The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian the voice of the Jewish community of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Running title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Physical Description:
4 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 8, no. 41 (Dec. 24, 1982)-v. 11, no. 26 (Aug. 30, 1985).
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44606415
lccn - sn 00229548
ocm44606415
System ID:
AA00014310:00040

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
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Jewish floridian
VOLUME 9-NUMBER 37
PALM BEACH. FLORIDA
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 25,1985
h
PRICE 35 CENTS
Sen. Percy Calls Israel's West Bank Settlements 'Provocative'
JEW YORK (JTA) -
I, Charles Percy (D., 111.),
ling Israel's "extensive"
1st Bank settlements
Irovocative," told a group
of Jewish leaders that the
settlements discouraged
Jordan from entering into
peace negotiations with the
Jewish State. He said he had
been assured that King
Hussein wants to enter into
negotiations with Israel.
Percy, chairman of the For-
eign Relations Committee,
Code Started Mobilization
TEL AVIV (JTA)
ael Radio repeatedly
Dadcast 14 code words Nov.
ordering military reservists
report to predetermined
kcmbl> points. The
pbilizaiion exercise for
pice personnel and vehicles
planned some time ago,
military spokesmen
Icsscd ii was not hostile in
intent or a response to the
mobilization of Syria's
reserves ordered last week.
THAT MESSAGE was
directed especially toward
Damascus in an effort to
reduce the tension which
escalated alter the truck bomb
attack on Israeli military
headquarters in Tyre. The
Israelis held Syria responsible,
at least indirectly, but insisted
that Israel was not threatening
any country.
Military spokesmen said
the mobilization drill would be
of short duration. As soon as
the reservists check in or
deliver their vehicles to the
proper places, they would be
dismissed and sent home, the
spokesmen said.
spoke to a closed meeting of
the Conference of Presidents
of Major American Jewish
Organizations. The meeting
with the some 100 Jewish
leaders was requested by
Percy, who is seeking
reelection.
THE SENATOR said he
opposed the establishment of
an independent Palestinian
state but asserted that the
Palestinian people needed a
national homeland, which he
said should be in some form of
confederation with Jordan.
He said he regarded Yasir
Arafat, the Palestine Libera-
tion Organization's chief, as a
"relative moderate compared
with George Habash," the
leader of the Popular Front
Leadership Conference
To Kick-Off 1984 Campaign
Mvion J. Nickman, General
iipaign Chairman of the
M Jewish federation of
Beach County-United
iish Appeal campaign, and
IiiiIkts ol the Campaign
Itimci have invited the com-
lnn>\ campaign leadership
la lull day of educational
lining sessions on Sunday,
V II. 1983 at the Royce
cl, 9:30 a.m. until 2 p.m.
I'llie purpose of this con-
lencc is io bring key
Imbcrs ol our lay leadership
feilicr io learn and discuss
pressing needs of Israel
lour local community. We
>c io moiivaie ourselves to
fome further involved with
campaign and to enhance
solicitation skills so that
ia> be more effective
paigners. We have
|>u8lii in a number of re-
Ircc people headed by
[iiig Bernstein, the National
pcutive Vice Chairman of
A," slated Nickman.
Irving Bernstein
Conference Chairman
Barbara Gordon, immediate
past Campaign Chairman of
the Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County, stated "I am
pleased to chair this very im-
portant event for our com-
munity. 1 have received the
lull support and participation
of the members of the 1984
Campaign Cabinet. We anti-
cipate a tremendous response
from the community in an ef-
fort to initiate our 1984 cam-
paign towards a new plateau,"
stated Mrs. Gordon.
Irving Bernstein, a recogn-
ized authority on fundraising
and the American Jewish
community became Executive
Vice-Chairman in 1969 after
serving for a number of years
as Assistant Executive Vice-
Chairman. Bernstein is an as-
sociate member of the Board
of Governors of the Jewish
Agency in Israel. He is chair-
man of the Memorial Museum
Committee and the President's
Commission on the,
Haulocaust.
Bernstein is active within the
Jewish educational commun-
ity serving as chairman of the
Board of Advisors for
Brandeis University's Ben-
jamin S. Hornstein Program
for Graduate studies and Jew-
ish communal services.
in his present capacity,
Bernstein has presided over
the operations of the UJA
during a most demanding and
impressive period of growth as
a fundraising body and instru-
ment of Jewish unity.
A vrriety of workshops will
be conducted during the con-
ference which will include
young adults, special gifts, up-
grade and new gift sessions.
for the Liberation of Pales-
tine."
The senior Senator from
Illinois also defended his
support for the 1981 sale of
AW ACS reconnaissance
planes and other advanced
weaponry to Saudi Arabia,
which he termed as a
"moderate" Arab state
"compared with Libya and
Syria." He said the military
balance had not shifted
against Israel as a result of the
U.S. arms sale to the Saudis.
On other topics, Percy was
reported to have appeared
uncomfortable with a question
about why the U.S. did not
move its Embassy to Jeru-
salem. He said "the time was
not ripe" for such a move and
that he would not seek to push
the Reagan Administration
into such a step at this time.
PERCY SAID he strongly
opposed any demands by Syria
or its surrogates in Lebanon
that the government of Presi-
dent Amin Gemayel abrogate
its May 17 security and with-
drawal accord with Israel. The
Administration, he said, was
strongly opposed to any such
action. He said that he had
personally urged President
Hosni Mubarak of Egypt to
return his Ambassador to
Israel and to resume progress
toward normalization between
the two countries.
In a statement distributed at
the meeting, Percy detailed
various actions he has taken in
opposing the Arab boycott
and supporting the right of
Soviet Jews to live as Jews and
to emigrate.
Former Republican Sen.
Jacob Javits of New York,
who was a surprise guest at the
meeting, distributed a state-
ment to the Jewish leaders
supporting Percy's reelection
bid.
HOLD THE DATE
Wednesday. January 18,1984
Quarter Past Seven
The Breakers, Palm Beach
GALA COMMUNITY DINNER CELEBRATION
on behalf of the
|1984 Jewish Federation of Palm Beach county/
United Jewish Appeal campaign
Representatives of Jewish women's organizations from the Palm Beaches
gathered together at the Fifth Anniversary Jewish Women's Anniversary to
learn about issues relative to the 1980's: A Decade of Concern Crises in Jewish
Life. See photo display, Page 2.


Page 2 The Jewish Flpridiau of Palm Beach County/ Friday, November 25,1983
The Women's Division of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County and Federation's four beneficiary agencies, the Jewish
Community Center, the Jewish Community Day School, the
Jewish Family and Children's Service and the Morse Geriatric
Center set up displays describing the programs and services they
provide for the community.
Jeanne Levy, president of the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County, introduced the
executive directors of the four
beneficiary agencies of Fed-
eration.
Julie Cummings, vi prtJ
dent for education Wonn'i
Division, welcomed the wo
en saying that "Women's Oil
vision was honored to prtsml
this unique educational exBrr-l
ience." I
Fifth Anniversary
Jewish Women's Assembly
SESSION I
MARCIA SHAPIRO
Chairman
ADELE SIMON
Recorder
SESSION II
DORIS SINGER
Chairman
MARVA PERRIN
Recorder
JEWISH WOMEN'S ASSEMBLY COMMITTEE
MAWORIE DERG SHERYL DAVIDOFF
Co-Choirwomen
Nancy Abrams
Renee Bossuk
Barbara Bernstein
Debbie Brass
Irene Dardashfi
Laura Feuer
Mollie Rfterman
Jeanne Glasser
Barbara Goldberg
Stephanie Kleiner
Shirley Mullen
Morjorie Schimelmon
Morcia Shapiro
Doris Singer
Esther Szmukler
Lorraine Virshup
1980'S: A Decade Of Concern Crises In Jewish Life
The managing editor of Moment magazine, Carol Kur, gave the
plenary address entitled "Destruction From Within: Are We
Our Own Worst Enemies?" As Jews, she said, we must worry
about the larger problems of peace in the Mideast, anti-
Semitism, the state of Jewish education in America and inter-
marriage. Listening intently are [left to right] Sheryl Davidoff
and Marjorie Berg, co-chairmen of the JWA; and Julie
Cummings, education vice president for Women's Division.
"Our man in Jerusalem" Zelig Chiniti, director general of the
Israel Office of the United Israel Appeal, Inc., dramitwj
spoke of Israel's needs and issued a personal invitation for i
women to come to Israel and visit with him in Jerusalem.
MM
1 8 B <&9 B^B^^^^
"AC- Wk
8 3 m
tt
I* -
J
Dr. Norma Schulman, clinical Cults and their threat to our
psychologist, conducted a
workshop on the effects and
influences of crises on tradit-
ional Jewish life-styles.
children and our elderly was
the subject of Dr. Sandy
Andron's, youth program
director of the Central Agency
for Jewish Education in
Miami, workshop.
I T^
* H M ^f
J r!tj J|
HPr
^H ^^V^H

Sheila Engelstein [third from left], president
of Women's Division of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach County, presents a tireless enons -
bouquet of roses to thank Sheryl Davidoff success of the Fil
[left], co-chairman of JWA; Lynne Khrlich Women's Assembly.
from left. Wo-ej
's
Diti
for I
a- -wl as ass


