The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian the voice of the Jewish community of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Running title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Physical Description:
4 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 8, no. 41 (Dec. 24, 1982)-v. 11, no. 26 (Aug. 30, 1985).
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44606415
lccn - sn 00229548
ocm44606415
System ID:
AA00014310:00035

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)


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Full Text
IE VOICE OF
IE JEWISH
JMMUNITY OF
UM BtACH
JUMTV
"Jewish floridian
VOLUME 9-NUMBER 32
PALM BEACH, FLORIDA
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 21,1963
PRICE 35 CENTS
Near-Panic Dominates Israel's Money Market
Food Prices Leap Upwards by 50 Percent; Gasoline Follows Close Behind
By GIL SEDAN
And HUGH ORGEL
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Wear panic dominated Israel's
Imoney market Sunday as
public confusion mounted
over the government's seem-
lingly contradictory policy
toward the Shekel.
The Treasury had been
romising for the past week
(li.ii ihere would be no sharp,
Uddui devaluation of Israel's
urrvney. The commercial
hanks unexpectedly an-
nounced ihat ihe Shekel will
fell al ilie rale of 70.99 to the
j.S. dollar, down from the
6.63 rale that prevailed last
Irida*. Two hours later, the
kink of Israel, the country's
Leniral bank, announced an
official base rate of 69.27
Shekels to the Dollar.
SPECULATORS who had
disregarded the Finance Min-
istry's promise to maintain the
Shekel and purchased Dollars,
earned a profit of over five
percent. Those who trusted
Finance Minister Yoram
Aridor's assurances that
devaluation would be gradual,
registered losses of between
15-30 percent.
ONE DIRECT result of this
difficulty was that prices on
foods iosc by SO percent as of
last week when the new
Yii/h.ik Shamir government
announced a reduction in gov-
ernment food price subsidies.
Also rising sharply, by 23
Advanced Weaponry
Claims Public Attentions
TEL AVIV (JTA) Advanced weaponry claimed
public aticntion in Israel last week. A new improved model of
line Israel-made Merkava tank the Mark II was unveiled at
la public ceremony at Latrun, scene of a bitter battle during
Israel's war for independence. And Israel Television disclosed
lilui an Israel-manned American Hawk missile downed a Soviet-
|buili MIG-25 figher over Beirut in August, 1982.
THE ORIGINAL version of the Merkava (Chariot) tank
roved itself in action in Lebanon according to Maj. Gen. (res.)
Israel Tal, the man most responsible for the design and produc-
tion of the tank. He said the new model has a 30-50 percent
Improved capability over the old. It is more maneuverable,
better protected and more accurate in its fire power, Tal said.
According to Israel Television, modifications and special
tactics worked out by an Israeli technician manning the Hawk
battery were responsible for the MIG-25 kill.
percent, was the cost of
gasoline. Both stunning in-
creases caused panic buying in
the country's major cities.
The government sought to
maintain the Shekel at last
week's rate to stem the public
rush to buy foreign currency,
mainly Dollars, before they
became too expensive.
Upwards of $60 million worth
of foreign currency was
bought by the public in a three
day period last week.
The atmosphere of panic
was engendered by the suspen-
sion of foreign currency trans-
actions. The Tel Aviv stock
exchange was closed Sunday
and expected to remain closed
for several days. The buying
and selling of Israel commer-
cial bank shares was sus-
pended, probably for the rest
of the week.
THE LOCAL money
market suffered a severe shock
over the weekend when the
commercial banks and the
government agreed in prin-
ciple on measures to stabilize
bank stock. Until recently,
bank shares were considered
lo be the safest investment,
preferable even to index-
linked government bonds. But
that changed in recent weeks
as the shares showed a down-
ward trend.
The public began selling off
their bank shares to buy
foreign currency. The banks,
anxious lo avoid the collapse
of their stocks, invested some
10 billion Shekels to shore up
their value. This worked as
long as there was no excessive
demand for cash. But the run
on foreign currency preci-
pitated a crisis.
Late last week, the heads of
the commercial banks met
with officials of the Treasury
and the Bank of Israel. Agree-
ment was reached to link bank
shares to the U.S. Dollar, in
effect a government guarantee
of their value. Shareholders
would be required to retain
them for a specified period,
probably five years.
THE AGREEMENT is still
subject to approval by the
Cabinet and the Knesset
Finance Committee. Israel's
largest commercial bank, the
Bank Leumi, was reportedly
unhappy with the new
arrangement'. Opposition
spokesmen and others
demanded yesterday that the
new agreement be in-
corporated into law.
One of the effects of the
drop in bank share prices may
be a spate of bankruptcies of
firms which obtained credit
from the banks, using their
shares as collateral. The banks
are likely to decide that the
value of the collateral is insuf-
ficient to guarantee the credit
and may demand additional
security which some clients
may not be able to provide.
Histadrut warned that it will
fight hard against any attempt
by the government to reduce
cost-of-living allowances
which are presently pegged to
a three month increase equi-
valent to 80 percent of the
cost-of-living index during the
previous quarter.
Herzog Accuses World of Hypocrisy
In Relation to Israel and Lebanon
JERUSALEM (JTA) President Chaim Herzog has ac-
cused international public opinion of hypocrisy in relation to Is-
rael and Lebanon. When the Sabra and Shatila massacre oc-
curred last year, he said, Israel was blamed worldwide even
though it was plain that no Israeli hand had spilled the blood of
the victims. Now, however, when massacres are once again
being perpetrated in Lebanon the world stands by and says
nothing.
THE PRESIDENT made these remarks during a day-long
tour of several religious kibbutzim and moshavim in the north-
ern Negev. He attended afternoon services at the Moshav
Shitufi of "Massuot Yitzhak," named after his late father,
Chief Rabbi Isaac Halevy Herzog of Ireland.
Burrows Visits Poland and Israel
With Campaign Leaders From Around Nation
By LOUISE ROSS
Assistant News Coordinator
Michael Burrows, 1984
[campaign special gifts vice-
Ichairman, has been overseas
land to Israel many times but
|no visit moved him as much as
[the one he took this summer.
Mike Burrows and Doug
Kleiner, Jewish Federation
campaign director, were two
of 35 Federation American
Jewish campaign leaders to
visit Israel and Poland for an
I in-depth exploration of the
i issues underlying the 1984
United Jewish Appeal cam-
paign.
Poland, the first stop on the
mission, made quite an im-
pression on Burrows. "Very
p'lcn my mind conjures up all
[sorts of images and 1 find each
time I emerge with something
diffCrCnl(.. reflected Burrows.
Hut the feeling 1 came away
I*"" 's that in that beautiful
liountry 0f Poland, all of a
sudden v/x million souls
Sn? ,10 exist- They rcp-
Lh uCdL a "Sment of society
IBS hLas becn obliterated.
,nas the part that sticks in
my stomach and I can't get it
out. It's not only the loss of
life itself that is so horrific,
but the loss of a Jewish civil-
ization and how it was done."
Three members of the Mis-
sion were survivors of Ausch-
witz. Burrows had conversa-
tions with them and observed
their reactions to their return.
He identified most with Ernie
Michel, executive vice-
president of the New York
Jewish Federation, who had
returned for the first time
since his escape in 1945.
"Ernie's was a soft kind of
response, accepting friends
who tried to comfort him. We
sensed the moments when he
stopped at specific spots which
evoked painful memories for
him," Burrows said.
At the site of what was once
the main synagogue in
Warsaw, destroyed by the
Nazis during the Warsaw
Ghetto revolt, the Poles had
built a skyscraper after the war
and left the bottom few floors
unfinished. Every window in
the building is boarded up. "I
Continued on Pag* 4
Michael Burrows [right] and Doug Kleiner at Auschwitz.


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, October 21,1983
Leaders Attend
Four community leaders
from the Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County recently
attended the second annual
Hineni II United Jewish Ap-
peal Leadership gathering in
New York City. This third of
seven LIFTOFF events that
opened the 1984 UJA-com-
munity campaign was co-
chaired by H. Irwin Levy of
Palm Beach. Also attending
from this area were Michael
Burrows, Myron J. Nickman
and Alan Shulman.
According to Levy, Project
Renewal chairman for the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County, Hineni II
brought over 175 major gifts
contributors to New York, the
Views On Jewish Women's Assembly |
"It has been so exciting to see
the networking among all the
women's Jewish organization
in this area which has been ini-
tiated by the Jewish Women's
Assembly. It's very helpful
and stimulating."
Doris King, president
National Council
of Jewish Women
"/ see the Jewish Women's
Assembly, sponsored by the
Women's Division of the Jew-
ish Federation of Palm Beach
County, as a good opportunity
for the different generations to
come together to exchange
ideas, share experiences and
become informed about the
critical issues of the day. "
Sonia Gold, president
B'nai B'rith Women,
Ohav Chapter
"Over 500 Jewish women of
our community gather to-
gether once a year for the
privilege of sharing ideas and
learning. I am delighted to see
the tremendous growth of
leadership in our area, re-
membering how small we once
were.''
Sylvia Lewis, president
Mitzvah Council of
B'nai B'rith Women
"I find the speakers and
workshops very interesting
and informative. I encourage
women of this community to
participate in this education
day, sponsored by the
Women's Division of the Jew-
ish Federation of Palm Beach
County, as they surely will
gain something from it.''
Edith Grushow, president
Temple Judea Sisterhood
"/ have attended every Jewish
Women's Assembly since it
began. It is the greatest thrill
to see so many Jewish woman
gathering together in this com-
munity which reflects our
growth and the strides we are
making."
Helen Bilawsky, president
North Palm Beach County
Region of Women's
American ORT
Comptow. Owodv and Ktmm itm Form tor HiwvoHom
Fkii
ADORESS
, WtUWfc
ORGANIZATION
_ond CHAPTER.
