The Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian the voice of the Jewish community of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Running title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Physical Description:
4 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 8, no. 41 (Dec. 24, 1982)-v. 11, no. 26 (Aug. 30, 1985).
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44606415
lccn - sn 00229548
ocm44606415
System ID:
AA00014310:00036

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
IE VOICE OF
IE JEWISH
IMMUNITY OF
ILM BEACH
HJNTY
ewish floridian
VOLUME 9-NUMBER 33
PALM BEACH, FLORIDA
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28,1983
PRICE 36 CENTS
ihamir Urges End to
Mad' Arms Race
By DAVID LANDAU
IERUSALEM (JTA)
[zhak Shamir, in his first
lesset speech as Prime
lister, called for an end to
|e mad arms race" in the
idle East. He referred only
jiqucly to ihc recent ship-
tit of advanced Soviet
jiponry lo Syria.
lc seemed to imply that
kcli forces will remain in
piiuon only so long as a
krity threat remains to its
(han borders and is
kfore not necessarily
(ingent on a simultaneous
in withdrawal from
inon.
Ihis appeared to be a
ariure, however small,
the Reagan Adminis-
lon's position that all
^ign forces must be
oved in tandem and that
Israeli presence is required
I then.
lAMIR'S FAILURE to
specifically to the Soviet
|l ground-to-ground
lies now in or on the way
".i also contrasted with
in Reagan's emphasis
! menace posed by the SS-
(hose 70 mile range can
I targets deep inside Israel
lell as U.S. warships in
poll" Lebanon.
h
cqucnily hear of new
Yitzhak Shamir
^capons systems reaching the
Middle East, each one more
modem and advanced than the
last, more devastating and
murderous," Shamir said.
"And this is in addition to the
ongoing flow of 'regular'
weaponry to the region, from
ilic last and from the West,
rockets from the East and
planes from the West.
"Perhaps the time has come
10 call to the nations of the
region to pause for one
moment and to ask them-
selves: Mow long? Has not the
lime come lo end this mad
pursuit, this murderous
race ... Is not our region
Continued on Page 5
teagan Administration
Mum On Jordan Deal
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
iS'?C,TN ~ (JTA) ~ The Rea8an Administration
k ih i !"ainlain an official silence over the weekend on
mat the U.S. plans to equip two Jordanian army bri-
iioiserve as part of a joint U.S.-Jordanian strike force to
special emergencies in the Persian Gulf.
'rW,hil.eLHo"se DePuty Press Secretary Larry Speakes said
"jay that since both Jordan and the U.S. are interested in
pi security "it should surprise no one that questions of
pai security are regularly discussed."
rJ'"g to reports, the Administration has secretly pro-
le ,j"5.m|lon appropriation for the two brigades and to
ttinni n,ans with C"130 transport planes, medical
1 transport and advanced infantry and river crossing
lent.
in ?' ch has Decn in tne works since 1979> "as
Th *'th key members of Congress and with the Is-
onl Llnislra,ion apparently hopes to persuade Israel
15 the Plan but the Israelis fear the force can be used
PUS- Friday he wou,d neither "confirm or deny" the
it haw an imPrtant friend of the United States with
shin.* c.'on8-standing and well known military supply
ni Speakes said.
i"'hf .'"terest of the United States to continue these re-
equallv iiCi0untrics have an interest in regional security
f reed t known. It should surprise no one that ques-
e al security are regularly discussed."
an JnhCnunt was cxac,,y the same as State Department
Public c ugnes made last Thursday when the report
'. sine ^trong Congressional opposition to the plan is
lalarmV. nave been moves in Congress against any
KS! l0 Jordan in the wake of King Hussein's refusal
Mideast peace negotiations.
Ikes
Community Builders Join To
Form 1984 Campaign Cabinet
Myron J. Nickman, General Campaign
Chairman, and Michael Burrows, Special
Gifts Vice-Chairman, have announced the
formation of the 1984 Campaign Cabinet for
the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County.
"The men and women who have joined
our Cabinet represent a cross section of the
leadership of our Jewish community. Each
has a record of volunteer and philanthropic
work in many areas of general and Jewish
community life. Each has accepted a role in
what we hope will be the most successful
campaign yet in the history of our
Federation."
Nickman and Burrows noted that the dev-
elopment of the new Federation branch of-
fice in Boynton Beach heralds a new era for
campaign and leadership development in that
area. Nickman noted that "four years ago
there was no campaign in Boynton Beach.
Last year we raised close to $200,000 in that
area. We are now aware that many of the new
developments in Boynton Beach, along with
Hunters Run, Indian Spring and the condo-
minium developments, will be joining our
drive. Banyan Springs already has a chair-
man for the 1984 drive and we hope that this
wonderful growth and involvement will con-
tinue as the season comes closer." The
Boynton Beach leadership will be the subject
of a separate feature article in an upcoming
issue of the Floridian.
See Community Builders Pages 6-7.
Jewish Federation of PBC
Receives Award In GIF 1983
Public Relations Competition
Robert L. Adler, chairman
of the Council of Jewish Fed-
erations Public Relations
Award committee, recently
announced the winners of the
1983 Public Relations Award
competition.
In the Intermediate City
category, the Jewish Federa-
tion of Palm Beach County
captured a major award in the
category of newspapers and
newsletters for a series of sup-
plements to the Jewish Flo-
ridian entitled "Federation."
The CJF Public Relations
Award committee which
judged the entries included, in
addition to Chairman Robert
L. Adler, Donald Butler of
Pittsburgh, Howard Levine of
New York, Julius Schatz of
the American Jewish Con-
gress, Norman Weiser of
UJA, Frank Wundohl of the
Jewish Welfare Board, Amy
Goldberg of the American
Jewish Committee, and
Robert Aronson, Barbara
Mautner, Edith Pitashnick
and Frank Strauss of CJF.
Awards will be presented at
the CJF General Assembly
which meets in Atlanta, Ga.,
Nov. 16-20. All of the award
winning material will be on
display at that time.
The Council of Jewish Fed-
erations is the association of
200 Federations, Welfare
Funds and Community
Councils which serve nearly
800 communities embracing a
Jewish population of more
than 5.7 million in the U.S.
and Canada.
Established in 1932, the
Council serves as a national
instrument to strenghten the
work and the impact of Jewish
Federations through leader-
ship in developing programs to
meet changing needs in the
.Jewish community; through
the exchange of successful
experiences to assure the most
effective community service;
through establishing guide-
lines for fund raising and
operation; and through joint
national planning and action
on common purposes dealing
with local, regional, national
and international needs.
Leah Siskin is chairman of
the Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County's Public Rela-
tions Committee and Ronni
Epstein is Public Relations
director.
Wolff Appointed
Director of JCDS
The Jewish Community Day
School announced the ap-
pointment of David Wolff to
serve as director of the school.
David Wolff's academic
background includes two
masters degrees; one in
Educational Supervision and
Adminisiration, the other, a
masters degree plus 45
graduate credits. In addition,
he has also received Guidance
Counselor Certification.
He has been a classroom
teacher, an elementary school
principal, a summer instructor
at the College of William and
Mary, an educational con-
sultant for Silver Burdett and
Prentice Hall publishers, an
assistant superintendent and
most recently, the Super-
intendent of Schools in
Montville, N.J.
He has also had non-
academic, but child-related
experiences as a Youth
Director for USY and Pre-
USY Groups, Youth Club
Administrator for several YM-
YWHA's, vice president and
Executive Board member
Congregation Emanuel,
Roselle, N.J. and as a Hebrew
Sunday School teacher at the
Conservative Synagogue of
Linden, N.J.
Shirley Dellerson, president
of the JCDS, stated, "The
Board of Directors is pleased
to have David Wolff, with his
prestigious credentials and
broad range of educational ex-
perience, serve as our new
director."
David Wolff


i w cuut uencu i
My/ II
21,1983
Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, October 28,1983