Friday, November 26,1983 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 3
Zimmerman To Speak At
jon of Judah Cocktail Reception
Mildred Hecht and Berenice
oeers, co-chairmen of the
Jn of Judah Cocktail Re-
gion, announced that
arrict Zimmerman, national
.airman of the Women's
Syision of the United Jewish
-peal, will be the speaker for
e Lion of Judah Cocktail
reception. The event will be
Id on Dec. 14,4 p.m., at the
me ol Mrs. Jerome New-
ban in Palm Beach.
Mrs. Zimmerman served as
hj 1979-82 Women's Division
Campaign Chairman in
ktlanta, Ga. In addition, Mrs.
fimmerman serves on the
Board of the JDC, the Amer-
bn Jewish Historical Society,
Jewish Telegraphic
Agency, is a delegate to the
Jewish Assembly and is a na-
tional officer of the American
I Public Affairs Com-
nitiee.
Mrs. Zimmerman is a mem-
cr of the Board of Governors
.the American Jewish Com-
nittec as well as the Board of
Harriet M. Zimmerman
the Institute on American
Jewish-Israeli Relations. She is
a member of the Board of the
Atlanta Jewish Federation.
Besides her numerous civic
and community activities,
Mrs. Zimmerman is active in
the Democratic National
Committee and served as Na-
tional Director-Jewish Com-
munity Liaison of the 1976
Cartcr-Mondale Campaign.
She was appointed by Pres-
ident Carter to a six year term
on the National Council for
the Humanities.
"Harriet Zimmerman is a
dynamic speaker who inspires
her audience," stated Mrs.
Rogers. "She will bring her
personal and intimate know-
ledge of Israel and its people
to our women who are
committed to Israel's sur-
vival," added Mrs. Hecht.
Women whose personal
commitment to the annual
Federation-UJA campaign is
$5000 or more receive a Lion
of Judah pin in recognition of
their contribution. The 14K
gold pin which represents the
Lion of Judah category was
inaugurated by the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation
Women's Division in 1972 and
has been adopted by several
communities since its in-
ception.
lorse Geriatric Center Holds Dedication
B> LOUISE ROSS,
Assistant News Coordinator
"This impressive facility,
undcd b\ individuals, is a
htimonj to people who
lure,'* slated Sen. Howard H.
Mcucnbaum (D-OH) in his
Icynotc address ai the dedica-
tion ol the Joseph L. Morse
Ijcriatric Center Sunday, Nov.
1.', As several residents of the
tenter, contributors, and rc-
IrCNeniatives from the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
Bounty looked on, Mctzcn-
fcaum staled that the achieve-
ment of a Jewish Home for the
fged in the Palm Beaches was
i "keeping with the tradition
V (zeddakah giving of
pie's own resources and put-
ling back more of what one
Jas received."
Metzenbaum told the au-
[ience that they have a res-
onsibility to be involved in
jnatier of a political nature.
[This Center needs people in
"it House and Senate who
Icrstand the importance of
p'ping senior citizens. We
an't afford not to be in po-
''," the senator said.
He also urged those present
use their monetary re-
purees as an impact to elect
pends ol Israel to the Senate
lnd House. "We only have
purselves to blame if Israel
loesn'i receive support from
7>e United States."
Heinz Eppler, dedication
inairman, welcomed those
pose commitment brought
P '20-bed long term nursing
p facility to fruition and
Nked Alec Engelstein,
"nan of the building corn-
Fee, lor his "tireless effort
?.?-. en0tion l0 the com-
munity."
Myron Nickman, general
Em f the ,984 Federa-
Ei rcamPai8". who
rwi in for Jeanne Levy,
IJtdent of the Jewish Fed-
E5? of Pa,m Bea<*
tei:h0_w?si''. brought
fee'ngs from the Jewish Fed-
Pon who initiated and saw
ne Project to completion.
lHL,*S A,an Sherman.
PerS?S.rf thc Morse
fez L,CcnlV' dedicated the
lezu*ah, Alec Engelstein
As Rabbi Alan Sherman (standing, right], chaplain of the Morse
Geriatric Center, offers blessings and prayers of dedication,
Alec Engelstein [standing, left], chairman of the building com-
mittee, and H. Erwin Blonder, president of the Board of
Trustees, Join him in dedicating the mezuzah for the Center.
Seated on the podium are [left to right] E. Drew Gackenheimer,
executive director; Heinz Eppler, chairman of the dedication
committee; I. Edward Adler, public relations director, and
Senator Howard H. Metzenbaum, keynote speaker.
presented a symbolic key to
thc new facility to Erwin H.
Blonder, president of the
Board of Trustees. Blonder
paid tribute to the dedicated
volunteer corps who "help the
residents maintain a link with
the community." He also re-
affirmed the link between the
Center and the Jewish Federa-
tion of Palm Beach County.
E. Drew Gackenheimer,
executive director, stated that
it was important to "develop
specialized new programs for
the elderly." These programs
would include outreach to the
community in the areas of
adult day care, congregate
housing, hospice and others.
Gackenheimer stressed that
thc staff of the Center played a
key role in insuring that a high
quality of life would be main-
tained for the residents.
Anita Anton, president of
the Residents Council, re-
ceived a warm round of ap-
plause as she sincerely thanked
the community for their ef-
forts in making a Jewish home
for the aged a reality and
giving all the residents a
"wonderful place to live."
Senator Howard H. Met-
zenbaum [I)., Ohio] gave the
keynote address. He stressed
the importance of supporting
services for the elderly and
that the community should
take pride in the beautiful
facility it has built for its
senior citizens.
The Palm Beach County Jewish community has grown
over the past two decades into one of the fastest growing
Jewish communities in this country. We have been suc-
cessful in building a strong and viable Jewish community
because of the many dedicated men and women who have
built and will continue to build a strong foundation upon
which this community will thrive. We now introduce you
to more of our .
Community Builders
1984 Federation
Committee Chairmen
the Jewish Federation ot
Palm Beach County
Chaired the Advisory
Council for the Jewish
Community Center's
Comprehensive Senior
Service Center for four
years; member of Federa-
tion Community Planning
Committee; volunteer at
Community Mental
Health Center; founding
president of Bloomfield,
N.J. ORT; past member
of Palm Beach County's
Coalition for ERA; at-
tending Nova University
in Master's Program for
Counseling Psychology.
Helen Hauben, chairman
Council on the Aging of
Nathan Kosowski, chair-
man Jewish Education
Committee of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County Engineer with
Pratt and Whitney;
Masters in Engineering
from Rensselaer Polytech-
nic Institute and Masters
in Economics from New
School for Economics;
currently president Jewish
Family and Children's
Service and member of the
Community Planning
Committee of Federation;
past president of Temple
Beth David and chairman
of its Youth Committee;
past member of Midrasha
Committee, Israel
Scholarship Committee
and Campaign Cabinet of
Federation; worked with
Russian Jewish immi-
grants through the Jewish
Family and Children's
Service.
JEWISH
FEDERATION
OFPA1M0EACH
COUNTY
Join them in helping
to Share the Vision
Over 500 people attended the formal dedication ceremonies of
the Joseph L. Morse Geriatric Center [Jewish Hone for the
Aged], Nov. 13. Several residents of the Center came oat to sec
their home, and the people who helped make it possible,
recognized.


Page 4 The Jewiah Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday. November 26,1983
Forty-three Chaplain Aides met in the Federation offices to hear
Lois Gackenheimer, lecturer and writer on the subject of
gerontology, stress that a volunteer's caring about the elderly
patient can be more effective than drugs administered for
Affective Disorders.
A Nurse's View of Geriatric
Care Presented At
Chaplaincy Meeting
By MURRAY J. KERN
Chairman
Chaplain Aide Program
"Time and the human
resource is generally more
effective than drugs in the
treatment of the elderly in
nursing homes," was a major
point made by Lois Frady
Gackenheimber, RN, guest
speaker at the First Seminar
Workshop Meeting, 1983-84
of the Jewish Federation
Chaplain Aide Program,
Tuesday, Nov. 8, at Federa-
tion offices.
Mrs. Gackenheimer, lec-
turer and writer on the subject
of gerontology, told the 43
Chaplain Aides and guests
gathered for the meeting, that
the work of the volunteer in
transmitting a message of
'caring' to the elderly resident
can be more effective than
drugs administered for
Affective Disorders without
side effects.
Calling on her long exper-
ience as a nurse and supervisor
for 400 nurses at the Hebrew
Rehabilitation Center for the
Aged in Roslindale, Massa-
chusetts, Mrs. Gackenheimer
also sees an important role of
the volunteer as a conveyor of
information from the resident
to the nurse. She noted that
the volunteer generally has
more time to spend with the
resident in friendly corner-.
sation than the professional.
Because of the 'friend to
friend' relationship, the
resident may reveal feelings to
the volunteer, which when
discussed with the profes-
sional, leads to improved
treatment.
Describing the role of the
nurse, Mrs. Gackenheimer
presented a chart which
showed the difference between
the nurse's responsibility in
the nursing home and the
hospital. Th<* health of the
nursing home resident is more
dependent on the nurse in
contrast to the hospital where
Lois Frady Gackenheimer,
RN, was the guest speaker at
the First Seminar Workshop
Meeting of the Jewish Federa-
tion of Palm Beach County
Chaplain Aide Program.
the doctor assumes the greater
responsibility for the overall
health of the patient. She said
that this highlights a serious
weakness in the treatment of
the elderly in many geriatric
facilities, namely, the shortage
of qualified devoted nurses
due to the lower pay scale in
nursing homes versus
hospitals. Some nurses are
reluctant to work in a geriatric
milieu.
On the brighter side, Mrs.
Gackenheimer described some
effective new drugs for the
treatment of ailments that are
common among older per-
sons. She pointed to the
development of human insulin
for diabetes and the portable
infusion pump, computerized
to deliver the correct amount
of insulin automatically. It is
not yet on the market for
general use. She described new
drugs for Osteo and
Rhematoid Arthitis which
are oral, non-steroidal and
anti-inflammatory. She also
mentioned new effective drugs
for the treatment of asthma.
She advised that the U.S.
Department of Health and
_____Continued on Page 6-
the
School Board Votes
To Table Religious Ban
The Palm Beach School
Board, in a meeting Nov. 16 at
Jupiter Elementary School,
voted 6-0 to table the pro-
posed ban on religious activity
in the public schools. The pro-
posal, submitted by School
Superintendent Thomas Mills,
would have limited religious
club meetings to after school
hours and prohibit religious
programs which had as its
specific purpose proselytizing
or indoctrination into the
tenets of any religious group.
However, it would have al-
lowed prayers before sports
events and certain ceremonies
like graduation exercises.
Under the new guideline
religious clubs would only be
allowed to meet in school
facilities at least a half hour
after school ends which, ac-
cording to Mills, would have
brought the School Board into
conformity with the law of the
land regarding rigid separation
of church and state.
However, Ted Williams,
executive director of the
Rutherford Institute, a non-
profit Christian organization,
who came down from Wash-
ington D.C. to speak before
the School Board, disagreed
with Mills' interpretation.
Williams said that if the pro-
posed new policy were ac-
cepted, he would consider
bringing suit against the
School Board.
Williams was given the time
slot of three ministers enabling
the School Board to hear his
objections extensively, ac-
cording to Rabbi Howard
Shapiro. He attended the
Continued on Page 12
Statement Delivered
To School Board
On behalf of the Palm Beach County Board of RaKh
the Community Relations Councils of the Jewish F#i
and t
crations of
Palm Beach
is
ish Fed-
County and South County I
welcome this opportunity to communicate our position',,!
the proposed policy on religious activities in our nutS
school system. We have long regarded the principle of
religious liberty and separation of church and state a
fundamental to American society. We further believe that
the American public school system, free and
sectarian, is one of the most precious
American democracy.
non-
Products of
In reviewing these guidelines we must tell you that*?
do have serious concerns about prayers offered durini
special ceremonies. Yet nevertheless, we believe that taken
as a whole these proposed guidelines.serve the best interests
of all pupils enrolled in our school system. We would
therefore urge you to act upon them favorably.
As a nation of people attached to many different
religious faiths, or to none, we owe our survival and our
unity to the universal acceptance of the uniquely American
concept that the relationship between man and God mav
not be subject to government control and regulation. The
maintenance and further, nee of religion are the respon-
sibility of the synagogue, the church and the home, and
not of the public school sy tern.
The public schools must recognize the realities of
religious differences in the community and among their
pupils. They should continue as they have done through-
out their history to teach pupils that acceptance of and
respect for such differences are basic to American
democracy and contribute toward harmonious living in a
free society. Where religious differences among pupils are
ignored it is the children of minority faiths who are injured
most severely.
The Supreme Court decisions have not prevented
children from observing the faith prompted by their
consciences or the teachings of their parents. And, ex-
perience shows that those decisions have not undermined
America's religious faith. On the contrary, they have stood
as a reminder and symbol of the freedom of conscience
that is America's proudest tradition. Thank you.
Perhaps the most popular
play in Soviet drama is
Chekhov's "The Three Sis-
ters, a wort of fiction. This
week we report on three other
sisters, Jewish, L YDIA
KLAUDIA and TAMARA,
living today in the USSR- a
story of fact.
Jewish f lor idian
of Palm Baacn County
Combmmp, Our Vweo" and 'Fadaration Waportar"
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HW fed PuMMhat Eiacutwa Editor Maw Coordinator
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MaM Offleat Plant: 120 NEBth St. yiami.Fl 33101 Phona I 373^006
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Combined Jatafi Anu Jiateli Padaraticm of Palm Beach County, mc OSBeaji Preetdent. Jeanne
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Tanan Secretary Or EMiebeth %. Piejlloh; Treasurer. AMn WMeneky Submit material to Ronm
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Fader at on of Patm Baach County. 501 S Fleeter Or. Meet Palm Baacn. Fia 33401 Phona 32
21 SO Out Of Town Upon FiumIM
Friday. November 26,1963 19 KISLEV 5744
Volume 9 Number 37
KLAUDIA and TAMARA
are twins. They grew up in the
Ukraine, with their elder sister
LYDIA. In the early seventies,
their parents died and the girls
decided they wanted to go to
Israel. At that time the auth-
orities insisted that educated
applicants must first repay the
state for any higher education
they had had and all three girls
had been to secondary
schools.
They moved to the Black
Sea port of Sukhumi, in the
Georgian Republic, in the
hope that things would be
easier there. In 1973, the
authorities decided to waive
he Education Tax and the
iisters put in their applications
for a visa. The Yom Kippur
War broke out and the auth-
orities told them "it would not
be in their interests to move to
so dangerous an area."
KLAUDIA, a teacher, got a
job in a restaurant belonging
to the Ministry of Air Defense;
TAMAR, an accountant, got a
job as a waitress. Both mar-
ried and had children.
KLAUDIA's son, ALEXAN-
DER, was 10 years old when
they applied; TAMARA's
sons, ANATOLY and MIK-
HAIL were six and five. It was
LYDIA who refused to take
"no" for an answer and
continued to pester the au-
thorities, local, regional and
national, right up to the
Minister for Internal Affairs,
and to LEONID BREZHNEV
himself.
Then, in 1979, LYDIA got
permission and was allowed to
leave. KLAUDIA and
TAMARA were assured "that
once LYDIA had arrived in
Israel and sent them a vysov
(an official invitation) there
was no impediment to them
joining her."
In 1981, KLAUDIA was
called in by the police and
questioned in connection with
a fire which had broken out in
the "Rossiya" Hotel in
Moscow. When she was able
to prove that she'd never been
to Moscow in her life and was
on duty at the restaurant they
were forced to let her go.
Nevertheless, she was
dismissed from her job and
Voices of Soviet Jewish Women
Three Sisters.. .A Tale Of Waiting j
told to quit the Hat she
living in on the groundsthatii
was Ministry property. Sfc
and ALEXANDER moved
withTAMARA'slamily.
Then it was TAMARA's
turn. First she was demoted
from waitress to cleaning
woman, then told thai w
building she worked in.*
Komsomol (Young to*
munist League) house, wasno
place for a person who wiw
to live in Israel and she los
that job. Also, she comply
to "Chelovek iZakonl M"
and the Law") a jl
informing citizens oi j
legal rights. She got *
swer.
Increasingly anxious aboj
her sisters. LYDIA. JJ
married to an Israeli, appeal
to the Soviet authonuesandw
the United Nations M
Rights Commission-W
particularly worr,^J
ALEXANDER was JjJ
the age when he couWI bem
scripted into 'he ArJi
was aware that *JfrT
now widowed, would hen"
"refused" for another *"|
years at least.
KLAUDIA and TAMJJ
put a brave face on J
taught themselves HW"
learned Israeli songs
waited. The three bo "
synagogue as regula I)
possibl?and also taugW,
selves Hebrew ... 5,
decade and they all JL
London, June I98J.