(HAMawd)
W#OJ# tfCtft MOftftQ pfVftf*J)fK#,
. M any (Norn*)
Organization:
Enclosed is my check for $
($22.00 Per Person) payable to:
Jewish Federation of Polm Beach County
JEWISH WOMEN'S ASSEMBLY
November 9, 1983
Sessions have limited searing capacity. My preference would be:
D "THE EFFECTS AND INFLUENCES OF CRISES
ON TRADITIONAL JEWISH LIFE-STYLES'
DR. NORMA SCHULMAN
D "CULTS: THE CHARISMA AND
THE CHALLENGE"
DR. SANDY ANDRON
REGISTRATION CLOSED ON TUESDAY. NOVEMBER 1ST
SPACE LIMITED
CHILDCAAE Will D AVAILAOIE FOR INFANTS THROUGH PRESCHOOL
? Yes. I would like chikkor* for______child(ren). oge WEDNESDAY NOVEMDER9 1900
PROGRAM
8 45 AM 2 15 Pf*
6:45 AM.
REGISTRATION
Carte* and Carton
VWwtrqOHptayTobtwor
Ofld h COraNhMflf decencies
9:30 AM OPENING REMARKS
SHCILA F.NGOSTT.IN. Pi*****
Womn DMsior. of the j*wt*
Federate! of Palm Beocti Counry
10:00 AM
PLENARY ADDRESS
"DESTRUCTION FROM WTTMIN: ARE VE OUR OWN WORST ENEMIES?-
CAROL HUM
11:00 AM. SESSIONS (CHOKE OF ONE)
THE EFFECTS AND INFLUENCES OF
CRISES ON TRADITIONAL JEWISH UFE- STYLES"
Of. Hofmo i. jotuvnon
'CULTS: THE CHARISMA
AND THE CHALLENGE"
OR. SANDY ANDAON
12.30 PM LUNCHEON 6 KEYNOTE ADORESS ,
"ISRAEL TODAY: FACING PROBLEMS IN A COMPLEX SOCIETY"
2:15 PM ADJOURNMENT
HYATT PALM DEACHES
Wesr Polm Deoch FL
5
Sponsored By:
WOMEN'S DIVISION. JEWISH FEDERATION OF PALM DEACH COUNTY
w*hhe>
PontdpoKon of comfnuolfy-w*d Jewish Women's Or^onizorions
city with the world's largest
Jewish population and fore-
most financial and informa-
tion center. "We made use of
the resources available to
provide an exciting and
meaningful program for
people who play a strong
leadership role in UJA-com-
munity campaigns."
The 1984 United Jewish
Appeal Regular Campaign
received a significant early
boost with announced pledges
totalling $14,427,000, UJA
National Chairman Robert
Loup announced. Of this sum,
$6,467,000 is new to the 1984
Regular Campaign. An ad-
ditional $1,126,500 was newly
committed to Project
Renewal. The Hineni pledge
total for the Regular Cam-
paign represents a 23.4 percent
increase over contributions by
the same donors last year.
Participants at the leader-
ship seminar heard Meir
Rosenne, Israel's Ambassador
to the United States, former
Secretary of State Henry
Kissinger and New York City
Mayor Edward I. Koch speak
about issues of concern to
world Jewry. Leading work-
shops were Dr. Haim Shaked,
professor of Middle Eastern
Studies at Tel Aviv University,
who provided an overview of
the opportunities and risks for
Israel in the regional and
international environment and
Robert Russell, international
chairman of Project Renewal.
Russell issued an urgent
appeal for increased financial
commitments to Renewal. "In
spite of all the enthusiasm
generated between our com-
munities and their twinned
neighborhoods," Russell said,
"cash instability causes
concern about the future of
the project. Ironically,"
Russell noted, "cash shortages
threaten the program just as
Project Renewal is demon-
strating obvious and
measurable success."
But the highlight 0f ,K I
according to Myron ft]
man, general chairman 1*1
1984 UJA-Jew* S,0[M
of Palm Beach cH
campaign, and mS
Burrows, 1984 1*1
special gifts vice SA
were the home hoso&l
and/-vit to the L
neighborhood during flgf
Nickman stated "a i
of us were invited to dinn.Up
the home of Martin^'
internationally known 'J
dealer and expert on 2
masters. His home, which J
also his art gallery," J?A
realm of make believe H.
invited his close friend u
discuss the economy of lSR2
with us who pointed out ib
Israel is in real trouble becau 1
she is obtaining loans in$5
of grants from the US
Consequently, Israel il
look to the Jewish commuS
in the Diaspora for help."
Burrows noted that joinunl
with a group of men aill
women at Hineni II who wot
committed in their hearts toI
the survival of the Jewfak
community was significant to I
him but he considered equaii
significant his visit to the
Lubavitcher community. "|
came away with the feelinj
that although we approach
Judaism differently, we are all
the same. An amazing |
amalgamation took place
therefor me."
Alan Shulman, chairman of
long range planning for the
Jewish Federation of Palm i
Beach County and a national
UJA vice chairman, summed
it up by saying, "Hineni II
brought together a rather
unique group of committed
and responsible Jews who,
because of their good fortune, I
have the opportunity to share
with others collectively in
meeting their Jewish res-
ponsibility for providing and
caring for others. It is hoped
that this event will help set i
standard by which all con-
cerned Jews will be judged by
each other as well as by them-
selves."
B&P Women To Attend National UJA]
Career Women's Mission To Israel
Susan Wolf-Schwartz,
chairman of Missions for the
Business and Professional
Women's Group of Women's
Division of the Jewish Federa-
tion ol Palm Beach County,
announced that three career
women from this community
will participate in the first
National UJA Career
Women's Mission to Israel.
The mission will take place
from Oct. 30 to Nov. 7 and is
billed as a "concentrated
learning experience with an
important people to people
component."
Attending from the Palm
Beaches arc Melanie Jacob-
son, Lois. Frankel and Elfcj
Rampcll. The women J
experience home hospitality
with Israeli working women.
learn about social services and
problems, about defense
during a visit to an army base
Continued on Page 9
S22 00 Registration Fee 'Hiudes
Morning Cottee o i
Die'ory tows Obst-
*" -* aaaauae^^^
Members of the Public Relations Committee of the J*jJ
Federation of Palm Beach County met recently for II or**
tation .nd to review plans for the coming year. Pictured bo"
are [left to right] Barry Krischer, Stacey Levy, Gail ScawjU.
Judy Schimmel, Barbara Tanen, Harvey Goldberg, Leah Sis* i.
chairman, Ronni Epstein, director of Public Relations for w
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County, Rabbi How"*':
Hirscn, and Ann Leibovit. Not pictured are Cynnie Lisi
Karen List.


Friday, October 21,1983 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page*
Reflections
What do you feel arc the priorities or key
issues that the local Jewish community
must begin to focus on in 5744?
ft
lirttin Blonder
"My concern has been and continues to be
providing for the elderly in our com-
munity. With our Morse Geriatric Center
open and operating and soon to be at full
capacity, we must devote our energies to
developing outreach programs and other
services for the elderly who are able to stay
in their own homes.
Erwin Blonder, president
Joseph L. Morse
Geriatric Center
a critical challenge that faces us all today
hhe need to arrest and reverse the rate of
I ition; our diminished numbers. Our
Immunity can do that by educating our
EunR and our adults, strenghtening their
kish awareness so that we need never
orrv about losing them and by strength-
jiing and supporting Jewish life, wherever
he need is perceived, through specialized
.cial services."
Nathan Kosowski, chairman
Education Committee
of the Jewish Federation
of Palm Beach County
"In our growing Jewish com-
munity, 1 see the need for tem-
ples and synagogues, along
with the Jewish Community
Center, to take on a more
central role in providing op-
portunities for Jewish singles
to meet and socialize. 1 sup-
port the work of the Single
Parent Task Force of the Jew-
ish Federation of Palm Beach
County and their efforts to
recognize and address the
problems of Jewish single
parents in our community. We
also need to recognize the
importance of counseling op-
portunities for these special
family problems and to en-
courage them to take ad-
vantage of the services availa-
ble at the Jewish Family and
Children's Service.
Barry Krischer, attorney
and board member of
the Jewish Federation
of Pmlm Beach County
Nathan Kosowski
Carolyn Ring
"One can only ask where would our
absence be felt most keenly? What issue
would be virtually unserved without our
influence and concern? Without the
dedication of our Jewish community and
like communities throughout the country
working to insure the strength of Israel's
future, a gaping, irretrievable chasm
would be created. We are unique in our
commitment to the survival of our spiri-
tual homeland because we are unique in
our commitment to the survival of the
Jewish people."
Carolyn Ring, chairman
brad Bonds District VI
)nc of the problem areas that our com-
munity faces is lack of inexpensive cultural
fctivities, lack of efficient surface trans-
lation and many things that the senior
|tizcn was used to 'back home.' Syna-
Dgucs should provide transportation to
heir religious services whether bythem-
tlvcs or through the resources of the Jew-
kh community. Personal outreach to
bnely people is a must. Each newcomer
bust be brought into the secular and reli-
tous community and made to feel a part
i (he scene."
Ceceil Tishman, principal
Temple Israel
Religious School
Ceceil Tishman
Dr. Paul Klein
"I was gratified to see that our community
has reaffirmed the need for a new Jewish
Community Center facility through the
needs assessment study undertaken by the
Jewish Federation under the chairmanship
of Buddie Brenner. Now, in the coming
year, my primary concern is to see that
need begin to become a reality in order to
help fulfill the programs and services a
community of our size and growth
requires."
Dr. Paul Klein, president
Jewish Community Center
Barbie Demands
- -ii
PARIS Klaus Barbie, the
lartinic "butcher of Lyon,"
T* in jail awaiting trial for
rones against humanity, has
emanded his release on
[founds that he was a kidnap
Pctun.
According to his defense
lounsel, Jean Verges, Barbie
?as seized by unidentified
rrench agents in Cayenne,
rrench Guiana, after his ex-
pulsion from Bolivia last Feb-
Luary and transported to
Trance. "| was a kidnap
['im and request justice,"
l"c lormer deputy commander
T1 ,he gestapo in Lyon said.
Verges has filed suit in Cay-
enne, requesting the chief jus-
tice there to order an investi-
gation into the circumstances
of the alleged kidnapping and
to disclose the identities of
the agents and their accom-
plices.
Barbie was sentenced to
death in absentia by a French
court shortly after World War
II.
Barbie's suit charges collu-
sion between the French and
Bolivian authorities, claiming
that France and Bolivia have
no extradition treaty.
