
Council lor four years, a
member of the National
Honor Society and active in
Ihe Drama Club. She parti-
lipaied in Super Sunday and
t> involved in USY activities.
k will attend the University
I Miami.
\ graduate ol i"in Lakes
jligh School, Ms Slomowitz
r>o> a library, aide and a
lumber ol the hoys line team.
She was a counselor ai Camp
Shalom and participated in a
Matilda lour to Israel last
lumnicr. She will be
liicndinu Palm Beach Junior
follcgc m ihe fall.
Ms. Wagnei also graduated
Irom h\ui | akes High
Ichool where she was a
tcniher ol ihe Debate learn
pd the Computer Club.
Kctive in Super Sunday and
tM. she look part in a USY
Pilgrimage lo Israel this past
miner.
I Midrasha students were
po recognized lor excellence
Ihe following areas:
Hebrew Alissa Debs and
psliall Bro/ost.
j Judaic Studies -
pMhcson.
Jwish Issues Sharon
NlOWll/,
Hne ,\r,s Lric Weiss,
Jderail; Merrie Burman,
Jiaciress; Mitch Levy, best
fc- ,and Literature -
Eric
\
Postal.
, Wt ihe National
Pliable a scholarship
JpW the efforts of a
fc Eft* ThC
award was
Sharon
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Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County /Friday, June 22, 1984
Men's B&P Mission to Israel: Ties Rne^ved_l^*|^ Jwlgta ^Homeland
Resting on top of Masada are [left to right]
Bob Gross; Jeff Jacknin; Harvey Goldberg,
mission
Silber.
co-leader;
Jacknin and Louis
Continued from Page 1
by a fanatical Jewish faction
against Arabs within Israel
and the differing philosophies
on the settlements have
prompted heated discussions
among Israelis on which road
to follow.
"The country is divided on
values which has become a
traumatic situation for them.
Things used to be black and
white but are much more
complicated now," Silber
said.
Norman Landerman, a com-
puter marketing representative
who studied in Israel for a
year in 1972, observed a
welcome change in Israel's
attitudes. "In 1972 the
victory of 1957 was most
recent and Israelis looked at
themselves as invincible. Now
since the Yom Kippur War
and the war in Lebanon, they
are more willing to take
outside factors into
consideration. I see this atti-
tude change as positive."
One of the highlights for
the majority of the parti-
cipats was a meeting with
Simcha Dinit/. former
ambassador to the U.S. and
presentl> a Labor member ot
Knesset. He presented a briet
overview of the major issues
and stayed an extra hour to
answer questions in what the
men characterized as "a very
candid manner."
"] wasn't familiar with
Israeli politics and internal
social problems," stated Bob
Gross, an attorney who had
not been to Israel before. "It
I had gi a tourist, 1
wouldn't have leaned so
much.
Gross was impressed with
the diversity ot the people in
Israel, the historical perspec-
tive of the country and the
kibbut/ as an institution. "I
was amazed how the kibbut/
exerts influence in Israel
beyond the number of people
living there. For example, a
great number of leaders come
from the kibbutz movement
which is out of proportion to
their three percent of the
population," he said. He
characterized the mission as
being the best experience he
has had next to getting
married.
Another first timer,
attorney Gary Zwickel, also
was not so knowledgeable
about politics in Israel before
he went. "Now 1 see how
politics affect the day to day
life of the people. It really
was a fantastic trip. It left me
feeling optimistic about the
future of Israel because of
the power of its people."
This feeling of optimism
was underscored for the
mission members by a visit to
the Dead Sea Works where
they held discussions with its
director, Shlomo Drori. The
men learned that within the
next ten years, Israel will
become one of the major
producers of pesticides and
fertilizers in the world. At
that time hunger will be the
number one problem in the
world, not oil. Israel will
then be in a position to cure
world famine at the turn of
the century, thereby helping
also to solve its own
economic problems.
In addition to helping
Israel financially, Louis
Silber believes that the
Middle East political situa-
tion will be eased from these
kinds of endeavors. He noted
that Israel would like to give
By MARILYN GRANT,
Project Renewal Coordinator
Some people in this world of ours give far more than
their fair share.
Twenty-one year old, Elisha, dressed in his IDF
uniform, stood before a group of young men from Palm
Beach, a Young Business Leadership Mission who had
come to visit their community in Israel, Hod Hasharon's
two Project Renewal neighborhoods, Giora and Gil
AmaJ. We were in the Ellie and Herb Katz Youth Club
in the Giora neighborhood and Elisha was telling us
about the activities which take place for youngsters from
five to 20. It was indeed an impressive program, ranging
from sports, arts and crafts, all kinds of interest groups
a small library and a very extensive tutoring program.
What is Elisha's part in all of this? And why do we
single him out? He works with marginal youth, those
kids who neither work nor study, and for many of them,
visits from police and probationary officers make up a
good part of the week's activities. Elisha is a big
brother, an interceding friend, an enabler, a doer, an
example.
Elisha was doing his regular three year army service
and was stationed with his unit in Lebanon. There he
was seriously wounded. After his long period of
hospitalization, he was told that he should continue his
recuperation at home. But Elisha had other ideas. He
wasn't going to sit at home.
And so, Elisha, from a middle class Ashkenazi family
from Jerusalem, found his place in Giora working with
the kids and making an impact greater than anyone
could have imagined.
Palm Beach's Mission, made up of young men not
much older than Elisha, saw a great deal in Israel. They
saw Project Renewal at work and came away
impressed. But the example of Elisha, who is giving far
more than his share, will perhaps leave a greater
impression. We all wish Elisha a speedy recovery. No
matter what happens, the neighborhood will be richer
from his having chosen Hod Hasharon as the place to
recuperate rather than his bed.
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Friday, June 22, 1984/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page*
L technology to Jordan
Lh will make that country
\Tnumber one Arab power
' ten years. Since it has
, "egr U;ng Jgdj;;
other projects, PLU attacks
from Jordan have ceased.
The Middle East
.rnhlems will be solved when
555*, "The project at the
D ad Sea Works leads me to
Sieve there is some hope.