Update .Opinion
Friday, November 25,1983 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 5
By TOBY F. WILK
Moscow Kindergarten
V raided by the KGB. The
jjldren were interrogated and
biffed. The daughter of
,ris Fridman (head of the
leningrad Jewish Choral
bsemble) was questioned in
;hool and told to denounce
:r father.
J Yuri Tarnopolsky, a refuse-
Ik Chemist, was sentenced to
Iree years in a Soviet labor
imp on trumped-up charges
tsed on his Jewish cultural
ttivities. His 12 year old
Lughter wrote Andropov
(king for her father's release.
]ie received no reply. In con-
ast, when a 10 year old
Imerican girl wrote to
Indropov, she received an
[slant and well publicized re-
ly and free trip with her
trents to the Soviet Union.
The Greek Government is
ie only EEC member to ac-
Did diplomatic status to the
ILO.
trnest Boyer, President of
|e Carnegie Foundation for
fc Advancement of Teaching,
a leading non-Jewish
ducator. In his report on
Jccondary Education in
fcicrica, Buyer recommended
Li courses in High Schools
kcludc the Holocaust. He
eclared students "need to be
hade aware of the web which
Ic call civilization and how
usily ii can be lorn asunder."
Bramson OKI, the only
rcluiical college in the U.S.
Iider Jewish auspices, is res-
mding to the problems of
hiciiiployinent by training the
Iblcsh for high-technology
iccrs. Biunison has modest
ilion and gives financial aid
lubliiig students to attend
piling ihe day, evenings, or
indays, lull or part time.
[According to a stud\ In
pniicsl} Intel national,' the
hililvss Syrian Government of
licMdciii Assad in as sac I cd
loin lU.iHK) to :t),(H)0 people
Jlhc ancient City of llama in
P'N-. Many aliocilics were
trpetraied aguinsi innocent
Ihabitanis. Was there a
Viing of the UN Security
jouncil? Of course not. All of
J* people killed at Hama were
man citizens. If the Syrians
prnmit such crimes against
feir own people, what would
fey do against Israelis if ever
venthe chance.
Jfto\ar Park, a memorial
w 200,000 Jews and others
Ffcrcd near Kiev by the
Nsduring WW II, will open
a"> m Denver. The Park
* a message not alone for
[*ish nghis but for human
W"> ol all people. Park
[hires include a "talking
pument," activated by a
Jh-button which tells vi-
P Hie story of Babi Yar.
lP.irk has features designed
'eiuamd visitors of the
nn i l'ars' ,mP"sonment and
JWcssness experienced by
fiocaust victims.
[Koshcr rood is now availa-
C h;al sPwial vending
K^3'JFK International
In the words of the Kuwaiti
^assador, the U.N.
onsored Conference on
C* n Geneva was a
|Wp. The Conference cost
r U.N. Seven Million Dol-
r and resulted once again in
anti-Israel declarations by
extremist Arabs. Arafat's
clumsy performance alienated
millions of Catholics around
the world by stating at a news
conference that "Jesus was the
first militant Palestine
fedayeen."
Israel, at great cost to her-
self, has absorbed 700,000
Jews from Arab countries.
Would that Hussein, with an
area of about 36,000 square
miles, would absorb the
600,000 Arabs of Judea and
Samaria.
SHEPP NACHAS
Fortune magazine published
a special section describing Is-
rael as a "New World Center
for Technology." The little
nation of miracles, within a
short time and despite a*i
odds, rose from poverty and
hunger in her formative years
to worldwide esteem in tech-
nological advances.
A popular Soviet children's
newspaper with nationwide
circulation carries virulent
anti-semitic articles.
In Argentina, the infamous
"Protocols of the Elders of
Zion" are disseminated by the
Army, and anti-Semitic litera-
ture is freely sold at street
kiosks. Fifteen hundred Jews
have been kidnapped. Many
of them were not active in
movements opposed to the
military junta in Argentina.
They were kidnapped because
they are Jews.
If Sam Breakstone hadn't been so
meshuggah about his sour cream
and cottage cheese in 1882, they wouldn't
taste so good today.
100 years ago, Sam Breakstone had a reputation for being a demanding man.
A very demanding man.
Good wasn't good enough for Sam. His sour cream and cottage cheese had to
be as fresh, as natural, and as delicious as they could possibly be.
And because Sam was so demanding then, fas sour cream and cottage cheese
tastes so delicious now.
Right now, you can demand 10< off both Breakstone's sour cream and cottage
cheese by redeeming these coupons.
CERTIFIED KOSHER
9HT2EE OOEhT
3$zeafatoneb
1(K
1
STORE
COUPON
Mr. Grocer: Kraft, Inc. will reim-
burse you for the face value of this
coupon plus It handling allowance
provided you'redeemed it on your
retail sales of the named product(s)
and that upon request you agree to
furnish proof of purchase of suffi-
cient product to cover all redemp-
tions. Coupon is void in Wisconsin
SAVE lOe ON ANY SIZE
BREAKSTONES COTTAGE CHEESE.
or where taxed, prohibited, or
restricted by law, and may not be
assigned or transferred by you.
Cash value l/20e. Customer must
pay applicable sales tax. For
redemption, mail to Kraft, Inc.
Dairy Group, P.O. Box 1799. Clin-
ton. Iowa 52734.
maoo sasma
SbEiES QQEhT
Mr. Grocer: Kraft. Inc. will reim-
burse you for the face value of this
coupon plus 7c handling allowance
provided you redeemed it on your
retail sales of the named product(s)
and that upon request you agree to
furnish proof of purchase of suffi-
cient product to cover all redemp-
tions. Coupon is void in Wisconsin
SAVE 10* ON ANY SIZE
BREAKSTONE'S SOUR CREAM.
vteb
COUPON
1(K
or where taxed, prohibited, or
restricted by law, and may not be
assigned or transferred by you.
Cash value l/20. Customer must
pay applicable sales tax. For
redemption, mail to Kraft. Inc.
Dairy Group, P.O. Box 1799. Clin-
ton. Iowa 52734.
0MBtM>4/M
1M3DQ 23731s


Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Bech County Friday, November 26, 1983
The Jewish Educators Council of Palm Beach Coaaty and the
Jewish education Committee of the Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach Coaaty recently sponsored a Fall la-Service Teacher
Workshop at Temple Beth El. Simon Kops, artist and Jewish
Educator, showed over 50 teachers how to utilize the arts in the
Jewish classroom. Mr. Kops [left] illustrates creative projects
lor Temple Beth David teachers, [left to right] Donna Block aad
Ruth Wall.
The teachers were shown how to make craft items with their
students that can be categorized as fast, clean and cheap.
Teachers begin to make a Chanukah card complete with an
expandable dreidl.
With G. Washington's* Seasoning
and Broth you'll never have
mish-mash kasha!
^ mm*
I *>.