Friendly Visitors Provide Vital Link For Homebound Elderly
UH IB ^BM^^JMM m i IHIJP.II ... .. ., .
By LOUISE ROSS
Assistant News Coordinator
When Nettie Granitz and
her husband, Harry, were
invited out to lunch in honor
of Father's Day, it became a
double celebration. As a
Friendly Visitor from the Jew-
ish Family and Children's Ser-
vice, Nettie has brought joy
into the life of the person she
visits and this luncheon was
her "client's" way of showing
her heartfelt appreciation.
Says Nettie, "You have to let
older people do something for
you too for they receive joy
not only from being on the re-
ceiving end but from giving to
others also."
Being responsive to the
needs of others as well as being
a good listener is the mark of a
successful Friendly Visitor
volunteer. Nettie exemplifies
that quality when she says, "I
listen to whatever they have to
say but 1 try to have them talk
about things that made them
happy in their lifetime because
it makes them happy to relate
it."
The Jewish Family and
Children's Service will begin a
series of six training sessions
for Friendly Visitors on Nov. 7
at 10 a.m. at their offices,
2250 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd.,
Ned Goldberg
Young Singles and Couples
Dance Into The Future
Young Adult Division To Hold Club 2001
Mark and Staccy Levy, co-
chairmen of the Young Adult
Division of the Jewish Federa-
tion of Palm Beach County,
announce that the first YAD
event of the year will be a
disco "Nightclub of the
Future," Club 2001. The
dance will be held on Nov. 12,
8:30 p.m., at the Royce Hotel.
According to Sid Kulick,
program chairman, the YAD
Cabinet recognized that many
events with a nostalgia theme
have been held by organiza-
tions in this community. "The
Cabinet felt a nightclub of the
future would be different and
would appeal to young singles
and couples in their 20's and
30's," stated Kulick. "We are
very excited about our theme
and the interior designs that
are being planned by Karen
List. It will be an out of this
world evening. The YAD
Cabinet encourages all young
singles and couples in the
community to join with us in a
fun-filled evening of dancing
and socializing at Club 2001."
Assisting Kulick are mem-
bers of the YAD Cabinet: Dr.
Moshe and Marci Adler,
Philip and Laura Balas, Barry
and Marjorie Berg, Soni and
Jim Kay, Dr. Alan and
Marilyn LeRoy, David and
Judy Schimmel, David and
Gail Schwartz, Dr. Steven and
Susan Schwartz, Dr. Robert
Wacks, Michael and Cantor
Elaine Zimmerman and Mark
and Stacey Levy, chairmen.
The couvert which will
include food and spirits is $17
per person. Reservations are
requested by Nov. 7. There
will be no solicitation of
funds. For more information
contact Ronni Epstein, Lead-
ership Development director,
at the Federation office, 832-
2120.
Suite 104. According to Ned
Goldberg, program manager
for the Quick Response Pro-
gram, which encompasses
Friendly Visitors as one of its
facets, home visitors pro-
vide companionship as well
as being on the outlook for
problems that the client is not
dealing with. "Perhaps a
volunteer observes that her
client is not eating right,"
stated Goldberg. "She will let
me know and then I can inter-
vene and try and help with the
problem."
Basically, the training
program is geared for two
kinds of individuals. First of
all, there are people who have
volunteered in the Jewish
community and understand its
structure, explained Goldberg,
but have not experienced
direct contact with people.
Secondly, Goldberg con-
tinued, there are professional
counselors or social workers
who know all about helping
people but don't know about
this Jewish community.
"Therefore, the training
program gives people a sense
of not only what they can do
as volunteers but what our
agency and others do in the
community. We explain what
a social worker, physical
therapist and other im I
sionals do,*' said %^\
The case a.de worker k 2
pointers on how to Qi
rapport with a client, whTJI
look for ma client's^1
when to and when not ,o SI
jdv.ee. and other h^|
Volunteers come f
varied backgrounds and 3
brought hope to the lives
the isolated elderly. Goldhi
relates the story of two u
men, one in his 80's who i
ceived the help of a voW
in his 70's. The client li*.
alone and had little conlfl
with the Jewish commune I
The elderly volunteer be
so attached that he even tuj,
his client to doctor's appoa
ments, not a required pan (
his volunteering. Hewasii
able to bring to the mm
of the JF&CS certain mafa.
and financial problems la]
client was having.
The JF&CS is looking f
individuals who areinteresia
in helping others and willinu
give an hour a week to via]
home bound client.
Fot more information i
tact Ned Goldberg at
IF&CS, 684-1991.
National UJA 'Fly-In* Results in $14.9 Million
Pledged To 1984 Regular Campaign
NEW YORK Teams of
Israeli personalities and
American Jewish leaders
traveled to 53 communities
across the United States in the
United Jewish Appeal's Sept.
12-21 "Fly-In" Program,
raising $14.9 million for the
1984 UJA-Community regular
campaign. An additional $1.3
million was pledged for
Project Renewal.
UJA National Chairman
Robert E. Loup applauded the
o\erall 25.7 percent increase in
giving to the regular cam-
paign, and the 37.1 percent
increase in total dollars raised.
"For the second year,"
Loup said, "we have sought to
bring the immediacy and
THE JOSEPH L MORSE GERIATRIC CENTER
ANNOUNCES
Receiving applications for admission to the 120-bed
long term care skilled nursing facility
THE NEW CENTER FEATURES
ami
by M*HtCd proUnlOMf
CiumHII m.ctl i
ttmmm
OmmmHihiI itmnai
iii>imnni
maaamteam
flMHfM*ir1yw
by H*MM Man Uwmw
OMptatoeySOTleM
'IIMMvl
For Information Write or Colt
The Joseph L. Morse Geriatric Center
4847 Fred Gladstone Drive
West Palm Beach, Florida 33407
Attn: Social Service Department
(305)471-5111
A Facility of the Jewish Home for the Aged, Inc
and
A Beneficiary Agency of The Jewish Federation of
authority of a national event
into the communities during
the campaign kick-oft period.
The drama and excitement of
a Fly-In event has once more
proven its power to heighten
awareness of needs and raise
giving levels."
Alan L. Shulman of Palm
Beach, a UJA National Vice
Chairman and Chairman of
"Fly-In", reported that 32
national Jewish leaders and 23
Israelis formed the teams that
brought national resources to
local communities for
briefings on the Israeli scene,
major gifts dinners, and face-
to-face solicitations.
"The significance of Fly-In
goes beyond dollars raised,"
Shulman said. "One of our
goals is to strengthen com-
munication between Israelis
and American Jews. "Fly-In"
brings people together for
dialogue and allows them to
share their concerns about the
issues and events that are the
very foundation of our
campaign."
Sandra Weiner of Houston,
Tex., who chaired the event
last year and visited several
communities during this year's
program, stated that she was
pleased to see the number of
women who were involved as
national resource persons and
solicitors. "We also hope that
Fly-In will be the beginning of
an ongoing close relationship,
during the 1984 campaign, be-
tween the communities and
national UJA." Weiner is a
UJA National Vice Chairman
and Chairman of Major Gifts.
Israel's Inflation No. 3;
Bolivia Takes Top Honors)
GENEVA (JTA) Israel has the highest inflation
any Western nation and stands as number three of countn'
around the world that are suffering from astronomical i
flation, according to a study published here by the Iniernaiio
Labor Organization.
BOLIVIA IS FIRST on the list, with a record high of 2N|
percent inflation rate. Argentina is second, with an infl
rate of 209.7 percent, followed by Israel with a 131.3 pc
inflation rate. (The study was completed before the cun
economic crisis in Israel where inflation is expected to soar tol
annual rate of 160-170 percent this year.)
Among the countries listed in the study, Japan, hast
lowest inflation rate of 1.8 percent.
o
Radio/TV Highlights
* MOSAIC Sunday, Oct. 30, 9 a.m. WPTV|
Channel 5 with host Phyllis Shever Girard.
* I (HA VIM -Sunday, Oct. 30, 10:30 a.m. WPBlJ
1340-AM with host Rabbi Mark S. Golub The Je*ts
Listener's Digest, a radio magazine.
JEWISH MUSIC AND CULTURE HOUR-Sunday.I
Oct. 30, 10 p.m. WHRS-FM Stereo 91 withhostur.
Simon Silvcrman.
SHALOM Sunday, Oct. 30, 10 a.m. -.^I
Channel 12 (8:30 a.m. ON TV Channel 51) witnM"
Richard Pcritz.
* Sponsored by the Jewish Federation of Palm Bm |
County.
2250 Palm Beach Lakes Boulevard Suite 104
Watt Palm Beach, Florida 33408
JEWISH FAMILY AND CHILDREN'S SERVK*
iwii i nmiki nnwwnibwnwo
outstanding professional and counsaling ag*W JJJjJgl
'// community of Palm Beach County. Prom*10"'
An
Jewish community .
confidentialhelp is available tor
Problems ottha aging
Consultation and
valuation sen leas
Uarit$lcoun*M
Paiant-chlid^f
Personal P"**"
^_^ 684-1991
Moderate tee* ars charged In family end "^j^ST /
thoee who can pay (Fees ere based on Income ana "w^L**
The J.wi.h Family and Children's Services Is s bensrtcWs
the Jewish Federation of Fatal Beech County.


Friday, October 28,1983 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 3
Israel Consul For Economic
Affairs Seeks Investors
By LOUISE ROSS
Assistant News Coordinator
srael is fast becoming one
the leading high technology
Intries in the world and,
tSi provides an excellent
[e'stment opportunity,
fording to Avi Harpaz,
Lly appointed Consul for
pnomic Affairs with the
aeli consulate in Miami.
ael's spokesman for trade
J investment to the south-
Item United States recently
Led the office of the Jewish
deration of Palm Beach
luniy where he explained his
ksion.
I'l am in the process of
Irching for businessmen
lo will invest money in new
Itories in Israel, mainly in
[h tech," Harpaz said. "For
kmple, two large companies
im California, Intel and
itional Semi-Conductors,
ve already invested
ko.000,000 and $50,000,000
Jpectively.
"We are also looking for
ncriain businessmen who
interested in joint ventures
(tha company in Israel,"
Harpaz. The Israeli
npany can supply the
|ancing and skilled workers,
explained, while the
nerican company can
bvide the know how and
Irketing aspects.
|srael offers export in-
itives, working capital with
necessity for only a 15-20
Kent cash outlay and other
le n lives to American
Isincssmen. However,
Irpaz pointed out that the
julabilits of a skilled high
'i labor force in Israel and a
turnover rate of employee
I of primary importance to
linessmen to whom he has
kken. "When an ad is put in
t newspaper in Israel for an
Ironic engineer, for
[mple, many qualified
Pple aPPly for the position,
when a person joins a
jpany, he usually stays
uhem until he retires."
larpa/, who had been vice
Went of Israel's largest
n food concern before
"g requested by Israel's
mster of Finance to accept
current position, is also
olved m finding markets,
pacts, agents and other
*ns of assistance for Israeli
npames who wish to export
jne Southeast United States.
|n the next few months,
FPaz will be primarily
prmmg chief executive
[ccrs of high tech com-
?' m the Southeast about
Jjajor economic conference
Ije held in Israel in May
I* 'he Consul added that
P People from the U.S. will
I'nvitedaswellasl50from
ppe and Japan. "We will
*na invitations only to
fre- will be selecting only
UeaT,P"nieS from the
wding to H
fng he main speakers for
! conference will be former
Ei?.y of State Hey
teermand Professor
ban h mayor of a city in
research and develop-
kfer.He notcd that the
B? h- wiM hi8hli*ht
fi'n defense, .-speciai
thoJnd.w,n be arranged
,nosc interested in a
Consul Avi Harpaz
specific industry."
The conference attendees
will also be able to visit
ISRATECH, a high technolo-
gy exhibition which only takes
place once every three years.
Harpaz pointed out that
businessmen and corporate
purchasing managers from all
over the world will have the
opportunity to view in one
location the products of the
biggest manufacturers in
Israel.
When asked how American
businessmen are responding to
his invitation to visit Israel, he
replied, "It's going very well.
The companies I have con-
tacted are very interested and
would like to come to the
conference."
Harpaz came to the U.S.
with a list of big companies in
which the Government of
Israel is interested. Although
he must concentrate on big
business because "I am only
one man," he encourages
anyone interested in investing
in or trading with Israel to
contact him at the Govern-
ment of Israel Investment and
Export Authority, 330
Biscayne Blvd., Suite 510,
Miami FL 33132 or call 358-
8140.
AJCongress Suffers Setback On
Issue of Arab Dollar Holdings
WASHINGTON (JTA) The American Jewish
Congress two year battle with the Treasury Department in an
effort to compel the Department to reveal the extent of Arab
dollar holdings in the United States was served a severe setback
when the Supreme Court, without comment, refused to hear an
appeal from the AJC against a lower court decision supporting
the Department's right to bar disclosure of American holdings
of individual Arab states.
THE GOVERNMENT had contended that it was justified
in withholding the data on the grounds that disclosure would
harm national security, although the International Investment
Survey Act of 1976 requires the Treasury to collect and publish
data about foreign investment in the United States. The AJC
claimed the national security issue was merely a pretext for
hiding the extent of Arab financial power and influence in this
country.
The suit against the Treasury Department was brought by
the Jewish organization in the U.S. District Court for the
District of Columbia after the Administration rejected a request
for data on Arab holdings.
Nobel Laureate McClintock
Wins Wolf Foundation Award
TEL AVIV (JTA) Dr. Barbara McClintock, the
winner of the 1983 Nobel Prize for medicine, was the recipient
of the Israeli Wolf Foundation Prize in 1981. The 81-year-old
biologist from Cold Spring Harbor, Long Island, N.Y., received
the $100,000 Wolf Award for her discovery that genes can move
from one spot to another on the chromosomes of a plant and
change the future generations of plants it produces. This
discovery also led to her winning the Nobel Prize.
Israel Appoints New Consul
General For Miami Office
Yehoshua Trigor, Minister-
Counsellor, has been ap-
pointed by the Government of
Israel as Consul General in
Miami and has assumed the
responsibilities for the
Consulate General, in succes-
sion of Mr. Joel Arnon, who is
being assigned other duties by
the Israeli Foreign Ministry.
The new Consul General of
Israel for Florida and Puerto
Rico was educated at the Tel
Aviv School for Law and Eco-
nomics and is also a graduate
of the National Service
College in Jerusalem.
After two years with the
State Comptrollers Office,
Trigor was transferred to the
Ministry of Foreign Affairs.
His First post was at the
Embassy of Israel in
Australia, which was ac-
credited concurrently to both
Australia and New Zealand.
Since then Trigor has had a
long, distinguished career,
having seen service on most
.continents. Trigor served as
Charge d'Affaires at the Em-
bassies of Israel in Seoul,
South Korea and Malta, spent
three years as Deputy Chief of
Mission and Charge' d'Af-
faires of the Embassy of Israel
in The Hague, Netherlands,
was in charge of the Israeli
Consular Mission in India.
During his tenure there Trigor
participated as a member of
the Israel Delegation in the
33rd meeting of the UN Econ-
omic Social Council for Asia
and the Pacific (ESCAP), held
in New Delhi. He also headed
a special technical assistance
Embassy to the Republic of
the Maldives. In the years
1959-1965 he was Vice Consul
in Atlanta, Ga, and Consul in
Los Angeles, Calif.
Trigor is the recipient of the
UJA National Man-On-The-
Go award, and has travelled in
1965-66 as the UJA Special
Emissary to Peru, Trinidad,
Barbados, Haiti, and Jamaica.
In 1977, Trigor spent four
CootimMd on Page 4
wwJicT niiMwm.
Project Renewal:
Our Partnership
In Israel's Future
OBSERVATIONS ON PROJECT RENEWAL
Peter Cummings, newly appointed co-chairman
of Project Renewal for the Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County, became directly involved in
this partnership with Israel because of his "con-
cern for the future of Israel and our need to tell
the story of Project Renewal in our local
community."
Cummings explains that the cornerstone of
Project Renewal is the creation of a "twin rela-
tionship" between the residents of Palm Beach
County and the residents of the Gil Amal and
Giora neighborhoods in Hod Hasharon, in Israel.
"Federation's Project Renewal Committee and
the residents of the neighborhoods have worked
together to set neighborhood priorities. We have
participated in the implementation of social
welfare programs for the residents and their
children," Cummings said. "This experience
really transcends just raising money and going to
visit. This project has involved us in the very real
problems of Israeli life. It offers us the best
chance we have to meet and engage Israelis on
their own ground and broadens our exposure to
Israel
"Our next step locally must be to involve as
broad a group as possible in the enthusiasm and
future decision making. The Federation has
committed to raise $1.1 million over a five-year
Continued on Page 4-
Jonathan Woocher To
Keynote Siyum Ha Itorah
On Sunday, Nov. 6, the
Jewish Community Day
School of Palm Beach
County, Inc., will hold a
Siyum Ha Torah (dedication
and presentation of a Torah)
on its campus facility, 5801
Parker Ave., West Palm
Beach. The Torah to be de-
dicated on this day will be
presented to the school by
Congregation Anshei Sholom
in West Palm Beach.
The program will begin at 1
p.m. with a procession of
Torahs from local synagogues,
culminating with the inscrip-
tion of the new Torah on the
school grounds, and will be
highlighted with addresses by
Dr. Jonathan S. Woocher,
Professor of Judaic Studies at
the Benjamin S. Hornstein
Program in Jewish Communal
Service at Brandeis University,
Waltham, Mass. and Dr.
Harry Z. Schectman, Rabbi
Emeritus of Congregation
Anshei Sholom.
Members of the community
will be encouraged to purchase
certain offerings which will be
symbolically written by a
scribe in the actual Torah.
Participants will be able to
purchase different portions of
the Torah from a complete
book for a donation of $3,600
to an individual word for $18.
All tax deductible donations
should be made to the Jewish
Community Day School of
Palm Beach County.
The Jewish Community Day
School of Palm Beach County
was founded in 1973, and over
the last ten years has grown
from an initial enrollment of
37 children to the present
student body of 182. The
Parker Ave. campus, a seven
acre site, opened one year ago
and includes classrooms,
library, media center, an art
and music center, a science
laboratory, and a r rkaz,
which includes an auditorium
and chapel building, with a
kosher cafeteria facility. The
Benjamin S. Hornstein
Elementary School, grades K-
6 and the Rbbert E. Rapaport
Junior High School, grades 7-
mTHEHIESTII
YOUR CMLMEI ION. awe
> PW P*M KACH COUNTY
a MMncuftv MM* or TMf JMM nation or pmm macm count*


i aw* tl VI A
21,1988
Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County /Friday, October 28,1983
...
Cohen-Orgad's Credentials
When Yoram Aridor resigned as Min-
ister of Finance, it is reported that Prime
Minister Yitzhak Shamir turned to Deputy
Prime Minister David Levy. Promptly, or
so the story goes, Levy said, "Thank you,
but no thanks."
One reason may well be that Levy still
saw himself as a heartbeat away from the
prime ministership when Menachem
Begins resignation shocked the world, and
that Shamir's succession has only whetted
his appetite for the job all the more.
In Israel, the Treasury is seen as a
political dead end. Aridor's resignation is
merely one more sad story in a series of
similar sad stories in that ministry.
And so now there is Yigal Cohen-Orgad,
the 46-year-old Herut MK whom Shamir
tapped for the job on Monday. Whatever
Cohen-Orgad's background in finance, his
credentials seem all the more vigorous in
another area entirely. Dominantly, he is a
political hawk, and to demonstrate the
principle, Cohen-Orgad lives on the West
Bank.
What is more, like Minister of Defense
Moshe Arens, he opposed the peace treaty
with Egypt. While this may or may not be
an important statement in the case of
Arens as Defense Minister, it appears to be
a virtual irrelevancy so far as Cohen-Orgad
is concerned.
Other than to say that Cohen-Orgad is
another staunch representative of Herat's
political principles, we are hard-pressed to
understand whether the talent he brings to
the Treasury will in fact help bring the
country out of its current fiscal crisis. Or
whether he will come to a dead end there
like so many of his predecessors.
He Needs Best Wishes
This is an important consideration be-
cause Cohen-Orgad's success or failure will
not be his alone. It will relate directly to the
destiny of Israel itself, which is in the midst
of a fiscal crisis so severe that the crisis has
prompted some pretty angry observations
in the wake of Prime Minister Shamir's
own comments about it during his inau-
gural address last week.
In that address, Shamir scored Israel's
increasing habit to live way over its head.
Other observers promptly noted the as-
tonishing number of new automobiles Is-
raelis are buying these days, crisis or no
crisis, no less than the number of television
sets, video recorders, high-fi's and cameras
the public appears to be consuming vora-
ciously no matter what the inflation rate
and the cost of living.
Cohen-Orgad doubtlessly has his hands
full, as did Yoram Aridor and a string of
Finance Ministers who came before them.
We wish him well.
^r^^wWvW^
UrgentHelp Needed For Two Refusen
ll
s
I

3
8
v
1
the
Lev Elbert, recently im-
prisoned for one year for draft
evasion, incredibly, was ac-
cused of smuggling 25 grams
of hashish into the labor camp
where he is serving his prison
term and confined to
isolation. In protest, his wife,
Ina Mizruchina-Elbert, went
on a hunger strike almost a
month ago.
The public help is urgently
requested in the following:
1. Cables urging that the
case against Lev Elbert be
dropped and that he be
released, sent to: Aleksandr
M. Rekunkov, Procurator
General, UL. Pushkinskaya
15-A, Moscow 103009,
RSFSR, USSR.
2. Please also send cables of
support to Lev Elbert at: EZ
302-573, Ispraviiclnotrudovoy
Israel Appoints
New Consul
General
Continued from Page 3
months as Special Emissary to
Australia and New Zeland.
While on his home tour in
Israel, Trigor served as deputy
director of the Official Guests
Division of the Israeli Foreign
Ministry. He previously served
as a Senior Referant in the
Asia-Pacific Bureau of the
Foreign Ministry, and twice
(1977 and 1979) as Director of
the Israel Youth Information
Program in the United States
of America.
Prior to his present appoint-
ment, Trigor served for two
years as Consul General for
the Southeastern United States
in Atlanta,. During his posting
in Atlanta. Trigor was
awarded by the Israel Foreign
Ministry, the Medal for Meri-
torious Diplomatic Service.
Lager, Poseolok Trudovoy,
Peschansky Rayon, Vinnits-
kaya Oblast, UKR.SSR,
USSR.
Ina's hunger strike is
becoming life-threatening.
Her father-in-law, Chaim
Elbert, an elderly World War
II Hero, has also threatened a
hunger strike.
Dr. Alexander Mizruchin,
brother of Ina Mizruchina-
Elbert, currently on a U.S.
speaking tour, corroborated
these reports with NJCRAC.
He has confided his worry
about
weight
|>is sister's exc<
loss and, in 2
tion, is trying to send i
of smaller-sized do hinT'
Ina m order to drami
tallen from size 10 to4.
v/lea!e send cabl to
Mizruchina-ElbertandCh
Elbert urging them i0
their hunger strikes in
merest of their health
cables to: Dr. Ina Mizmchi,
Elbert, VolgogradskavaSt
6, Apt. 33, Kiev, IJKRS'
USSR.

Project Renewal
Continued from Page 3
period for use in two neighborhoods in Hod
Hasharon."
Cummings notes that projects slated include the I
renovation of a day care center in the Gil Amal neigh-
borhood, and the building of a similar center in Giora The
project also involves the funding for five years of
programs for adults and children, that will take place in
the newly renovated structures. "While Jews in Israel
represent approximately 10 percent of the world Jewish
population, approximately 40 percent of all Jewish babies
born annually are born in Israel. Large families are the
norm in the Giora and Gil Amal neighborhoods, and in
most Project Renewal neighborhoods. Because of the large
number of youngsters involved, the success of Project
Renewal is as crucial to the future security of Israel as are
secure borders."
Cummings explains that Project Renewal works "on
site," in the neighborhoods to develop programs that build
on the residents' own resources and values. In this way,
Renewal programs differ from the traditional work of the
Jewish Agency in absorbing immigrants, providing seed
monies for new kibbutzim and taking disadvantaged
youngsters into Youth Aliyah programs, away from
difficult environments. Enrolling children, for instance,in
Youth Aliyah is a proven remedy for distress, says
Cummings. "But these children do not always return to
the neighborhoods where they grew up. Project Renewal
exerts a force to hold a community's people together, and
seeks to begin a process that the residents can usetosolvea
whole host of problems, like drug abuse and illiteracy. The
model which we Americans bring to problem solving is
new to these people. But they learn quickly and realize that
organizational and planning skills are part of theanswerto
their problems. And the bond we are forming with them is
everlasting."
Random Thoughts
Jewish floridian
of Palm Beach County
Combining -Our Vote* ind "Federation Report*"
FRED K. SHOCHET SUZANNE SHOCMET RONNI EPSTEIN
Editor and Publisher Eiecutive Editor News Coordinator
Published Weekly October through Mid April. Bi Weekly balance ol year
Second Class Postage Paid at Boca Raton Fia USPS #069030
PALM BEACH BOCA RATON OFFICE
2200 N Federal Hwy Suite 206. Boca Raton. Fla 33432 Phone 368-2001
Main Office & Plant 120 N E 6th St. Miami. Fl 33101 Phone 1373 4605
Postmaster Return form MTV to Jewish Floridian. P.O. Boi 01 2973. Miami. Fla. 31101
Advertising Director Stacl Leaaer. Phone SM 1852
Combined Jewieh Appeal Jewish Federation ol Palm Beach County Inc Officers President. Jeanne
Levy Vice Presidents. Peter Cummings. Alec Engelstem. Arnold Lamport. Myron J Nickman Barbara
Tanen. Secretary. Or Elizabeth S Freilich. Treasurer. Alvm Wnensky Submit material to Room
Epstein. Director of Public Relations. 501 South Flagler Or. West Palm Beach. FL 33401
Jewish Floridian does not guarantee Kashrutn of Merchandise Advertised
SUBSCRIPTION RATES Local Area $4 Annual (2 Year Minimum $7 50). or by membership Jewish
Federation of Palm Beech County. 501 S Flagler Or, West Palm Beach. Fla 33401 Phone 832
2120 Out Of Town Llpon Request
Friday. October 28,1983
Volume 9
21HESHVAN5744
Number 33
By MURIEL LEVITT
1 am fed up with television.
The programs all have a
sameness and as soon as one is
successful, imitations pop up
all over the tube. It's time for
something different, some-
thing new, something original.
For 30 years we have been
watching and waiting. I
believe the moment has come
and I have a few suggestions to
offer. Consider a new TV
season which would feature
the following programs.
Let's begin with "Charlie's
Yentas." This might be the
story of Charlie Shapiro who
owns a grocery store in the
East Bronx. He is plagued by
shoplifting, hold-ups, and
even mysterious graffiti which
shows up on the walls when he
opens the store each morning.
He needs help, but fast. So
Charlie hires three yentas to
do his dirty work. They are,
respectively, Meryl Beryl,
Chana Shprintzeh, and Itta
Gitta. These ladies are
dedicated to cleaning up the
neighborhood and their antics
should be amusing, to say the
least.
How about "All in the
Meshpuchah," a sitcom
concerning Archie Bernstein,
s wife Ada and their
hi
children. Archie
who lives in Long Island but
works in Manhattan. He hates
the immediate world but his
malaprops and earthy philoso-
phies are always good for a
laugh. This kind of show
certainly has universal appeal.
"Little Tenement on Delan-
cy" shows promise. An im-
migrant family from central
Europe settles on the lower
east side. They speak no
English and think that the
Spanish spoken all around
them is the real American
dialect. Before you know it,
they arc part of the bunch,
foregoing*" Yiddish for the
Latin idiom. The father
becomes a mambo champ, the
mother cooks tacos and
tortillas, and the kids grow
long sideburns and wear black
leather jackets. The possi-
bilities are endless!
Think about a game show
called "Tic Tac Gelt." It
could pit one religious student
against another, ask questions
pertaining only to things
Jewish, and offer prizes like
trips to Israel. Boy, would I
like to see this one take off! It
should go over in the northeast
but would probably lay an egg
in the midwest ... oh well.
'The Galloping Galit-
another
chef flying all around the
studio teaching you ho* |
stuff helzle, make kimto
and create kugels. You irngMi
not laugh a lot but you'ds*
learn to cook. However, ifj*
and yours are Litvaks. cerltf
recipes might seem a I
strange. But that's of Wi
import when you are widen*
your horizons and learm*
through TV.
Finally, we might I
"Mork and Minnie -
from the outer world o\
Okeefenokees and she m
the Catskills. They comef
different cultures and m
ittle in common butJJ
grits
anil
ouffle, m
in
make hilarious
together. He talks
she talks noodle so-.---.
eventually they blend
up with kasha varnish*,s. y
crazy but funny and
become a real sleeper.
Well,.here you have |i.^
sure you have lots o-JJ
ideas for Jewishi TV.
combine my though"
your thoughts, maybe
bombard ABC, ^ ij^i
CBS. And ifihey won J
lo us' lc,'S. S,S itCCN.*
network and call "^^
case you don't knonijj
stands for, lIsTar;e heart
is a cloakie winner. They'd have th
Chcvrah Network.
and give us time.
The
or-UI
is
im


Community Calendar
October 28
Jewish Federation In-Service Management Seminar 8-45-
11:45 a.m.
October 29
Temple Judea Art Auction Sheraton WPB
October 30
Jewish Federation Single Parent Task Force Temple Is-
rael 9:30 a.m.
October 31
Jewish Federation WD National B and P Mission through
Nov. 7 Jewish Community Day School executive board -
7:30 p.m. Pioneer Women Ezrat membership tea 2
p.m. Brandeis University Women Lake Worth -
opening meeting -10 a.m.
November 1
Election Day Jewish Federation WD Campaign Cabinet
7:30 p.m. Pioneer Women Ezrat board 10 a.m.
Yiddish Culture Group Century Village 10 a.m. B'nai
B'rith Women Chai board 7:30 p.m. ORT West
Palm Beach board 12:30 p.m. Pioneer Women -
Cypress Lakes board 1 p.m. ORT Golden Lakes -
board- 10 a.m.
November 2
Temple Israel Sisterhood board 7 p.m. Yiddish Culture
Group Crest haven Temple Beth Shalom Sister-
hood 12:30 p.m. Temple Beth El board 8 p.m. Labor
Zionist Alliance 1 p.m. B'nai B'rith No. 3115 board 8
p.m. National Council of Jewish Women Palm Beach -
board -8 p.m. Hadassah Lake Worth board -10 a.m.
Jewish Community Center executive committee 8 p.m!
Pioneer Women Ezrat card party 1 p.m. Pioneer
Women Golda Meir dinner theater Hadassah Yovel -
flea market -10 a.m. Hadassah Shalom bazaar.
November 3
Jewish Federation Community Relations Council -noon
Hadassah Golda Meir board -10 a.m. Pioneer Women
- Theodore Herzl 1 p.m. B'nai B'rith No. 2939 board -1
p.m. Hadassah Chai board 10 a.m. B'nai B'rith
Women Ohav 1 p.m. ORT Lake Worth-Covered
Bridge 12:30 p.m. B'nai B'rith Women Olam 12:30
p.m. Hadassah Ben Gurion board 9:30 a.m.
Pioneer Women Golda Meir board 10:30 a.m.
National Council of Jewish Women Okeechobee Unit -
board- 10 a.m.
Milton Gold Elected To
World Zionist General Council
Alleck Resnick, president of
ic Zionist Organization of
imcrica, announced the
keeni election of Milton Gold
If Royal Palm Beach, as a
ember lor Life to the World
lionisl General Council
Actions Committee). Gold
l;is served on this council as a
Icncial member since 1978.
Hie election of Gold to a
Lifetime Membership of this
prestigious council is in recog-
nition of his outstanding ef-
forts in behalf of Israel. His
service to Israel presently
includes the presidency of the
Palm Beach District of the
Zionist Organization of
America and the chairmanship
of the Israel Mideast Task
Force of the Jewish Federation
of Palm Beach County.
THEY'VE GIVEN YOU THE BEST...
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FATHERS THE BEST NURSING CARE
Specialists to suit your every need:
RNs LPNs Therapists Nutritionists
Orderlies Companions Child care workers
Housekeepers Homemakers
Medi@ross nursing services, inc.
1020 BELVEDERE ROAD, WEST PALM BEACH FLORIDA 33406
TEL: (305) 832-6774
Friday, October 28,1963 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 6
Shamir Urges End To 'Mad' Arms Race
Continued from Page 1
sated with wars? What the
region needs is not weapons
but peace," Shamir said. He
added: "We call upon all the
nations of the Middle East and
their governments to end the
mad arms race and come to
the negotiating table."
ACCORDING TO ob-
servers, Shamir's maiden
speech as head of government
was deliberately low key in
order not to exacerbate the
tensions raised by the deploy-
ment of SS-21s in Syria. There
has been no confirmation here
of American media reports
that Israel will seek U.S.
Pershing missiles to counter
the Soviet-Syrian threat.
Observers also noted the
slight but significant shift in
Shamir's treatment of the
Syrian role in Lebanon and its
impact on Israel's policy and
position there. He did not
specifically and unequivocally
link Israel's withdrawal to a
parallel pull-out by Syria. He
appeared to indicate that
Israel could contemplate
leaving Lebanon regardless of
an ongoing Syrian presence
there, provided the security
threat posed by that presence
is somehow removed.
The observers saw in this the
possible influence of Defense
Minister Moshe Arens who
has long advocated a more
flexible approach, stressing
thai the sole criterion of
Israel's policy in Lebanon
should be the security of its
northern borders.
"WE SHALL withdraw our
forces from Lebanon when
conditions of security (for
Galilee) have been secured,"
Shamir said. "Syria's massive
military presence on Lebanese
soil indicates the danger that
Lebanon might return to being
a base for attacks against Isra-
el .. The presence of Syria,
which supports a war of
terrorism against Israel from
.ebanese soil prevents us from
leaving Lebanon," he said.
He added that the sooner
the Syrians withdraw, "the
better it will be for Lebanon
and for the prospects of
stability in the whole region."
In that way, according to
observers, Shamir seemed to
focus on the security threat
posed to Israel by Syria's
presence in Lebanon, not to
its presence per se. The im-'
plication was that if the threat
could be neutralized, Israel
would feel free to leave.
On other foreign policy
matters, Shamir noted that
Israel was "not happy" with
its "cold peace" with Egypt.
He pledged his government's
determined efforts to protest
against and seek to improve
that situation.
HE EXTOLLED the suc-
cess of the previous govern-
ment, headed by Menachem
Begin, in securing agreements
with Egypt and Lebanon,
although the latter is still not
ratified, and noted that the
delegations of those countries
were the only Arab delegations
which did not walk out of the
UN Assembly when the Israeli
Ambassador, Yehuda Blum,
addressed the world body.
Regarding the situation on
the West Bank, Shamir said it
was "a pity" that the golden
opportunity presented by the
Camp David accords has r**n
missed so far.
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Alfred Golden, Executive Vice President
Leo Hack, V.P., Religious Advisor
Keith Kronish, Vice President, F.D.
William F. Saulson, Family Consultant
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-


Pag* 6 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday,


The Palm Beach County Jewish community has grown over
the past two decades into one of the fastest growing Jewish
communities in this country. We have been successful in
building a strong and viable Jewish community because of the
many dedicated men and women who have built and will
continue to build a strong foundation upon which this com-
munity will thrive. Over the next several months, you will meet
our. .
28,1983

Myron J. Nickman. General and Special
Gifts Chairman Came to Palm Beach
County in 1976 from Cleveland; Retired,
chief executive officer of electrical and
hardware distributorship in Cleveland; A
graduate of the Delaware College of
Science and Agriculture; member of the
Board, United Way of Palm Beach; Board
member, Jewish Federation ol Palm
Beach County; American Join! Distribu-
tion Committee.
Michael C. Burrows, Special Gifts Vice
Chairman Came to Palm Beach from
Boston in 1953 and has continued as a
builder and developer in Palm Beach1 A
graduate of Harvard BA.. MBA'
Member, Board of Directors Jewish
Federation.
Barry Berg Came to Palm Beach County in 1980
from Tampa; Partner, CPA in charge of tax depart-
ment of West Palm Beach office of Ernst and
Whinney; Graduate of George Washington Univ-
ersity; Member, Board of Directors, United Way of
Palm Beach County and Palm Beach Chamber of
Commerce; Member, Board of Directors of Jewish
Federation and Jewish Community Center.
Rabbi Joel Chazin Came to Palm Beach County
in 1980 from Connecticut; serves as Rabbi at Temple
Emanuel in Palm Beach; serves as President of the
Board of Rabbis.
Milton Gold Came to Palm Beach County in 1977
from Philadelphia, where he was president of Phila-
delphia Light Supply Co.; A graduate of Temple
University; Affiliated with the Lions Club; Member.
Jewish Federation Board; Chairman, Federation
Mid-East Task Force; a representative of the Zionist
Organization of America to the Jewish Agency in
Jerusalem; active with Israel Bonds.
Barbara Gordon Came to Palm Beach County in
1969 from New York; President of Pegasus Produc-
tions; Past President of the Women's Division of the
Jewish Federation; Past General Campaign
Chairman of the Jewish Federation; Chairman of the
1984 Campaign Kick-off. Graduate of NYU and
I \L. ___________________
Fred Greenberg Came to Palm Beach County in
19 from New Jersey; Owned Modecraft Co.. a
manufacturer of women's wear, and sold to Villager
upon retirement; Graduated Northwestern School of
Commerce; Founder of Albert Einstein College of
Medicine; member, Anti-defamation League and
American Jewish Committee.
Rabbi Howard Hirscta Came to Palm Beach
County from Cleveland in 1980; member, Board of
Trustees, Palm Beach Opera; Rabbi at Temple Beth
El, West Palm Beach; National Vice-Chairman,
United Jewish Appeal Rabbinic Cabinet.
Arnold Lampert Came to Palm Beach County in
1976 from Philadelphia; President, CLU, of
professional planners, a life and health planning
firm; Life member million dollar round table;
member General Agents and Managers Association
of Palm Beach County; Vice President of Jewish
Federation and a member of B'nai B'rith.
Erwin H. Blonder Came to Palm Beach County in
1973 from Cleveland; Graduate of Ohio State Univ-
ersity; President, Joseph L. Morse Geriatric Cento
of the Jewish Home for the Aged; Board member,
Jewish Federation; Past President Menorah Park iii
Cleveland, as well as past board member of
Cleveland Federation and Mt. Sinai Hospital.
Arthur Gladstone Came to Palm Beach County in
1970 from New York; Works with real estate invest-
ments and development; Graduate of Long Island
University; Member of the West Palm Beach Ex-
change Club, a former master of Stepping Stone
Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons in Great Neck,
New York; Member of Jewish Federation Board and
Morse Geriatric Center Board; member of Oyster
Bay Jewish Center in New York.
Harvey Goldberg Came to Palm Beach County in
ll)Sl from Miami; Partner, CPA in charge of West
Palm Beach office of Eisner and Lubin; Graduateof
Cl M Baruch School; Member of Homebuilders
Vssociaiion and the West Palm Beach Chamber of
Commerce; Member. Jewish I cdeianon Board and
the BiuiJ ol the Jewish Communit\ Center.
Lionel Greenbaum Came 10 Palm Beach Counts
from Cleveland in 1980; Senior Vice President,
Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fennel and Smith in Palm
Beach; Graduate ol Ohio State University; Board
Member. I nited Way ol Palm Beach County, Board
ol Palm Beach I estival; c leveland Sight Center, Bcl-
fairc Home in Cleveland; Board Member Jewish
I ederation; past membei of Cleveland Federation
Board.
Jerry Hartman Came to Palm Beach County in
1456 from Detroit; Vicc-President for Investment for
Prudential Bache Securities in Palm Beach;Graduate
ol the Universil) of Florida and the New York Ins-
titute of finance; Financial Editor, w PEC Channel
12 television and WPBR radio; financial advisor to
Palm Beach Times.
Benjamin S. Hornstein Mr. Hornstein is known to
all for his support and involvement of Jewish institu-
tional life in America; He is a founder of the Jewish
Theological Seminary and is a founder of the Albert
Einstein College of Medicine; He established a chair
at Brandcis University for the Benjamin S. Hornstein
Program in Jewish Communal Service and our
Jewish elementary school in West Palm Beach is
named in his honor.
Rabbi Joel Levine Came to Palm Beach County
1978; Rabbi of Temple Judea. West Plm .%*
member, Jewish Relationships Council ot. V" .
Scouts of America; member, Board ofJe*'i"ar(iof
munity Center; immediate Past President ot do flf
Rabbis; member. National Rabbinic taom
I nited Jewish Appeal.


Builders
1984 Campaign Cabinet
Friday, October 28, 1963 /The Jewiah Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 7
Join them in helping to Share the Vision
II. Irwin Levy, Project Renewal Chairman
Came to Palm Beach County in 1951;
Chairman of the Board, Chief Executive
Officer and President of Cenvil Develop-
ment Corp.; President of Century Village
of Israel, Ltd.; A graduate of Pennsyl-
vania State University and the University
of Miami; A member of the Economic
Council of Palm Beach County; Member,
Board of Directors of Jewish Federation,
Jewish Community Day School; National
Council of AIPAC, Boys Town of Israel;
Israel-Florida Chamber of Commerce,
American Committee Weizman Ins-
titute; a member of the American Jewish
Congress and the American Jewish Com-
mittee.
JEWISH
FEDERATION
OFftUMDEACH
COUNTY
Peter D. Cammings, Project Renewal Co-
Chairman Came to Palm Beach County
in 1975 from Montreal; Is president of
Southern Realty Group, Inc., a real estate
development based in Stuart; A graduate
of Yale University and the University of
Toronto; A member of the Economic
Council of Palm Beach County; A Vice-
President of Jewish Federation.
Mark Levy Born in Palm Beach County; An at-
torney in the firm, Levy, Shapiro, Keene and King-
cade; Graduate of University of Florida; Nova
University Center for the Study of Law; Chairman,
legal committee for Palm Beach County for the Anti-
Defamation League; Co-Chairman, Young Adult
Division of the Jewish Federation.
John I. Moss Came to Palm Beach County from
Chicago in 1973; Graduate of Illinois Institute of
Technology; A member of numerous technical and
professional societies; Past president, Jewish Family
and Children's Service; member, Jewish Federation
Board, an active supporter of ORT for over 25 years.
Robert Perrin Came to Palm Beach County in
1973; Assistant Vice President, Merrill Lynch,
Pierce, Fenner and Smith in Palm Beach; Graduate
of Trinity College.
Rabbi Howard Shapiro Came to Palm Beach
Count) m 1981 from New Jersey; serves at Temple
Israel, West Palm Beach; Board member, Mental
Health Association; Board member, Jewish Federa-
tion and Jewish Community Center; Vice-President,
Hoard of Rabbis.
Alan L. Shulman Came to Palm Beach County in
1969 from New York; a developer of hotel
propcilies; Graduate of Brooklyn Law School;
Hoard member of the First National Bank in Palm
Beach; Board member, Jewish Federation; Joint Dis-
uibiuion Committee; Board of Overseers of Jewish
Theological Seminary; former board member of the
Council of Jewish Federations; past campaign
chairman and president of the Jewish Federation; a
national vice-chairman of the United Jewish Appeal.
Les,er Sodowick Came to Palm Beach County in
JW from Jew Jersey; many affiliations with the
Jewish and general community in New Jersey and
1 mm Beach County.
Mortimer Weiss Came to Palm Beach County in
1972 from Boston; retired Treasurer of Cooney-
Wciss Fabric Corporation lnmont Corporation;
graduate of the University of Pennsylvania; a
member of the Jewish Federation Board and the
Hoard of the Morse Geriatric Center of the Jewish
Home for the Aged.
Dr. Jerome Lorber Came to Palm Beach County
in 1973 from New York, where he worked profes-
sionally as a dentist; Graduate of City College of
New York and the New York University College of
Dentistry; Member, B'nai B'rith; Past chairman, Is-
rael Bonds Committee at the Fountains.
Larry Ochstein Came to Palm Beach County in
1975; Retired as president of Bremen Iron and Metal
in South Bend, Ind.; Graduate of Indiana University;
Affiliated with Boy Scouts of America; Immediate
past-president, Jewish Community Center; member,
Jewish Community Center Board; Jewish Federation
Board.
Bernard Plisskin Came to Palm Beach County in
1975 from Cleveland; Graduate of Yeshiva College in
New York; Board member, United Way of Palm
Beach; a Hospice volunteer; member, Jewish Federa-
tion Board and Morse Geriatric Center of the Jewish
Home for the Aged; member, American Jewish
Committee.
Richard G. Shugarman, M.D.-Came to Palm Beach
County in 1971; President of Palm Beach Eye Asso-
ciates, an ophthalmology practice; Graduate of John
Hopkins University and the University of Maryland
School of Medicine; affiliated with numerous
professional organizations; A past-chairman of Israel
Bonds and a past Vice-President of the Jewish Com-
munity Center; a member of the Board of the Jewish
Community Day School. A former Vice President of
the Jewish Federation; Past President of Temple
Israel.
Phillip Siskin Came to Palm Beach County in 1971
from New York; is President of Lischer Laundry,
Inc., involved with sales and leasing of laundry
equipment; a graduate of Rochester Business
Institute; affiliated with the Moose Lodge; a former
vice-president of the Jewish Community Day School-
Served as Financial Secretary of Temple Beth El
Nathan Tanen Came to Palm Beach County in
1971 from Melborne; President, Tanen Construction
Company; Charter Member, President's Forum of
Boston Children's Hospital.
Michael Zimmerman Chairman, Leadership De-
velopment Committee of the Jewish Federation Past
President of JCC Young Singles; and Past Member
?Q0a,riOf D,,rectJors Jemple Beth El; Winner of the
1983 Young Leadership Award.


Richard and Debra Holtsberg with the Vlasim torah.
ALL PUBLIX BAKERIES OPEN AT 8 AM
Page8 ^^^^^mHf^^^^E^J^^^^^.
Temple Judea To Dedicate
Vlasim Torah Scroll
Temple Judea will dedicate
a Torah Scroll rescued from
the Jewish community of
Vlasim, Czechoslovakia
during services on Friday, Oct.
28 at 8 p.m. at St. Catherine's
Cultural Center at the corner
of Southern Blvd and Flagler
Drive. Temple members
Richard and Debra Holtsberg
and the Holtsberg family have
donated this scroll in memory
of Richard's father, Herman
Holtsberg.
The Holtsberg family is one
of the historic Jewish families
of South Florida. The
Holtsbcrgs settled in Key West
over one hundred years ago
and have made a strong im-
pact in the Jewish commun-
ities of Key West, Miami, and
Palm Beach. The family store
on Worth Avenue, Herman's
Top'n Bottoms, founded by
Herman Holtsberg remains a
Palm Beach institution. In
keeping with the history of the
family and in Herman
Holtsberg's love of European
travel, Rabbi Joel Levine of
Temple Judea, contacted the
Union of American Hebrew
Congregations which assisted
him in locating the Vlasim
Scroll. Rabbi Levine informed
the Holtsberg family that the
Westminster Memorial Trust
Committee of London's West-
minster Synagogue has been
restoring rescued Torah
Scrolls from synagogues
destroyed by the Nazis. The
Holtsberg family donated the
funds to bring the Vlasim
Torah to Temple Judea on
permanent loan as well as to
provide for this Torah proper
vestments and silver orna-
mentation.
Participating with Richard
and Debra Holtsberg and
Richard's mother Ruth in the
Torah dedication will be Rab-
bi Levine, Cantor Rita Shore,
Temple President, Dr. Jeffrey
Faivus, and honored pulpit
guest. Rabbi Lewis Littman,
Director of the Southeast
Council-South Florida Feder-
ation of the Union of Amer-
ican Hebrew Congregations.
Rabbi Littman will present to
Temple Judea, the charter
from the UAHC and welcome
the congregation officially
into the Reform movement as
a UAHC affiliate congrega-
tion.
Since research into the
origin of the Vlasim Jewish
community is a most difficult
task, Rabbi Levine asked
Temple member Joseph
Gottfried who is fluent in the
languages of Eastern Europe
to prepare for the congrega-
tion and the community the
story of the Vlasim Jewish
community up to 1934, when
this community became
practically extinct as a center
of Jewish life.
About 35 miles South-East
of Prague (Czechoslovakia),
in the Benesev district, gently
spreads the town of Vlasim. A
modern road, E-15, rolls by
the much larger town of
Benesev before reaching
Vlasim. Here, a well known
Gothic castle from the late Re-
naissance was converted into a
magnificent park containing
romantic structures from the
beginning of the 19th Century.
Here, in Vlasim lived a rela-
tively small Jewish com-
munity. However, it should
not be measured by size, but
by the devotion to Judaism
and by its contribution to Jew-
ish life. The community had
210 members in 1983, and in
Continued on Page 11
A Kick-Off Reception for the
1983-84 State of Israel Bonds
campaign will be held on Oct.
30 at the home of Mr. and
Mrs. Gerald Lesher of Palm
Beach. Special guest speaker
for the Kick-Off reception will
be Jerome Gleekel, official
liaison for the Israel Consulate
in Miami for the Jewish Com-
munity in South Florida.
Gleekel travels frequently to
Israel where he is well known
by the leadership of the vari-
ous political parties and has
access to leading government
officials.
where shopping is a pleasure 7days a week
Chocolate
hip Cookies)
.99*
Pumpkin Pie
$159
8"iz
each
Cinnamon
Raisin Rolls..........................6 149
Decorated for Halloween
Cup Cakes............................6
Prices Effective
October 27th thru 29th. 1983
for
$J59
Plain
Mini Donuts


Friday, October 28,1989/ The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 9
jiblbcDeliSpec!alsfbrVbur
Prtca* Enact** In Data,
roward, *** Baach, Martin,
St. Lucia and Indian Rlvai
Countlaa ONtr.
where shopping is o pleasure
7doysoweek


Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, October 28,1983
Organizations in the News
HADASSAH
Tikvah Chapter of Hadas-
sah, West Paint Beach coming
events:
Nov. 1 Luncheon and
Card Party at the Red Lob-
ster. Call Bea.
Nov. 15 Hadassah Israel
Bond Luncheon. Call Frances.
Nov. 16 "Pal Joey," call
Celya.
Nov. 21 Paid-up Mem-
bership Luncheon and Mem-
bership Meeting at Congrega-
tion Anshei Sholom. Reserva-
tions.
Nov. 24-27 Thanksgiving
Weekend at the Glatt kosher
Sea Gull Hotel. Call Martha
Fein.
Nov. 22-27 New Orleans
Trip. Call Martha S, or
Martha F.
Shalom West Palm Beach
Hadassah will participate in a
giant Bazaar and Flea Market
at West Palm Beach Auditori-
um, Wednesday, Nov. 2, 10
a.m. lo 4:30 p.m. Free
Parking, free admission, and
many bargain items for holi-
day shopping. For details, call
Florence Wechsler or Goodie
Levin.
The next meeting will be
held on Wednesday. Nov. 16,
12:30 p.m. at Congregation
Anshei Sholom. Pearl Klein
will present her original
"Hanukah Preview."
Calendar:
Nov. 15 Hadassah Israel
Bond Luncheon at The Hyatt.
Contact Lillian Dorf (North-
ampton R-361) for reserva-
tions.
No\. 24-27 A few choice
reservations still open for
Shalom's gala Thanksgiving
weekend at the Sea Gull
(kosher), Miami Beach. Con-
tact Mae Podwol (Southamp-
ton A 207).
Yovel Hadassah, West Palm
Beach Chapter coming event:
No\. 2 Hadassah Flea
Market and Bazaar Don't
miss this opportunity to find
what you have been hunting
lor for a very long time.
Fvrryihins is reason-
ably priced. The West Palm
Beach Auditorium.
The Lee Vassil Group of the
Lake Worth Chapter of Had-
assahcomings events:
The drama at the Palm
Beach Junior College, called
"The Night of Jan. 16," will
lake place Nov. 5, proceeds
from the above allocated for
the Emergency Medical Fund
for Israel.
Husbands and friends are
always invited to enjoy our
programs and partake of our
dessert and coffee. If you need
transportation call Helen
Turbowitz.
Newly chartered Tamar
Royal Palm Beach Chapter of
Hadassah will hold its first
meeting on Oct. 28 at 12:30
p.m. at Royal Palm Beach Vil-
lage Hall. Refreshments will
be served before the meeting.
We are looking forward to the
following events:
Hadassah Bonds for Israel
Luncheon Will be held at
the Hyatt on Tuesday, Nov.
15.
A Brunch for New and Pro-
spective Members, will be held
at the home of Irene Burns on
Wednesday, Nov. 16 at 11
a.m.
Ruth BarBaraoidin will hold
her annual Pool Party and
Luncheon in honor of hei
mother's birthday. Proceeds
go to the Hadassah Hospital in
Israel. Date Nov. 17.
Study Group will meet at
the home of Ruth Crandall on
Monday, Nov. 21 at 10:30
a.m.
WOMEN'S AMERICAN
ORT
Century Chapter Women's
American ORT will hold its
next meeting on Thursday,
Nov. 10 at 12:30 p.m., at
Temple Anshei Sholom. We
will have our paid-up mem-
bership luncheon. There will
be a 52 charge to defray ex-
penses. We will be entertained
by the Sylvia Friedland Dance
Group.
Coming Events
Nov. 13 Sunday evening,
by popular demand, "Listen
To The Music" at the
"Musicana" dinner and show.
Please call Rose Weisberg
Nov. 24-26 Fort Myers,
an African Safari, an Ever-
glades Cruise, Rooftop Res-
taurant, Thanksgiving Feast,
plus "Everybody Loves Opal"
at the Naples Dinner Theatre
Please call Lil Davis.
Women's American ORT,
Lake Worth Chapter of
Covered Bridge ill be holding
their next meeting on Thurs-
day, Nov. 3. at their Club-
house at 12:30 p.m.
Mter their business
meeting, a program will be
presented bv "The Perform-
ers." a group headed by
Norma Sirota, who were asked
to return by popular demand.
Members and guests are in-
vited. with refreshments
served.
B'NAIB'RITH
WOMEN
Menorah Chapter No. 1496,
B'nai B'rith Women meets
Nov. 8 at the American
Savings Bank, at 1 p.m.,
boutique 12 noon.Sol Kopman
will speak on the topic, "How
to Make Money Without
Working." Refreshments
served.
Coming events: Nov. 14-15,
Sea Escape Cruise, entertain-
ment; Nov. 20, Sunday,
"Charity Bazaar" at the Cross
County Mall, home-made and
hand-made items only; Nov.
24-27, Thanksgiving Weekend
at the Deauville Hotel, free
golf, cocktail party, and enter-
tainment.
PIONEER WOMEN-
NA'AMAT
Theodore Herzl Club of
Pioneer Women Na'Amat
Paid-Up Membership Lunch-
eon Nov. 3, 1 p.m., at the
Lake Worth Shuffleboard
Courts, 1121 Lucerne Ave.
Program: Slides "A
Letter From Lami." Refresh-
ments.
AMERICAN MIZRACHI
WOMEN
American Mizrachi Wom-
en, Rishona Chapter will have
their regular meeting on Nov.
9 at 1 p.m. to be held at the
American Savings Bank,
Westgate, CV. Entertainment
by Estelle Bauman. producer,
and her group will present sev-
eral skits. Collation to follow.
All invited.
B'NAIB'RITH
Century Lodge No. 2939
B'nai B'rith will meet on Nov.
8, at 7:30 p.m. at Anshei
Sholom. Dr. Abraham Fisch-
ler, president of Nova Univer-
sity guest speaker. The
Lodge still has a few vacancies
available for the exciting
Thanksgiving Holiday
planned for Nov. 22-25 at
Port-Of-The-lslands Resort.
Help Wanted
ASPIRING CAMP DIRECTOR
Top Northeast camp. Minimum age 30. Experienced in
all phases of camping, energetic, personable, willing,
to train and earn a year-round salary. Send resume' to
Box ACD c/o Jewish Floridian, P.O. Box 012973, Miami,I
Florida 33101.
at Marco on the west coast of
Florida. All types of activities,
including golf, tennis, swim-
ming, horseback riding,
boating, fishing, and much
more will be available, in ad-
dition to a welcome cocktail
party, full breakfasts, and
delicious gourmet dinners.
WOMEN'S LEAGUE
FOR ISRAEL
The Sabra Chapter of the
Women's League for Israel
will hold its next meeting on
Nov. 1 at 1 p.m., at the Sun-
rise Savings and Loan Associ-
ation, at Gun Club Rd. and
Military Trail.
Our guest speaker will be
Ms. Ann Lipton, Jewish Ed-
ucation Director of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County, who will give us a dis-
cussion of Israel.
On Nov. 9 we will have A
Flea Market Sale at Miller's
Supermarket on Military Trail
and Southern Blvd.
LABOR ZIONIST
ALLIANCE
The Labor Zionist Alliance
Poale Zion will meet on
Wednesday, Nov. 2 at 1:15
p.m. at the American Savings
Bank at the Westgate of Cen-
tury Village.
The guest speaker will be
Ben Teller, who will discuss,
"The Political Situation in
Israel." After a distinguished
career as director of the New
York office, and assistant
national Secretary of the Far-
band, Ben and his wife, Ruth,
made aliya to Israel about 10
years ago, where he became
the representative of the
"Anglo Saxons Clubs" to the
Histadrut.
All are welcome. Refresh-
ments will be served.
YIDDISH CULTURE
GROUP
On Nov. 1 the Yiddish Cul-
ture Group presents "The
Opus 111 Singers." In addi-
tion, Chase Federal will have
drawings for three $50 savings
bonds for our audience. The
program starts at 10 a.m. in
the clubhouse auditorium.
The Nov. 8 program of Yid-
dish Culture will present The
Century Village Mandolin
Ensemble under the direction
of Morris Bell. Max Lubert,
one of our executive board
members will read briefly for
us. We also will have the
pleasure of hearing soprano
Florence Sharp with Ruth
Stcindorf accompanying on
the piano.
On Tuesday, Nov. 15 Yid-
dish Culture presents The
Ruth Hyde Group in an origi-
nal cantata entitled "From
Herzl To Weizman To Vic-
tory." This was written and
will be narrated by Lee
Duchin. Soloists will be
soprano Ann March and Bari-
tone Jack Zuckerman. Ruth
Hyde, who is the musical di-
rectress of the group, will ac-
company on the piano. Alice
and Charles Kurland who are
known as 'The Rocking Chair
Melodeers' will entertain us.
The instruments utilized will
be the guitar, banjo, and
piano.
DEBORAH HOSPITAL
FOUNDATION
Palm Beach Chapter, Debo-
rah Hospital Foundation
meeting will be held Wednes-
day,Nov. 9, Anshei Sholom 12
noon.
Nov. 3 Tag Day. Irene
needs your cooperation. Call
her and be merited as a volun-
teer.
Nov. 21-25 Cruise Free-
porI-Nassau on the Costa Line
Ameiikanis, five days, four
nights; Bus, Port Tax, tips in-
cluded, lew De Luxe reserva-
tions still available. Call l//.y
or Sid.
_Z,ayde wore
~~ kilts!
Although Jews have a tradition of maintaining their cultural heritage,
they also have the reputation of becoming an integral part of the community they
live in. And Scotland is no exception.
Glasgow prides itself on having the only Jewish pipe-band in
the world. And one of the city's largest kilt-makers is Jewish.
Scotland's most famous product is fine Scotch whisky. And
America's favorite scotch is J&B. We carefully select the finest scotches
and blend them for smoothness and subtlety. The result is why we say
that J&.B whispers.
No matter where your friends or guests come from, serve them
Jc*B to make them feel at home. *1cY"* Tf 1 '
J&13. Jt whispers.
86 Piool Blendrt Scotch Wh.sky C1961 The Paddmgion Corp NY

I



ews
L
Friday, October 28,1983 / The Jewish Florklian of Palm Beach County Page 11

Lv. & (Jl
w 7
i -/
^ ft. .* ...
Chairperson of the Jewish Community
Annual Dinner Dance which was held
|5 at the Royce Hotel is shown accepting
larvey Goldberg, Vice President of the
elation of a job "well done." Dr. Jeffrey
(ft was also thanked for his work in making
sful. Over 250 people enjoyed the fruits of
COLLEGE BOUND?
le Jewish Community Center, 2415
Id., West Palm Beach on Sunday, Oct. 23,
ip.m. and learn everything you ever wanted
f'The First Year of College Survival."
ks College Selection, Financial Aid, Fresh-
It, Jewish Holidays, Test Taking and much
(cussed.
for your easier adjustment to an important
la new life.
1689-7700 for any additional information.

Stmi
of the Writer's Workshop which have been
lewish Community Center as part of Adult
|e 1977, have gathered in preparation for
eh is being published. Shown from left to
are Sylvia Schechtman, Dorothy Rikon,
iman, Ruth Hafter, Elias Shaneson, Joel
^rie Delcau and Esther Molat. From left to
Helen Vicino, Dorothy Solomon, Ruth
utor, and Sid Sherman.
STATE OF
AEL BONDS
OUGHT AND SOLD
Invest in
ael Securities
|KRK SPECIALISTS IN
ISKAKL SECURITIES
***
tCTIONS DAILY VIA TELEX
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iimi
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18 East 48th Street
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(212)759-1310
Corporation Toll Free (800) 221 -48381

JudeaTo
Via si m Torah Scroll
rr
IM
Continued from Page 8-
1910 only 121. By the year
1921 barely 87 were still in
town. At that point the elders
decided to join with nearby
congregation of Stepanove
and shortly after with those in
Naceradci. The new congrega-
tion was lead by David
Gratum (in office from 1982
to 1898). Much remembered at
the time was the leadership of
Emanuel Kollinsky and his
sons Dr. Jindrich and Otto, a
businessman in Prague. Other
community notables were Saul
Polacek, Mark Kumermann,
Filip Englander, Herman
Reich (who served as President
and Chairman of the Hevra
Kadisha) and Mrs. Emilie
Glaserova, who was the Pres-
ident of the Women and Girls
Club. In 1922 the President
was Oskar Grunhut. The Rab-
bis and teachers of the com-
munity were Zigmund Fisher,
Zigmund Pollak, Zigmund
Kohn and Rabbi Victor
Taussig from Prague.
There was a private Jewish
School in Vlasim in 1875, with
instructions conducted in
German. The school was
closed in 1897. The Vlasim
Synagogue burned down in
18S0. It took 40 years, but the
members rebuilt the syna-
gogue in greater splendor than
the original. The dedication
took place in 1890. The
cemetery was almost in ruins.
The Hevra Kadisha, under the
presidency of Hynko Broda,
cleared the site and reinstated
the cemetery which is still
there in a relatively good
shape. There was a Hevra
Kadisha in Vlasim as late as
1934, even though most Jews
have abandoned the area. One
of the last Rabbis to serve the
community was Edward
Lieben.
The entire congregation is
warmly invited to the Torah
Dedication and the Oneg
Shabbat following sponsored
by the Holtsberg family. For
more information, call the
Temple office.
Delray Beach Condo
New 2 bedroom, 2 bath on intercoastal. Boat
dock available. Tennis courts, swimming
pool, etc. For sale by owner $122,000. for fur-
ther information
Call:
(215) 368-8656 or (215) 368-2990.
Ask for Pat.
2b0R0NI
The delicious, nutritious Noah's Ark
off pasta-shaped animals kids lova!
Moms and kids go lor Zooroni two by two1 Kids think Zooroni
looks as great as it tastes And since Zooroni is vitamin-
enriched pasta simmered in lots of yummy tomato sauce and
tangy cheese. Moms love to pair up with it, too!
What
other coffee
would I
chooser
Erika
Ballerina
16 b* a great MMm
and piackion. And
K much caftan turn
aown t Klip. Inat %
wtyldrinkSanka*'
; $>WMOmi>l*aVCi'M""*


Page 12 The Jewish Floridkn of Palm Beach County / Friday, October 28,1983
Senior News
FROM THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
TRANSPORTATION
Transportation is available
in our designated area for
persons 60 years of age and
over who do not drive and
cannot use public trans-
portation. We take people to
treatment centers, doctors
appointments, to hospitals,
nursing homes to visit spouses,
to social service agencies and
nutrition centers. There is no
set fee for this service but
passengers are encouraged to
make contributions.
We offer another service to
the community as a result of
vehicles awarded to us through
the Urban Mass Trans-
portation Act by the Depart-
ment of Transportation and
the support of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County. We are now able to
serve groups of persons who
have specific transportation
needs. Under this funding, we
are able to take people to a
variety of places, both day and
night.
Groups and organizations
can call the JCC to arrange to
go to luncheons, theatre,
shopping exhibits, trips, etc. A
moderate group fee for each
event is charged to cover our
vehicle and driving expenses.
Our lift van is available for
handicapped persons within
limited areas. For information
about these services, call 689-
7703.
HOT KOSHER
LUNCH CONNECTION
Kosher lunches are served
Monday through Friday at the
Jewish Community Center,
along with stimulating
programs and an opportunity
to meet and greet old and new
friends. Persons 60 years of
age and older who are not able
to avail themselves of other
County meal programs are
eligible. Meals are prepared
mdm JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER nay
HjW OF THE PALM BEACHES, INC. W
2415 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach, FL
689-7700
ADULT PROGRAM SPECIALS ******
CENTERSTAGE
with Joan WoMberg
BEGINNING STAINED GLASS CLASS
with Mary Young
STRETCH AND TONE
with Debra Stem
ISRAELI POLK DANCING
with Yaacov Sassi
'CaD 689 7700
with the special dietary needs
of older adults in mind and
Kashruth laws are strictly
enforced.
There are no fees for this
program but participants are
encouraged to make contribu-
tions at each meal. Our
program has been extended to
two seatings per day to accom-
modate more people and for
those who have no way to
come to the Center, trans-
portation is available through
a Federal Grant. For in-
formation and reservations,
call Carol Fox or Mark
Zweibel at 689-7700.
A second Hot Kosher Meal
Program is located at Congre-
gation Anshei Emuna in
Delray Beach. Persons
residing in Boynton Beach,
Delray Beach, and Boca Raton
who wish to avail themselves
of the program may call 495-
0806 between 9 a.m. and 12
noon for more information.
Meals are also delivered
daily to those persons who are
homebound. For more in-
formation, call Mark Zweibel
at 689-7700.
SECOND TUESDAY
OF THE MONTH
SOCIAL ACTIVITY
The ^prnnH Tupsrlav Coun-
cil, a most active group, meets
the first Tuesday morning of
each month to plan, organize,
and conduct a variety of social
and fundraising programs. A
monthly meeting with special
programs is provided, refresh-
ments are served, and it is a
great way to meet new friends
and revisit old ones. Come and
join this fun group! For more
information, call Sam Rubin,
president, at 689-7700.
ADDITIONAL ADULT
EDUCATION CLASSES
Weekly Programs
MONDAYS: Arts and
Crafts, Lee Blumenthal,
Evelyn Katz, Leaders 2
p.m.
TUESDAYS: Round
Table Talk Timely Topics,
Sylvia Skolnik, Leader 1:30
p.m. Speakers Club, Morris
L'chaim to life ,
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Shulen, President 9:30 a.m.
Round Table Talk
Timely Topics meets every
Tuesday except for the second
Tuesday of each month.
WEDNESDAYS: Bridge,
Beginners and Advanced,
Alfred Parsont, Instructor
9:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. Due
to the unexpectedly huge
response to this calss, at
present registration is closed.
Those wishing to be put on a
waiting list for classes to be
started in the future (at
present, time and date has not
been established), call Rhonda
Ostrow at 689-7700.
Special Programs
Health Insurance Assist-
ance, Edie Reiter Held
every Tuesday at 2 p.m.
If you have a new aa
are planning tollSHI
fetusknow AhVTv',pl
some folks &**
receiving The Jew?\h
and would like to?
know. Everv Elr*1!
Jewish fSrSV
Beach County's aJJ
contains news you *0>
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Friday, October 28, 1963 /The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 13
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Pave 19 Tm Tmsrivh IT^-SJ:-------*.i
Page 14 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, October 28,1983
Hie Rabbinical Corner
DEVOTED TO DISCUSSION OF THEMES AND ISSUES RELEVANT TO JEWISH UFE. FAST AND PRESENT
Israel's Right To Settle
The West Bank
1 Wadler Appointed
Israel Bonds Chairm;
of Synagogues
By RABBI
WILLIAM H. SHAPIRO,
PhD
Secretary
PBC Board of Rabbis
When the venal members ot
our State Department
maintain that Israel's settle-
ment of the West Bank is
illegal, their position is un-
derstandable. When other
Americans, brainwashed by
the insidious propaganda
campaign of the Oil Cartels
and Arab interests groups,
follow suit in claiming that
Samaria and Judea belong to
Jordan, we can forgive them.
But when masses of well
meaning Jews, ignorant of
international law, argue the
same points, it truly hurts and
the pain is excruciating. Let's
look at the record.
Israel has an unassailable
legal right to establish settle-
ments on the West Bank. The
West Bank was part of the
British Mandate in Palestine,
which encompassed present
day Israel and Jordan. Under
the Mandate Jewish settle-
ments on the West Bank were
legal. All rights under the
Mandate were preserved by
Article 80 of the United
Nations charter. Conse-
quently, the settling of the
West Bank remained legal
even after the termination of
British control.
Israel is not on the West
Bank only as an occupying
power, as the West Bank has
never been indisputably
Jordanian. Israel's claims are
as good as Jordan's. Jordan
held the territory for 19 years
as the spoils of a war of
aggression, whereas Israel
took the area during a war of
self defense.
The West Bank was never a
legal integral part of Jordan.
Therefore, the protective
provisions of reversion of the
Geneva Convention do not
apply. Whether or not Israel's
right to settle the West Bank
should be exercised at this
particular time is then a matter
of prudence and not of law.
Wc know that such settlements
Founder Of
Yiddish Culture
Group Honored
The Netanya Chapter of
American Red Magen David
for Israel receptly honored
Jacob Duroshkin, the founder
and head of the Yiddish
Culture group, on his 90th
birthday. He was presented
with a life membership in
American Red Magen David
for Israel. Over $1,000 was
raised as his friends made con-
tributions to Israel's second
line of defense in honor of his
birthday and his 70th wedding
anniversary.
Rabbi Dr. William H. Shapiro
are impediments to peace. But
the absence of such settle-
ments between 1948 and 1967
certainly did not hasten
Jordanian peace negotiations
with Israel!
The Arab position con-
sistently overlooks the Balfour
Declaration, the Mandate, and
all that flows from these legal
documents. It disregards the
powers of the League of
Nations, the United Nations,
and the very existence of Israel
itself.
The President of the United
States has cautiously declared
on several occasions that the
Israeli settlements on the West
Bank are "not illegal." Out-
standing international legal
experts, including Eugene
Rostow, former Dean of the
Yale Law School, have
verified the President's legal
position. Nearly every
Democratic presidential
candidate has expressed his
position on Israel's
unquestioned legal right to
settle Judea and Samaria. Let
all Jews stand firm in
maintaining Israel's right and
duty to secure its future by
strengthening the West Bank.
Sam (Simcha) Wadler was
recently appointed Chairman
of Synagogues for Palm Beach
County State of Israel Bonds.
Wadler has lived in Florida
since 1974 and resides in
Century Village with his wife
Sylvia.
Wadler has been involved in
communal life, both while
living in New York and here in
the Palm Beaches. He is a past
Chancelor Commander of the
largest Pythian Lodge in the
country. He is past president
of the Displaymen's Guild,
past president of Temple Beth
El Men's Club, member of
Friendship Lodge, board
member of ZOA in Brooklyn
and for the past five years
president of Temple Beth El of
West Palm Beach. Wadler is
president of the President's
Council of local synagogues.
Wadler stated, "I am very
excited and honored to have
been appointed chairman by
Israel Bonds. I hope to reach
Sam Wadler
out to every synagogue
Palm Beach County and p
every temple member an I
portunity to be a part of oi
effort to help the Stale
Israel."
Religious directory
CONSERVATIVE
B'nai Torch Congregation
1401 N.W. 4th Avenue, Boca Roton, 33432. Phone 392-8566.
Rabbi Theodore Feldman. Sabbath Services, Friday 8:15 p.m.,
Saturday 9:30 a.m.
Congregation Anshei Sholom
5348 Grove Street, West Palm Beach 33409. Phone 684-3212.
Rabbi Isaac Vander Walde. Cantor Mordecai Spektor. Daily:
8:30 a.m. and 7 p.m. Friday: 8:30 a.m., 5 p.m., and a late
service at 8:15 p.m., followed by Oneg Shabbat. Saturday: 8:30
a.m., 7 p.m., Mincho followed by Sholosh Suedos.
Congregation Both Kodesh of Boynton Beach
501 N.E. 26 Avenue, Boynton Beach. Phone 734-0802. Rabbi
Avrom L. Drazin. Sabbath services, Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9
a.m.
Golden Lakes Temple
1470 Golden Lakes Blvd., West Palm Beach 33411. Phone 689-
9430. Rabbi Joseph Speiser. Daily Services 8:15 a.m. and 5:30
p.m. Sabbath services Friday 8:15 p.m. Saturday 9a.m., 5 p.m.,
Mincha followed by Sholosh Suedos.
Temple Beth David
4657 Hood Road. Palm Beach Gardens 33410. Phone 694-2350.
Rabbi William Marder, Cantor Earl J. Rackoff. Sabbath services,
Friday 8 p.m., Saturday 10a.m.
Temple Both El
2815 No. Flagler Dr., West Palm Beach 33407. Phone 833-0339.
Rabbi Howard J. Hirsch, Cantor Elaine Shapiro. Sabbath services
Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9:30 a.m. Daily AAinyan 8:15 a.m.,
Sunday and Legal Holidays 9 a.m.
Temple Both Sholom
224 N.W Avenue "G", Belle Glade 33430. Sabbath services
Friday, 8:30 p.m. Phone 996-3886.
Temple Bath Shalom
315 N. "A" Street, Lake Worth 33460. Phone 585-5020. Rabbi
Emanuel Eisenberg, Cantor Jacob Elman. Services Monday and
Thursday 8:15a.m. Friday 8:15p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.
Temple Both Zion
Lions Club, 700 Cornelia Dr., Royal Palm Beach. Mailing
Address: 640-101 Trail South, West Palm Beach 33414., Sobbath
Services Friday 8 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m. Rabbi Nathan Zelizer;
Cantor Chaim Baltuck. Phone 793-9122.
Temple B'nai Jacob
2177 So. Congress Ave., West Palm Beach 33406. Phone 433-
5957. Rabbi Dr. Morris Silberman. Sabbath services, Friday 8
p.m., Saturday 9 a.m., Monday through Thursday 9 a.m.
Templo EmaiM-EI
190 North County Road, Palm Beach 33480. Phone 832-0804.
Rabbi Joel Chazin, Cantor David Dordashti. Sababth services,
Friday 8:30 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.
Temple Emeth
5780 West Atlantic Avenue, Delray Beach 33446. Phone 498-
3536. Rabbi Bernard Silver, Cantor Seymour Zisook. Sabbath
services, 5 p.m. and 8 p.m., Saturday and holiday, 8:45 a.m.
DailyMinyan, 8:45a.m. and 5 p.m.
The Treasure Coast Jewish Center
(Martin County) 3257 S.E. Salerno Road (opposite Winn-Dixie),
Stuart, FL 33490. President Lief Grazi: 1-287-7732. Friday service]
CONSERVATIVE LIBERAL
Temple Eternal Light
Boca West Community UMC, 8900 Boca West, GlodesRood(
mile west of Boca Turnpike). The free Synagogue, P.O. Bo3,l
Boca Raton 33432. Phone: 368-1600, 391-1111. RabbiBenianw|
Rosayn. Sabbath services, Friday 8:15 p.m.
ORTHODOX
Congregation Artz Chaim
Century Village, West Palm Beach. Phone 689-4675. Sobboe]
services 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. Daily services 8:15 a.m. ond6:30]
p.m.
Congregation Anshei Emvna
551 Brittany L. Kings Point, Delray Beach 33446. Phone 499740?
or 499-9229. Harry Silver, President. Daily services8o.m.or
p.m. Saturdays and Holidays 9 a.m.
REFORM
The Reform Templo off Jupiter-Tequesta
at St. Jude Church (Parrish Hall) 204 U.S. No. 1 So; ^Ij
address: Plaza 222, U.S. No. 1, Tequesta 33458. phone7t!,
President Jeanne Tarsches. Services the second ond
Friday of every month, 8 p. m.
Temple Both El of Boca Raton
333 S.W. Fourth Avenue, Boca Raton 33432. Phone 3VIW
Rabbi Merle E. Singer, Cantor Martin Rosen. Sabbath set"
Friday 8:15 p.m. Torah Study with Rabbi Singer, Saturday
a.m. Sabbath morning services 10:30 a.m.
Temple Beth Shamm
St. Helen's Parish Hall, 20th Avenue and Victory Blvd.
Beach 32960, mailing address: P.O. Box *m
32961-2113. Rabbi Stephen Adams. Phone 1-569-0 iw-
Temple Beth Torah
at St. David's in the Pines Episcopal Retreat, Forest HillBlvd
Wellington Trace, West Palm Beach. Mailing aoor .
Lantern Tree Lane, West Palm Beach 33411. Friday ser. ^A
p.m. Rabbi Steven R. Westman, Cantor Nicholas Fenaw
793-2700.
Temple Israel
Weis. Sobbo*
1901 No. Flagler Dr., West Palm Beach 33407. Phn
Rabbi Howard Shapiro, Cantoriol Soloist Susan
services, Friday 8 p.m.
Temple joaea
I Hall *1
at St. Catherine's Greek Orthodox Church Social ^
Washington Rd., at Southern Boulevard. Rabbi ^ ^l
Cantor Rita Shore. Mailing address 1407
Worth 33463. Phone 965-7778.
Temple SaM
at Cason-United Methodist Church, corner \la^Jl9&\
Swinton Ave., Delray. Phone 276-6161. *['"Vmot| S**l
N.W. 9th Street, Delray Beoch 33444. Rabbi *>
Friday services 8:15 p. m.


Friday, October 28,1983 /The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 15
iagogue News
Candle Lighting Time Friday, October 286x24
loly
TEMPLE ISRAEL
luring the Shabbat service
[Friday, Oct. 28, Father
nk O'Loughlin of Holy
5s Church in Indiantown
deliver the sermon. To
note further community
lects by the temple's Social
in Committee, Rabbi
Shapiro has invited
priest to be his pulpit
it. The title of Father
[oughlin's sermon is
irvest The Shame
kited."
ither O'Loughlin has been
fgnized for his help and as-
Jnce to the migrant farm-
ers in the Indiantown
With the backing of the
ch, and with support from
townspeople and other
fc-ches in the community,
Frank has led the way
eeking improved housing
jitions, financial aid, so-
and legal services for
ch the migrants are sup-
td to have access.
Cross Church consists
Anglo families, a hand-
I blacks and a congrega-
nt' about 200-250
panics each Sunday. The
t's services are conducted
|panish and English.
is expected that in his
non to Temple Israel,
her Frank will enumerate
\s in which the congrega-
can become involved in
grams to help the migrant
kers. Marilyn Cohen,
Irman of the Temple Israel
lal action committee, has
Icated that the temple has
lady pledged large quan-
ts of food to Father
Loughlin for distribution.
|n Tuesday evening, Nov. 1
p.m., Temple Israel will
Ugurate its latest innova-
|: an outreach program for
pe who have chosen to be
alizing a marked increase
number of persons who
f converted to Judaism in
Past year, Rabbi Howard
)iro has announced that
Pie Israel will conduct the
each program "to offer a
supportive group and a learn-
ing experience from which
they (converts) may draw
strength and confidence in
their desire to live Jewish
lives."
Co-hosting. with Rabbi
Shapiro during the first
evening, will be Jonathan
Gottlieb, chairman of the
Outreach Program. According
to Jonathan, "We are reach-
ing out to you in order to help
you make your conversion
more meanningful. Please
take our hand and join the
outstretched, welcoming
hands of all who share your
needs and concerns."
The Outreach Program at
Temple Israel invites those
who have chosen Judaism,
and their spouses to come to
the initial meeting on Tuesday,
Nov. 1 at 8 p.m. For informa-
tion or clarification, you may
call Rabbi Shapiro at Temple
Israel.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID
On Oct. 28, 8 p.m. Temple
Beth David's Adult Education
committee under the chair-
manship of Shirley Lichtstein,
will be sponsoring a service
entitled "Impressions of Is-
rael." Congregants who were
in Israel this past summer, will
share their impression of Israel
based on the program that
they participated in. Rabbi
William Marder will act as
moderator as the people also
discuss how does Israel
strike you while you were
there? An Oneg Shabbat will
follow the service.
TEMPLE JUDEA
The Temple Judea Art Auc-
tion is set for Saturday
evening, Oct. 29 at the
Sheraton, the corner of 1-95
and Palm Beach Lakes Blvd.
The preview begins at 7 p.m.
with the auction at 8 p.m.
Light refreshments are com-
plimentary and a cash bar will
be available.
Myra Berger, chairperson
and Barbara Chane, fundrais-
ing chairperson, have invited
Peter Gemini and his wife,
Debi of the "Wizard of Art
Gallery" of Jupiter, to auction
their collection of outstanding
art. The collection includes
works by the famed Israeli
artist Avram Ebgi as well as
oils, plates, scupltures, litho-
graphs, and decorative posters
by Kravjansky, Simbari,
Neiman, Luongo, Mingolla,
Noyer, Hibel, and Ceravolo.
A special collection of poster
art by Agam will also be avail-
able.
All purchases will be tax
deductable with proceeds
going to the Temple. This is
the first of many fundraising
events which will be open to
the public. Temple Judea now
numbers over 285 families and
is planning to break ground in
the near future for its sanc-
tuary, banquet hall, chapel,
and school near the corner of
Congress Ave. and 1-95. For
more information about the
auction, call Peter at the
"Wizard of Art Gallery" or
the Temple office, 965-7778.
Temple Judea's new office
will open Nov. 1 at 5154 Okee-
chobee Blvd. Suite 2B. This is
west of Haverhill Road on the
south side of Okeechobee
Blvd. The new temple tele-
phone number will be 471-
1526. Office hours will be
Monday through Thursday, 9
a.m..-4 p.m. and Friday from
9a.m. to3 p.m.
The office will include a
study for Rabbi Joel Levine
and the use of two spacious
conference rooms. Conversion
Area Deaths
PMCM
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Jaimy
Board Certified and Fellow of the
Royal College of Canada
H. Bensimon M.D., P.A.
Medical Director of the
Joseph L. Morse Geriatric Center,
is pleased to announce the opening
of his office for the practice of:
ICARDIOLOGY AND INTERNAL MEDICINE
fe8t?eriatric Center
T7^ Gladstone Drive
wt plm Beach, Fla. 33407
Tel 306-471-5111
Office Hours I
By Appointment
classes, adult Bar-Bat Mitzvah
classes, committee meetings
and small study groups will be
utilizing these facilities. A 24-
hour answering service will be
effective Nov. 1.
Visitors to the office will be
able to study the floor plan
and renderings of the new
building of Temple Judea
which will be located near
Congress Ave. and 1-95. Rabbi
Levine will maintain morning
office hours and will be avail-
able by appointment at
mutually convenient times.
BETH KODESH
CONGREGATION
Sisterhood
The Sisterhood of Con-
gregation Beth Kodesh will
hold their meeting on Tues-
day, Nov. 1 at 12:30 p.m. at
501 NE 26 Ave., Boynton
Beach.
William Dansker will deliver
a talk on Soviet Jewry. He is a
student of Russian History
and Russian Language, as well
as government economics.
Dansker travelled to Russia
and visited many Jewish fami-
lies there. Refreshments will
be served. Husbands and
guests are welcome.
ANSHEISHOLOM
CONGREGATION
Sisterhood
Sisterhood of Congregation
Anshei Sholom will hold its
Board meeting on Monday,
Nov. 7 at 9:45 a.m., and its
Regular meeting on Tuesday,
Nov. 15 at 1 p.m., when
Esther Samuels will review the
book "This Year in Jeru-
salem."
BETH SHOLOM
Sisterhood
Sisterhood of Temple Beth
Sholom, Lake Worth, will
hold a regular meeting on
Wednesday, Nov. 2 in the
Social Hall, at 315 N. "A"
Street. Refreshments will be
served at 12:30 p.m., prior to
the meeting, which will com-
mence at 1 p.m. Following the
meeting, Fanny Greenberg at
the piano, will present an
interlude of classical music ap-
preciation.
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Page 16 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County /Friday, October 28,1988
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