Project Renewals
Our Partnership
In Israel's Future
Shirley
DeBerson
"I believe that one of our
priorities in 5744 should be a
comprehensive review of the
transportation problems we
have in our community. Our
inadequate public transporta-
tion system, coupled with the
fact that many elderly who
comprise our large and grow-
ing senior citizen population
do not own cars, dictates that
we must do something to help
alleviate the problem."
Shirley DeUerson, president
Jewish Community
Day School
dhe Jewish Federations of Palm Beach County and
South Broward's twinned neighborhood Hod Hasharon.
Project Renewal Is now active in 80 distressed neighbor-
hoods throughout Israel. It hns united hundreds of
thousands of Israelis with Jews throughout the world hi
cooperative effort to improve the quality of Mfe hi these
depressed areas. Hod Hasharon, the twinned conmnnity
with the Jewish Federations of Palm Beach County and
South Broward, is located northeast of Tel Aviv.
Midrasha Enrollment Soars
To New Heights
By LOUISE ROSS
Assistant News Coordinator
Something exciting is hap-
pening in this community. If
the increased enrollment of the
Midrasha-Judaica High
School is any indication,
Jewish kids are getting turned
on to Jewish education.
Classes began on Oct. 5 at the
Jewish Community Day
School with 82 young adults
enrolled attesting to the fact
that Jewish education is high
on their list of priorities.
According to Dr. Paul
Klein, chairman of the
Midrasha Committee of the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County, behind this
growth is a "growing aware-
ness for the need for Jewish
high school education and
social interaction linked with
the assistance and support of
our rabbis and congre-
gations." Midrasha now
includes twenty 10th graders
who are preparing for their
confirmation with their own
rabbis from Temple Judea,
Temple Israel and Temple
Beth Torah.
Another reason for the
success of Midrasha can be
.attributed to the relevant
.......
courses that are being offered.
"We have had such a good
response," stated Ann Lynn
Lipton, Jewish Education
Director of the Jewish Federa-
tion of Palm Beach County,
"that we had to divide classes
and make extra sessions."
This was especially true in
Holocaust Studies taught by
Jack Rosenbaum. Rosenbaum
devised a new curriculum
which includes visits from
survivors and movies as well as
the traditional material.
Another popular course
with 45 enrolled is Judaism
and Christianity with in-
structor Skip Paille. The
students will learn more about
their own religion as well as
that of their neighbors. Visits
from religious leaders of
various Christian denomina-
tions will be included.
Martin Pomerancc will
teach a new course entitled
Anti-Semitism. As part of the
curriculum, Pomerance will
hold a moot court trial to
dramatize the effects of anti-
Semitism.
"1 was very pleasantly sur-
prised," stated Lipton, "that
so many youngsters wanted to
take Israeli Song and Dance, a
new class offering." Yaacov
Sassi will be the instructor and
by the end of the semester it is
hoped that the group will be
able to get out into the com-
munity and put on per-
formances, explained Lipton.
Bible, a mainstay, will be
taught by Rabbi Steven West-
man of Temple Beth Torah in
Wellington. Hebrew, once
again, will be taught by
veteran instructors Rachel
Stein and Edna Golstein. Roz
Pomerance will teach a class
on Cults as well as share with
her husband, Marty, the
teaching of Current Events
and Journalism. The in-
structors have made a com-
mitment to produce a profes-
sional type newspaper, staffed
by the class, that will highlight
the ideas and activities of the
Midrasha students. One of the
student's parents has offered
to publish the paper.
The Drama class will be
taught by Gary Kessler who is
the drama specialist at Camp
Ramah each summer. He is a
cantor who now teaches music
at the Jewish Community Day
School. "We are excited about
the experience in Jewish
drama that Gary will bring to
Con tin u*d on Pag*


i County / Friday, October 21,1983
Borrows Visits Poland and Israel With Campaign Leaders
Pagel
felt like they were purposely
trying to ridicule the last
memory of the Jews by first
constructing a commercial
building on that site, and then
not even finishing it," ex-
plained Bunows.
"When I left Auschwitz I
understood the greater reality
of that experience by looking
at the faces of the Poles and
wondering what made people
do as they did," reflected
Burrows.
Attempts at memorializing
the history of that time struck
Burrows as equally insulting.
The place in Warsaw where
hundreds of thousands were
put on trains to concentration
camps is marked by a small
wall with a few com-
memorative signs. "Five feet
away from this memorial is a
gas station. This was done by
the Poles as a complete vilifi-
cation of a whole cultural
base."
Burrows attended Shabbat
services at Warsaw's one
synagogue, built only recently
b the Polish Government for
? ceremony commemorating
the 40th anniversary of the
Warsaw Ghetto uprising.
"There were twenty old men
there, all seventy sears plus. In
five years or so, it'll all be
over. A culture is gone, our
heritage is gone and what's
more, who cares? Who says it
can't happen in the States? It's
feelings of this sort that keep
creeping into my head. We
must keep talking about what
happened in Poland and
elsewhere to keep it from
becoming ancient history and
forgotten," stated Burrows.
The role of the Joint Dis-
tribution Committee in
Poland was made clear to the
mission participants. The
"Joint," funded by the United
Jewish Appeal, was allowed
back into Poland in 1981, for
the first time since 1939. Over
$600,000 was spent last year
for filling individual medical
prescriptions and providing
health needs such as hearing
aids, eye glasses, wheelchairs,
providing cultural programs
including records and cassettes
of Jewish music, lectures,
films on Jewish topics, and
regular visits by actors of the
Yiddish Theater to fourteen
clubs and seven Kosher
Kitchens; maintenance ot
Kosher Kitchens; support to
the Jewish religious congre-
gation and its infrastructure;
providing religious supplies
such as matzot, ethrogim and
lulavim; and conducting
public Seders which were
attended by 900 Jews.
Burrows and Kleiner ate and
talked with the Jews of
Warsaw and Cracow in the
Kosher facilities provided by
the Joint Distribution
Committee.
"In Cracow, which was not
destroyed during the war, we
drove through the streets and
could still see where Mezuzot
had once been placed on door
jams," Kleiner said. 'The
imprint of Jewish life is
everywhere, in roads still
called by Jewish names and in
houses once used for worship,
but the Jews are gone. Other
people have taken their places.
as if the Jews never were there.
The few who are left are
brave, but they don't remem-
ber when the last bris took
place in Poland. They are
brave, but realize that they are
extremely isolated."
Burrows had an experience
in Poland that no one else in
his group had. Not realizing it
'at the time, he walked into the
midst of an outdoor Solidarity
rally. "There were easily 300
people there, all with blank
staring faces, but all singing
and chanting the word
'Polski,' he said.
"They really know what the
word solidarity means in
Israel, the true essence of the
word. Thai's the thing thai we
must inculcate in our own
Jewish society, in our own
community, in our own
children. If we don't preserve
our heritage, we will all be left
dying like Poland," concluded
Burrows. In an intensive four
days in Israel, participants in
the L'JA community leader-
ship seminar were briefed b>
top Israeli leaders and Jewish
Agency officials and studied
L'JA funded programs and
services first-hand.
The leaders announced 1984
regular campaign pledge*
totaling SI, 100,000, a 35 per-
cent increase over giving by
the same donors in 1983. An
additional $435,000 in pledges
to Project Renewal was also
announced.
Before his trip, Burrows
said he knew little about
Project Renewal, the dynamic
effort to upgrade Israel's
distressed neighborhoods.
"But, believe me, I know
now." He observed the sense
of pride that the residents of
Hod Hasharon, the Jewish
Federation of Palm Bea^h
County's twinned neigh-
borhood in Israel, possessed
"which I really respected.'" He
Members of tie mission reflect on the horrors of the Naii period.
saw that the needs are
enormous. "Among other
things, children must be given
an opportunity for a quality
education so that they will be
able to take their proper place
in the mainstream of Israeli
life."
Burrows returned from
Israel and Poland with a
mission, a man deeply touched
bv his experiences. "Each of
un is in this world to count for
certain things, to see for our
kid's well being and
education, to live nicely, to
reach a sense of credibility in
our community through our
business or whatever we do,
but there is still another
dimension. What about really
doing something for


Nomebody else? I support a lot
of things, both Jewish and
non-Jewish, because I care
.ibout them but what 1 hadn't
really realized before was that
;his -ensc of giving and caring
and wanting to help people
lives me another reason for
being on this earth and of
wanting to work hard,** con-
cluded Burrows.
This monument in Warsaw commemorates the place it
the Jews were collected for transport to concentration chi*,'
gas station is in operation just five feet to the retrod
monument.
Readers Write
JCDS Joins Interscholastic
Private School League
A new sports league has
been organized in Palm Beach
County for grades 4-6 and 7-8.
The league offers soccer in the
fall for grades 4-6, basketball
in the winter for grades 4-6
and 7-8, and softball in the
spring for grades 4-6 and 7-8.
Currently, there are five
schools represented: The Jew-
ish Community Day School,
Lake Worth Christian, Sunrise
Academv and Unity Wee
"Jewish f loridian
Combining
of Palm Beach County
Out Voice end f Mrt.on Report*
FREO K 8HOCHET SUZANNE SMOCMET RONNI EPSTEIN
Editor and Puoi.shar Uecutme Editor Nawt Coormnato.
Puotrenod Weekly October through Mio-Apm. B Waoi, Balanceol rear
Second Ciat Pottage Paid at Boca Raton Fia USPS aO69O30
PALM BEACH BOCA RATON OFFICE
2200 N Federal M*, Suite 208 Boca Raton. Fia 13432 Phone 368200'
Maw Office A Plant 120 N E 6th St. Miami. Fi 33101 Phone 1 373 60S
pMiaiaslsrRilsim len UTt Jewish FierMto*. t> o k. oi 2T J. Mtort, Fia 111 oi
AaliarWlIm Director Steel Leeaer. Phone Mt-IBU
Comomed Jewish Appeal Jewish Federation ol Palm Beach Count, inc Officer* President Jeanne
Levy Vice Preeidente. Peter Cummmgi. Alec Engeistein. Arnold Lamport. Myron J Nicaman. Berba'a
Tenon. Secretary. Or Elueoeth S Freii.cn Treasurer. Aivm Wilensky Submit material to Ronm
Epste.n Director of Public Relations S01 South Fiegier Or West Palm Beach Fl 33*01
Jewish Fioridian does not guarantee Kashrutn of Merchandise Advertised
SUBSCRIPTION RATES Local Area U Annual (2 Veer Minimum |7 SOI or by membership Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach County. S01 S Flagler Or West Palm Beach Fia 33*01 Phone 832
2120 Out Of Town Upon Request
Friday, October 21, 1983
Volume 9
14HESHVAN5744
Number 32
Wisdom School.
These schools are now play-
ing soccer at Okeeheelee Park
on Tuesdays and some Thurs-
days. Winners of games,
which took place on Oct. 4,
were the Jewish Community
Day School and Sunrise
Academy. "The school spirit
generated by the games was
evidenced by the good play
and sportmanship of the
student players," stated Jack
Rosenbaum, soccer team
coach.
The children representing
the JCDS were: Michael
Eisenberg, Paul Rivas, Eitan
Gillard, Jeffrey Gottlieb,
Joshua Wcingard, Eileen
Bassett, Nikki Weiss, Barry
Lagos, Clint Ehrlich, Kenny
Church, Zachary Berg, Eddie
Mullen, Brian Friedman,
Michael Gordon, Jordan
Tartakow, Adam Krischer,
Jordan Werner and Tamir
Goldstein.
Assisting Mr. Jack
Rosenbaum is Shawn Young.
EDITOR:
The Jewish Fioridian:
If five hundred thousand
Arabs can live in peace, har-
mon> and prosperity among
three and one half million Is-
raelis, why can't a handful of
Israelis live among millions of
Arabs on the West Bank, es
pccially, in the land that is
theirs historically?
W.W.WACHTEL,
Member Reagan
Tak Force
EDITOR:
The Jewish Fioridian:
My husband, Mac, and I are
volunteers with the JCC,
livcring kosher meals 10ti
persons w ho are homebowii|
Mac feels as though hei
rounding the circle. Hestand
working as a deliverybojri
he's resuming that job,
that he is "retired." Asl
me, it's quite a change froai|
teaching English! HowoJ
wc both enjoy deliveringbj
sher meals to the home
as a JCC service
Wc find it very graiifjjl
because we're not only bn*|
ing prepared food to
unable to prepare or pun
Continued on Pr"
\ Radio /TV Highlights }*
MOSAIC Sunday, Oct. 23, 9 a.m. WPTV
Channel 5 with host Phyllis Shever Girard.
L'CHAYIM -Sunday, Oct. 23,10:30 a.m. -WPjJ
1340-AM with host Rabbi Mark S. Golub The Jew"
Listener's Digest, a radio magazine.
JEWISH MUSIC AND CULTURE HOUR Sunday.
Oct. 23, 10 p.m. WHRS-FM Stereo 91 with hostur-
Simon Silverman.
SHALOM Sunday, Oct. 23, 10 a.m. -Jf^S
Channel 12 (8:30 a.m. ON TV Channel 51) *'" m
Richard Peritz.
MESSAGE OF ISRAEL Sunday, Oct. 23,7:05j
- WEAT 850-AM Rabbi Samuel Silver of Tj-J
Sinai, Delray Beach, will speak on "Independence
Interdependence." i
Sponsored by the Jewish Federation of Ptl* BtlC
County.



Fi^PQi^bw.T*398SYTl4e^ TageS
Update.
i
TobyF.Wilk
Incessant feuding among
Lrab countries, splits in the
IpiO and the three year old
liiin-Iraq war make a mockery
lof the premise that the issue of
|5udea and Samaria settlements
are the key to middle East
[stability-
i The American Jewish Con-
Less filed a brief in the U.S.
Icourt of Appeals asking our
treasury Dept. to disclose
holdings of Arab States in our
country. The Appeal Brief
noted that the International
Investments Survey Act re-
quires the collection and
publication of information
about foreign investments,
land their implication for the
"economic welfare and^na-
I tional security of the U .S."
Arab power to intimidate
and blackmail the Western
world has declined. It could
have been invested for the
future good of their people,
but it seeped through the sands
of Arabia, the Boutiques of
Europe and numbered ac-
counts in Switzerland.
Salomen Bros., a leading
Wall Street investment bank,
has been included in the Arab
boycott list much to the dis-
may of many Arab and Amer-
ican banks. The boycott stems
from Salomen's merger with
an international trading group
which had links to Israel.
A considerable amount of
Arab money has been made
available to British Univer-
siiics seeking funds in the face
of government cutbacks.
Unlike endowments from
Japanese industry where no
ulterior motives exist, the
Arab generosity has serious
political ulterior motives.
Liberia became the second
black African nation after
Zaire, 10 renew formal ties
with Israel. Very little
promised Arab wealth made
iis was into African coffers.
Now, iliac is a re-awakening
in Africa regarding the value
of Israel as a friend and ally.
This is being nurtured by 1s-
racl and should be encouraged
In ilie U.S.
I he National Council of
Young Israel's Public Affairs
Committee has set up a 24-
hour a day telephone hot line
to give callers guidance and
suggestions relating to Israel
and causes of Jewish interest.
Opinion
Israel is No. 1 in the world
in the percentage of popula-
tion involved in research.
Three out of every 1,000 Is-
raelis are engaged in full-time
research and development
activity. The U.S. is in second
place with 2.5.
A new neo-Nazi game
glorifying the Nazi extermina-
tion of the Jews is being distri-
buted in West German
schools. The game has been
sent anonymously to Jewish
homes for the aged, schools
and youth clubs.
The Methodist Church at its
annual conference in England,
passed a resolution recording
its distress at the recent in-
crease in anti-Semitism in
Europe. The message ex-
pressed "love, respect and
thankfulness to the Jewish
people," and added, "We
confess that Christian history
and belief have been gravely
disfigured by sinful prejudice
against the Jews."
Dr. losif Begun, the refuse-
nik who has already served
two sentences of internal exile
in Siberia for teaching
Hebrew, has been arrested and
charged with anti-Soviet agita-
tion. The perfectly legal teach-
ing of Hebrew has been trans-
formed into an "especially
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dangerous crime against the
State," for the purpose of
"weakening the Soviet
regime." President Andropov
must be urged to have Dr.
Begun released.
In England, Lord Beloff,
the guest speaker at the world
ORT Congress, received a
letter asking whether he knew
anything about this 103 year
old international Jewish orga-
nization for technical and
vocational training. This was
as if someone had asked
Einstein if he knew anything
about Math. Lord Beloff's
father introduced ORT to
Britain; his sister, widow of a
Nobel Prize Physicist, is vice
chairman of British ORT;
another sister is life president
of British Women's ORT. "I
even proposed to my wife at
an ORT Ball," he declared.
None of the world ORT
organizers would admit to
having sent him that blush-
inducing letter.
In 1948, a Japanese indus-
trialist had a vision that di-
rected him to seek out Israel
and its people. He founded a
sect called the Makuya. They
now number over 60,000 in
Japan and have a fiery love
and reverence for Israel and
Judaism. Young members of
the group study at the Hebrew
University in Israel. Makuya
speak Ivrit and take Hebrew
names. On Shabbat, they sing
with Lubavitch-like gusto in
faultless Israeli accents.
Through the Makuya, some-
thing of Judaism is exported
to the Far East.
The University of Oxford
has a cholent society a
tradition founded by Prof.
Weitzman, whereby the Pres-
ident of the Society has the
task of cooking the Cholent.
At a long, kosher meal eaten
by the Society's members, the
only toast is "To the Cholent!
Long may she simmer."
The Jabotinsky Prize,
Shield of Jerusalem, has been
established. It is intended to be
the Nobel Prize of the Jewish
world, and will be presented in
New York in November and
annually to the man or
woman, Jew or non-Jew con-
sidered to have done most for
the defense of the rights of the
Jewish people.
President Chaim Herzog
told Moslem and Christian
db leaders that he intends to
new his study of conversa- -
jonal Arabic. Herzog said
Jews and Arabs in Israel have
proven that coexistence is
possible.
An enterprising group of
young people plan a fund-
raising event for British ORT
the First International
Ram's Horn Championship.
The aim is to attract com-
petitors from throughout the
country to raise money for the
ORT Kennedy School in Is-
rael. It is hoped the event will
also revive interest in the art of
shofar-blowing.
The Jewish population of
the diaspora may decline by up
to 25 percent furing the next
25 years, according to research
in London and Jerusalem, due
to intermarriage, assimilation
and decline in Jewish birth
rate.
FIRST CLASS ROUNDTRIP TICKET
3 Stop* Including
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pgg The Jewish Floridian of Palm Be^h County/Friday. October 21,1983
Organizations in the News
B'NMB'RITH
The next meeting of B'
B'rith Yachad Uait of Palai
Beach County will be held on
Oct. 26 at 7:30 p.m. at Royal
Palm Clubhouse, 554 NE 22
Avc, Boynton Beach, with a
speaker and refreshments.
HADASSAH
Shalom West Pain Beach
Hadassah Bible Study Group
will meet on Tuesday, Oct. 25,
3 p.m., at Century Clubhouse.
For information call Augusta
Steinhardi, Oxford 200-102,
Century Village.
Nov. 8 A Day at Calder,
reserved seats and transporta-
tion. For reservations, contact
Gene Fermaglich, Coventry K-
262.
Yovel Hadassah in coopera-
tion with Shalom and Leisure-
villc are launching an an-
nual Flea Market and Bazaar
on Wednesday, Nov. 2, 9 a.m.
to 4 p.m., at the Palm Beach
Auditorium. This effort will
benefit the Mount Scopus
Hospital in Israel. There will
be no parking fees and every-
one is welcome.
These items will be featured:
old and new jewelry, ceramics,
paintings, lamps, linens, piece
goods, appliances, books,
crafts, novelty items, plants,
and new clothing.
Yovel Hadassah, West Palm
Beach Chapter events:
Nov. 24-27 Gala Thanks-
giving Week-End. Four days
at The Tarleton Hotel in
Miami Beach. Fine Kosher
cuisine. The low price of $120
per person includes delicious
meals, transportation and all
gratuities. For reservations,
call Bessie Hoffman-Green-
brier A or Bertha Kaplan-
Somerset F.
Dec. 7-9 Three Fe-
Filled Days. Visit and enjoy
the exciting and interesting
EPCOT. Included in this
package at a cost of S181, are
three breakfasts, two dinner
shows ('Annie' and
'Camelot'), dinner at The
World Renowned Chalet Suz-
anne and much, much more.
For reservation, call Jeanne
Tobin, Sussex K, or Essie
Goldberg, Berkshire H.
Tamar Royal Palm Beach
Chapter of Hadassah events:
Nov. 18 Hadassah Bond
Luncheon for Israel at Hyatt
House.
Nov. 22-28 Trip to Costa
Rica.
Monday, Dec. 5 Paid-
Up-Membership Luncheon at
Indian Trails C.C.
Dec. 7 Annual Luncheon
and Pool Party at home of
Ruth Baraodian.
Jan. 23 Youth Aliyah
Luncheon at Flagler Museum.
Aliya Group of Lake Worth
Chapter of Hadassah will hold
a Paid-Up-Membership
Luncheon on Thursday, Oct.
27 in Temple Beth Sholom,
Lake Worth at 12 noon. The
General Meeting will take
place after the luncheon. Your
Paid-Up-Membership card is
your admission, dues are pay-
able at the door if you wish.
Other activities:
Wednesday, Nov. 9
Jewish Women's Assembly
sponsored by Jewish Federa-
tion of Palm Beach County at
the Hyatt Hotel, 8:45 a.m. to
2:15 p.m. Breakfast and
Lunch are included.
WOMEN'S AMERICAN
ORT
The Palm Beach Chapter of
Women's American ORT [Re-
habilitation Through Train-
ing) will hold its regular
meeting on Oct. 24 at 1 p.m. at
the Community Center, 110
Southern Blvd., West Palm
Beach (adjacent to St. Cather-
ine's Greek Orthodox
Church).
An ORT Film "Nothing But
the Best" will be presented.
Refreshments will be served.
Bring your friends.
The HaverhUI Chapter of
Women's American ORT will
present Ralph Stern, a resident
of Leisureville of West Palm
Beach, whose topic will be his
personal experiences of ORT
training and education. Mr.
Stern will address the members
and their guests at the regular
meeting, Thursday, Oct. 27,
12:30 p.m., at the Sunrise
Savings and Loan Bank, Gun
Club Road and Military Trail.
Refreshments will be served.
The regular meeting of the
Lake Worth West Chapter of
Women's American ORT will
be held on Monday, Oct. 24 at
their new meeting place
Sunrise Bank, on Military
Trail and Gun Club Road at
12:30 p.m. A Chinese Auction
will be held, and members are
cosmic kids
The taam is out of this world'
Your kids wiU have a Wast witti Cosmic KkJs from Chef Boy a' dee1
Because Cosmic Kids are the detoous new pasta shapes
fhtf loo* like little hying saucers robots and afcens
all m a savory tomato sauce And smce
Cosmic Kids are enriched
you moms will love
them, too1
W*
V
Zffit'i
s35-? /5oV
Thursday, Nov. 10 Lake
Worth Chapter Education
Day; Temple Beth Sholom,
Lake Worth, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Tuesday, Nov. 15 Had-
assah Bond Rally at the Hyatt.
Honorees are Carol Roberts
and Molly Freiberg.
There will be armti,
bership Tea soon herM-
asked to donate one or two
articles in very good condition
and salable. They should bring
them to Martha Freedberg's
home before the meeting so
they may be tagged. Honor
Roll credit will be given for
each item sold.
The next meeting of the
Golden Lakes Chapter of
Women's American ORT will
be held on Tuesday, Oct. 25 at
1 in the Clubhouse.
The program will be high-
lighted by a talk by John Skow
entitled, "Living More Effec-
tively in a Changing World."
Mr. Skow has a Master's
Degree in Social Work and is a
Marriage and Family Therap-
ist. He is a professional advis-
or to the Mental Health Asso-
ciation of Palm Beach County
and is on their roster of
speakers.
Refreshments will be served.
Boutique opens at 12:30.
TECHNION
Joe Dorf, president of Cen-
tech Chapter, American Tech-
nion Society, announced that
the special guest at their Oct.
27 meeting will be Mike Lc-
vine, talk host of WJNO. Mr.
Levine's topic will be
"Reaction to Technological
Change and its Potential for
Good and its Effect on our
Lives in South Florida."
Because of the damand for
seats the meeting will be held
at Congregation Anshei
Sholom, 5348 Grove St. (Cen-
tury Village), West Palm
Beach. The meeting is open to
(he public and will start at 10
a.m.
The Lee YassU Gronp of the
Lake Worth Chapter of Had-
assah v- ill meet Tuesday, Oct.
25 at 12:30 p.m. at Temple
Beth Shalom, 315 A St., Lake
Worth.
will hold a reguUr""11^
-I*9*** to Ton, h- a
Edwards, will be SgflB
Watson Duncan -y
! served.
Dr.
book is based onThMir*
Margaret Mitchell 7ut lfe of
The afternoon will feature a Gone With the Wind 1
dramatization of the 69th Refreshments will be
Convention which took place All are welcome
recently in Washington, D.C._________
Veterans* Counselor Appointed
Alfred Golden, executive
vice- president of Riverside
Memorial Chapels, announces
the appointment of Maurice
Weinman as Veterans
Counselor for all Riverside
chapels in South Florida. His
long and dedicated involve-
ment in aU aspects of veterans
affairs, and his experience i.
conducting the JWV 2*1
of funeral services E?
Maurice Weinman" 0 '
uniquely helpful as RiversidS
representative to familv J
friends of those So'hJ
served ,n the armed f
the United States. '
With G. Washington's* Seasoning
and Broth they'll never say
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G.WASHINGTON'S
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For a more flavorful flanked, nm
in G Washington s Rich Brown
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add the water anrj vegetables to
the meat G Washington s Sea-
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seasoning The special Mend ol
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flanken in more ways than one
And it does wonders lor your
stock, too'With G Washing-
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they'll say more1
KCertMee Keeker aaafhvn
4 pounds Hank steak 6 whole peppercorn!
2 tablespoons shortening 3 stalks celery
1 Vt quarts Mllaa tier 3 sprig s parsl ey
3 packets G. Washington s 2 onions
Rich Brown Seasoning and Broth 2 carrots
Lightly brown flank steak in shortening, drain Add remaining ingredients
stir Cover and cook for 2 hours over low heat, or until flank is lender
Strain stock set aside as soup Sbcethemeat Serves6to8
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Friday, October 21,1983 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 7
Page 7
"Airfare to Israel,
a hotel overlooking tke sea,
and a can
How can you do it for $839?
\bu need friends?
Get a complimentary
Avis Rent A Car.
"You have them.
"El Al, the Airline of Israel.
"And we've put together a
'Sunsation' vacation
good enough for
friends.
"We're going to,
prove it to you from
the U.S. to Ben Gurior
Airport in Israel
and back again.
"El Al is the
only airline that flies
747s nonstop. So you
get to Israeland your vacationhours sooner.
"You'll get to stav at a superior hotel for six days and five nights.
"And to see more of Israel on your own, a complimentary Avis Rent A Car is part or
the package for five days.
"If vou like, vou can add $100 to the $839 package
price and stay at the deluxe King David Hotel in Jerusalem,
ourcitvofgold. mm .
"Or you can choose the deluxe Dan Hotel in Tel Aviv.
It's our most modem city right on the Mediterranean.
"To get this much vacation from as low as $839 takes
more than a friend.
"It takes the airline of Israel.
"So call vour travel agent. Or El Al at
Stay 6 days/5 nights. 1-800-223-6700."
r
i
For complete lour details, call or write Suasaikm Six ttfM
El Al Israel Airlines. HW Third Avenue, New Nork. >T 100...
Name
Address
Come to Israel
Come fly wit
Net** pnee tmmion New York-Tel MTMMP onlv ** **trom
nwr area, COHUCI your travel ageiii or tl Al
The Airline of Israel.

.


Senior News
FROM THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
The JCC-CSSC is funded in
part by Title III of the Older
Americans Act awarded by
Gulfstream Areawide Council
on Aging, Florida Department
of HRS, the Department of
Transportation, Jewish Feder-
ation and client contribution,
enabling us to provide a
variety of services for the older
adult. Our Services through
Title III of the Older Ameri-
can Act is available for per-
sons 60 and over.
TRANSPORTATION
Transportation is available
uvim JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
'$ OF THE PALM BEACHES, INC.
2415 Okeechobee Blvd.. West Palm Beach. FL
689-7700
!- ..',' CSB
GALA ART AUCTION
The Jewiah Floridian of Palm Beach County/ Friday, October 21,1983
for persons 66 years or over
who have no cars and cannot
use the public transit system to
go to doctors appointments,
hospitals and nursing homes
to visit spouses, treatment
centers and the JCC Kosher
Lunch Connection. For infor-
mation, call 689-7703.
"Hot Kosher Lunch Con-
nection" Monday to Friday
at the Jewish Community
Center .
Hot Kosher Meals and sti-
mulating programs are pro-
vided. Two seatings are avail-
able in order to accommodate
everyone. There is no set fee,
but participants are encour-
aged to make a contribution at
each meal.
Reservations must be made
in advance. For reservations
and further information, call
689-7700.
Persons who are home-
bound and need hot koshei
meals delivered may also call
for information at the abovt
number.
ARTIST OF THE MONTH
Mr. Herman Perloe
Mr. Perloe, a retired ac-
countant, has worked in the
unique medium of hand-
painted black and white
photographs for many years.
His works have earned him
public acclaim when on exhibit
and has received prizes for his
efforts locally in contests
judged by the Norton Art Gal-
lery.
Works of Senior Artists are
displayed at the JCC. Seniors
are invited to call the Center if
they wish to exhibit their art.
Artists may price their individ-
ual work, giving people an op-
portunity to purchase
anything they wish. For
further information, call 689-
7700.
SA1URDAY NOVEMHR 19.1983
700pm CHAMPAGNE REVIEW
SOOnm AUCTION
TO BE HELD AT TEMPLE ISRAEL
1901 S. FLAGLER DRIYE
OPEN TO THE PUBLIC
Sponsored by:
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER OF THE PALM 0EACHES INC
6897700
PLEASE HELP US
HELP YOU!
from J.B. Hanauer & Company
By Mitchell L. Silverman, Senior Vice-President
Beginning next January 1, thousands of retired
owners of municipal bonds will be forced by the new
Social Security law to report their tax-exempt income to
the Federal government. .. and to count the interest
from their municipal bonds in computing their tax
liability. In effect, this is a tax on tax-exempt income.
The Social Security Amendments of 1983 contain a
clause which calls for taxing up to half of Social Security
benefits of taxpayers whose adjusted gross income
exceeds $25,000 for individuals or $32,000 for couples.
The adjusted income includes half of Social Security
benefits and all interest from tax-exempt bonds.
J.B. Hanauer & Company is a member of the Public
Securities Association (PSA), and agrees
wholeheartedly with their position that this tax
(Section 121 of the Social Security Amendments of
1983). is "unfair, improper and unconstitutional". We
know that this new tariff will adversely affect
thousands of you who have so carefully structured your
retirement finances. Furthermore, it will require you to
report all your tax-exempt income, something which
"younger" bondholders don't have to do yet.
Two bills have been introduced to repeal these
measures. Senator D*Amato IR-NY) has introduced
S. 1113 in the Senate, which now has 11 bi-partisan
co-sponsors. Representative Owens (D-NY) has
introduced H.R. 3028 in the House of Representatives
(which now has 15).
If you want to preserve both your privacy and your
future income, J.B. Hanauer & Company can help.
Simply call 471-5500 or fill out the coupon below and we
will provide you with additional information and a
model letter for your use in contacting your legislators.
Whether you are in immediate danger or not, we urge
you to let your Senators and Congressmen know how
you feel.
Name.
Phone
Address______________________________________
Please contact me with additional information
on how Section 121 of the Social Securities Amendments
of 1983 will affect me.
Please send me a copy of the model letter referred to above.
For More Information, Call or Write Today
Call 471-5500
J-b
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.HanauercVCo.
Municipal Bond Specialists Since 1931
2271 Palm Beach Lakes Boulevard
West Palm Beach, Florida 33409
Member NASD. Inc. Member SI PC
EDITOR:
The Jewish Floridian:
The Jewish Community
Center of the Palm Beaches
has been providing services for
our youth group in many dif-
ferent ways. Their willingness
and desire to help us has
exceeded the realm of our
imaginations. Not only did
they make meeting rooms
available at our every whim,
free of charge, but they have
also permitted us to borrow
one of their modern vehicles to
transport members of our
group to Johnathan Dicken-
son State Park for a youth
rally. This, in addition to the
manv other services it provides
us with, proves it to be an
active part on the growth of
our area. Along with their
support, we feel we can grow
into young adults who will
take an active part in the goals
of our movement and work
hard towards the development
of the Jewish Community.
MERICONSOR
Member,
Young Judaea Organization
West Palm Beach. Florida
THANKSGIVING
ATTHE NEW
Ti Glatt -
Barcelona
Hotel & Tennis Club
4 DAYS/3 NIGHTS
89
pp/
dbl. occ.
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2 Glatt Kosher meals daily
3 on Saturday
Complimentary lunch snack
3 tennis courts
Next to Fonuinebleau Hilton
Call (305) 532-3311
44th A Collins Ave. Miami Beach
JCC News
%
ISRAELI "DANCING IN THF .,
PERMITTED,HEAI*-
Yaacov Sassi, noted Israeli music and dan-.
is conducting a weekly class in Israeli Fniw n*"*
held at the YWCA. 901 So. Olive Ave WaSS
The class, under the auspices of the \'rr I alml
evening, Oct. 16 at 7:30 p.m. Donation for Jc?11!
is $2.50, non-members $3.50 for each session *
CENTER STAGE
"Center Stage," a new Drama wn,u
Wednesday, Oct. 19. at 7:30 p.m at thM^P.
nity Center, 2415 Okeechobe? Brvd; WattS?
Adults will work on scenes, monologues and\St!
as well as exercises in voice contro* relaxa,21
movement. This group will become the n
JCC "Center State Players." rCfe JLfi!!!for
members $40 per year. member$ BJ,
COLLEGE BOUND?
Come to the Jewish Community Center iai*.
chobee Blvd., West Palm Beach on2und 'b '
1:30-4:30 p.m. and learn everything vou /., 3f"
know about "The First Year of SiMMS!"*
HARVEST COSTUME BALL
The Young Singles of the Jewish Community r.
ages 30-35, will hold another "Fun Dance^K'a i
Oct. 29 at 9 p.m. at Temple Israel, 19oTn0 FlL "t'l
West Palm Beach. W0, Fla81erDt,l
In the spirit of the season, Singles will arrive oil* J
or out of costumes. "Willie B" from Y-100 wilK'J
spin tunes and hold dance contests. There 3 fcSl
bar with the first drink free. Donation if $4 for S
members, $6 non-members.
CAREER SINGLES TO MEET
AT PLAYER'S LOUNGE
Dancing and conversation in a relaxed atmosohml
will be the order of the evening when the Jewish Cot!
nity Center's Career Singles, Age 40 plus, meet u]
Player s Lounge in the PGA Sheraton, Palm Beach (J
dens at 9 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 22.
"ESP" PLUS OFF TO METRO ZOO
The Jewish Community Center's "Especially SinskI
Parents" and their children, plus other "ESP's *il
boarding the bus Sunday, Oct. 23 at 10 a.m. at the Center,
2415 Okeechobee Blvd. for a visit to the Metro Zooii
Miami. Zoo admission is $2 each for children and $450,
Tor adults. Cost of gas will be divided among the partici-
pants. Reservations are necessary.
Call the JCC 689-7700 for additional information.
A vote is to take place at the Jewish
Theological Seminary on October 24, II
on a proposal that a woman be admittedtd
the Rabbinical School for ordination.
We the senior members of the Talmud!
department, declare that in our opinion this]
is against the Halakhah. Professor Saul
Lieberman, of blessed memory, our revered
teacher and one of the greatest Rabbinic
authorities of our time, rendered a decision
on the subject three years ago. We accept
this decision as binding.
The sages tell us that in the cased|
tvtsm n nm Trtnri nan an *tf
If there is a difference of opinion
between a master and his disciples, it istne
master who is to be heeded. How much
more so in this case when we the disciples
are in complete agreement with the masten
HaimDimW"*1
Jose foui
Israel Mg
David H*}
DovZloWd
1M MMMM MM m lor by th. UNION tor TRADITIONAL aO*******



Friday, October 21,1983 /The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 9

FALL WINTER SPRING FALL WINTER SPRING FALL
81 82 82 82 83 83 83
Idrasha enrollment soars off the graph.
\ct the Fall of 1981 the number of students
attending Midrasha has increased by over 100
percent!
Midrasha Enrollment Soars To New Heights
Continued from Page 3 stated Lipton. ^i.h ,h da ^
UMSM: s Jhe Mid.asha-Judaica Hi8 ST t/tStfTfl
S5ni fwwinltotavlM fhoC 5 sponsored by the lemples. For more informa-
[B&P Women To Attend National UJA
Career Women's Mission To Israel
Continued from Page 2
lid strategic areas, and will
in. i with political leaders at
L kncsscl as well as visiting
Ilk i ncus of interest.
I.Melunic Jacobson is an
Ivhi.ini county attorney with
lc I'alm Beach County at-
Iiiicn's office. She is a
L'liibei of the B and P
lumen's (iioup of Women's
vision of the Jewish Federa-
ls and a life member of
luional Council of Jewish
lumen, I'alm Beach Section,
kobson is a docent at the
Irion Gallery of Art and is
filiaicd with the Florida
\ociation of Women
layers,
ll ois I rankcl is an attorney
jtli the firm Montgomery,
li.il, Rciter, Dcnney and
|ircy. Frankel is a member
Ihc IJ and P Women's
Iroup of Women's Division
|d will be going to Israel for
first time. She also is a
(ember of the National
(taniiation of Women,
orida Association of
lomen Lawyers and the
omen's Network of Palm
pcli County.
[A certified public account-
with Rampcll-Rampell
f; Ellen Rampell also will
^ making her first trip to
fad. She currently is a
Fiber of Bat Gurion
Nassah, having served as
P president of education in
|c 1982-83 year, and
?men's American ORT
pa "each Evening Chapter,
vmg served as president of
organization. She parti-
Ned in the joint Jewish
flcration-JCC Feasibility
fdy and is on the Pre-school
T>mm.ttcc. She also belongs
I 'he B and P Women's
joup of Women's Division.
[Wolf-Schwartz, having
fended the Cameo B and P
[won of Women's Division
II year, is confident that the
w women will have an
aSS"? of a lifetime.
IrlS Kael as a ,ourist is
fceff nUt ,his missin.
I sa"y ,desined for
omen rand Passional
P* wnT adadross Lhc
'' w"i add another
Community Calendar
October 21
Jewish Federation In-Service Management Seminar 8.45-
11:45 a.m.
October 22
Jewbh Federation Young Leadership Development 8
p.m.
October 23
Jewish Community Center-Daddy and Me Pioneer
Women Cypress Lakes BBQ noon Congregation Aitz
Chaim board 10 a.m. Golden Lakes Temple Sisterhood
-10 a.m. Temple Beth Torah Men's Club 10 a.m.
October 24
Hadassah Chai Youth Aliyah luncheon ORT Palm Beach
- 1 p.m. ORT Mid-Palm 1 p.m. ORT Poinciana -
noon Temple B'nai Jacob Sisterhood paid-up luncheon
- 12:30 p.m. Hadassah Tikvah Epcot through Oct. 26
B'nai B'rith Women Olam blood bank donor night 7:30
p.m. Pioneer Women Orah membership tea 12:30
p.m.
October 25
ORT Boynton Beach board 1 p.m. Hadassah Lee
Vassil 12:30 p.m. Hadassah Chai luncheon and card
party noon B'nai B'rith Women Menorah Epcot -
through Oct. 27 Yiddish Culture Group Century Village -
10 a.m. B'nai B'rith Women Masada board 7:45 p.m.
Temple Beth David Sisterhood 8 p.m. ORT Golden
Lakes- 1 p.m.
October 26
Jewish Federation Board of Directors S p.m. ORT
Golden Rivers noon American Red Mogen David for
Israel 12:30 p.m. Yiddish Culture Cresthaven ORT
Royal-7:30 p.m.
October 27
ORT Boynton Beach luncheon card party noon
Hadassah Chai noon ORT Haverhill 11:30 a.m.
Hadassah Bat Gurion-8 p.m. .
dimension. I look forward to will be meaningful and full of
hearing their reactions when superlatives," commented
lhc\ return as I expect thev Wolf-Schwartz.
Kohl Brings Ideas For Peace
To Cairo, Amman Rulers
BONN (JTA) Chancellor Helmut Kohl, presently visit-
ing the Middle East, intends to present ideas for bringing peace
to that region based largely on his meeting with King Hussein of
Jordan, West German radio stations reported.
Kohl, who was in Cairo after visiting Amman, was quoted as
saying he was greatly impressed by what Hussein had to say.
The Jordanian ruler publicly attacked Israel as "expansionist,"
but there were no indications of what Kohl has in mind.
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.oM for TRADITIONAL CONSERVATIVE jU04_
at||lOl* in the spirit of Solomon Schechter ^'^M
We are pleased to announce the formation of a new organization in the
Conservative Movement dedicated to the traditional ideas on which the
movement was founded.
IF YOU BELIEVE THAT CONSERVATIVE JUDAISM
SHOULD REMAIN TRUE TO ITS HISTORIC MISSION THAT:
CONSERVATIVE JUDAISM IS TRADITIONAL JUDAISM
EVOLUTIONARY CHANGE IS IN ORDER, NOT REVOLUTIONARY CHANGE
JEWISH LAW MAY BE DECIDED ONLY BY THE FOREMOST TALMUDIC SCHOLARS
THE FAMILY IS THE CORNERSTONE OF JEWISH LIFE
JUDAISM SANCTIFIES DISTINCT ROLES FOR MEN AND WOMEN IN RITUAL LIFE
SHABBAT AND KASHRUT ARE BASIC FOR MEANINGFUL JEWISH SURVIVAL
THEN YOU ARE NOT ALONE.....JOIN US!
Due to the holydays we were unable to list all the names
that we received. They will appear in our next ad.
on sine mum
Ml MYN! M.ICN
MM MIIION MM
AMI IIONAKO J MONSON
0" CC*H0 KW(0fT7
mi Kiiin nmomu
CDMftO KKMS1CIN
SYWl r CKNVCIN
H0OACC SIC*
(Mil DOMKI MONSKIN
a aMMfN mown
on. 0*in chiin
ARMOlO DAVIS
MAlKA CDCIMAN
AMI HOSMt COClMMt
JANICC ll C"SUIN
AMI JOtl CPSHIN
MMI VUAMON 'AC
AMI AMAMAM CtlMIK
AMI 0V1D ftlDMAN
MMAK FINCMKC
trm 'iscm
AMI iAmjCM (TOMAN 0f
AMI A!HC ruTTCKMAN
Mtim GAILATW
ONAIO CAUAtW ___.-
PHOT. CCMMO CCKSHfKl.0
MMlWUCI Crt**C
(MIST CWCNWaO
SIOMCMAK*
PWYUIS MAMTSON
paji HMniMM
JUMTHR MtlCKlfN
on. miANjosf"
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CMMK>e JOSCH
SCYMOU* I KA'7
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MOT WMAM OMMCNSttm
MMI JONATHAN B0MA1H
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NAME ________________________
ADDRESS_____________________
CiTY/STATE/ZIP________________
O STUOEWT MEM8ERSHIP
Q SINGLE MEMBERSHIP
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t10
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$___
UTCJ.PO BOX 44
GRMD CENTRAL STATION/** York/J Y.10B3


10 The
P1ondianofPalBaac*Cocaty/ Friday, October 21,1963
The Rabbinical Corner
Mi to oocussm or
5SUC2 tf^rmtr to JtmanwL rsr tm
Jews By Choice
never do it only closes them
off from us and we are the
losers. It is hard enough when
they bear the pejorative state-
menu from the non-Jewish
community, it is hard enough
when they begin to experience
the anti-Semitism that is oat
there, they do not need to fed
rejection from within as well.
It is written that "Those
who bring others near to
Judaism
arc
accorded
B? RABBI
HOW AMD SHAPIRO
Temple Israel
The Midrash our poetic,
allegorical and homiletical
interpretation of the Torah
writes concerning the giving of
the Law in the Uderness:
"The Torah was given in
public for all to see, in the
open. For if n had been gr>en
in the Land of Israel, Israel
would have said to the nations
of the world, you have no
share in it;
"Therefore, the Torah was
given in the open, and every-
one who wishes to receive a,
let them come and receive it. "
That statement is at the
bean of Judaism's Outreach
Program. We believe Judaism
is not closed; the Jewish
people are not exclusive; the
covenant we call Torah
belongs to anyone who wishes
to become part of it.
For too long, we have been
seen as a community whose
arms are locked together with
no way to break into the circle.
Our interlocked arms gave us
strength and there were many
times, we needed that
strength. But the longer you
keep your arms in one
position, the more brink you
become and, eventually, the
weaker. Judaism needs to say:
Bar/Bart Mtzvah
JatteSaksoa
JULIE SAKSON
Julie Dawn Sakson,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Edward M. Sakson of Palm
Beach Gardens, will become a
Bat Mitzvah on Friday
evening, Oct. 21 at Temple
Israel Rabbi Howard Shapiro
will officiate i
Julie, a ninth grader at Palm
Beach Gardens High School,
enjoys playing the saxophone
in the school band, piano and
acting.
ANDREW MEREY
Andrew Mercy, son of Dr.
Daisy and Dr. John Merey of
Palm Beach, will be called to
the Torah on Saturday
morning, Oct. 22 at Temple
Beth El.
MICHAEL LEVINE
Michael Scott Levine, son
of Mr. and Mrs. Steven Levine
of Palm Beach Gardens, was
called to the Torah on Satur-
day morning, Oct. IS at
Anshei Sholom. Rabbi Isaac
Vander Walde and Cantor
Mordecai Spektor officiated.
Michael attends Edison
Russell Day School.
Rabbi Haward Shapiro
"Let us open our arms and
make a break in the circle so
that others can enter and give
us new strength."
Our Palm Beach community
can be very proud that
through the Palm Beach
County Board of Rabbis, it
offers a course for those
people who are exploring their
desire to become Jews. It is
not an easy process. There is a
lot to learn, there is a whole
new culture to adopt. There is
a new history to make yours,
there is a new identity to
accept. But it's not impossible.
And those people who have
begun this process deserve our
encouragement and not our
criticism.
Too many Je*s by choice
have told me of the inap-
propriate comments made
either to them or near them by
Jews by birth (as opposed to
Jews by choice). Comments
that are seemingly so innocent,
I am sure, are made without
malice. But they are inap-
propriate. And we need to be
aware that more and more
members of our community
are people who have chosen to
be Jewish and labeling them
"Shaigetz" or "Shiktsa" only
distances them from us. We
need to be aware that
questioning their motivations
and telling them they can
me merit as thouZE.
fven birth ,0 2JM
Je* by choice isT .N
* Jewish peopled
by choice haTAL,^1,
father and ffl*gl
mother. WekS? \
them feel how ha ^
2 they have &S
their hand in hS**
Help Wanted
ASPIRING CAMP DIRECTOR
Top Northeast camp. Minimum age 30 Experien^
all phases of camping, energetic, personable 27
to train and earn a year-round salary. Send resiZ"
Box ACD c/o Jewish Floridian, P.O. Box 0l2 Florida 33101. JMli
- o -> > m
Executive Suite for the Dncrinmatmg PrriwskJ
Beautifully furnished 1 bedroom/1 bath
private golf coarse spectacular view, pool!
hour security.
Ideal for interim rental while trying to locah
permanently.
Maybe shared by singles if desired. $500,
month yearly phis utilities.
Call M. Rosenstein 968-2431
+ttoottetttt
cowarvATTvi
Tare.
Religious directory
1401 N.W. a* A.tnue Boco Raton. 33432. Phone 392-8566
Rabbi Theodore Ftldmon Sobboth Services. Fndoy 015 p.m.,
Soturdoy 9:30 a.m.
5348 Grove Street. West Palm Beoch 33409 Phone 684-3212
Robb. Isooc Vonder Wolde Conior Mordecoi Spektor Doily
8 30 a.m. ond 7 p.m Fndoy: 830 a.m.. 5 p.m.. ond a loie
vice ot 8 15 p.m.. followed by Oneg Shabbot Saturday: 830
am .7pm, Mincha followed by Sholosh Suedos
let* Uetta tf It ratta leech
501 N E 26 Avenue. Boynton Beoch Phone 734-0802 Robbi
Avrom I Drazm Sobboth services. Fndoy 815 p.m., Soturdoy 9
a.m.
iTi
1470 Golden Lakes Blvd.. West Palm Beoch 33411 Phone 689-
9430 Robb. Joseph Speiser Doily Services 8:15 a.m. and 5:30
p.m. Sobboth services Friday 8:15 p.m. Saturday 9o.m., 5p.m.,
Mmcho followed by Sholosh Suedos
Tea* Is* Dwia
4657 Hood Rood, Polm Beoch Gordens 33410 Phone 694-2350
Robb. W.llKjm Morder. Contor Eorl J Rockoff Sobboth services
Fndoy 8 pm, Soturdoy lOo m.
TeaeMftvttfcl
2815 No Flogler Dr.. West Polm Beoch 33407 Phone 833-0339
Robb. Howord J. Hirsch. Contor Elome Shopiro. Sabbath services
Friday 8 15 p.m.. Soturdoy 9:30 a.m. Doily M.nyon 8:15 a m
Sunday ond legol Holidays 9 am.
h
224 N.W. Avenue "G". Belle Gbde 33430 Sobboth services
Friday, 830 p.m. Phone 996-3886
315 N. A" Streei. loke Worth 33460. Phone 585-5020 Robbi
Emonuel E.senberg Cantor Jocob Elmon Services Monday and
Thursday 8 15 o m Friday 8 15 pm Soturdoy 9 a m
Tt-pk left Zitt
Lions Club. 700 Cornelia Dr. Royal Palm Beach Ma.lino
Address 640-101 Trail South. West Polm Beoch 33414 Sobboth
Services Friday 8 p.m.. Saturday 9 a.m. Robb, Nathan Zel.zer
Cantor Chaim Boltuck Phone 793-9122
TteynraelJeceB
595TsL*nZ1A"\}!!?'PolmBeoch33406 "*3-
5957 Robb. Dr. Mom, S.lbermon. Sobboth services. Fndoy 8
p m Soturdoy 9 o m Mondoy through Thursday 9am
TaeanbnwB
i!LN 832-0804
Hlti,l "'L^0'*00"'6 Dordo*h" Sobobth service,.
Friday 8 X p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.
3536 Robb. Bernord Silver. Contor Seymour Z.sook SobboTh
services, 5 p m and 8 p.m Saturday and holiday 8.75 am
DoilyMinyan. 8:45a.m. and 5 p.m.
TWTr
(Martin County) 3257 S.E. Solerno Rood (opposite Wmn-Dnnl I
Stuart, FL 33490 President Lief Grail: 1-2877732. Friday strva
8p.m.
coNsavAim
Ttaatt Etarad lifirt
Boco West Community UMC, 8900 Boco West, Glodes Rood (I
mile west of Boca Turnpike). The free Synogogue, P.O. Bo.!:
Boco Raton 33432 Phone: 368-1600. 391-1111 Rabbi Im|m|
Rosoyn. Sobboth services. Fndoy 815 p.m.
AtoGMfa
Century V.lloge. West Palm Beoch. Phone 689-4675 Sobba* 1
services 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. Daily service, 815 a.m. andfcl
p. m
551 Bntiany I King, Point. Delray Beoch 33446. Phone*N-W\
or 499-9229 Harry Silver. President Doily service, 8 o.m.ondi |
p.m. Saturday, and Holidays9 a.m.
Tht Itfena Tepla tf jtjarrtr-Ttattttt
at St Jude Church (Parrish Hall) 204 U.S. No. 1 So.; moih||
oddress Plaza 222. U.S. No. 1. Tequeslo 33458 Phone 747-42&I
President Jeanne Torsches. Services the second ond fafl|
Friday of every month, 8 p.m.
Tt.aU Beta D ef laca ItlM
333 S.W. Fourth Avenue. Boco Roton 33432 Phone 391-1
Robbi Merle E. Singer. Conior Martin Rosen. Sabbath mtM |
Fndoy 815 p.m. Toroh Study with Robbi Singer, Soturdoy"'|
am Sabbath morning services 10:30 a.m.
St. Helen's Ponsh Hall. 20th Avenue and Victory ^-^,
Beach 32960. moiling address P.O. Box 2113, Veto No*11
32961-2113. Rabbi Stephen Adams. Phone 1-569-0180
Tttaaet left Ttrail
ot St David', m the Pines Episcopal Retreat. Forest Hill Blvd.cd
Wellington Troce. Wesi Polm Beoch. Moiling addreu.
Lontern Tree Lone. West Polm Beach 33411 Friday *rv*,s J
p.m. Rabbi Steven R. Westman. Cantor Nicholas Fenakel r>
793 2700
1901 No. Flogler Dr.. West Palm Beoch 33407. HttBtlJJJ
Robbi Howord Shapiro. Cantonol Soloist Susan Weiss Sow
services, Friday 8 p.m.
at St Catherine's Greek Orthodox Church Social HoJ.
Washington Rd ot Southern Boulevard. Rabbi Joel I J
Conior R.ta Shore Mailing oddress 1407 Mlh Lo"
Worth 33463. Phone 965-7778.
2005
ot Coson-Un.ted Methodist Church, corner of Loke^, #
Sw.nton Ave., Delroy. Phone 276-6161. Moiling ad*
N.W. 9th Street. Delray Beoch 33444. Robb. Sam"1
Friday services 8 15pm
"


Friday, October 21,1983 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beech County Page 11
iagogue News
Candle Lighting Time Friday, October 216:30
,PLE BETH DAVID
jcl 21 at 8 p.m. Temple
fpgvid will have a new
er Sabbath honoring 35
kmilies, who will be par-
fing in the service.
|e Beth David is a temple
,ed to increasing within
mbers a love for, and
itment to, Judaism and
living. The Temple is
itted to the age-old
ideals of love of God,
Israel and our fellow-
' The congregation is
ised of families, singles,
sters, teenagers and re-
people. Following this
there will be anOneg
ot sponsored by the
ership committee under
airmanship of Dr. Rus-
LindaStoch.
PLE BETH DAVID
SISTERHOOD
pie Beth David Sister-
will sponsor a "Dessert
for all paid up sister-
members on Oct. 25 at 8
io be held at our new
on Hood Rd. For more
ation call Carol Gay or
Wanuck.
PLE B'NAI JACOB
Thursday, Oct. 20 at 10
abbi Dr. Morris Silber-
of Temple B'nai Jacob
itiate a weekly course in
education on the subject
ic Judaism." It will be
d to members and non-
ers. If interested contact
le B'nai Jacob office,
one 433-5957.
Tuesday, Sept. 27, the
|s Club of Temple B'nai
i of Palm Springs was or-
|cd under the chairman-
kf Julius Levine.
peers Pro Tern are: Pres-
Julius Levine; Vice
pent, David Greenstein;
ura, Samuel Miller,
[der for the Day: Ernest
s.
cussion was held regard-
:aims, functions and in-
l:\alueof this new arm of
lie B'nai Jacob, and it
I determined that both
members and non-members of
the Temple will be eligible for
membership in the Men's
Club.
The 52 members who at-
tended this organizational
meeting shared their past ex-
periences and assisted greatly
in the planning.
Refreshments were served.
The next meeting is scheduled
for Oct. 30 at 10 a.m.
TEMPLE JUDEA
Father John Theodore, Pas-
tor of St. Catherine's Greek
Orthodox Church will be guest
speaker at Temple Judea Sab-
bath Services, Friday evening,
Oct. 21 at 8 p.m. Services are
conducted in the Cultural
Center of the Church at the
corner of Southern Blvd. and
Flagler Drive. Rabbi Joel Le-
vine and Cantor Rita Shore
will officiate.
Rabbi Levine has invited
Father John to the Temple
Judea pulpit in order to wel-
come him to the community.
Father John arrived late this
summer from Newport,
Rhode Island with his wife,
Elaine, sons Tom and Georgie
and daughter Stephanie. He
served for seven years as
pastor of St. Spyridon Greek
Orthodox Church and during
his tenure in Newport, Father
John distinguished himself in
interfaith work and in coun-
selling the terminally ill.
Father John will be wel-
comed at the Temple Judea
oneg shabbat by the Sister-
hood. The regular junior oneg
will be held during Father
John's sermon. The entire
community is cordially invited
to attend. Call the Temple
office for more information,
965-7778.
Over 76 couples attended
the first Temple Judea "X, Y,
and Z Club" Brunch-Cabaret
on Sunday, Oct. 9 at the Sun-
rise Bank Meeting Room.
Organized during the early
summer, this Xtra Years of
Zest club embraces retired
members of the congregation
from all the condominiums in
the Palm Beaches. "X, Y, and
Z Club" provides a warm
social atmosphere for making
new friends from different
condominium communities.
Officers of the Club include
Jean Fritz, president and Ellen
Wallman treasurer. The Club
has been so active that this
Brunch-Cabaret was sold out a
month before the announced
date. An extensive social
calendar for the year is being
planned. The "X, Y, and Z
Club" joins Temple Judea's
social and cultural clubs which
include the Live and Learn
study groups, the Good
Timers for those in their
middle years, the Young
Couples and Singles, the
Brotherhood, Sisterhood, Se-
nior and Junior Youth
Groups. For more informa-
tion about Temple Judea's
social and cultural groups, call
the office at 965-7778.
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Temple Israel has a lively,
new organization in its midst.
At a recent meeting, the group
decided to call itself "Young
Adults" and proceeded to
elect its officers and a board.
Co-chairing the Young
Adults for this year will be
Debbie Thrasher and Dr.
Robert Wacks. Irene Levine
will be the new treasurer and
Shari Fuss will serve as secre-
tary.
Elected to the board of the
Young Adults are Shari Bren-
ner, Jonathan Fuss, Gordon
Lerner, Jane Lerner, Joel Le-
vine, Karen and Marty List.
Presently the group is plan-
ning a late Friday evening
service to take place after the
regularly scheduled service
and an outdoor service as well.
Social events being planned
for the membership include a
racquet ball and tennis party,
a bowling and pizza party and
a hay ride. The Young Adults
are considering a cocktail
party in the very near future
and a coffee house with enter-
tainment.
For more information about
the Young Adults, please con-
tact the temple office at 833-
8421.
Readers Write
Area Deaths
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ch. Riverside Guardian Plan
I "eat Palm Beach.
Board Certified and Fellow of the
Royal College of Canada
laimy H. Bensimon M.D., P.A.
Medical Director of the
Joseph L. Morse Geriatric Center,
is pleased to announce the opening
of his office for the practice of:
IDIOLOGY AND INTERNAL MEDICINE
F Geriatric Center
4' Fred Gladstone Drive
[eat Palm Beach, Fla. 33407
Tel 305-471-5111
Office Hours
By Appointment
Continued from Page 4
food for themselves, but it
gives the recipients an oppor-
tunity to see and speak to
someone from the outside.
Most of the clients are elderly,
handicapped, or just home
from the hospital. Some have
no contact with people outside
of social service workers; most
have no close relations and the
little exchange we have gives
them a lift.
We have mailed letters,
carried out the garbage, ex-
changed book reviews, news,
gotten feedback on the meals,
etc., and it makes us feel
little cheer. We feel we're very
fortunate to be on the giving
end and we urge any drivers
who have time to give, to join
in this volunteer capacity.
Incidentally, there is a fund
for reimbursement of gasoline
and mileage. All we donate is
abouftwohours per week each.
Little enough for the good
feelings and we have a
reminder of how lucky we are
not to be dependent on others.
However, should the tables
turn, we know there is a Ko-
sher Hot Lunch Connection at
the JCC, a Title III program,
to take care of us.
GERTRUDE FRIEDMAN
happy to be able to provide a
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WARD
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Menorah Gardena and Funeral Chapel.
When you buy a pre-need
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doesn't come up short.
There's one reason why
people obtain pre-need
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They wish to
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In the tradition of our fathers ...and their fathers before them.


^fi^BBu^unt^^Tic5y^)ctobr21,1988
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