K CwtMrt Uttm art Pinrt
G. WASHINGTON S
RICH BROWN KASHA
1 Vj cups buckwheat groats
1 tag. well beaten
3 caps boiling water
\
i
i
When you're trying to give
your kasha an extra special
flavor you can sometimes add
too much of this, not enough
of that and end up with a
mish-mash Next time, use
one complete seasoning Use
G Washington s Rich Brown
Seasoning and Broth when you
cook your kasha No mere food
enhancer. G Washington's
special blend of herbs
and spices flavors your food
more ways than one for one
great dish So don't settle for
mishmash kasha Enioy
geschmak kasha'
3 packets G. Washington's
Rich Brown Seasoning and Broth
Combine the groats and egg m a saucepan over low heat, until the groats
separate Stir in water and G Washington s Cover and cook over to*
heat for 15 minutes All water should be absorbed, if not. dram Serve as
a side dish with melted butter Serves 6
STATE OF
ISRAEL BONDS
BOUGHT AND SOLD
Invest in
Israel Securities

WERE SPECIALISTS IN
ISRAEL SECURITIES
***
TRANSACTIONS DAILY VIA TELEX
TO ISRAEL STOCK EXCHANGE
Leumi
A SuMianty <* Bank Umh ihhi S M
NASD
18 East 48th Street
New York, NY. 10017
Securities (212)759-1310
atiCMl Toll Free (800) 221-48381
Chaplaincy
Meeting
Continued from Page 4
Human Services for disease
control suggests vaccination
with influenza virus for all
individuals of increased risk
to be done at this time.
"Drugs for dementia and
related Hisorders," Mrs.
Gackenheimer said, "should
not be administered before
determining the cause of the
ailment. And," she added,
"without personal contact, the
effectiveness of the drug is
greatly diminished and can
lead to over-dosage with
deleterious side-effects."
Mrs. Gackenheimer con-
cluded by cautioning the
Chaplain Aides to keep in
mind that the nursing facility
is "a home" first and health
care is secondary. She
congratulated the Volunteer
Aides for their enthusiastic
interest in the subject of
gerontology and their work
with nursing home residents
whom she had observed at the
Joseph L. Morse Geriatric
Center. She had acted as
Supervisor of Nurses to get the
Morse facility started. She is
the wife of Drew Gacken-
heimer, Administrator of the
Morse Center. She is now
Director of Nurses for Medi-
Cross Nursing Services, Inc.
Her writings published in
professional journals include
"Living Arrangements That
Promote High Quality Institu-
tional Long Term Care," "An
Effective Behavior Modifi-
cation Milieu Therapy Pro-
gram for the Aged," "Clinical
Management Confused
Elderly."
The Seminar Workshop
Meeting inaugurated the fifth
year of the Federation
Chaplaincs which is under the
direction ot Rabbi Alan R.
Sherman. Rabbi Sherman
distributed an interesting
article on "Helpful Tips for
Nursing Home Visiting" and
announced that a brochure on
the uncoming Chanukah
Festival will be distributed to
all nursing homes. The
brochure describes the signifi-
cance of the holiday, tradi-
tional foods that may be
served to the Jewish residents,
songs and includes many
suggestions to aid in the cele-
bration.
Jeanne Glasser, Co-Chair-
man of the Chaplain Aide
Program, reminded the Aides
of some guidelines that should
be observed when visiting at
the nursing homes and in
hospitals. Jeanne, assisted by
Bea Kern, arranged for the
collation which highlighted the
social preceding the meeting.
Chanukah programs will be
conducted at 15 facilities for
jthe elderly and other institu-
tions by members of the
Chaplain Aide Program with
the assistance of children from
the Hornstein Jewish Com-
munity Day School, a choir
from Temple Israel, a dance
group from Century Village
under the direction of Sylvia
Fried and Cantor Elaine
Shapiro ol Temple Beth El.
Persons desiring to become
members of the Chaplain Aide
Program may call the office of
the Chaplain, 832-2120.
Meet The
Authors
Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2:30-5
p.m., the Jewish Community
Center, 2415 Okeechobee
Blvd., will be hosting a very
unique group of authors,
according to Jean Rubin,
director of the Center's Com-
prehensive Senior Service
Center.
"Members of our Writers
Workshop who meet at the
Center in cooperation with the
School Board of Palm Beach
County's Adult Community
Education will launch their
newly published book, 'Pat-
terns, Parody, Poetry and
Prose.' Their instructor, Ruth
K. Graham, encouraged our
writers between the ages of 60
and 96 to expand their crea-
tivity and share their writings
with others," stated Mrs.
Rubin.
The Writers Workshop has
been in existence since 197,
and two of the original J 7
bers Esther Mola?M
Kant, are still with the .,
In 1979, instructo? SB'
bury helped the ^
their first collection ^i
writings. Their creativity^
also recognized in 1982 *hl
the Palm Beach v3
Times and the Palmf^
County Department of ?2
and Recreation ran a Senior
Citizens Story Telling Come?
Twelve members of the Jfr
Writers Workshop were recii
lents of awards with Harry
Kurtz winning two of
major prizes.
"Patterns, Parody, Poeir,
and Prose" published by th!
Publishing Department of tht
Palm Beach County Public
Schools will be available after
Nov. 29 at the Center. Call for
more details.
AMERICA'S PLUMPEST PITTED PRUNES
AMERICA'S FAVORITE FIGS
AMERICA'S RAISIN CHOICE
They're America's favorite noshes. When yy"JFigs
one. you'll know why. Sunsweet" Prunes. Blue wooo
and Sun-Moid* Roisins each hove o fresh ^JJ^J, t0
sweet taste you won't find anywhere else Ada
your holiday recipes for more flavor and nurrn .
Or nosh rhem whenever you hove the notion
certified kosher!
C Jun Damond 0'O 1 1903


Friday, Novemb*25,1988/The Jewish Floridiaii of Palm Beach County Page 7
Horowitz Appointed Chief
Professional Officer Of UJA
bsi
NEW YORK Stanley B.
[orowitz, executive director
the Jewish Community
deration of Cleveland Oh.,
* been appointed chief pro-
isional officer of the na-
,nal United Jewish Appeal,
,jA President Herschel W.
lumberg announced today on
half of the organization s
3ard of Trustees.
Horowitz is assuming the
rofessional reins of a corn-
lex and far-flung mterna-
onal organization that main-
,1ns offices in five geographic
.gions in the United States
Stanley B. Horowitz
>ris Singer, well known
immunal leader, will receive
(e National Council of Jew-
Women Hannah G. Solo-
'ii Award at the organiza-
lin's Annual Support Lunch-
iin to he held at the Breakers
Hotel in Palm Beach, Wed-
nesday, Jan. 25 at noon. The
Hannah G. Solomon Award is
presented to an outstanding
woman who has helped to
change and expand the role of
other women in vital areas of
community life, and whose-
leadership has motivated others
to fight for change. "We are
delighted that Doris Singer has
been chosen to be honored at
our Annual Support Lunch-
eon, marking the 90th An-
niversary of the national orga-
nization." said Doris King,
president of the Palm Beach
Section. "Her boundless
enthusiasm, devotion to many
causes, and rare ability to
work with everyone were
major factors in organizing
and developing the Palm
Beach. Section into the suc-
cessful one it is."
and in Israel. In 1982 UJA
raised $568.7 million in part-
nership with more than 600
federated and non-federated
communities nationwide, to
provide humanitarian services
to Jews in need throughout the
world.
Horowitz is the first UJA
chief to come from the local
Jewish federation movement.
"As a result," Blumberg
stated, "he is expected to have
a major influence in further
strengthening the relationship
between UJA and local com-
munities."
"The chief professional of-
ficer of UJA plays a critical
role in American Jewish com-
munal life," Blumberg added.
"He directs UJA's efforts to
raise funds for Jewish needs
around the globe and is a vital
instrument for raising Jewish
consciousness. 1 am delighted
that we found such a highly
qualified and experienced
individual for this demanding
position."
Horowitz, 49, served as a
member of the executive staff
at the Jewish Community Fed-
eration of Cleveland for 18
years in positions of increasing
responsibility, including cam-
paign director and planning
director, prior to becoming
executive director in 1975.
New Israeli designer fash-
ions emphasizing the polish
and sophistication of the
season will be shown under the
auspices of the Women's Divi-
sion of State of Israel Bonds.
Internationally known de-
signers team up with up-and-
coming houses for the annual
gala fashion event to be held at
The Breakers on Dec. 15 at 12
noon.
Fashion is a major revenue
producer for Israel. The tiny
Mideast country, now cele-
brating its 35th year of exis-
tence, created its fashion in-
dustry with design, talent and
craftsmanship that flowed to
the country with immigrants
from over 70 lands. Its de-
. velopment came with ihe he\p
Polish and
Sophistication
Dramatize
Israel
Fashion Show
of Israel Bond investment
funds, channeled through Is-
rael's Development Budget.
Sensationally modern and
elegantly designed, the '83
styles depict a whole way of
dressing for leisure, for
work, for weekends, for day
and for night. The fashions
flow and move for enormous
impact and freedom.
On view will be haute
couture designs by Raquell
Biba, Lisa Boker, Oded Gera
and Gideon Oberson. Ready-
to-wear collections are by
Beged-Or, Biba, Diva, Gottex,
Honigman, Gabi Model,
Niba, Gideon Oberson,
Papco, Scharf, Sixteen Plus
and Tadmor.
Telephone (505) 659-7400
Res. 798-0225
DAVID M. WEISS
Sales Representative
Schooley Cadillac, inc.
414 Third Street
west Palm Beach, Fia.
Menorahs and Dreldels
for your Holiday Celebration
Giltware and Jewelry
for your holiday giving
All imported exclusively from Israel
Military & Okeechobee Cross Country Mall
471-4274
Burkina


Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of Pahn Beach County / Friday. November 25, 1983
4Thursday for a night of fun.
Ifot information contact Ruth
Rubin, Sussex F-101.
Organizations in the News
B'NAI B'RITH
A Chanukah Party will be
the theme of the next meeting
of B'nai B'rith Yarhad Unit of
Palm Beach County. This will
be held at Temple Emeth, 5780
W. Atlantic Ave., Delray
Beach, on Wednesday evening
on Nov. 30 at 7:30 p.m.
Students of the Royal Palm
Children's Theatre under the
direction of Hank Markat will
offer a program of song and
dance.
WOMEN'S AMERICAN
ORT
Women's American ORT,
Covered Bridge Chapter, Lake
Worth, will be holding their
Paid-Up Membership Lunch-
eon on Thursday, Dec. 1, at 12
noon.
All paid-up members are
invited to attend. Entertain-
ment by Herb and Annabel
Aronson.
I______
The Lake Worth West
Chapter of Women's Ameri-
can ORT will be holding their
paid-up membership luncheon
on Monday, Nov. 28, at I
p.m. at the Sunrise Bank,
corner Gun Club Rd. and Mil-
itary Trail. A Chanukah
musical program is planned
and members are asked to
bring their Menorahs and
candles to the meeting. Mem-
bers many bring guests, but
there will be an admission
charge for guests of $3.
The next regular meeting of
Mid-Palm Chapter of Wom-
en's American ORT will be
held on Nov. 28 at 1 p.m. at
Senior Citizens Center, 201
North Dixie Hwy., Lake
Worth. Entertainment will be
a Chanukah program con-
ducted by Cantor Irving Char-
ney, which will include Cha-
nukah music and a candle
lighting ceremony.
Dec. 12 Mother to
another paid-up luncheon
Royce Hotel $1 per person.
Dec. 19 Paid-up mem-
bership luncheon to be held at
Temple Beth Sholom, 315
North "A" St., Lake Worth.
For further information please
call Ida Mozzor.
Dec. 24 Gigi Stage
Theatre, Saturday matinee
$10 per person. For further in-
formation contact Lee Roth,
Lee Levine, or Connie Duck-
man.
Women's American ORT,
Covered Bridge Chapter. Lake
Worth, will be holding their
Third Annual Flea Market on
Sunday, Nov. 27 at Super X
Drugs, Parking Lot, Military
Trail and Southern Blvd., 8
a.m. to 4 p.m.
A large assortment of
Ladies, Men's and Children's
Apparel, Housewares, Jewelry
will be offered at low prices.
BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY
Lake Worth Chapter of
Brandeis National Women's
Committee will sponsor a
Guided tour and luncheon to
Grove Isle on Dec. 16. Grove
Isle is a private island on Bis-
cayne Bay. There will be a
viewing of the Sculpture Gar-
dens which include works by
Alexander Calder, Isamu
Nogouchi, Louise Nevelson
and many famous artists.
Luncheon will be served at
one of the restaurants on
Grove Isle. Transportation
will be by a private bus and
limited to 40 persons. Dona-
tion for the tour is $23.
HADASSAH
On Sunday, Dec. 4, Shalom
West Palm Beach Chapter of
Hadassah will participate iri
"Hello Hadassah Day."
There will be a telethon and
programs to acquaint the
community with the activities
of Hadassah, the largest
Zionist organization in the
world. Nev. members are
welcome. For information,
contact Tillie Becker (Ply-
mouth L 96) or Ida Goldstein
(Stratford L 196).
Other Events: Sunday, Dec.
18 Flea Market at Century
Corners, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Contact Bertha Rubin or Lil
Schack.
Dec. 15 Israel Bond
Luncheon and Fashion Show
at the Breakers. Call Lillian
Dorf.
Jan. 4 Luncheon and
Matinee perlormance ot "Bye
Bye Birdie," at Burt Reynolds
Theatre. Call Ida Goetz or
Sylvia Poznick.
Lee Vassil Hadassah coming
events:
Dec. 4 Hadassah Sunday.
Jan. 17 HMO Luncehon
at Royce Hotel.
Jan. 26 Bus Trip to Bass
Museum to see the Jewish
Artifacts and on to the Vis-
cay a Museum.
Our December meeting will
feature a Fashion Show with
clothes from the Hadassah
Resale Store.
Iamar Royal Palm Beach
Chapter of Hadassah is having
its next meeting on Monday,
Nov. 28 at 12:30 in the Village
Hall in Royal Palm Beach.
Come early for refreshments,
and see the beautiful selection
2250 Palm Baach Lakes Boulevard Suit* 104
WMt Palm Baach, Florida 33409
JEWISH FAMILY AND CHILDREN'S SERVICE
An outstanding piotassional and counsalmg agency serving the
Jawish community of Palm Baach County. Professional and
confidant lal halp it available for
Problams of the aging
Consultation and
avatuation services
Marital counsalmg
Parant-chlld conflicts
Parsonal problems
684-1991
Tn# J#wt#h
### Cn4>T9#d W\ fa)0Wy Mid
can pay (Face an bated on Income end I aatj aM
i Tamik\mi ChaWn'a tanHoaa to a howoftclary
F#o#fittoci Of P4>lwi B##cn County.
la
The next meeting of Olam
Chapter, B'nai B'rith Women
will be held Thursday, Dec. 1
at 12 noon in the Poinciana
Room of Challenger Country
Club.
This First Day of Chanukah
is a paid-up membership
|UiTcneonFfoVl983"'wYuoe'n'eid luncheon and traditional
the Indian Trail Country Latke Party.
of gift son display.
Our paid-up membership
ai
Club on Dec. 5 at 12 o'clock.
Latke Party. A minimal
charge of $2 for members and
$4 for guests will be charged to
help defray expenses. Our
Rishona Palm Beach Chap- guest speaker will be Rabbi
ter of Hadassah, is haying Howard Shapiro who will ad-
their annual Youth Aliyah dress us on "Beyond the
Luncheon on Monday, Dec. 5, Miracle of Oil," giving new
at 12 noon, at the new Royce meaning to Chanukah.
Hotel. A delightful program ______
has been planned for the after-
noon, including the return en-
gagement (by popular
demand) of the Palm Beach
Piano Quartet, directed by
Sylvia Brainan. The profes-
sional performers are Selma
Cohen, Sadie Danziger, Doro-
thy Goldberg, Dorothy Green-
baum and Fannie Ushkow.
For reservations, please call
Madeline Edelstein, or Celia
Reich.
B'NAI B'RITH
WOMEN
Menorah Chapter of B'nai
B'rith Women will meet Dec.
13 at the American Savings
Bank at 1 p.m., boutique 12
noon. Estelle Baumann and
the Actors Group will per-
form. Refreshments served.
Coming events: Dec. 14,
"Bye Bye Birdie" at the Burl
Reynolds Dinner Theatre,
dinner and bus included. Dec.
25, Royal Palm Dinner
Theatre for dinner and show
"Annie." Jan. 18, Poinciana
Theatre lor "Brighton Beach
Memoirs." Jan. 31, Visit to
Bass Museum in Miami to see
vast collection ot Jewish Arti-
facts. Games bus goes every
Mini-Card party, Monday,
Dec. 5, 12 noon at Temple
Beth Sholom, Lake Worth.
For tickets contact Irma Wax-
man, Cynthia Nembenhaus,
or Mildred Perry. Contribu-
tion $3.50.
B'nai B'rilh Women of
Boynton Beach will hnu
meeting Monday rw ,
: afia
Hyde, Program'cli,
will present Ann PS
Jewish Education Dir^
BeWachhrFederati0n ?
Beach County, who *,
summer program in hj
Reservations still arc a,
able for our New Year,!
end Dec. 31 -Jan. 2 c*
Call Mildred Perry' *
Lubin.
DEBORAH HOSPITAL
FOUNDATION
Deborah Hospital Fan
tion. Palm Beach Chanter!
meeting Anshei Shnl
Wednesday, Dec. |f|
noon.
PIONEER WOMEN.
NA'AMAT
Theodore Herd Chb
Pioneer Women-NiAi*,
hold their regular mceiinn
Dec. I. 1 p.m., a, lhe8
Worth Shuffleboard Co
1121 Lucerne Ave.
Program: Irene Stewart i.
Musical Group will perform.
ORT An American Present
Jean Zugman, Hollywood Helen Bilawsky President;
Delegation Chairman of the presenting 26,000 ORT vc*
220 member delegation of teer members in eight Soa
Women's American ORT eastern states came together
DISTRICT VI to the 27th Na- deliberate plans for deepcai
lional Biennial Convention, the OKI presence in
reported unanimous approval United States.
for the planned opening of the The Jewish High Scho
Los Angeles ORT Technical south Florida is ORT'!,
Institute in 1986. mU) ,hc Jewish Da> Scl
Marcia Light, DISTRICT movement. I lie OR I cxpe
VI President, and leadership ol more thun
from Dade South Loisbeth
Lmunuci, Picsidcnt; Smith
estaein I lorida Region Dale
Main. President; South
Broward Region Joan
toudclman. President; South
Palm Beach County Region
Norma Heit, President; North
Palm Beach c ounty Region
educating an estimated
million people around
world in science and lechi
og>, links with South Hot
youngstcis today. R
Herring, principal ol
school, has charactcriadl
link as "a perfect canal
with Jewish history."
It's haggis, but is it Kosher?
As almost everyone knows, Scots have long been partial to a dish called
haggis. This is a pudding made from the minced meat of a sheep or calf,
combined with seasonings and boiled in a skin casing. But as hardly anyone
knows, there is a shop in Edinburgh where this specialty is truly the most
special. For here is sold the only Kosher haggis in all the British Isles!
Now there is another delicacy for which the Scots have shown
their fondness. And while it, too, is akin to no other, it is one whose
appeal is somewhat broader: fine scotch whisky. Why, even Americans
have shown themselves partial to this spirit, and the one they prefer is
JckB Rare Scotch. For its flavor possesses such a soft and mellow
smoothness that it is said to whisper. Which is more than you can say
for haggis.
at psm atmam Scoi* mats* tajaj t RaaaajM corporator,, h. v
]&B. It whispers.


Friday, November 25,1983 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 9
Former Irgun Fighter To
Help Israel Once Again
By LOUISE ROSS
Listant News Coordinator
|A recent article in the
vjsh Floridian about the
eanization, Volunteers for
ael, caught Al Rosoff's
lention. After all, he had
light with the Irgun, an arm
/Israel's underground army,
[ring the War of Indepen-
jnce so helping the Jewish
lie once again was right in
lp with his way of thinking.
|He contacted Benjamin
Inkes, regional co-rordinator
Volunteers for Israel, and
Jfered his services to help
Kiel, this time to alleviate
linpower problems in the
jlitary caused by the
[mbcrs of troops deployed in
Ibanon. Before Rosoff left
Israel on Nov. 22, he was
lerviewed at the Federation
lice where he is the inter-
jficc coordinator.
[Asked what his volunteering
a tour of duty! to help
lael's military will ac-
.nplish, he said, "I'm doing
mething for the State of
rael because I'm relieving a
jldier to go home to be with
i family. I will take' his place
king tanks and armaments
li 30 days," explained
JsolT.
We plans to stay in Israel for
1 additional three weeks to
it his old army buddies and
lends. His eyes sparkle as he
laics how he joined the Irgun
11948. He was 34, had a wife
Id a six-year-old son, but
ncn he heard a representative
diu the Irgun recruit men to
[lend the new Slate of Israel,
I couldn't refuse.
had been discharged
Jin the U.S. Marine Corps
liei serving during WWII. I
lli/ed iliai Israel needed
lople like me and I thought it
V important lor mc to go,"
pied Rosoff.
[Rosofl left New York for
lance to meei the Irgun ship,
Italenna, a picture of which
carries in his wallet along
1th his discharge papers from
|c Israeli Army. He relates
l> he saw action in many
leas and remembers how in-
Tnse the lighting was, es-
fcially in Dcit Nuba.
|"l was due to be relieved
Itcriwo weeks ol lighting the
rabs, but the battle became
intense that we had to stay
P* lor three months. During
i lime, I met my good
*ho is a seventh
fncraiion Sabra born in Jeru-
Wcm."
Illc also remembers that it
pat a church outside of the
Mil in Jerusalem where he
Is lighting to retake the old
|y. that the Davidka was
tented. "We filled a small
ft with gunpowder, nails,
is. etc. and shot it out of a
"'ar:,,was the only way we
M keep the Arab Legion
{J*rs off ,he wall and
Fern them from shooting
lioni us," related Rosoff.
gough the city was not
pn during this war, the
pvwka was a major factor
C conlr'buted to the
jmate SUCcess of the Jews in
E?iL knew Mcnachem
pj who was the leader of
irgun forces during that
bi.u '"ought he was a
rU'"s Iwder and have
'responded with him."
Rosoff turned home to
New York after his two years I am going back as a volunteer
of service. He went bak to visit for Israel's army once again "
Israel in 1965 and 1973. "Now stated Rosoff.
Al Rosoff proudly displays his discharge paper from the Israeli
army. He fought in the Irgun during Israel's War of Indepen-
dence and has recently left for Israel as a volunteer to help
alleviate the military's manpower problems.
\ Radio/TV Highlights JPl'
* MOSAIC Sunday, Nov. 27, 9 a.m. WPTV
Channel 5 Joseph L. Morse Geriatric Center (Jewish
Home for the Aged) Dedication.
* L'CHAYIM Sunday, Nov. 27, 10:30 a.m.
WPBR 1340-AM with host Rabbi Mark S. Golub
The Jewish Listener's Digest, a radio magazine.
JEWISH MUSIC AND CULTURE HOUR Sunday,
Nov. 27, 10 p.m. WHRS-FM Stereo 91 with host Dr.
Simon Silverman.
SHALOM Sunday, Nov. 27, 10 a.m. WPEC
Channel 12 (8:30 a.m. ON TV Channel 51) with host
Richard Peritz.
VIEWPOINT Saturday, Nov. 26, 7:30 p.m.
WPBT Channel 2 featuring a panel discussion on
current South Florida issues with leading community relig-
ious leaders.
FLAMES OF FREEDOM Thursday, Dec. 1, 10:30
p.m. WPBT Channel 2 This program is divided into
eight segments including an interview with Abraham
Gittelson, associate director of CAJE and the Bob Wolf
family of Hollywood, whose son Jerry was killed while
serving in the Israeli Army.
Sponsored by the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County.
where shopping Is o pleasure 7doys a week
ALL PUBLIX BAKERIES OPEN AT 8 AM
Sandwich
Rye or
Pumpernickel
$139
32-oz.
loaf
Cinnamon
Raisin Rolls
6$149