Attorney Ron Gold has
I ten io Israel several times
bJ this was his first m,ssion.
had scon all the sights
before but this time I had the
opportunity to meet people
5 in the public and private
Lor and to hear their
andid responses on issues
ch as the West Bank and
,he absorption centers. Each
time I go I form a stronger
bond to the country and to
I its people."
Absorption centers, like the
[one the group visited for
Ethiopian Jews, assist those
I who emigrate to Israel from
other countries enter the
mainstream of Israeli life.
The residents of Hod
Hasharon, Palm Beach
County's twinned Project
Renewal neighborhood, did
not have this buffer when it
Las settled by Sephardic Jews
in the early 1950's. Now
through the help of commu-
nities in the diaspora, neigh-
Jborhoods like these are also
Jbeing assisted.
After visiting the Ethiopian
I absorption center Louis
iSilber felt that dollars raised
b> the United Jewish Appeal
jfor projects like these are
[both important and neces-
Isary. "What greater way to
Iu\e funds than to teach
I people living in another
Icentur) a ne life and a pride
I in being Jewish," he said.
he Jacknins, father Roger
[and sons, lav and Jeff,
traveled to Israel as a family
Iunit, seeing the land for the
ti'-i time. "I or a long time I
have warned to take my boys
to i-rael to get the feel of the
IViddishkeil and of our
heritage. It brought us closer
Iio Judaism." related Roger
Uacknin.
I Ik ilso were very
touched b\ their joini visit.
a> ,i \ cry mo\ ins. expe-
more so by
|jieliing oui father's expres-
sing Israel lor the
'i inn. and observing the
H hi had for the
[ -.ml.
VddilioiijIK
lav
was
New Jewish
Directory
i JERUSAI i\! 1 (JTA) -
/ new rel irence manual,
poniainniu details on close to
W publications all over the
Nd has jum been released.
guide is entitled "The
ffwtory ol World Jewish
f^and Publications." The
pM'xner, a Jerusalem PR
F. claims thai this is the
P'j; up-to-date book of its
P> 'he first to be produced
R* Joseph Fraenkel's
fc?1). Prs of the
Jrw. which was published
Amng the directory's
L L arc Jcwish Publica-
pons from Poland, Czcchos-
r*'?. Hong Kong. India
lil abwe- ,srael has the
rtnes number of entries
P? "3. followed by the
g* 263. It is obtain-
fcoriH 0IV the Directory of
rL-Je*ish Press and
gbhtftions. POB 7699.
"""em 91076, Israel.
inspired by the Israelis'
commitment not only to
survive, but to be recognized
throughout the world as
leaders in agriculture, in
medicine, etc. "Prior to the
trip I was not an involved,
committed Jew, but I came
away with a new awareness
and feel committed to help. I
now know it is important for
American Jews to help
sustain Israel's efforts," he
said.
The only mission member
to extend his trip beyond the
eight days was Sid Kulick
who took a five day bus tour
of the Sinai. He camped on
the desert with people from
many different countries.
Kulick achieved his goal of!
climbing Mt. Sinai and I
reveled in the "breathtaking
views and beautiful wadis"
of the desert.
Siskin summed up the;
magnitude and success of the
mission by stating, "We saw
Israel's past history going
back through thousands of
years brought up to the
present and extended into thi
future, all in an eight day
trip."
-
TIMESHARE FORECLOSURES
SAVE 70-75% $1,395-$3,150
DEEDED WEEKS-Direct from Lender
Florida Ocean Front*North Carolina Mountains
Originally $6,500. to $13,500
RCI Exchange Network
from $360 down $51.88; per mo. 3 or 5 yrs at 18%
Call Mr. Jay Collect (305) 943-6444
HERITAGE FINANCIAL CORP.
j9to8 Dally/Sat. & Sun. 1 to6---------
ShoheI&ji*
^"^^ MOTH 4 If ACH ClUI ^^^
The Only Glirf Kosher Hotel In The Lincoln Road Are.
CELEBRATE THE SHEVUOT HOUDAYS
SPECIAL SUMMER RATES
TV in All Rooms Movies Free Parking
Entertainment Private Beach Olympic Pool
Mashgiach and Synagogue on Premises
GLATT
KOSHER
Reserve Now For The
HIGH HOLY DAYS and SUCCOTH
Services Conducted by Prominent Cantor
Beautiful SUCCA On Premises ( i
Phone:1-538-7811 \^
ON THE OCEAN it IfRh ST.. MIAMI BEACH FLA. 33!30
The
KOSHER

I HOTEL
OCtANFAONT
40th to
41 si Street!
JULY 4th WEEKEND CELEBRATION
Any 4 Days & >C^4*\ *"!5 D(rfs *
3 Nights ALTaXj 4 Nights
July 2 to July 8 / Mr/fv July 1 to July 8
SAO S*f*rux< \M ^Tf $10fl P*Pw
04 double occ ^~*Wf IWB daubs oec
INCLUDING MEALS plus tax .gratuttiM INCLUDING MEALS
INCLUWS: Gtaft Kosher CuWne TV In of Rooms Music Top
Entoflatnnwm. CHRIS DALTON EntwMnmsnt Msdor It Done* Host
(Radio TV Pwwnaily) Vast Prtvaie Beoch
Olympic Pool Synooooue on Premises
DINING ROOM OPEN TO THE PUBLIC
Your Hosts, MICHAEL LEFKOWITZ ALEX 8MILOW
RESERVE NOW FOR THE HIGH HOLY DAYS & SUCCOTH
SERVICES Conducted by Prominent Cantor
For Reservations Phone
1-531-5771
"SOUTHERN BELL MM I HELP YOU?M
With all the exciting, revolutionary
technology we have to offer you in this
new Information Age, we at Southern Bell
haven't lost sight of the needs of our cus-
tomers. In fact, with all the changes in our
business, our commitment to good service
becomes even more important. After all,
our families pick up their phones-
just like yoursfor friendship,
convenience, and sometimes, emergencies.