Have a continental breakfast
Croissants
Great for breakfast toast,
Plain English Muffins.............S3: 49
Topped with creamy chocolate icing
Eclairs...................................3 **, "
Serve a delightful treat to your guests during the Holiday Season. Try our
frozen, ready to bake Gourmet Hors d'Oeuvres. All you do is bake and
serve. Six delicious varieties. Ask for information at your Bakery Dept A
great time saver for Thanksgiving.
Start your day the healthy way
Bran
Muffins


Page 10 The Jewish Floridiap of Palm Beach County / Friday, November 25,1983
COLLEGE HOMECOMING
HAPPENING
Colby and Robert D. Rapaport will once again be
hosting the Annual College Homecoming Monday
evening, Dec. 26.
Jewish College Students who are presently on the
Jewish Community Center's mailing list will be receiving a
personal invitation. If you know of a new college student
attending school in the area or who will be coming home,
please call the Center, 689-7700 and have their name added
to the list.
This annual event is by invitation only. Watch the
mail! :j:
Every Sunday
TOURLITE TO TEL AVIV
Lowest fares from Miami to Israel!
$749* round tripone way from $449
via Arista International Airlines
Flying Arista on our quality scheduled charter flights from
Miami to Tel Aviv is inexpensive and convenient. Fly direct
from New Yorks JFK to Tel Aviv. Your return trip allows you
a night in New York to visit family or friends or sightsee
until your connecting flight to Miami the following day.
And Tourlite International, one of New Yorks biggest and
most dependable tour operators, also offers scheduled club
charter flights between Miami and New York every
Wednesday and Sunday. Our fares are as low as S79
one way, slightlv higher during the holidays.
Tel Aviv $749' round trip! New York as low as $79 one way!
Fare applicable to all seals all departures, except Dec 18th and 26th Plus taxes
See your travel agent or
call Tourlite for the
lowest fares to Israel!
NYC (212) 599-2727
Toll-free (800) 223-7605
Community Calendar
November 25
B'nai B'rith Women Masada board, 7:45 p m
November 27
Golden Lakes Temple Sisterhood, 10 a m rnno
AitzChaim, 10 a.m. or
cation
November 28
Jewish Federation Board of Directors, 8 m m ,_,,
Federation Single Family Task Force 6, 9 p J2J
Federation Community Relations Council Soviet i
Task Force, 10 a.m. Women's American ORT uu
Palm, 1 p.m. Jewish Community Day School execmL.
board, 7:30 p.m. Women's American ORT PoffiS'
noon Temple B'nai Jacob Sisterhood, 12:30 p.m
November 29
Hadassah Chai Epcot trip thru 12-1 Jewish Fedemi
Single Family Task Force 6, 9 p.m. Jewish FedtE
Women's Division, 10 a.m. Pioneer Women Cm"
Lakes game nite, 7 p.m.
Century Village, 10 a.m.
ypress
Yiddish Culture Group.
November 30
Israel Bonds Evelyn Blum Testimonial Dinner ai
Breakers National Council of Jewish Women Palm
Beach board, 8 p.m. Yiddish Culture Group I
Cresthaven Women's American ORT Boynton Beach-
theatre and lunch, noon Pioneer Women Orah paidud
membership celebration First Night of Chanukih
December 1
Hadassah Golda Meir board, 10 a.m. Pioneer Womnl
- Theodore Herzl, 1 p.m. B'nai B'rith No. 2939-board,
1 p.m. Hadassah Chai board, 10 a.m. Hadassah-I
Lee Vassill dinner-dance B'nai B'rith Women OUu
- paid up membership party, noon B'nai B'rith Women-
Ohav, 1 p.m. Pioneer Women Golda Meir board,
10:30 a.m. Hadassah Bat Gurion board, 9:30a.rn.
Women's American ORT Lake Worth-Covered Bridge,|
12:30 p.m. National Council of Jewish Women
Okeechobee Unit board, 10 a.m.
EXECUTIVE SECRETARY
Self starter. To assist busy administrator. Excellent stenoI
and typing skills. Good benefit package. Call Jeish|
Federation of Palm Beach County 832-2120.
Florida Division,
American Committee for the
Weizmann Institute of Science
cordially invites you to attend its gala
Dinner-Dance
celebrating a year of major scientific advances
by Israel's primary research center
Saturday evening, December 10. 1983
Fontainebleau Hilton, Miami Beach
Reception 7:00 PM
Fleur-de-Lis Room
Dinner 8:00 PM
Fontaine Room
PROGRAM-G/ Speakers
TED KOPPEL
Television journalist, of
"Nightlinc," ABC s award
winning news and-interview
program; formerly the
network's Chief Diplomatic
Correspondent
PROF.
DAVID SAMUEl|
Director. Center for
Neurosciences &
Behavioral Research
Weizmann institute M
Subscription $500 per person
Dietary Laws Observed
Black Tie
Honorary Chairman
Southeast Region
Jay Weia*
Chairman Dinnar Chairmaa Director
Florida fUgioa Norman Braman Barak* Sunder
Robart 11 Dinner ( o chairmen
Philip Warm
Florida Division,
American Committee for the
Weizmann Institute of Science
420 Lincoln load / Sate 3091 Miami Beach 331391 Phone: 538-3090
Israel Liaison
Cal. Mahe Dtokl"


Friday, November 25,1983 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 11
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o
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So, wherever you may live in South Florida, you can now bank at any one of our 40 offices with greater
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Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, November 25,1983
Senior News
FROM THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
TRANSPORTATION
Transportation is available
in our designated area for per-
sons sixty years of age and
over who do not drive and
cannot use public transporta-
tion.
We offer another service to
the community as a result of
vehicles awarded to us through
the Urban Mass Transporta-
tion Act by the Department of
Transportation and the sup-
port of the Jewish Federation
of Palm Beach County. We
are now able to serve groups
of persons who have specific
transportation needs. Under
this funding, we are able to
take people to a variety of
places, both day and night. A
moderate group fee for each
event is charged to cover our
vehicle and driving expenses.
Our lift van is available for
handicapped persons within
limited areas. For information
about these services, Monday
through Friday, call 689-7703
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. only.
HOT KOSHER
LUNCH CONNECTION
Kosher lunches are served
Monday through Friday at the
Jewish Community Center,
along with stimulating pro-
grams and an opportunity to
meet and greet old and new
friends. Persons sixty years of
age and older who are not able
to avail themselves of other
County meal programs are el-
igible. For information and
reservations, call Carol Fox at
689-7700.
A second Hot Kosher Meal
Program is located at Con-
gregation Anshei Emuna in
Delray Beach. Persons resid-
ing in Boynton Beach, Delray
Beach, and Boca Raton who
wish to avail themselves of the
program may call 495-0806
between 9 a.m. and 12 p.m.
for more information.
Meals are also delivered
daily to those persons who are
homebound. For more in-
formation, call Carol Fox at
689-7700.
SECOND TUESDAY
OF THE MONTH
SOCIAL ACTIVITY
The Second Tuesday Coun-
cil, a most active group, meets
the first Tuesday morning of
each month to plan, organize,
and conduct a variety of social
and fundraising programs.
Sam Rubin, President.
VOLUNTEER PROGRAM
DO A MITZVAH
VOLUNTEER!
There is a reward greater
than money in helping people
to help themselves. The Jewish
Community Center needs
volunteers to help in all phases
of our programs. Bring your
skills, expertise, or just your
smiling face to the JCC. We
need your help in areas such as
the pre-school, and office, or,
help deliver meals to our
homebound elderly.
There is nothing in life more
important than human beings
helping each other so expe-
rience the great satisfaction of
helping the JCC to serve the
needs of our community. Call
Marcie Frish at 689-7700 for
more information.
All Domestic & Foreign Cars
Diesel Cars & Pick Ups
WALLY HICKMAN AUTO SERVICE
Complete Auto Service
832-5583
School
Board
Continued from Page 4
meeting to deliver a prepared
statement supporting the ban
by the Palm Beach County
Board of Rabbis and the
Community Relations Coun-
cils of the Jewish Federations
of Palm Beach County and
South County.
"There was much support
of Williams' beliefs among the
group gathered at the meet-
ing," stated Rabbi Shapiro in
an interview following the
meeting, "although the
speakers were evenly divided
on the issue."
Although the proposed ban
was tabled, one of the School
Board members vowed to re-
move it from the table and
offer a substitute motion at a
later date.
In commenting about the
School Board decision, Rabbi
Shapiro said, "This was one
way of diffusing the issue for
the moment but I'm sure it will
return and they will have to
deal with it again."
Barbara Kaplan, liaison
between the Community Rela-
tions Council of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County and the Palm Beach
County Schools, in a phone
interview said, "We have an
ongoing line of communica-
tion open with the school sys-
tem. The Community Rela-
tions Council constantly
monitors what it does in the
area of separation of church
and state and makes presenta-
tions when appropriate. We
are pleased to see that the
School Board has cooperated
with us in the past and we look
forward to that cooperation in
the future."
Over 23 years
Same Owner
1810 South Dixie
West Palm Beach, Fla.
Temple Israel
takes great pleasure
in inviting you to be
a patron at
THE FIRST
ANNUAL
JEWISH
ARTISTS'
SERIES
THE GIORA FEIDMAN TRIO,
Classic Klezmer Music
DECEMBER 10 1983 8PM
PAUL COWAN,
Author of An Orphan In History"
JANUARY 9 1984 8PM
AVODAH DANCE ENSEMBLE,
Dance On The Bimah
MARCH 20 1984 8PM
DONATION OF $25.00 PER PERSON-ADMISSION TO ALL THREE EVENTS
PATRON DONATION OF $50.00 PER PERSON-ADMISSION 4 PREFERRED
SEATING AT ALL THREE EVENTS RECEPTION FOLLOWING
DECEMBER 10 PROGRAM
Mail check to Temple lereel Cultural CemmWee
1901 N. Fleeter Drive, West Mm teach. Ft 33407
M0 Jutwafo Jftotohe*
I
Steve
GreengtJ
Edie
Nauen
582-1786
Under North & South County Rabbinical Su
5801 Parker Ave., W.PjB., 1*2
ivvi JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTEB
T^T OF THE PALM BEACHES, INC.
2415 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach, a
689-7700
featuring
FAMILY CHANUKAH CELEBRATION
at Camp Shalom
Sunday. December 4. 1983
1230 to 4:30 pm
CTO5lfT0 !ME*lE^faHjcTn.w
THEIR OWN PEOPLE'
A CMNUKH PLAY UM>0> owctcn
or 101 MUTCH
and
isali damcmg
hav hides
pony hides
iwonnau
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chaauhah baloohs
chaaukah bag lady
YOUTH GH0UP CHAHlKAh
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MY SCHOOL
0* PALM KACH COUNTY
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A KNEFIOMT AGENCY Of THf jrwiSH AtOflUTION Of PALM IIACH CO*r.
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Friday, November 25,1983 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 13
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-M/
Page 14 The Jewish FToridian of Palm Beach County/ Friday, November 25,1983
Jewish Life In America
ADL Exhibit To Be
Showcased At
Flagler Museum
* *
When the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith was
founded in 1913, Jews were
the butt of anti-semitic jokes
and cartoons, resort advertise-
ments specified "Christians
only," and Jews were overtly
discriminated against in em-
ployments, housing, educa-
tion, and social clubs.
To mark its 70th Anniver-
sary, ADL has assembled a
documentary exhibit on Jew-
ish Life in America and how
far Jews have advanced during
their 300 year presence in this
country. Titled "Jewish Life
in America; Fulfilling in the
American Dream," the exhibit
will be premiered at a Gala
preview 7:30 p.m., Monday,
Dec. 5th at the Henry
Morrison Flagler Museum,
Cocoanut Row, Palm Beach,
Florida, where it will be on
public display from Dec. 6-24.
Dorothy Rautbord and
Grace Hokin are the co-chair-
men of the exhibit and
hostessess for the opening
which will include a black tie
dinner dance.
The exhibit, is co-sponsored
by ADL and the Flagler
Museum. The collection of
paintings, sculptures, prints,
miniatures, photographs,
drawings, and documents is
divided into chronological
periods documenting how
Jews have been an integral
part of the development of
America since 1654.
Bat Mitzvah
The first section, "A Few
Among The First Settlers'
(1654-1819) recounts the
arrival of 23 Jews in New
Amsterdam and the begin-
nings of an indigenous Jewish
community. Among 'he ex-
hibits are a title page of a 1735
Hebrew grammar text and ad-
vertisements placed by Jewish
businessmen like Haym
Solomon and Benjamin
Gomez.
The next period, "Creating
a Jewish Presence" (1820-
1880) includes portraits of
Jews who gained prominence,
including Judah Touro, a New
Orleans merchant and philan-
thropist; and Capt. Jonas
Phillips Levy, a naval officer
during the Mexican War and
president of the first syna-
gogue in Washington, D.C.
Also in this section is a record
of Jewish-owned commercial
establishments which began
during the period.
"A Community With
Contrasts" (1881-1919)
records the East European im-
migration with period photos
of Ellis Island; the Lower East
Side of New York City: Chi-
cago's Maxwell Street; early
agricultural colonies run by
/
KaylaRudner
V
Kayla Liane Rudner,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Lawrence Rudner of North
Palm Beach, will become a Bat
Mitzvah on Saturday, Nov. 26
at Temple Israel, West Palm
Beach.
Rabbi Howard Shapiro will
give the charge to Kayla, who
will conduct services and read
a portion of the Torah and the
Hal torah. Kayla and members
of her family will also partic-
ipate in the Friday night serv-
ice.
Kayla is in the eighth grade
at Howell Watkins Junior
High School where she is on
the softball and soccer teams.
PAMELA JO MARGOLIS
Pamela Jo Margolis,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Edwin Margolis of Palm
Beach Gardens, will be called
to the Torah on Saturday,
Nov. 26 at Temple Beth Da-
vid. Rabbi William Marder
and Cantor Earl Rackoff will
officiate.
Pam is in the eighth grade at
Howell Watkins Junior High
and enjoys the sports of soft-
ball, basketball and horseback
riding.
"Passover Seder at Great Lakes Naval
Station, 1943" is one of the photographs in
the exhibition, Jewish Life in America,
n
assembled by the Anti-Defamation I
B'nai B'rith, which will be shown i
Flagler Museum, December 6-24.
Jews and the growth of firms
like Levi Strauss and Co. and
Sears, Roebuck Co.
The period 1920-1945 is
contained in a section entitled
"Americanization Becomes
Evident," and chronicles the
experiences of second and
third generation American
Jews with photos of "second
generation" Jewish neighbor-
hoods in New York and Cleve-
land, Ohio, and the Wilshire
Boulevard Temple in Los
Angeles. Noted Jewish enter-
tainers and musicians of the
period are included.
"In the Mainstream" (1945-
1983) recalls the postwar im-
migration of Holocaust sur-
vivors, the celebration of Is-
rael's founding in 1948, the
dramatic arrival of a new wave
of immigrants from the Soviet
Union, and captures other
aspects of contemporary
American Jewish Life.
The basic exhibit will be
augmented by the loan of out-
standing art by major Amer-
ican Jewish artists in
collections and museunuj
the Palm Beach County i
Many works have neverl
seen publicly.
For further informatiot]
the Gala opening and to I
art, contact Louise Shu
the ADL. Tours can
arranged through the
Museum at 655-2833.
Flagler is open Tu
through Saturday, lOa.ra.i
p.m., Sunday, 12 noon I
p.m.
Religious directory
CONSERVATIVE
B'nai Torah Congregation
1401 N.W. 4th Avenue, Boca Raton, 33432. Phone 392-8566.
Rabbi Theodore Feldman. Sabbath Services, Friday 8:15 p.m.,
Saturday 9:30 a.m.
Congregation Anshei Sholom
5348 Grove Street, West Palm Beach 33409 Phone 684-3212.
Rabbi Isaac Vander Walde. Cantor Mordecai Spektor. Daily:
8:30 a.m. and 7 p.m. Friday: 8:30 a.m., 5 p.m., and a late
service at 8:15 p.m., followed by Oneg Shabbat. Saturday: 8:30
a.m., 7 p.m., Mincha followed by Sholosh Suedos.
Congregation Bath Kodash of Boynton Botch
501 N.E. 26 Avenue, Boynton Beach. Phone 586-9428. Rabbi
Avrom L. Drazin. Sabbath services, Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9
a.m.
Golden Laku Tempi*
1470 Golden Lakes Blvd., West Palm Beach 33411. Phone 689-
9430. Rabbi Joseph Speiser. Daily Services 8:15 a.m. and 5:30
p.m. Sabbath services Friday 8:15 p.m. Saturday 9a.m., 5p.m.
Mincha followed by Sholosh Suedos.
Temple Both David
4657 Hood Road, Palm Beach Gardens 33410. Phone 694-2350.
Rabbi William Marder, Cantor Earl J. Rackoff. Sabbath services
Friday 8 p.m., Saturday 10a.m.
Temple Both B
2815 No. Flagler Dr., West Palm Beach 33407. Phone 833-0339
Rabbi Howard J. Hirsch, Cantor Elaine Shapiro. Sabbath services
Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9:30 a.m. Daily Minyan 8:15 a.m.,
Sunday and legal Holidays 9 a.m.
Temple Both Sholom
224 N.W Avenue "G", Belle Glade 33430. Sabbath services
Friday, 8:30 p.m. Phone 996-3886.
Temple Beth Sholom
315 N. "A" Street, Lake Worth 33460. Phone 585-5020. Rabbi
Emanuel Eisenberg, Cantor Jacob Elman. Services Monday ond
Thursday 815 a.m. Friday 8:15p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.
Temple Both Zion
Lions Club. 700 Camelia Dr., Royal Palm Beach. Mailing
Address: 640-101 Trail South, West Palm Beach 33414., Sabbath
Services Friday 8 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m. Rabbi Nathan Zelizer;
Cantor Chaim Baltuck. Phone 793-9122.
Temple B'nai Jacob
2177 So. Congress Ave., West Palm Beach 33406. Phone 433-
5957 Rabbi Dr. Morris Silberman Sabbath services, Friday 8
p.m., Saturday and Holidays 9 a.m., Monday and Thursday 9
am Temple Emanv-EI
190 North County Road, Palm Beach 33480. Phone 832-0804.
Rabbi Joel Chazin, Cantor David Dardashti. Sababth services,
Friday 8:30 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.
Temple Emoth
5780 West Atlantic Avenue. Delray Beach 33446. Phone 498-
3536. Rabbi Bernard Silver, Cantor Seymour Zisook. Sabbath
services, 5 p.m. and 8 p.m., Saturday ond holiday, 8:45 o.m.
Daily Minyon, 8:45 o.m. and 5 p.m.
The Treasure Coast Jewish Center
(Martin County) 3257 S.E. Salerno Rood (opposite Winn-Dmw
Stuart, FL 33490. President Lief Grazi: 1-287-7732 Friday serve
8p.m.
CONSERVATIVE LIBERAL
Temple Eternal Light
Boca West Community UMC, 8900 Boca West, Glades Rood(,
mile west of Boca Turnpike). The free Synagogue, P.O 6V
Boca Raton 33432. Phone: 368-1600, 391-1111. Rabb. Ben,om
Rosayn. Sabbath services, Friday 8:15 p.m.
ORTHODOX
Congregation Aitz Chaim
Century Village, West Palm Beach. Phone 689-4675. Sob
services 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. Daily services 8:15 a.m. ond I
a.m.
Congregation Anshei Emuno
16189 Carter Road, Delray Beach, FL 33446. Phone 499-9
Rabb. Louis Sacks. Daily services 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Saturdoyo
holidays 8:45 a.m. _.,..# u.m.
REFORM
The Reform Temple of JofHor-ToaMSti
at St. Jude Church (Parrish Hall) 204 U.S. No. I B"
address: Plaza 222. U.S. No. 1, Tequesta 33458. Phone
President Jeanne Tarsches. Services the second
Friday of every month, 8 p. m.
Temple Bath El of Boca Rotes
333 S.W. Fourth Avenue, Boca Raton 33432 JJjJJJJ-
Rabbi Merle E. Singer, Cantor Martin Rosen. Sobbo'
Friday 8:15 p.m. Torah Study with Rabbi Singer, Saw
a.m. Sabbath morning services 10:30 a.m.
Temple Both Shalom
St. Helen's Parish Hall, 20th Avenue on^f w^Jijeaai,
Beach 32960, mailing address: P.O. Box *'*!.-
32961-2113. Rabbi Stephen Adams. Phone 1-Sov-w
Tempie Bath Torah
at St. David's in the Pines Episcopal Retreat, Forest HiH
Wellington Trace, West Palm Beoch. Mailing a
Lantern Tree Lane, West Palm Beach 33411 Friday |
p.m. Rabbi Steven R. Westmon, Cantor Nicholas re
793-2700
Temple Israel
1901 No. Flagler Dr., West Palm Beach 33407. Phow ^
Rabbi Howard Shapiro, Cantorial Soloist Susan
services, Friday 8 p.m.
Temple Jwdee
at St. Catherine's Greek Orthodox Church Socio ^ ^
Washington Rd., at Southern Boulevard. Rot*1 |vd
Cantor Rita Shore. Mailing address 5154 Okeecnoo.
Palm Beach. Fl 33409. Phone 471-1526
833-84*1
f Lake Ida l*J
at Cason-United Methoditt Church, corner o o0yfs*
Swinton Ave.. Delray. Phone 276-6161- MjW"9 $il<
N.W. 9th Street. Delray Beoch 33444. Robb- *>
Friday services 8:15 p. m.
*.