So we know how important it is that your
phone always works. That's why we have
people on duty 24 hours a day, every day
of the year. It's the kind of effort you have
expected from us in the past. And we are
not about to let you down now, or in the
future. Because we're Southern Bell.
Already In Touch With The RitureT
Southern Bell
ii i "n-"r-~i


Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County /Friday, June 22, 1984
Jamie Danette Dreyfus
Engagement
Mr. and Mrs. Alan
Dreyfus of Youngs town,
Ohio announce the engage
menl of their daughter, Jamie
Danette, to Norman I)a\id
Landcrman of Lake Worth.
Landerman is the son of Mrs
Louise I evine of Lake Worth
and the late Paul landerman.
The marriage will be held on
August 12 at Temple Beth El
with Rabbi Howard Hirsch
and Cantor Elaine Shapiro
officiating.
Jamie, a speech therapist at
Wynnebrook Elemental
School, has a BS in Speech
Pathology from Ohio Univer-
sity and a MS in Special
Education from the Unvier-
sity of Cincinnati.
Norman, who has a BA in
Sociology from the University
of Connecticut, is a computer
marketing representative with
Radio Shack Computer
Center in West Palm Beach.
He is a board member of the
Jewish Community Center
having served as president of
the JCC Young Singles this
past year.
Birth
Announcement
Dr. and Mrs. Moshe Adler
of West Palm Beach an-
nounce the birth of their
daughter, Malka Caroline, on
June 11. She weighed six
pounds four ounces and was
19'/: inches long. Malka has
two brothers, Michael, and
Matthew.
Proud grandparents are
Mordecai and Bertha Adler
of North Miami Beach and
Lou and Sandra Silbermann
of Richmond, Virginia.
The Adlers are active
members of the Young Lead-
ership-Young Adult Division
Cabinet of the Jewish Fed-
eration of Palm Beach
County.
GIRO WARD
QAPER*
PACKAGING
FREE DELIVERY FLORIDA
PALM BEACH 832-0211
0ROWARD
QAPER *
[JACKAGING
SSB,*r-T
0CE/WFW0WT
BOMWHKHOThL
522SS2S5S5
Miami Beach, R-*
&SS5L
The
Mulfl-
Million
Dollar
Kosher
Dtc.i,oniheOceln
40thlo41Sl
Miami Beach
___-.----pZ
m d-ift per person
$78
dble.occ
RESERVE
NOW
fOR
JULY
4th
Tennis Faculties Souno HondboM Volleyball
Olympic Pool Full Block of Private Beach Color TV In
All Rooms PoolsWe Therapeutic WWrtpool e star Studded
Entertainment CHRIS DALTON Entertainment Director & Dance
Host (Radio & TV PersonaHty) newly refurbished rooms
DAILY SERVICES IN OUR OCEANFRONT SYNAGOGUE
Reserve Now For The
HIGH HOLY DAYS & SUCCOTH
ft Traditional Services Conducted By
Prominent Cantor
(3

GROUP
RATES
AVAILABLE
CATERING
UP TO 500
PEOPLE
SB
s<*ccaT
For Reswvatlons Phone: 1 "531 "5771
Your Hosts Michael Lefkowttz It Alex Smllow
One of our
Danish Bakery Specialities
Kaiser Rolls
669
Plain or with Seede
Rye Bread
0
loaf
59
Cinnamon
Pull Aparts
$149
12-oz.
vv^-CV'.s---.!
Available at All Publix Stores
and Danish Bakeries
Delicious
Applesauce Cake...........* $169
Chocolate Lovers Delight
Gourmet Brownies.........57*1*
Butter Streusel
Coffee Cake....................tach $169
Available at Publix Stores with Fresh
Danish Bakeries Only.
Rich and Creamy
Banana Cream Pie
each
$|99
French Cruellers............6 for $1
Prices Effective
June 21st thru June 27th. 1984
Quantity
Rights Reserved
FREE! WEDDING
CAKE ORNAMENT
Valued up lo $15.00 with this
Coupon and tha purchase of any
Thraa Tier or Larger Wedding Caka
(Coupon Eipiraa Wed.. Sept. 30. 1984)
(Varo Beech to Homestead Only)
(On* coupon per item purchased.


Friday, June 22, 1984/The Jewish Floridian 6f Palm Beach County Page 11
\
{
H
A
L Paul Klein [standing], president of the Jewish Community
jfiiitT, (hanks the many volunteers for their "tremendous
Kppori ."nd loyally throughout the year." Seated with him on
j dais at the JCC Volunteer Luncheon held recently at
-isliBf's Restaurant are [left to right) Frances Wilt, assistant
leculive director; Jerome Melman, executive director; Jean
bbin. director Comprehensive Senior Service Center; and
Ceslspeaker Muriel Barry, RSVP volunteer coordinator.
JCC volunteers served as
models for the fashion show
presented by Lise's LTD.
Shown with Marcie Frisch
[right], volunteer
coordinator, are [left to right]
Ann Stromwasser, Selma
Adelberg, Harriet Bregman,
Ann Glen, Sabina Gottschalk
and Harriet Steinhart. Essie
and Sam Baum, provided the
musical background for the
show.

Blumenthal proudly dis-
lys the graduated boxes she
(orated presented as favors
leach volunteer. A message:
tongratulaiions from the
|C" was found inside the
fat box. Mrs.
menthal also made a pull
prl floral arrangement and
senied a corsage to each
I" member on behalf of
polunteers.
New Olim
felping The IDF
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
? Israel Defense Force has
!" auxiliary composed of
Wreds of recent in-
fants ho perform non-
Par> 'asks that ordinarily
pa have required calling
[additional reserve soldiers,
fas disclosed.
Li! rojfu is sponsored
R >>y the World Zionist
"aiion and the IDF
kan.command- The im-
C?. residents of
wption centers all over
[wjuniry. volunteer their
FJhis week a group of
.""migrants from
ro *"V?u,h America.
K,and Ethiopia were
K.J" fo"'Nation
|ne Jordan Valley.
Tof $i* P to the
L w are accepted as vol-
J ih?v arnval at mili [5a?vd arc br*efed on
VThevVllUa,,0n in lhe
*s a ? and ea with
Wi"! lo ,IC8U,ar mCSS-
*ani ? hc armv. he
f* volunteer, have
fa of 'l!e ,DF
01 man-hours of
JCC Thanks Volunteers
At Luncheon
Seated among the 80 volunteers honored by the JCC are
Carol Fox [left], food manager at the West Palm Beach
Kosher Lunch Connection site, and Marion Tobias [right],
food manager at the Delray Kosher Lunch Connection site.
Now there's a great-tasting,
sugar-tree drink for people who
want to look and feel their best.
New Crystal Light" Drink Mix.
It's sweetened a whole new
way. so there's absolutely no
saccharin and no saccharin
aftertaste. Crystal Light comes in
lots of delicious natural flavors.
And there's just 4 calories a glass.
Try Crystal Light. It'll make
a believer out of you.


PW12 ?! Jewiah Floridim of Palm Beh County /Friday. June 22, 1964
Senior News
FTOM THE JEWISH COMMUNrTY CENTER
TRANSPORTATION '
Transportation is available
in our designated area for
persons 60 years of age or
over who do not use public
transportation. We take
people to treatment centers,
doctors' offices, to hospitals,
nursing homes to visit
spouses, to social service
agencies and nutrition
centers. There is no fee for
this service, but participants
are encouraged to contribute
their fair share. There is a
great demand for this service,
so please make your reserva-
tions in advance. For
information and-or reserva-
tions, call 689-7703 Monday
through Friday.
HOT KOSHER
LUNCH CONNECTION
Many elements combine to
make the Hoi Kosher Lunch
Program at the Jewish Com-
munity Center a success.
Foremost among this is the
opportunity to form new and
lasting friendships.
Each weekday, seniors
gather for intimate talk,
100 COPIES
*3
95
IAX
EVEN BIGGER SAVINGS
ON LARGE QUANTITIES
CAMERA READY ART
TOM PRINTED ON 8V*x 11 or 8VSx 14
BLACK INK ON 20 LB. WHITE
Printing Canter
586-6220
107 So. Dixie, Lake Worth
"WE MAKE YOU LOOK GOOD"
Miles of white sand beaches heated swimming
pool live entertainment m lounge tennis and
golf nearby boat trips available for sightseeing
fishing shelling Children 18 and under FREE
m room with parents Children s meals at
menu prices
Write or call for
RESERVATIONS
813-597-3151
VANDERBILT INN on the GULF
11000 Gulf Shore Drive. North. Naples. Fla. 33940
Oaily Rate Now Reduced May Through November 17V;S
IC iclunf Hwoilll Oiy w* la
0.1
Regular Rate $42 00
Less 17V?% Discount 7.35
You Pay
$34.65
Coupon cannot be used with other discount package
PRESENT THIS COUPON AT
1
I
I
I
I
I
I
how to create invitations, $2.50 per class and m
greeting cards and unique be purchased at it,
gifts that will last a lifetime, class. Please call u .'
with instructor, Eloise classes begin Friday, July 13, 689-7703 for J$
who will show you 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. The fee is and-or more inform!.""!
Heinser
educational discussions, game
playing, leisure and s<>n8;
These activities are followed
by a hot, kosher, nutritious
lunch, served with warmth
and hospitality by our dedic-
ated volunteers.
Please come and join us.
For information and reserva-
tions (which must be made in
advance) call Carol or Lillian
at 689-7703, Marion at
Delray 495-0806.
SPECIAL HURRICANE
PREPAREDNESS
PROGRAM
On Thursday, June 28, 11
a.m., the Jewish Community
Center will present a program
on Hurricane Preparedness
with guest speaker, Bob
Pape, Meteorologist from
Channel 12. Pape will cover
I all types of dwellings. The
, Hurricane Season officially
started June 1, so do not get
caught unprepared.
EVERYONE IS INVITED!
NEW SUMMER PROGRAM
QUILLING CLASSES
"Finally, a
Catsklll resort
that lets you
stop eating
long enough
to have
some fun..."
$365-$380
Per week, per person (dW.occ.)
Every Room wit h Private Bath.
Air Conditioning and Color TV
For reservations and
information phone
TOLL FREE
1-800-431-3854
Hotel Brickman
South Fallsburg. NY. I2779
Master Card. Visa, Amex
Overlooking a great
18 hole golf course
When you escape the Florida heat
this Summer, escape to something
more than non-stop overeating.
Escape to the Brickman.
We know that you go on vacation to
do more than live from one meal to the
next. That's why we're on the Modif ied
American Plan, serving two sumptuous
meals daily Breakfast (until 11:30 am).
and Dinner (from 6:30 to 8:30 pm).
Mid-day snacks? Magnificent Pool-
side Coffee Shop.
There will be no announcement at
I pm calling you back to the Dining
Room which you just left, no need to
rush off the golf course or tennis courts.
Linger at the pool all day if you choose.
We have one outdoor and indoor (con-
taining health club and jet whirlpool
spa). Play duplicate bridge, take art
classes, go folk dancing, jog, or work
out on our Universal minKjym. In short,
enjoy a full day of outdoor activities and
sunshine, and all the other fabulous
things we have to offer, including enter
tainment that's second to none.
So come to the Brickman. Where the
meals are fun.. .not something that
gets in the way of fun!
Hotel
VVe don l /lt ^ your host for three generations.
The Posner Family
Fordaljciouihrw*
$on.p Brond 1*"
Coffoe .Jadwo-
Woc.owrou"*^
CoHo. to o mN ok*. Stir in on.^P woM 0
,c. and orv with croom ond ug< <\7 ^i*
oik for ii at your k*wi* "^^M'.'^J
lighrM.umroercoolor tickroolcop "^
caffein-f roe. And Kosher. oo_ S**
for tvmmor i* wen a it of vour mmmmt Uiowtd only bo to
refro*Hmg,l
i



Friday, June 22. 1964 The Jewish Floridian of Prim Beach CoJfcity ftgalS
**
I
I
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
Norton Tire Company is not only Florida's
largest Michelin dealer, largest BF Goodrich
dealer and largest Perilli dealer, but offers 13
more reasons why their stores are the best
place for you and your car.
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED.
That's not just words, we put it in writ-
ing (read our 30-day money-back
guarantee). And if you're not satis-
fied with any purchase from us, we'll
do our best to make it right.
EXPERIENCE AND INTEGRITY. You'll like the
way we do business. And our experience and integrity will save
you money.
CERTIFIED MECHANICS. To better service you and your car, we have
expert mechanics, trained and certified by the National Institute for Ser-
vice Excellence, available at our stores.
LOWEST PRICES. Our tire prices are the lowest... anywhere, anyplace,
anytime!
FREE 10-POINT SAFETY CHECKUP No purchase necessary. Drive in
anytime and we'll check your tires, alignment, balance, brakes, shocks,
idler arm, muffler, battery, belts and hoses. Free.
COURTEOUS TREATMENT. You can count on always receiving excel-
lent, prompt, courteous service at any of our stores.
NO BAIT AND SWITCH. We carry complete inventories of all tires. The
low prices we advertise are always backed up by an ample supply of the
tires in our ads.
WE SOLVE PROBLEMS. If you have a problem with any purchase, con-
tact the store manager where the purchase was made. If he can't come
up with a solution, ask him for our special customer service department
number. Every possible effort is made to keep our customers happy.
CLEANLINESS. We offer clean, air-conditioned waiting rooms for the
convenience of our customers.
HI-TECH EQUIPMENT. We have modern, up-to-date equipment, includ-
ing the latest in hi-tech computer balancing, hi-tech alignment and spe-
cial tire changing equipment for protecting mag wheels.
CERTIFIED TIRE SPECIALISTS. Our stores are staffed with tire special-
ists trained and certified in the various features of each manufacturer's
tires and each automobile's specifications.
PURCHASING POWER. With 35 stores throughout Florida, we have the
strongest purchasing power of any tire company in the state. That's how
we are able to offer you the lowest prices.
SIXTY YEARS UNDER THE SAME FLORIDA MANAGEMENT Since
our first store opened in 1924, our management policy has always been
the same: Give our customers quality products and keep them happy.
YOU GET MORE THAN JUST LOW PRICES AT
FETY CHECKS BRAKES EXPORTS
:RTIFIED MECHANICS WHOLESALE
Ifc...CORAL QABLjg
riaS 667-7575
|WS OoiwHwy 233-S241
H4ALEAH/PALM SPRINGS MILE
1275 49th St 822-2500
MIAMI AIRPORT
N W 25 SI I Milam Dairy Rd 593-1191
WEST MIAMI
Bird ft Galloway Rd$ 552-6656
KENDALL DR./WGATE SQUARE
13872 SWIM* S 387-0128
W TABBBB1 TRAIL
125201li 551-1141
MOMtfTlAO
30100S Federal Hwy 247 1622
HOLLYWOOD
497 S SUN Rd 7 987-0450
CHELIN I.BELL. BS W*>cdrteh YOKOHAMA
ALIGNMENT BALANCING SHOCKS
FRONT END SERVICE LUBRICATION
All STORES OPEN 7:30
St Rd 84 iust west ot Univ Or 473-4700
FTLAOOeROALE
1740E Sunrise Blvd 463-7588
PLANTATION
. 3S1N State Rd 7 587-2186
PEMBROKE PINES
H wood Blvd lust west ol Univ Or 435-1383
TAMARAC
44U W Comnwcial BNd 735-2772
TAMARAC
N Univ Or ft McNab Rd 721-4700
POMPANO BEACH
3151N Federal Hwy. 943-4200
DEERFIELD BEACH
2265 W Hills&oro Blvd 427-8800
DELRAY BEACH
1 Union BNd 272-1022
GREENACRE5
3838 Jog Rd 968-1014
WEST PALM BEACH
515 South OixW832-4181
LAKE PARK/N. PALM BEACH
532 N Lake Blvd 848-2544
TEQUESTA
Bridge Rd ft Old Dixie Hwy 746-9215
FT PIERCE
2604 South 4th a. 464-8020
VERO BEACH
755 21st Street 567-1174
DAYTONABEACH
907 VolusiaAve 255-7487
NAPUES
2065 E TamiamiTr 774-4443
FT. MYERS
15135 McGregor Blvd 482-8880
ASTERCARD.VA?AMERK^
...


r M W* A x
*r* tnn..nfa
Page 14 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County /Friday. June 22, 1984
Hie Rabbinical Corner
DEVOTED TO DISCUSSION OF THEMES AND ISSUES RELEVANT TO JEWISH LIFE. PAST AND PRESENT
The Synagogue Is Never Closed
By RABBI JOEL LEVINE
Temple Judea
The Greater Palm Beaches
has an. unusually high
percentage of unaffiliated
members of our Jewish com-
munity. In many cases, if a
family has a history of unaf-
tiliation with the synagogue,
entering the synagogue for
the first time appears at first
very difficult. However, with
many things which appear
difficult at first, the second
time and third time is easier.
Our community is blessed
with a diversity of
synagogues. Our synagogues
are open all summer, ready
to welcome you not only with
spirituality but with friend-
ship. As immediate past
president of the Palm Beach
County Board of Rabbis, I
am extremely proud of the
dedication of my colleagues
toward the enchancement of
Jewish life. A visit to one of
our synagogues may vey well
make a difference in your
life, may provide a spiritual
lift, may unlock new gems of
knowledge from the Torah
and from the totality of our
tradition. The summer is not
the time to feel the craziness
of boredom, to get on each
Rabbi Joel Levine
other's nerves, to become
depressed, or feel lost
because society is moving at a
slow place. The summer is
the time to experiment, to
embark on an adventure into
the world of spirituality,
Torah education, to discover
the beauty of synagogue
worship, and to learn from
the distinguished rabbis and
cantors of our community.
In order to grow and to
mature, we must break old
habits, we must unchain our-
selves from the shackles of
routine, we must rediscover
adventure. Synagogue affi-
liation is part of the adven-
ture of Jewish life. It is never
too late to embark on this
adventure. For those of us
who are newcomers to the
Palm Beaches, I caution you
to enter the synagogue of
your choice with an open
mind, a willing heart, and a
new spirit. It is self-defeating
to compare our synagogues
with the synagogues we were
close to in our former
communities. Our home is
now in the Palm Beaches and
our gift to the Palm Beaches
is to bring into the synagogue
our special talents, are
willingness to volunteer, our
eagerness to share. The
synagogue is ready to make
an impact on your life if you
are willing to permit the
synagogue to begin to stir
your soul.
Our rabbis wrote that the
true service is the "service of
the heart." Instead of feeling
depressed about what we
have left behind, instead of
feeling down because of the
slow paced summer season,
take the risk, enter the
synagogue, allow the liturgy
to touch your heart, to stir
your soul, to open your eves,
and to remind you of the
many blessings life has in
store for you.
JCDS Marks Graduation and Award Night
Continued from Page 2
MAURICE
RATTINGER
AWARD
Achievement,
M.
MEMORIAL
for Science
presented by
Lorraine Rattinger 10 Kara
Click; GUSSIE COHEN
ACHIEVEMENT AWARD
for Most Improved Student,
presented by Mrs. Peggy
Leznoff lo Tamara Virshup;
B'NAl BRITH LODGE No.
3115 AWARD for displaying
excellence in Science Labor-
atory Experience, presented
by David M. Silverman to
Gregg Jartakow; NORTH
COUNTY REGION Ol
WOMEN'S AMERICAN
ORT AWARD lor displaying
excellence in Science Labor-
atory Experience, presented
by Blanche M. Silverman to
Shari Cohen; JEWISH WAR
VETERANS POST No. 408
CITIZENSHIP AWARD,
presented by Mr. Sam Mindcl
to Alan Teboul; B'NAI
BRITH CENTURY LODGE
No. 2939 AWARD for
Cooperation and Leadership,
presented by Mr. Sol
Margolis to Mark Kirsch;
David Wolff, director,
charged the graduates and
diplomas were presented by
Shirley Dellerson, immediate
past president. The 1983-84
class gift to the school,
presented by Jeffrey
Schimelman, was a Shofar.
The gift was accepted, on
behalf of the school, by Dean
Rosenbach, president.
Greetings were extended by
Myron Nickman, president ol
the Jewish I ederation of
Palm Beach Count). On
behalf ol the Board of
Rabbis and the Rabbinic
community, Joel Cha/in
presented greetings. Ann
Lynn Lipton delivered the
keynote address, "In I lie
Hands Ol Jewish Youth is
Our I mure.'- I he invocation
was given bj Rabbi Isaac
\ under W aide and I lie bene-
diction was given t>> Rabbi
Steven R. \\ cstman. I ollow-
ing the Recessional, u iceep-
lion was held lor the
graduates, ninth giaders,
their families and guests.
IACULTY
Motivation,
Perseverance,
Mr. Jack
David Millet;
AWARD for
AWARD for
Attitude and
presented bv
Roscnbaum to
PTO "CHAI"
displaying the
STATE OF
ISRAEL BONDS
BOUGHT AND SOLD
Invest in
Israel Securities

WE'RE SPECIALISTS IN
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most school spirit and fellow-
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Bcnilous to Rachel Pevsner;
BENJAMIN S.
HORNSTEIN
SCHOLARSHIP AWARD
lor Outstanding Student,
presented by Carol Roberts
to Kara Click.
The Salutatorian was Mark
Krischer and the
Valedictorian, Kara Glick.
***
TRANSACTIONS DAILY VIA TELEX
TO ISRAEL STOCK EXCHANGE
A Subsidiary o NASD
Securities
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18 East 48th Street
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Toll Free (800) 221-48381
Candle Lighting Time
Fri. June 226:55 pm
Religious Directory
CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION ANSHEI SHOLOM 534R rw
West Palm Beach 33409. Phone 684-3212' Rabbi iS v
Walde. Cantor Mordecai Spektor. Daily 8-30 a ml"
p.m. Friday: 8:30 a.m., 5 p.m. and a late serviced
p.m., followed by Oneg Shabbat. Saturday: 8-30aii.il
p.m.. Mincha followed by Sholosh Suedos.
CONGREGATION BETH KODESM OF BOYNT0NBEAG
501 N.E. 26 Avenue, Boynton Beach 33435. Phone 586-9?
Kabbi Avrom L. Drazin. Monday 8:30a.m.; Thursdays 30i
Sabbath services, Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9a.m.
GOLDEN LAKES TEMPLE: 1470 Golden Lakes Blvd wj
Palm Beach 33411. Phone 689-9430. Rabbi Joseph Speiser.'.
Services 8:15 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. Sabbath services Friday's!
p.m. Saturday 9 a.m., 5 p.m., Mincha followed by Sh
Suedos.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID: 4657 Hood Road, Pain
(iardens 33410. Phone 694-2350. Rabbi William Marder.l
Karl J. Rackoff. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m. Sa
10 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 2815 No. Flagler Dr., West Palm 1
33407. Phone 833-0339. Rabbi Howard J. Hirsch. CanatorE
Shapiro. Sabbath services Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9:30i
Daily Minyan 8:15 a.m., Sunday and Legal Holidays9a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 315 N. "A" Street. LakeWi
33460. Phone 585-5020. Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg, f
Jacob Elman. Services Monday and Thursday 8:15 a.m. i
8:15 p.m.. Saturday 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 224 N.W. Avenue G, BelkGlJ
33430. Sabbath services Friday,8:30 p.m. Phone996-3886.
TEMPLE BETH ZION: Lions Club, 700 Camelia Dr.. I
Palm Beach. Mailing Address: 640-101 Trail South. West I
Beach 33414. Sabbath Services Friday 8 p.m.. Saturday!
a.m. Rabbi Nathan Zelizer. Phone 793-9122.
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB: 2177 So. Congress A ve. West I
Beach 33406. Phone 433-5957. Rabbi Dr. Morris Silber
Cantor Gary D. Kessler. Sabbath services. Friday 8
Saturday and Holidays 9 a.m., Monday and Thursday 9in
TEMPLE EMANU-EL: 190 North County Road, Palml
.13480. Phone 832-0804. Rabbi Joel Chazin. Cantor
Dardashti. Sabbath services, Friday 8:30 p.m.. Saturday^
THE TREASURE COAST JEWISH CENTER -
Abraham: 3257 S.E. Salerno Road. Port Salerno.
Abraham Rose. 1-287-8833. Services Friday evenings 8pm.|
LAKE WORTH JEWISH CENTER: St Lukes
Methodist Chupel. 105 Ohio Road. Lake Worth. Phone <
Friday night services 8:15 p.m.. Saturday. 9a.m.
ORTHODOX
CONGREGATION AITZ CHAIM: Century Village,
Palm Beach. Phone 689-4675. Sabbath services 9 a.m anojj
Daily services 8:15 a.m. and 6:30 p.m.
REFORM
CONGREGATION BETH ISRAEL 1692 FloresU.P-0|
m.Y. I Iti Port St. I.ucie. FL 33452. Friday night services"
Saturday morning IV 30 a.m. Phone 465-6977.
THE REFORM TEMPLE OF JUPITER TEQUESTA\]
Jude Church (Parrish Hall) 204 U.S. No. 1 So.; maiung|
I'la/.a 222, U.S. No. 1. Tequesta 33458. Phone i
President Jeanne Tarsches. Services the second an -j
Friday of every month, 8 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 4600 Oleander Avenue. Fort
33460, Phone 461-7428. Cantor Anne Newman.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM: St. Helens ParishHJ|
Avenue and Victory Blvd.. Vero Beach 32960. maum*.
P.O. Box 2113, Vero Beach. FL 32961-2113. Rat
Adams. Phone 1-669-0180.
thf I
TEMPLE BETH TORAH: at St P^^'JLfi'
Episcopal I Retreat. Forest Hill Blvd. and WJ1J,,
West Palm Beach. Mailing address: 825 i** j
West Palm Beach 33411. Friday ^,^79
Steven R. Westman. Cantor Nicholas Fenakei. ra-
TEMPLE ISRAEL: 1901 No. Flagler D.r.. We* p
33407. Phone 833-8421. Rabbi HowardI W
Soloist Susan Weiss. Sabbath services. Friday P'
TEMPLE JUDEA: at St. Catharines Greek Orth*^
Social Hall. 4000 Washington Rd.. at So"ine"ddn
Rabbi Joel L Levine. Cantor Rita Shore. Mailing
Okeeehobee Blvd.. West Palm Beach. H
1526.
3340*


Friday, June 22, 1984/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 15
tagogue News
rEMPLE BETH TORAH
iTMitor Eenakel and lay
Vmb rs of the congregation
k conduct the serv.ce on
bh! June 22, In the
Ibbi's absence.
Friday, June 29, Rabbi
Uman and Cantor Fenakcl
conduct the service be-
ning a. 8:15 p.m. Rabbi
stman will give a D var
rah dealing with a modern
plication of the ancient
ual of the Red Heifer men-
med in the weekly Torah
TEMPLE JUDEA
Cantor Rita Shore will
teach and review liturgical
music at Music Sabbath, Fri-
day, June 22. Services begin
at 8 p.m. and are followed by
an Oneg Shabbat sponsored
by the Temple Sisterhood.
The liturgy will be con-
ducted by Yetta Kailes, a new
member of Temple Judea,
who worked very closely with
Rabbi Sanford Saperstein of
Merrick, Long Island. Mrs.
Kailes has been a rabbi's as-
sistant, Sisterhood president,
Hebrew teacher, and ritual
Organizations
in the News
AMIT WOMEN
Rishona Chapter is having a mini luncheon and card
pans at the Clubhouse at Century Village on Sunday,
I June 24 at II a.m.
B'NAI B'RITH WOMEN
Masada Chapter on Wednesday, June 27 is having a
luncheon and cruise on "The Paddle Wheel Queen."
Transportation will be provided. For reservations call
Frances Chodosh.
HADASSAH
Shalom West Palm Beach
The 70th annual national convention of Hadassah
takes place on Aug. 26-29 at the San Francisco Hilton
Hotel. I oi details, contact Lillian Schack.
Tikvah Chapter will be represented at the National
Hadassah Convention in San Francisco Aug. 26-29 by
Mary Sandier, Laura London, Frances Rose and Dori
Dacher.
A mini-luncheon and card party is being planned for
July 9. Call Emma for more information.
A professionally guided tour is planned for the
community by Yovel Chapter. This tour will include
Jewish points of interest through Miami and Miami
Beach: temples, synagogues, historic mikvah, museum,
and much more. This "day to remember" historic tour
in a deluxe air-conditioned bus will also include a full
kosher luncheon at the "Casablanca." There will also
be prizes and surprises. The bus leaves at 8:30 a.m.
from the West Gate (Carteret Bank) on Wednesday,
July 18. lor reservations call Lee Goldberg or Sarah
Kenvin.
keep Aug. 12, Sunday, open for an unusual Kosher
luncheon and card party.
JCC News
SUNDAY IN THE PARK
The Prime Time Singles of the Jewish Community
wmer (age 60 plus) are planning a Bar-B-Que, picnic
vmi swim afternoon starting at noon, Sunday, June 24,
I11 Picnic Island.
^fyjjdPWi are requested to bring a dish of one's
l .. 1 avoid duplications and complete details,
rase H Bob Million at 684-8593.
YOUNG SINGLES TO STAR GAZE
JrS^' June 23 ^e Young Singles (21-35) of the
linn." hommuni,y Cent will gather for a "June-
|moon House Party.
lUr.u/rder of lne evening will be to relax, do some
KkMr and 'ust ,0 mm8|e with congenial people
issi f Joym8 some munchies. Donation for the evening
'* members and $5 for non members.
rf directions and information please call 689-7700.
AREER SINGLES ENJOY A "HAPPY HOUR"
je40C*rcer Singles of the Jewish Community Cehter
Bencc .lnvi,e working professional adults to meet
jQc )q reak House to enjoy a "Happy Hour" Friday,
"oeuvres T 5 t0 7 D-m- Frec hot and cold hors
ogcthei be available. It will be a time to get
ople.
with old friends and meet new and interesting
chairperson for many years.
Mrs. Kailes will read the
Torah and present a com-
mentary on the Korach
Mutiny.
Rabbi Alan Sherman will
conduct services with Cantor
Rita Shore on June 29. Rabbi
Sherman is an honorary
member of Temple Judea and
is director of the Community
Relations Council of the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County, Community
Chaplain, and Chaplain of
the Morse Geriatric Center.
Members of the community
are invited to greet Rabbi
Sherman.
LAKE WORTH
JEWISH CENTER
Fanny Schwartz, president
of the Lake Worth Chapter
of Hadassah, will be guest
speaker at the Friday evening
service at 8:15 p.m., on June
22. Mrs. Schwartz has been
active in all phases of Jewish
life in New Jersey and Lake
Worth. Mrs. Schwartz's sub-
ject will be "The Two Faces
of Judaism."
All are welcome to attend
services held at St. Luke's
United Methodist Church,
165 Ohio Rd., Lake Worth.
Area Deaths
BRUTCKUS
Harold. 75. of Kent G 103. Century Vil-
lage, West Palm Beach. Riverside
Guardian Funeral Home. West Palm
Beach.
FRANKLIN
Samuel E., 77. of Bennlngton Lane.
Lake Worth. Menorah Gardens and
Funeral Chapels. West Palm Beach.
GARBER
Janet. 70. of 13812 Sand Crane Drive.
Palm Beach Gardens. LevHt-Weinsteln
Guaranteed Security Plan Chapel,
West Palm Beach.
COLA
George, 82, of Chatham 254 M, Century
Village. West Palm Beach Riverside
Guardian Funeral Home, West Palm
Beach.
HOFFMAN
Molly, 81, of Sussex M, Century Vil-
lage, West Palm Beach. Levltt-Weln-
steln Guaranteed Security Plan
Chapel. West Palm Beach.
HEMLEIN
Gabrtelle (Gall), 71. of 23 S. E St.,
Lake Worth. Levltt-Welnsteln Guaran-
teed Security Plan Chapel, West Palm
Beach.
KASSOVER
Max. 8S, of Palm Beach. Riverside
Guardian Funeral Home, West Palm
Beach.
KOPPELMAN
Louis, 84, of Southhampton A-118, Cen-
tury Village. Riverside Guardian
Funeral Home, West Palm Beach.
LIEBENSOHN
Irving, 70, of Singer Island. Riverside
Guardian Funeral Home, West Palm
Beach,.
LINDA
Helen, 2, of 711 Lori Drive. Palm
Sprtnfi. Riverside Guardian Plan
Chapel. West Palm Beach.
MAAS '
Ludwlg, 80. of Cambridge E-108. Cen-
tury Village. West Palm Beach. River-
side Guardian Funeral Home. Waat
Palm Beach.
MOLET ___
Joseph H.. W. of Strattord C. Century
Village. West Palm Beach. Menorah
Gardens and Funeral Chapela. West
Palm Beach.
PIASIO
Verecondo. T. ol Boynton Beach.
Mliell-FavUle-Zem Guardian Plan
Chapel. West Palm Beach.
Mildred IT. of Century Village. Waft
Palm Beach Riverside Guardian
Funeral Home, West Palm Beach.
ROSE MARK ____
Dr Jacob K. 74. of 207 E. Bond Drive.
Wa'riTpalm Beach. LevmW.ln.teln
Guaranteed Security Plan Chapel.
West Palm Beach.
SALOMON
Germalne. 76. of MB Orftlg Dajg
W Weet Palm Beach. Riverside
Guardian Funeral Home. West Palm
Beach.
West Palm Beach Leader Dies
Continued from Page 3
Jewish Community Center and an advisory board
member of the Comprehensive Senior Service Center.
He originated the idea for the creative writing
publication, Patterns, and contributed many selections
to the volume.
Molat was an active member of the Jewish Family and
Children's Service, Jewish War Veteran's Post 408 (he
was a World War I veteran). Science Museum of Palm
Beach County, Men's Club of Congregation Anshei
Sholom and Temple Beth El, American Israel Public
Affairs Committee, Century Village Friends of the
Opera, Century Village Democratic Club, AJC, RSVP,
Prime Ministers Club of Israel Bonds and many more.
In addition to his communal activities, Molat was an
inventor of over one dozen inventions, many of which
he donated to the U.S. Government. Most recently he
invented a Bingo board for the blind which will be
distributed free of charge. The rights for this invention
will be given to the Morse Geriatric Center. He was a
member of the Charter Institute of American Inventors
since 1942 and a member of the Palm Beach County
Society of American Inventors.
Molat is survived by his wife, Esther, who shared and
actively supported him in his community services.
As Ann Lynn Lipton [left], Jewish education director of the
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County, and other staff
members look on, Rabbi Alan Sherman [second from left],
chaplain and Community Relations Council director, affixes
the mezuzah on the doorpost of the Federation's new
auxiliary office. The office, which houses the Jewish
education department, the chaplaincy and the CRC, is located
at 120 South Olive Avenue, Suite 555, West Palm Beach
[Guaranty Building], phone 655-7706.
2 bedroom bungalow and 2 bedroom apartment
All hotel facilities available.
Synagogue on premises
Hotel Gibber
Kiamesha Lake, New York 12751
1-212-924-6162
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Page 16 The Jewish Ftoridian of Palm Beach County /Friday, June 22, 1984
VANTAGE
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THE TASTE OF SUCCESS

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Warning: The Surgeon General Has Oetermmed
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