Friday, November 25,1983 / The. Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 15
iagogue News
Candle Lighting Time Friday, Nov. 255:11 pm
Festival of Lights
iiples To Hold Chanukah Services
tEMPLE BETH SHOLUM
OK LAKE WORTH
he Men's Club ol" Temple
|h Sliolom \sill conduct ihe
uimkuli service l-riday
In. Dec. 2 ;u 8:15 p.m. It is
iidni imporlanl holiday,
|Ji transcends the legend of
miracle ol the burning
lie holiday ol Chanukah
nwil ol Lights) is
hnccd in the lighting of the
lioiiih which signifies the
Jiliiiil and moral ascen-
li-v ul I mlu "enlighten-
In o\ci Darkness "ig-
mce." h was the victory of
IMuccabccs that saved the
fii ol civilization from bc-
lcMinguishcd in the foul
IkiK-ss o| a heal hen world.
Inanukah commemorates
victor) ol the Maccabees
the Syrian drceks in 165
t- It constitutes one of the
|i critical turning points in
nunian history. Just as G-
0Commandments set the
Mines for the code of
morality and Man's Humanity
to Man, so the historical
events of Chanukah once
again brought forth, that only
thru justice, human dignity
and the right to live and wor-
ship in freedom can there be
peace between all nations and
all people.
I he oppression and sup-
pression of human rights and
human dignity being witnessed
today worldwide is but a fore-
runner of what is to come and
so the lighting of the
Chanukah candles is to remind
us that we should not stand
idly by and allow the destruc-
tive forces of evil to take con-
trol. The responsibility, com-
mitment and involvement of
ourselves is today greater than
ever, providing we have in
mind leaving a legacy of jus-
lice, truth and freedom for our
children and grandchildren.
TEMPLE BETH TORAH
Chanukah Programs
The Festival of Chanukah
will be celebrated in many way
by Temple Beth Torah, ser-
ving Wellington and the West-
ern Communities. On Thurs-
day, Dec. 1, there will be a
public Chanukah Menorah
Lighting at the Wellington
Commons Mall, the first of its
kind in the Western Commu-
nities. Led by Rabbi Steven R.
VVestman, Cantor Nicholas
1 enakel, and the congrega-
tion's Senior and New Junior
Choirs, under the Cantor's di-
rection, the ceremony will
begin at 7:30 p.m., with tradi-
tional music, foods, and gifts
for all the children.
On Friday, Dec. 2, the con-
gregation will have a Shabbat
Chanukah Family Service.
Every family will be asked to
bring its own menorah and
four candles, which will be lit
with the Temple Menorah.
Area Deaths
The service will feature special
music by the Junior and
Senior Choirs, and a birthday
blessing and Chanukah story.
It will begin at 7:30 p.m.;
please contact the Rabbi for
location.
On Sunday, Dec. 4, begin-
ning at 11:30 a.m., the Senior
Youth Group of the Temple
(WTY) will sponsor a Chanu-
kah Fair on the grounds of
Cirecn Acres Country Day
School, 57th Ave. and Lake
Worth Rd. Featuring booths,
games, prizes, and food, the
Fair will highlight Chanukah
for the children of the Reli-
gious School.
On the following Sunday,
Dec. II, the Religious School
will hold its Chanukah Festi-
val. The drama Chug (interest
group), under the direction of
Ms. Miriam Emihovich, will
present a Chanukah play;
Mrs. Andrea Cohan's newspa-
per Chug will usher and will
distribute its first edition; Mrs.
Mollie Fenakel's pre-school
will sing and light the candles;
Cantor Fenakel's Youth Choir
will perform. Rabbi Westman
will be Master of Ceremonies.
Traditional Chanukah foods
will be served by the Sister-
hood. All parents are welcome
to attend.
TEMPLE
B'NAI JACOB
On Sunday, Dec. 4, at 7:30
p.m., a Chanukah celebration
will be held at Temple B'nai
Jacob at 2177 S. Congress
Ave., West Palm Beach.
Rabbi Morris Silverman will
speak on the significance of
Chanukah in our lives. Cantor
Gary D. Kessler will chant the
blessing in lighting the
menorah candles. The Temple
choral group under the direc-
tion of Martin Kroshinsky w ill
give a rendition of appropriate
Chanukah songs, accompan-
ied on the piano by Ann
Bukas.
The traditional home made
Latkes will be served. There
will be a donation of $3.
TEMPLEJUDEA
Temple Judea Music Sab-
bath is scheduled for Friday,
Nov. 25 at 8 p.m. at St. Cathe-
rine's Cultural Center, the
corner of Southern Blvd. and
Flagler Drive. Rabbi Joel Le-
vine and Cantor Rita Shore
will officiate.
Cantor Shore will teach and
review the music for the Sab-
bath Services of the month of
December. Congregational
participation is part of the
philosophy of Temple Judea.
Music Sabbath has become a
most effective method of con-
tinuing congregational partici-
pation in the liturgical music.
The congregation is also
exposed to the world of Jewish
music in both traditional and
modern settings.
College students home for
vacation and area college and
college age young adults will
assist Rabbi Levinc in con-
ducting the service. Temple
Judea is expanding youth and
young adult participation in
weekly Sabbath Services.
for more information, con-
tact the office at 5154 Okee-
chobee Blvd., Suite 2B.
CONGREGATION
ANSHEI SHOI.OM
Sisterhood of Congregation
Anshei Sholom will hold its
Board meeting on Monday,
Dec. 5, at 9:45 a.m., and its
Regular meeting on Tuesday,
Dec. 20, at 1 p.m., when Israel
in Song and Dance will be
presented by Fannie Ushkow
and her Melodears and Sylvia
Fricdland and her Rhyth-
meers.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID
Future plans for the Kadima
group of Temple Beth David
include: Dec. 4 Chanukah
party where the group will be
making gifts for the Morse
Geriatric Center residents.
Jan. 22 picnic at Jonathan
DickensonPark; Feb. 18-19
A Shul-In where the teenagers
will come together at the
Temple for their own service,
then have a movie, party and
sleep-over in the Synagogue.
The L'SY Group (group 9-
12) also have an active
schedule planned. Jan. 22
they will join Kadima and
Jonathan Dickenson Park for
a picnic.
The programs arc open to
Temple youth, as well as non-
Temple affiliates. For further
information call Temple of-
fice.
TEMPLE BETH EL
Temple Beth El Sisterhood
will be mailing 37 Chanukah
Gift Packages to their college
synagogue youth and service-
men. Sisterhood members
under the chairmanship of
Blanche Lange are Sally Chai-
fetz, Gail Pariser, Barbara
Moskowitz; Kadima member
Stacey Pariser and USY
member Sharon Slomowitz
helped with the mailing.
V
> .
P December 10, the Klezmorim,reminiscent of roaming Jewish
liK-singers, will appear at Temple Israel, 1901 North Flagler
ira. Palm Beh- Glora Feidman ranks as the world s
C>SI. in,erPreter of ancient Klezmer folklorlstic music.
Ith Ln'an by b,rth- lsre" y choice, Feidman is principal
" he Israel Philharmonic. The Giora Feidman Trio
" ralir ,he Jewish Cultural Series sponsored by Temple
Jg Tickets are available for the series by calling the Temple
AUERBACH
Jacob. 92, of Fanahaw Jill. Century
Village, Boca Raton. Rlveralde
Guardian Plan Chapel. Weat Palm
Beach.
BIRNBAUM
Henry Jacob, 88. of 4380 Fountains
Drive. Weat Palm Beach. Rlveralde
Guardian Plan Chapel. Weat Palm
Beach.
NADEL
Alfred, 73, of Dover Century Village.
Weat Palm Beach. Menorah Gardena
and Funeral Chapel, Weat Palm Beach.
NEUBAUER,
Egon, 72, of 127 B Southampton, Century
Village. Levitt-Welnateln Guaranteed
Security Plan Chapel. Weat Palm
Beach.
RICHMOND
Muriel, 67, of Monaco, King's Point.
Delray Beach. Menorah Gardena and
Funeral Chapel. Weat Palm Beach.
ROSEN
Anna, 84. of Wlndaor, Century village
Menorah Gardena and Funeral Chapels,
Weat Palm Beach.
SUB
John. 78, of Dove A108. Weat Palm
Beach. Rlveralde Guardian Plan
Chapel, Weat Palm Beach.
WOLF
Geraldlne R.. 83, of 8210 NW 48th Court,
Lauderhlll. Rlveralde Guardian Plan
Chapel, Weat Palm Beach.
ZUCKER
Dorothy. 72, of Sallabury. Century
Village, Weat Palm Beach. Menorah
Gardena and Funeral Chapel. Weat
Palm Beach.
If your Funeral
and Cemetery
Arrangements are
"Back Home"...
Menorah Gardens & Funeral Chapels will work
directly with the funeral home of your choice
anywhere in the U.S. or Canada to carry out
your funeral and cemetery arrangements quickly,
efficiently and in the Jewish tradition.
FOR NATIONWIDE ARRANGEMENTS,
CALL IN WEST PALM BEACH
Cemetery & Chapel 627~2277
Planning Center 686-7722
rMeno&h^
Gardens and Funeral Chapels
-
^
v




Page lb t'he Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County, Friday, November 25,1983------------
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INGEST IEID EFHP2L3OL_CJYZ5B INGEST_TIME 2013-06-13T23:06:02Z PACKAGE AA00014310_00040
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES