The Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian the voice of the Jewish community of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Running title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Physical Description:
4 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 8, no. 41 (Dec. 24, 1982)-v. 11, no. 26 (Aug. 30, 1985).
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44606415
lccn - sn 00229548
ocm44606415
System ID:
AA00014310:00031

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
IE VOICE OF
IE JEWISH
IMMUNITY Or
ILM BEACH
JUHTY
ewish florid ian
VOLUME B-NUMBER 28
PALM BEACH. FLORIDA
FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER 111983
PRICE 36 CENTS
IS. Determined to Keep Its Troops In Lebanon
| By DAVID FRIEDMAN
/ASHINGTON (JTA)
: Reagan Administration
essed its "determination"
keep U.S. troops in Le-
non to help the government
President Am in Gemayel
achieve national Unity, despite
continued American casual-
ties. Two U.S. marines were
killed near Beirut and three
were wounded.
The Administration's de-
termination was expressed in a
statement read by State
Department deputy spokes-
man Alan Romberg expressing
sadness at the latest casualties
and condemning "those
responsible for the continuing
violence that has claimed
idropov Said to Be Taking 'Hani Nose*
Line On Human Rights
By HELEN SILVER
WASHINGTON (JTA)
5en. Dennis DeConcini (D.,
z.) said that Soviet leader
ri Andropov took a "very
nosed" position toward
nan rights during a meeting
nine U.S. Senators on
g. 18 in Moscow.
j)eConcini, who partici-
ed in the meeting, told the
iish Telegraphic Agency in
[interview here: "We pre-
yed a joint statement pre-
ed by al! nine of us and
hin that statement there
a discussion of human
Its. hour particular cases
le mentioned Andrei
|harov, Anatoly Sharan-
Uri Orlov and Raoul
lenberg. We also brought
Xndropov's) attention the
Iction in the number of
visas for Soviet Jews."
[ONIINUING, DeConcini
V "hi his response to our
snient. Andropov said
fcwhai facetiously that 'it
lucky day for him be-
I* *e had picked such bad
Inplcs.' Then Andropov
fpared differences between
what human rights means in
the Soviet Union and our
country. He said that the
USSR should not try to make
the U.S. think like it does on
human rights, and that the
U.S. in turn should not try to
make the Soviet Union come
to our standards. If (Andro-
pov told the Senators) this
continues, it will never lead to
better relations between the
two countries."
DeConcini said that Andro-
pov went over each of the four
cases with the Senators. He
told them that Sakharov was
"sick" and that he had written
an article in a foreign
magazine which called on the
U.S. to declare war on the
Soviet Union.
The Arizona Senator said
the Soviet leader referred to
Sharansky as a "spy" and
affirmed that "there will be no
discussion of him until his
prison time is finished." He
also described Orlov as a spy,
DeConcini said. As to Wallen-
berg, Andropov insisted, ac-
cording to DeConcini, that the
former Swedish diplomat who
rescued thousands of Jews
during the Holocaust, is not in
the Soviet Union.
THE ISSUE of Jewish im-
migration was also discussed
in the meeting and Andropov,
the Senator said, tried to show
with statistics from 1945 to
1983 that the USSR's record
on Jewish emigration was
positive. Andropov claimed
that 270,000 Jews have left the
Soviet Union since 1945. The
Soviet leader contended that
about 92 percent of the appli-
cations for exit visas were ap-
proved, DeConcini said.
The Senator reported that
he met with a number of re-
fusenik's in Moscow who ex-
pressed their gratitude for the
support they get from Ameri-
can Congressmen.
The other members of the
delegation were: Senators Dale
Bumpers (D., Ark.) Claiborne
Pell (D., R.I.) Russell Long
(D., La.), Patrick Leahy (D.,
Vt.), Howard Metzenbaum
(D.,Ohio), Donald Riegle(D.,
Mich.), Paul Sarbanes (D.,
Md.), and James Sasser (D.,
Tenn.)
thousands of innocent victims.
We are proud of our own
forces and the important role
they are playing to achieve se-
curity for the Lebanese
people," the statement said.
Romberg said the marine
casualties were caused by
shelling from an area 10 kilo-
meters east of Beirut airport.
He said the U.S. did not know
who did the shelling except
that it came from an area oc-
cupied by Druze. He also not-
ed that the U.S. "can't be
certain" if the marines were
"specifically targeted."
The marines fired back one
round but stopped when they
learned the area they were
shooting at was heavily
populated, Romberg said.
"The Lebanese government
has issued a call to all parties
to unite to restore national
dialogue," the statement read
by Romberg said.
"We will continue to work
with them toward that end.
The goal of a newly united Le-
banon, free of foreign forces,
is a dream of the Lebanese
people regardless of their reli-
gious community," the state-
ment said. "Together with our
Italian, French and British
partners in the multinational
force, we are performing a
critical role in support of the
efforts of the central govern-
ment. No one should mistake
our determination to continue
in this just cause."
Romberg added that the
marines have served a "useful
purpose" in the efforts to re-
store Lebanon's national
unity. He said there are no
plans to increase the marine
contingent in Lebanon or to
change the role of the MNF
which is purely defensive."
Meanwhile, Romberg was
cautious as to whether the
U.S. believes the Syrians are
behind the Druze shelling of
the Lebanese army and the
MNF, including the American
marines. U.S. special envoy
Robert McFarlane, who was in
Damascus recently, was be-
lieved to have told President
Reagan that the Syrians so far
have been entirely negative
toward the U.S. efforts to gain
the withdrawal of all foreign
troops from Lebanon.
All Romberg would say was
that Secretary of State George
Shultz said at his press confer-
ence that it would be "help-
ful" to the unification efforts
of Lebanon if all foreign
troops left that country. Syria
has the largest number of for-
eign troops in Lebanon.
One-Third of
Israel Goes
Back to School
TELAVIV (JTA) Just
under 1,300,000 pupils
about one-third of the entire
population returned to
school Sept. 1 at the end of the
summer recess. There were far
fewer than usual problems
associated with the opening of
the school year.
Only a handful of schools
failed to open on time as
against dozens or even
hundreds in previous years
mainly because of non-
completion of building or
repair work.
iftoif Events In Fall To Launch 1984 UJA/ Federation Campaign
lllpfn,LYORK ~ Sev*n
LlFTo^ 84 events during
September and October will
* an accelerated pace for
punching the 1984 Unhid
Project Renewal Campaigns,
kit ,Na1"onal Chairman
|Kobert Loup announced-
la,iede.a.^con):inced'"LouP
Era, H,ha.1 the momentum
ES ,Cu, bv LIFTOFF '84
Icamnl' for community
E,pa.,*n activities and
lu&S*.capacit*,evds
T*e LI m.e t,me" he added,
SSeSL %nthat ovcra"
fun:' that momen-
Liftoff began Sept. 6 with a
daylong $500,000 Washington
event which included meetings
and a luncheon, a private
dinner at the home of Israeli
Ambassador to the U.S. Meir
Rosenne and a meeting with
President Reagan at the White
House. The program was the
first such national event at the
$300,000 level.
The National Fly-In
program, scheduled for Sept.
12-16 and 18-21, will jet more
than a score of prominent
Israeli visitors into more than
70 American Jewish commu-
nities. Teamed with top UJA
lay leadership, the Israeli's will
participate in an intense series
of campaign meetings and
face-to-face solicitations. Alan
L. Shulman, UJA National
Vice Chairman from Palm
Beach, Florida, will chair this
event.
On Sept. 25-27 "Hineni II"
will bring donors of $100,000
to New York City for a
orogram drawing heavily on
the abundant resources of the
city. According to Co-Chair-
men H. Irwin Levy of Palm
Beach and Jack Nash of New
York, several outstanding
individuals have agreed to
participate in this three day
event. Ambassador Rosenne,
Mayor Edward I. Koch,
former Secretary of State
Henry Kissinger and actress
Tovah Feldshuh will take part
in Hineni II. Other highlights
of UJA's second annual meet-
ing of contributors at this level
include visits to the Wall Street
stock and commodities ex-
changes and lunch in Jack D.
Weiler's "Sukkah in the Sky."
Attending from the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County will be H. Irwin Levy,
co-chairman of Hineni II; and
his wife Jeanne Levy, pre-
sident of the Jewish Fed-
eration of Palm Beach Coun-
ty; Michael Burrows, Special
Gifts vice chairman; Myron J.
Nickman, general campaign
chairman, and his wife Eileen
Nickman; and Alan L.
Shulman, national United
Jewish Appeal vice chairman.
All LIFTOFF events will
include discussions on the
budgetary needs of overseas
and local community human-
support programs funded by
the UJA Regular Campaign.
According to Loup, "LIFT-
OFF will also place increased
emphasis on Project Renewal,
so that we can sustain and
strengthen the partnership
established between the scores
of American Jewish commu-
nities and neighborhoods in
Israel."
The $18,000 President's
Mission to Israel, to be chaired
by UJA National Vice Chair-
man and Overseas Programs
Chairman H. Paul Rosenberg,
will give top community
leadership and opportunity to
understand more fully the
human needs at the heart of
the 1984 Campaign. The mis-
ContintMd on Page 9


P*ge2 The Jewiafa Floridiarj of Palm Beach County Friday. September 16, 1983
Business & Professional
Women's Group
0er 100 on atieaded the opeaaf> diner mating of tie
Basiaess tad Professioaal N* oaiea's Groip of the Women's
Di isioa of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach Coaaty held
recently at the Royce Hotel. "Jewish Mothers aad Daaghters"
was the topk of a panel discnssion kd by Dr. Liana Werner, t
local psychologist specialuiag ia the area of womea's issaes.
Participating ia the panel were Penny Beers, vice presideat of
the \* oaiea's Dmsion for the Basiaess aad Professioaal
^ oaiea's Groip. aad her mot her. Fraaces GoMea: Detra kay.
hoard memher of WD. aad her daaghter. Monica kay; aad
three graerations represented b> graada*other Ida Schwack.
daaghter Thelraa Rachesky aad granddaughter Cheryl Sim-
aioas.
^-^ Caenl Sianinas left. Ida
<*chaek aad Thelraa
Detra :left aad Monica ka* Rachesk*
g for the panel
standmc left la right!: FJ
B aad P. Lyaae Enrich.
Jewish Fedcranaa *f
director of w
of W
S. F
are Leaore horafield
graaa chairmaa of the
of Wtaei't Dntstna af the
Coaaty: Barhara Pern.
are BjafJ to right] Dr.
f Wnaneas Dntsioa:
CJF Women's Division Names Local
Leaders To National Women's Cabinet
NEW YORK Sheila
Engelstem, Julie Cummings
and Marilyn Lampert have
been named to ser\e on the
Council of Jewish Federations
_>nal Women's Division
Cabinet, it has been announc-
ed b> Phyllis Freedman of
Atlanta. Women's Diwsion
Chairwoman. This cabinet will
meet at the CJF spring and fall
meetings as well as the annual
General Assembly.
Sheila Engelstein is pre-
sident of the Women's
Drrisioa of the Jewish Fed-
eration of Palm Beach Coun-
ty Julie Cummings serves as
its education vice president
and Marilyn Lampert is a
member of the board as well as
a board member of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County.
The CJF Women's Division
serves to link local Federation
women's divisions throughout
North America, developing
collect^e policy and direction.
It functions as a clearing house
and initiator of innovative
concepts in leadership train-
ing. Jewish enrichment and
fund raising skills.
The CJF is the association
of 200 Federations. Welfare
Funds and Community Coun-
cils which serve nearly 800
communities and embrace
over 95 percent of the Jewish
population of the
States of Canada. EstahiL
in 1932. the Council S
national instrument
strengthen the work and
5! PaClK,f iewirt Fedi
through leadership in devj,
ing programs to meet chana
needs in the Jewish i
munity; through the exch
of successful experience^
assure the most effective,
munity ser\ices; thrt
establishing guidelines
fund raising and operati
and through joint nati
planning and action on i
mon purposes dealing
local, regional, national
international needs.
JCC To Host First Annual Dinner Dance
The Jewish Communit>
Center of the Palm Beaches
will hold its First Annual
Dinner Dance on Oct. 15. 7:30
r ~ at the Royce Hotel. The
announcement was made by
D: Paul Klein, president of
the Center, who said. "We
10 -reate a feeling ol
iraderie among our mem-
>e-> anc to spread lha
titude throughout the Jewisli
munity. V* e would like to
a that the JC C
. i
el [ raner,
. -. -
Chaplain Aides
Conduct Services
Parr Beach *. out
-\ jc Program
. ___ ed at 2 n> in
Pa.r Be^
Set ..
at mar
- .....-
\ tk
\ _.
Rabrj Man R.
j Jeanne Gil
Chaplain
Vc; Program, p tied -.
in most of the ins-
titutions for the elderly
throughout the summer
months.
Persons desiring to affiliate
with the Federation Chaplain
\ide program may call the of-
fice of Rabbi Alan R. Sher-
man a:S32-2120.
emphasized that the entire
community is invited to this
inaugural dinner dance. "In
the past the JCC has sponsor-
ed man> picnics and
Chanukah. Purim and Inde-
pendence Day celebrations but
we have never had a function
primarily organized just for
the community to ha\e a good
lime enjoying each other*!
company .We** ill have a band
lor after-dinner dancing, a
cash bai an: just a lot of
tun." stated the Penners.
I nc Jewish community of
t Pain Beaches is expanding
Ju-t thi- year the
Joseph L. Morse Geriatric
Ccmcr opened it- doors
:he
, I .i. ish I am: a:-_
I ... > service
.: NS
..-. the Jewish c am-
inuniiy Da) Schuol noa has
.-Icmenti
-ion I. in it- i
campus and three tempi
have built new buildings,*]
said Dr. Penner.
"Everything has a timei
place and the time is rapL
coming for the JCC io havj]
new home, one in whichi
community can take piidej
explained Dr. Penner,
needs assessment >n
..haired by BuJdie BrennerL
shown that the eonimuniijj
behind this effort. ThisFir|
Annual Dinner Dai.
sponsored by the JCC isffl
loi the Jewish eommumtyl
foatci a sense ol good fello
ship," -aid Dr. Penner,"!
hope thai in the vet]
luture iin- cseai willbehi
our new C e:
I ickc;- ai S50 per pen
ma ... from Ptnl
and Jcliic) Penner.81211
. I anc, wesi Palm
33406b <'. .
Final planning for the Women's Di%i$*oa of the
Federation of Palm Beaeh Coaaty s ***J"JJi
presidents of Jewish organirations is aadera>- 1c ^
which met at the Feoeratioa offices to complete m*
the September 19 esent. iaclades Barhara Bert*",k1jffl'
richt): Doris Siager. Marjorie *. ew-Aarrmta Jf,
wo-ea's Assembly: Sheol Davhteff.co- aad her daughter: Step ha air Kkiaer: Marcn ****
Molae Fitteraaaa. ehairaaaa of Mmi-MissioBS.
If yon hasea aew address or
to move, please
an us know Also, if you know
some folks who art not no*
rece-.s.rc Tne Jew :_-. nraTmmmTi
and oJd hie to. aJso ha as
iaow. Ever> rssae of the
Jewish Federanoa of Pasra
Coamy's aewspipej
<* yot won't want
aJJB32-2l20.
.c*>s

*
%^-s:
&
HOLD THE DATE
Wednesday, November 9,1963
8:45 A.M.. 2:15 P.M.
WHAT: Jewish Women's Assembly
Fifth Anniversary
WHO: All Major Jewish Women's Organizations
in the Palm Beaches
WHY: To Be Educated About the 1960s: A
of Concern, Crises in Jewish Ufa
WHERE: Hyatt Palm Beaches
.


Friday, September 16,1963 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 3
Conference On Aging
To Highlight Housing
he Council on Aging of the
t fch County will convene its
.a Jewish Community
on the Aged
,, October 18, from 9
ference
l f
u'ntil 2:"30 pirn, at Temple
1 West Palm Beach. The
' for the all day con-
is "Housing Our
Options for the
lie
nee
fcrly:
Three years ago, the
incil on Aging convened its
1 conference which brought
her over 150 people to
iiss the growing concerns
Lr elderly," stated Helen
Hauben, chairperson of the
Council on Aging. "From that
meeting, several major
programs and services were es-
tablished by our local Jewish
agencies to assist many older
adults. This second Confer-
ence on the Aged will serve to
identify the housing needs of
our elderly population, in
particular, our more frail
elderly," continued Hauben.
"We will examine the various
options available to us as a
community in our attempt to
respond to their needs."
Keynote speaker for the
conference will be Sidney
Spector, Managing Partner of
Senior Housing Associates in
Cleveland, Ohio. Mr. Spector,
a renowned expert in the field
of housing for the elderly,
serves as consultant to the
Council of Jewish Federations
in New York.
Several workshops and
panel discussions are planned
during the day. A hot kosher
lunch will be served. Registra-
tion fee for the conference is
$5 per person.
Those interested in at-
tending should call Jay
Epstein, Planning Associate at
the Federation 832-2120.
A Service Of Compassion
MURRAY J. KERN
Chairman
( hapluin Aide Program
was 9:30 Saturday
Ining al the Joseph H.
Vse Geriatric Center,
pnteers were accompany-
lihc elderly residents of the
Iter into the beautiful and
liionally appointed reli-
f- chapel. Some of the re-
nts were already seated,
|iting the commencement
he Sabbath at 10 o'clock.
[hi new siddurim and
Isim were brought in from
(storeroom lor use during
service as chairs were being
nged so all could see and
[comfortably.
fcbbi Alan R. Sherman, the
(se Center Chaplain, was
supervising the arrange-
rs and synchronizing the
|rn microphone with the
I microphone attached to
Iperson so that he could
stand closer to the congregants
as he talked and prayed.
The introductory Sabbath
prayers were chanted by
volunteer Joe Haas. Ilsa
Mollen, a veteran member of
the Chaplain Aide Program,
led the Congregation in the
traditional Sabbath liturgy.
The choral voice of the elderly
participants grew stronger as it
blended with the delightful
soprano voice of Ilsa.
Residents of the Center
received the honor of opening
and closing the Ark for the
Torah service. Rabbi Sherman
carried the Torah to each
person. Hands shook and
tears flowed as they reached
eagerly with talis and siddur to
kiss the Torah.
For many of the residents
who had been homebound or
had come from non-Jewish
institutions, kissing the Torah
was an experience they hadn't
known for a long time.
As the residents aliyahs of
Cohen, Levi and Israel came
up in turn, their voices were
filled with emotion when they
chanted the Torah blessings.
Many of the participants
followed the text in the
chamash with the assistance of
Sol Mollen, as Mr. Haas read
from the Torah. Faces beamed
and heads nodded ap-
preciatively as Rabbi Sherman
explained the sedrah for the
week and delivered an inspir-
ing message.
The Rabbi blessed the con-
gregation and the service was
concluded with the singing of
Adon Olam. A traditional
Sabbath collation consisting
Continued on Page 10
Project Renewal:
Our Partnership
In Israel's Future
Why Are There Distressed
Neighborhoods In Israel?
To understand the background of the need
for Renewal, we have to go back to the begin-
nings of Israel when a community of 600,000,
mostly idealistic Zionists, absorbed, in a period
of five years, more than twice their numbers.
Initially, it was the refugees and survivors of
the camps in Europe. Later, the waves of Jews
from the hostile Arab lands came streaming in-
to the young and unprepared country. These
newcomers were settled wherever they could
be, first in transit tent camps on the edges of
existing towns and in sensitive and dangerous
border areas. Not from a lack of good will, but
from very limited resources and wholly
inadequate planning abilities and ignorance of
both the needs and the lifestyles of these
newcomers, the difficult situation was com-
pounded into an even more difficult situation.
When permanent housing was built, it was
substandard and in most cases too small for the
traditionally large Oriental families. The
downward spiral of negative self image, unem-
ployment, and poor educational achievement
resulted in a deplorable situation of worsening
poverty and lost hope.
To redress these problems, the concept of
Project Renewal was born. Hod Hasharon, the
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County's
twinned neighborhood in Israel, is just one of
these many distressed areas.
(Excerpted from "Communicator's Corner" By
Marilyn Grant, Project Coordinator, Hod
Hasharon.)
Young Leadership/Young Adult Division Open House
*!SS5f
100 young adult singles and couples met
Illy for an Open House held at the hone of Mark
ISticey Levy. The program, sponsored by the
fh Federation of Palm Beach County's Young
lership/Young Adult Division Cabinet, was held
effort to involve and educate those present in
forking* of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
my and the local Jewish community.
Dr. Moshe Adler [left] and his wife, Marci Adler
[second from left], members of the Young
Leadership/Young Adult Division Cabinet, greet
(left to right) Susan Schein, Keva Schem '
Liada Elias.
aad
Jack I.evine of Miami, Florida, a member of the
United Jewish Appeal Young Men's Leadership
Cabinet and the Council of Jewish Federations
National Committee on Leadership Development,
addresses the group on missions to Israel aad the
mmm *** F |: / Tf^J^i _J "P'"!! National Young Leadership Washington
RLAjIiASS ,he YoBB LeBder- Attending the YLD/YAD Open House are [left to Co"f'"-
Davw r D!Xision ODen House are [W*to right] Nini Krever, Art Smith, Gary Genoa and
t^.Md^t&cIrtJ1''' mmu Devon,h
m
<*>
Rabbi Steven Weitman {left] of Temple Beth Torah
M2J! rltB|l m *** LMPtrt, Is WeUtotto. aid hb wife, Sherrl [right] eajo, tat
^roaLeraer aad Jack Kraaaer. evening whh Kevin and Nancy Mlaor (center).


I
Pktared above at the YAD/YLD Open Home are
Roger aad Vicky Schwartz of Welliagtoa.
' vw//wW/W/ K nm'rfMKMM. u uW
W.WiV.V.VAV.'


Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, September 16,1983
the
Jewish floridian
of Palm Beach County
Combining "Out Voice" and Federation Reporter
FRED K. SMOCMET SUZANNE SHOCHET RONNI EPSTEIN
Editor and PutMlanar Executive Editor Newt Coordinator
Published Weekly October through Mid April. Bi Weekly balance ot year
Second Claaa Pottage Paid at Boca Raton, Fla USPS eo69030
PALM BEACH BOO *ATON OFFICE
2200 N. Federal Hwy Suite 208. Boca Raton, Fla 33432 Phone 368 2001
Main Office & Plant. 120 N E 8th St, Miami. Fl 33101 Phone 1 373-4805
Poatmaalar Return toon 357 to Jewtah Flrxldlen. P.O. Bon 01 2973, Miami, Fla. J3101
Advertising Director Stacl Letter, Phone Set 1852
Combined Jewish Appeal Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County, Inc.. Officers. President. Jeanne
Levy: Vice Presidents. Peter Cummings. Alec Engeltteln. Arnold Lampert, Myron J Nlckman. Barbara
Tanen; Secretary, Dr. Elizabeth S Freillch, Treasurer, Alvin Wilentky Submit material to Ronni
Epateln. Director of Public Relations. 501 South Flagler Or, Wett Palm Beach, FL 33401
Jewish Floridian does not guarantee Kaahruth ot Merchandise Advertised
SUBSCRIPTION RATES Local Area 84 Annual (2 Year Minimum $7 50). or bv membership Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach County; 501 S Flagler Or. Wett Palm Beach. Fla 33401 Phone 832-
2120 Out Of Town Upon Request
Update. .Opinion
Friday, September 16,1983
Volume 9
9TISHRI5744
Number 28
Justice Was Denied
In the end, the United States prevailed.
It sold out just about every Israeli gain in
the war with the double result that
Americans generally are just beginning to
feel. Not only will Israelis suffer this
betrayal of an ally in future years, but so
will Americans.
Indeed, Americans are already suffering
this betrayal with the presence of U.S.
Marines in Beirut, two more of whom were
killed in combat earlier this week against
feuding Moslem, Druze and Christian
forces as they explode back into the areas
to continue their civil war that the Israelis
have just vacated on their redeployment
march to the Awali River.
And so, it is as we have said. There are
two futures for us on the High Holy Day
season one as Americans and a second as
Jews. In each role it is of highest
significance for us that we recall the Akeda
in the synagogue on Rosh Hashanah.
And that, on the fast day, we pray to
Him Who answered Abraham to "answer
us and hearken to the voice" of our own
prayers today. For an answer is desperately
needed by all Americans who still do not
understand what is happening in Lebanon.
And by us, for we continue to believe in
the justice of what Israel wrought in
Lebanon, and to weep that our own country
has denied that justice, and is being
punished for it at this very moment.
To Dwell In The Sukkah
Sukkot, beginning this year
on the eve of Sept. 21 (14
Tishrci) and celebrated for
eight days, has dual origins,
being both a historical and
agricultural festival. Historic-
ally, it represents the journey
of Israel through the desert
after the exodus from Egypt
during which time the people
lived in booths of an obviously
impermanent nature. Agri-
culturally, the holiday cele-
brates the final gathering of
fruit and produce of the year.
The basic mitzvot regarding
Sukkot is to dwell in the
sukkah. Minimally, this means
eating in the sukkah. Even
more minimally, it means
saving, while inside, ha-Motzi,
Kiddush and the blessing:
"Blessed are You, Lord our
God, King of the Universe,
who has sanctified us through
His commandments and com-
manded us to sit in the
sukkah." Maximally, the
commandment includes sleep-
ing in the sukkah as well.
If you can get into the
mitzvah of sukkah-building,
you will probably find great
joy in it. Start building as soon
after Yom Kippur as possible.
One of the good things about a
sukkah is that you should
build your own. Most of us
live in houses or apartments
built by others. Most of us eat
bread baked by professionals.
Like hallah-baking, sukka-
building gives us the chance to
enjoy the fruits of our own
labor. The sukkah should not
be an elegant structure. A
rough shack built by hand is
the ideal.
You can do as you please
when it comes to decorating
the sukkah. Everything's pos-
sible from traditional fruit
hanging to ushpizin (hospi-
tality) posters to printed
murals to strung macaroni,
gourds, origami, paper chains,
etc.
Remember never to make
the sukkah overly comfort-
able. It should shake in the
wind. The entire roof must be
made of organic material and
the stars should be able to
shine through. One last thing
once you build it, use it. Eat
every meal there. Sleep in it if
you can. Invite guests to your
sukkah and share it with all
who have none. Hag somaoch
happy holiday!
Excerpted from "The
First Jewish Catalog" with
permission of the publisher.
The Jewish Publication So-
ciety of America.
ByTOBYF.WILK
Police raids in many
German homes disclosed
stacks of illegal Nazi propa-
ganda. West German police
were startled to find that this
hate-filled propaganda was
created and printed in Linc-
oln, Nebraska by the National
Socialist Party of America.
The death of Eric Hoffer,
the longshoreman-philosopher
is mourned. He always shun-
ned sham and searched for the
truth. Often he said: "Israel is
the world's barometer. What-
ever happens to Israel, that's
the way the world will go."
The intermarriage rate
among American Jews is near-
ing 47 percent. Eighty-two
percent of young American
Jews do not attend Sy-
nagogue, even on Yom
Kippur.
Israel's administration of
Judea and Samaria and its
settlement policy in that area
accords with international law
and is not an obstacle to
peace. The real obstacle to
peace remains the refusal of
Arab states, with the ex-
ceptions of Egypt and Le-
banon, to negotiate with Is-
rael. From 1948-1967, when
there were no Jewish settle-
ments in Judea and Samaria,
the Arab states refused to
negotiate with Israel. Arab in-
transigence, not settlements, is
the obstacle to peace.
The Soviet government con-
siders their armed forces a
crucial area of educating the
Soviet public. Their military
has the most concentrated
indoctrination program of all
institutions in Soviet life. Top
priority is given to attacking
Zionism, which is a mask lor
vitriolic anti-Semitism. This is
veil disturbing because ever)
male Soviet citizen must serve
in the army.
Our Justice Department
labeled a Canadian film on
acid rain "political propa-
ganda" in an attempt to limit
its circulation.
The secret weapon of the Is-
rael Defense force is unit CO-
hesiveness and unit morale. Is-
rael's desire for peace with her
neighbors equaled with the
desire for security and surviv-
al, gives her citizens the
strength to bear sacrifices.
Israelis are united in their
pride in and identification
with the nation's achievements
in a just society fulfilling the
prophetic dream.
FELAFELSCORES
A HIT
Israel's stand was one of the
most popular of the 25
representing various countries
at a charity food fair in Singa-
pore. Crowds of people
mohbed the stand to sample
fclafcl and pita prepared by
members of the Israeli
Embassy staff and their fami-
lies.
Alois Brunner, Eichmann's
tormer aide, lives under Syrian
protection in Damascus.
The Wall Street Journal
quoted a Jordanian official as
saying that "The PLO isn't a
revolution. It's a Corporation.
After all these years, the pay-
checks keep coming and life is
good. The PLO cares more
about preserving its privileges
than helping ordinary Pales-
tinians."
For 30 years, the Alaska
Railroad has sprayed toxic
herbicides along its routes.
These chemicals have con-
taminated crops, livestock and
drinking water along the 470
mile route endangering fish
and wildlife throughout. U.S.
Borax plans to dig the world's
largest open-pit molybdenum
mine. Every day for 70 years,
U.S. Borax will dump 60,000
tons of toxic mining waste into
pristine Alaskan waters.
The American campus is to-
day a staging area from which
(he Arabs pursue the victory
that has evaded them on the
battlefield. Bankrollers of
anti-Israel propaganda in this
country have allocated $10
million dollars to intensify
campus efforts. A new face on
the campus lecture circuit is
the Palestinian wife of Syria's
U-N. Ambassador
member of several pi]
gallons. Students ni0'
equ.ppedmoreeffeS,01
facts, guidelines a dj
to combat Arab pro?
and counter negaff1
paigns. 8 uve
With the presentoiljij
Saudis may weasel o,W
eight billion dollard1
for the AWACS our J
mstration approved i?,
controversial deal. \1\
nanc.al power is unravdl
This could change poy,i3
titudes around the world J
mean less Arab supJ
Egypt, Jordan, Syria3|
Many Israeli girls
their military insignia~"|
successful parachute u>
but 22 year old Ronit She
ol the Israel DefenseFortd
the first woman anywhot]
qualify as skilled instruct '
parachutists. Her pupilsa
men.
Letters to the Editor...
Your Opinion Counts
EDITOR.
The Jewish Floridian:
I refer to the recent letter
from Mrs. Donna Block
concerning the Random
thoughts column written by
Muriel Levitt.
Mrs. Block apparently has
many admirable trails.
Unfortunately, a sense of
humor is not one ol them.
We have friends in Palm
Beach who save us those issues
ol the Jewish Floridian in
which Random thoughts
appears. Mrs. Levin's writing
has wit and intelligence,
sparked with a delicious sense
of Yiddishkite. In fact, we clip
her columns and send them to
friends up north. They enjoy
her humor and nostalgia as
much as we do.
Moie Kaudom Thoughts,
please!
SYDNEY MILLER
l.auderdale Lakes
EDITOR.
The Jewish tloridiun:
On behalf of the member-
ship of Pioneer Women/-
Na'amal Palm Beach Council,
our special thanks are extend-
ed to you for the informative
article printed in your August
19 edition.
It gave an enlightened(
cripiion ol thcuorkingsofij
organization and avail
our pride in belonging toil)
[hanks again lor
publicity and the many<
articles you publish for us. j
SHIRI.EYFA1
EDITOR,
I he Jewish I loridian:
On behalf of ITnaiBl
llillcl I oundationofl
Palm Beach, 1 would lil:|
commend you on your <
lent feature on Jewish co
lilc. I only wish morel
munitics would take thei
to orient their Jewishst
to campus life.
I would like to bring mil
attention that we haveilj
B'liih llillcl prcscihtip
Palm Beach Junior loT
campuses. If there areaj|
dents in the area alii
Palm Beach Junior Col
please have them contacts
can be reached throat*]
United Campus
office at Florida I
University.
NESSAE.W
Program Coo
fl Radio /TV Highlights J|
* MOSAIC Sunday, Sept. 18, 9 a.m. *>JJ
Channel 5 with host Phyllis Shever Girard -m\
Eban, Israel's former Ambassador to the UN and men* I
of Labor Party Sept. 25 Dr. Rosalind Yalow,wwi
prize winner.
L'CHAYIM Sunday, Sept. 18 and 25, I0:30*
- WPBR 1340-AM with host Rabbi Mark S. Colub 1
The Jewish Listener's Digest, a radio magazine.
JEWISH MUSIC AND CULTURE HOUR-Sung
Sept. 18 and 25, 10 p.m. WHRS-FM Stereo91 -
host Dr. Simon Silverman.
SHALOM Sunday, Sept. 18 and 25, 10 J^
WPEC Channel 12 (8:30 a.m. ON TV Channel 51)
host Richard Peritz. I
THE STORY OF RUTH Saturday, Sept.24.IjM
- WPBT Channel 2 Starring in this ^"JpJjJ
Elana Eden, Stuart Whitman, Tom Tryon
Wood.
Sept-25.'
HOLOCAUST Parts I and 2 Sunday,
P.m. Parts 3, 4, and 5 Monday, Sept. 26 8r|W|
Parts 6 and 7 Tuesday. Sept. 27, 9 P-ft-g^l '
elusion) Thursday, Sept. 29,8 p.m. WPBTtnan
Sponsored by the Jewish Federation ofP"bn
County.


lumber of Jewish Aged Rising
Friday, September 16,1983 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 5
| FROM ISRAEL .
.The world Jewish popula-
L is dropping below zero
[nulation growth and is be-
mnft a numerical decline
will accelerate in years to
.mei according to a study
Klshed by the JDC-
Brookdale Institute of Geron-
tology and the Hebrew
University Institute of Con-
temporary Jewry.
Titled 'Elderly Jews in the
World,' the study was con-
ducted by Professor U.O.
Schmelz. It estimates that the
number of Jews in the Dias-
pora will drop from 9,6 milion
to 8 million in less than 20
years.
"Despite the drop in overall
Jewish population there will
be an increase in the number
of Jewish elderly, particularly
among the "old old," those
over age 75, and especially in
Israel, where the number in
this group is expected to jump
150 percent in the last quarter
of this century.
\"One consequence of the
shifting demographics noted
in the study is that by the end
of the century one out of every
five elderly Jews will be living
in Israel,
FREE GIFT
It's Fun To Be Jewishand now iff
My to com* "buy-1 For Ire* grit and
catalog writ*
ITS FUN TO BE JEWISH
JwHah Toy. and Grfej
IMS Ava. J, Brooklyn. NT 11230
Piaaaa sand 50* poataga and handling
credited lo your lira! ordar
What it takes to be a Riverside.
It takes years.
Nearly 70 years of building a name
People trust
L Stakes a special kind of leadership that
Ejated with Charles Rosenthal, Riverside's
Iftfr .^d which continues today, in the hands
Lh Gi?881*'*, Alfred Golden, Leo Hack,
inarew Fier and a new generation of Jewish
(management
*t is this leadership which, in coopera-
tion with Orthodox, Conservative and Reform
Rabbis, actually helped set the standards for
Jewish funeral services.
And it is this leadership that has
dedicated Riverside to maintaining the high
standards demanded by Jewish tradition.
That's why, at Riverside, people
continue to find the dedication and the
resources which are necessary to provide
service that is truly Jewish.
And that's why today, Riverside is the
most respected name in Jewish funeral service
in the world.
4714 Okeechobee Boulevard,
West Palm Beach
683-8676
RIVERSIDE
Memorial Chapel, IM./Twaml Diractora
The most respected name in Jewish funeral
service in the world.
The GUAKDIAN PLAN*
*>> ,

D ...*
J

.
' ....


Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, September 16,1983
Community Calendar
SEPTEMBER 16-29
September 16
YOMKIPPUREVE
September 17
YOM KIPPUR
Hadassah-Chai break the fast
September 18
Temple Beth Shalom Men's Club,
Congregation Aitz Chaim board, 10 a.m.
9:30 a.m.
September 19
JEWISH FEDERATION EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE, 8
p.m. JEWISH FEDERATION WOMEN'S DIVISION
PRESIDENT'S COFFEE AND MINI-MISSION Jewish
Family and Children's Service board, 7:30 p.m. Pioneer
Women Theodore Herzl board, 10 a.m. Brandeis
University Women Boynton Beach, noon ORT -
Golden Rivers luncheon-card party, noon Hadassah -
Henrietta Szold Jewish Study Group, 10:30 a.m. Pioneer
Women Ezrat, 1 p.m. Hadassah Tikvah, 1 p.m.
B'nai B'rith No. 3015, 7:30 p.m. B'nai B'rith No. 2016,
7:45 p.m.
September 20
B'nai B'rith No. 2939, 7:30 p.m. ORT Boynton Beach,
1 p.m. Hadassah Henrietta Szold, 1 p.m. Pioneer
Women Cypress Lakes, 12:30 p.m. B'nai B'rith Women
- Menorah board, 10 a.m. Temple Israel board, 8 p.m.
Congregation Anshei Shalom Sisterhood, noon Jewish
Community Center board, 8 p.m. JEWISH FEDERA-
TION YLD/YAD CABINET, 8 p.m.
September 21
B'nai B'rith No. 3115,8 p.m. National Council of Jewish
Women Palm Beach regular meeting and board, 10 a.m.
Pioneer Women Golda Meir, 12:30 p.m. Pioneer
Women Orah Israel, 1 p.m. Hadassah Shalom paid
up membership luncheon, p.m.
September 22
SUKKOT
B'nai B'rith Women Olam board, 10 a.m.
September 23
SUKKOT
September 25
Jewish Community Day School picnic Golden Lakes
Temple Sisterhood, 10 a.m. Congregation Aitz Chaim,
10 a.m. Temple Beth Torah Men's Club picnic, noon
September 26
ORT Mid Palm, 1 p.m. Jewish Community Day School
executive board, 7:30 p.m. ORT Poinciana, noon
ORT Boynton Beach board, 1 p.m. Temple B'nai Jacob
Sisterhood luncheon, 12:30 p.m. Golden Lakes Temple
Sisterhood luncheon and card party, noon
September 27
Hadassah Lee Vassil, 12:30 p.m. Temple Beth David
Sisterhood, 8 p.m. Pioneer Women Cypress Lakes
luncheon, 11 a.m. B'nai B'rith Women Masada board,
7:45 p.m. ORT Golden Lakes, 1 p.m.
September 28
HASHANA RABAH
B'nai B'rith Women Menorah trip through Oct. 4 ORT-
Golden Rivers, noon
September 29
SHEMINIATZERETH
Brandeis University Women Boynton Beach card party,
noon
ISRAEL-DELUXE
17 Days
o u FULLY ESCORTED
Nov. 8 Nov. 25 From Florida
1983 by Mura Mathason
$1699.00
P.P.DBL OCC.
R/T Air from Miami
5 Star HotelsR/T Airport Transfers
6 Nights Tel Aviv
2 Nights Tiberias ,SRAE-i wine & cheese
6 Ninhts JpmsalPm PARTY SLIDE PRESENTATION
. E 2! I !? PLEASE CALL FOR DETAILS
1 Night Madrid
Breakfast & Dinner Daily
Comprehensive Sightseeing (8 Days)
All Tips, Taxes, Baggage Handling
All Service Charges & Entrance Fees
Round trip transportation to Miami included*
Minimum 10 persons required.
All Tours Recognized by Government
of Israel Tourism Office
JUPITER TRAVEL INTERNATIONAL
71 East Indiantown Road
Jupiter, Florida 33458
Other Dates 744-1000' Available
Senior News
FROM THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
BE A GOOD NEIGHBOR
The Jewish Community
Center of the Palm Beaches is
presently serving congregate
kosher meals in West Palm
Beach and Delray as well as
delivering meals to people who
are homebound.
The Center is in need of vol-
unteer drivers in your neigh-
borhood in order to meet the
demand of people who need a
meal delivered to their home
as a result of coming out of the
hospital or living alone.
Be a good neighbor and help
someone who is in need. De-
velop a group of drivers who
can answer this call and feel
good to know that they are
giving their time and energy to
someone in need. The Center
will reimburse gas costs.
There is no charge for the
meal. The Government asks
that the recipient give a dona-
tion.
Call 689-7703 lor informa-
tion about this program and-
or if you can volunteer.
Transportation to transit
disadvantaged seniors, 60
years and older, is available at
the Jewish Community Cen-
ter, Comprehensive Senior
Service Center in a
designated area through its
Federal Grant Title 111 of the
Older Americans Act, funded
by Gulfstream Arcawide
Council on Aging Monday
through Friday, for medical
appointments, to nursing
homes, social services and lor
food shopping.
"Hot Kosher Lunch Con-
nection" Monday to Friday
at the Jewish Community
Center, 2415 Okeechobee
Blvd., West Palm Beach. Ko-
sher meals and stimulating
programs are provided as a
result of a grant. Title HI,
Older Americans Act, funded
through Gulfstream Area-
wide Council on Aging. We
have expanded our program to
include two lunch sittings, the
first at 11:15 a.m. and the sec-
ond at 12:30 p.m. All partici-
pants are invited to attend the
program at 11:50 a.m.
There is no exact fee but
participants are encouraged to
make a contribution at each
meal.
Beginners Bridge will h ,1
fered at the JcwSfLH
n"y Center star.? H
Wednesday, Sep^'Si]
a.m. y 9:M
. As enrollment will k I
ed, please call Sl^M
reservattonsandin&l
ADULT COMMUNE
EDUCATION^
ii...___..
mJ
Classes BeginU
October 10
Know Your Car .
days, 1:30 p.m.
VoR" In The Chair.
Wednesdays. 1:30 pT"-
Positive Life Attitude, j
Thursdays, 1:30 p.m. 1
Writers Workshop IR-J
ners] -Fridays. 1:30p.nITj
Writers Workshop 1
vanced)- Fridays, 9:15 a.*
Call Rhonda Ostrow at(M.|
7700 Tor information and J
istration.
The
KOSHER
AM CONOtTIOMC
* GUTT
___0UUMM1
HOTEL 40th to
OilSUttlt
N.Fo[YheSUCCOTH HOLIDAYS
Beautiful Oceanfront Succah
SUCCOTH PACKAGE
Any 5 days $ aa d* peson
& 4 NiqhtS 4w'IU double occupancy
INCLUDING MEALS
Tennis faciMies Sauna Hand tall Volleyball
Olympic Swimming, foot Interlammenl
lull ilock ol Private Beach TV in Rooms
Daily Synaf Ofue Services
Taw* Metis. a*c*MKefkowNi t ftlei Sm*>
Phone:1-531-5771
The Ten J^ost Qans of Israel*?
The Highland Scots, so the story goes, have laid claim to being
dependents of the Ten List Tribes of Israel. Whether they really are or not
we II never know. But one thing we do know for sure is that the first
Jews of rruxlem times came to Scotland in the 1600's, found it much
to their liking, and settled there.
Once established, the settlers undoubtedly discovered one of
bcotland s most famous pleasures, J&B Rare Scotch. Carefully
blended from a selection of the finest scotches, l&B has such a
smiKithness and subtlety that it can truly be said to whisper. No
wonder it s become the favorite scotch here in America. Serve
JC*B to your tribe, clan or mishpocha. One delightful sip will see
the stan of a tradition that will never be lost.
86 P.oo. Blended Scoi-hWh,sy C 198? The Padrtngion Co,p
NV
J&B. It whispers.


Friday, September 16,1983 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Pag7
P.B. County Board of Rabbis
[inaugurates Conversion Institute
, palm Beach County
lord of Rabbis may very well
oioneering a new concept
hen it inaugurates its
Aversion Institute on
faober 6, 7:30 p.m. at
Imple Israel. According to
tbbi Joel Chazin, president
ihe rabbinical board and
ritual leader of Temple
'ianu-El, intensive
brkshops and seminars for
ospective converts to
sm are held in other
nmunities for each division
Judaism. "We may be
Ijque in that our Conversion
kiituie is an effort across the
; io unify the endeavors of
members of the Palm
|ach County Board of
|bbis, which include spirit-
leaders from all groups of
Idaism, in a common
use," stated Rabbi Chazin.
Previously, each rabbi in
5 community has conducted
nversion sessions on an
dividual basis for pros-
fctive converts. At times, the
ter numbers made this
[ponsibility of the rabbinate
jerwhelming. The Con-
fsion Institute is "meant to
hten the individual burden
leach rabbi and, at the same
pe, unify and bring together
t efforts of the rabbis in this
fca," explained Rabbi
Those wishing to be
bdents can only enter
[ough a sponsoring rabbi
Io will guide and counsel
pm and ultimately determine
eir conversion. The
ulachic" nature or specific
vish ritual observed would
I under the direction of the
lividual's rabbi. "This is
lat permits us to be
jimenical," Rabbi Chazin
"At the end of the 16
ek course, the prospective
nvert will meet with his
pnsoring rabbi and will
|tideabout conversion."
I he curriculum was planned
Rabbi William Marder of
iple Beth David, Rabbi
ard Shapiro of Temple
acl and Ann Lynn Lipton,
>ish Education Director of
Jewish Federation of Palm
ach County. Lipton will
p as the instructor for the
liitute. In addition to being
line forefront of the plan-
K. ihe rabbis will monitor
guide this initial com-
nity effort.
lopics that will be covered
"the semester will include
introductory session on
a and what the Jewish
Me are; Jewish history; the
fish life cycle; holidays; the
Msn home, synagogue and
Timunity; concept of God
unity of God; Torah;
Pe and the importance of
"c> m the life of all Jews;
at converts are leaving
fm as they enter this new
! of life; and what it
'o be part of the Jewish
Crl a.r'J0US rabblS 3nd
Per knowledgeable people in
Flovof Sonsotton
NoSoxchorin
No Soibttol. No Solt
No Additives
MMriMN
^somcD Rflvow
POttoo* & hondlino.
<-l* KUAJKHCANDV
* Short HlHs
the community will be invited
as guest speakers. An integral
part of the curriculum will be
conversations with other
converts who have made a
successful transition.
The Conversion Institute
will also accept individuals
who are interested in the Jew-
ish community but, for one
reason or another, are not
ready to convert. The Institute
is not meant as a proselytizing
effort on the part of the Jew-
ish community to attract a
large number of Gentiles to
the Jewish faith. "But,"
concluded Rabbi Chazin, "it
may well develop into an out-
reach to inter-married
couples."
For more information on
the Conversion Institute,
contact Rabbi Joel Chazin,
Rabbi William Marder, Rabbi
Howard Shapiro, or Ann
Lynn Lipton. Lipton can be
reached at the Federation
office.
Temple Beth El of West Palm Beach recently
dedicated a "Tree of Life" in the lobby of
Fread Sanctuary. Rabbi Howard J. Hirsch,
Cantor Elaine Shapiro and guest Cantor Saul
Meisels participated in the ceremony. The
Tree was donated to the temple by Mr. and
Mrs. Max B. Shapiro. Pictured next to the
Tree are [left to right] Sam Wadler, president
of the congregation; Max B. Shapiro; Leo
Schwack, board member; Arnold I.ampert,
treasurer; and Marshall Brass, president of
the Men's Club.
Try the best thing next to
trench fries.
DEL MONTE^Cattup. It's got just the
taste kids love with their fries, burgers
and hot dogs. It's the one catsup that's
made with the same care and high
quality standards you've come to
expect from Del Monte.
So treat your family Next to
thick, rich DEL MONTE Catsup,
everything tastes better.


16.1983
Organizations in the News
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juj ubbbbI r:_ :>: r :
nrvc atunaor: p-ogress-*-:
ainr>tr :^i -~:
jeasc weiegiife tr ire-:
roiri; i>r: : re- ur i
--- r,; -,; _-.:;. ::' :-eaa\ >
k>t To rad tau saaipiaoas
ocaiaf we wii aH fattier a:
oae aoaK to partake of
~ >on Tluafs that Sa:
Oar forebearen ea>o>ed their
Out iae> ne^cr
dreaaMd of thehttdoos ttxau
lhai hae ondoped and in
. .-_.; a-ffl de-r- Coffee
aad Tea too ISI5 per
..-.: : -- -i : :-.->:
i 1 RT i.*i..- ci_^rri.'
nt \a>encaa ORT.
I* mi: : :r..-.- ~tt:.'i ::
Tuesci- Sr: 2C i: 12:30
p k a: a>e Renal Paax CKib
Hoate oa S E 22ad Ae. ana
froft Hifra> in Bo>-ntoc
Bearr \ fascinating book
-r> ir u. De gj*er. r> Heeti
Safai -Haaaaat Taies af
i^*ciai la'.erev. io ORT
member* ail be a talc by Her-
man Grant. A VRC roalear,
ho will recoaat kmk of bit
expeneaon as a yoang ORT
undent. Members aad facets
are urged to attend.
HADASSAH
Aiya Graap. Lake Wart*
Chapter af Haaaajabwil hoid
thev General Meeuaf oa
Thursda>. Sept. 29 at 1 p.m.
in Temple Beth Sholoaa. A
Street, Lake Worth.
Flora Fnedman, Presadeat
ill gj^e her report on the 49
National Contention bead in
^ashmgton, D.C. in Aagasi.
Final Plans will be made for
the trip to be beid Thaaksfri-
ing Week-End.
A Plaque wifl be presented
to Mr Sam Scfaatz in meaaoo
of Claire ho dsed dunag her
Presidenc> this past Ma>
The Lee V assi Graap af aV
Lake WBrth Caaater af Had-
assah ill meet Tuesday, Sept-
2" at 12:30 p.m. at Teaapk
Beth Shalom. 315 "A" SL.
Lake^onh.
It's been four oaths
our last meeting and n will be
great getting together again.
At this meeting which il be a
social afternoon acre you
will greet the new Board aad
get to ino hat they do for
et tokao* tbegirj^l
\ partake of our a
refreshmenu brin. i
*<* *d frSdTlK
***y welcome ,t 3
-STTlT'^ *i,crnoon$. 2
you on Tuesday S
-^t*>.SepL'27Mte
Tbe following are son,
schedule for this year:
27 Social Get To. I
Oet. 25 Convention b. i
port Dramamauon
'* ^* Education Day
rvF<*:2,~lJBookRevi-i
Dr. Anne Harris ,,
Orphaam History M|
Va^dHadassah.aesiPtb
-" Chapter dates ad
Oct. $ Enjoy a delightful
aad detooous day. Lunch at
the Bartrrci Hotel on Singer
lslaad foliowedoy anoneid
a half hoar relaxing boat ride
oa the lslaad Queen. One lot

. :r A
cur
-: i- -.-.l : rv r .;- ;
r- :.-.;.
NMI RITH
bVubbbbV
v -ffwrar aBcarrtr-
: :-: i : :
anr. In I
.. -
-"an-
as mtnritr-
iraor-ir, -
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*XaBm"" an: :>u
rrr-iocn *4r^ Tanaer ru?i
- < nar.rr" t_
* .imn : ru V a
-r-.nmrii.. v il k tztz. :ri: TH-tin. jaaaaaV n-
maasaac
or Jtii- rxciimt a'ir-T>noa'
OhJENS AWCRK W
ORT
af
^uawnraa ORT wil
innia inssiitu; .-- :n:
ubk:ii :i nu'ce> Sep: 11
a a :iu Surri^
met atu run BatM Our
. a. tiu v uraj- ~ -a,
l wil
he '*aoir : Assncnr- t
r~aa oracauaf *r aauanrni
3R~ atuosri: al awe* :rc
n.air-al" an: :utur
. r n ti: M-n >u.
* aac aan aawaca aac
" ^ -:.. :t .in ti-
caoaiing ORT aaBuaam Bar
nnr. en> aaafl IbjbjbjbbbI


also includes the cost of
Wtation and gratuities.
Nervations (there-, are
few left) Pearl Rosen,
i d c-61 or Esther
I Kent M57.
LZ4-27 Gala Four
|Thiks8ivin8 Week-End
ne Kosher cuisine at the
Ion Hotel in Miami
I Transportation and all
Lies also included in one
nrice. For reservations
e Bessie Hoffman,
brier A or Bertha Kap-
omersetF-110.
van, West Palm Beach
t,er of Hadassah activi-
y 17 Regular Meeting
Congregation Anshei
L at 1 p.m. Boutique
[p.m. An interesting and
Vative Hadassah film
fcshown.
(. 24, 25, 26 EPCOT
For reservations call
fceor Regina.
1. 16 "Pal Joey" at
oyal Palm Dinner The-
tallCelya.
V 22-27 New Orleans
six days, five nights.
kservations call Martha
In, or Regina.
k. 24-27 Thanksgiving
Lnd at (he Sea Gull Ho-
For reservations call
i Fein, or Regina.
lassah, Lake Worth
er, Henrietta Szold
levents:
JMonday, Sept. 19, the
Ilia Szold Group of
_kah will have their very
'Study Group" which
|ke place in the Sewing
at Lakeside Village
|I0:30 a.m. to Noon,
i Ruth Wood for reser-
meeting of the Season
turictta Szold Group of
*ah will take place on
}), Sept. 20 in the Audi-
ol lakeside Village,
Rd. west of Congress
'aim Springs. The
lim will he the "Story of
km."
ihurstl;i>, Sept. 29 Hcn-
kjZoM (iroup of Hadas-
' hold their first card
the season. This will
a'in the auditorium of
lc Village, Lillian Rd.
f Congress Avc. The
?:30 p.m. Donation
I ins Dessert and Card
> being chaired by Rose
Icin.
P. 31 the Henrietta
roup ol Hadassah will
M "Chai" Luncheon
Koyce Hotel, please
your reservation with
"i/ic Silvcrbergor Ray
an.
JERK AN SOCIETY
lORTKCHNION
[Joe Dorf, President of
P Chapter of the Amer-
Pwhnion Society, an-
Fa that the opening
Of the 1983-84 season
neld at the American
Bank, Okeechobee
|est date, and Tuesday.
*30 a.m.
further stated that Blos-
[ohen and May LeVine
gnsor this "Welcome
[Breakfast" celebrating
V Anniversary of the
f Technion, the
Institute of Technology.
I.E8rarm LwiU includc
tlon of the help and
{given by Congrega-
te Sholom.
?or/ further noted he is
forward to seeing
anJ members of Th-
re" as members of the
f lln a. this opening
"IB.,he numbcr of
lna' would be inter-
ested in attending, Mr. Dorf'
suggested that those interested
call 832-5401 for reservations.
YIDDISH CULTURE
GROUP
The Yiddish Culture Group
of Cresthaven is happy to an-
nounce its 9th season 1983-84.
Classes will resume on
Wednesday, Oct. 5, at 1
o'clock, in the Dudley Audito-
rium, with leader and founder
Goldie Lazarus at the helm.
Birthdays and Anniversaries
will be celebrated with enter-
tainment. Refreshments will
be served. All members are
urged to attend. Bring your
friends and neighbors for in-
teresting and informative
classes.
Liftoff
Continued from Page 1
sion, hosted by Israel's Pre-
sident Chaim Herzog, will
focus on Project Renewal and
the challenge of fully absorb-
ing several generations of im-
migrants into Israel's complex
modern society.
The LIFTOFF program-
ming will conclude with the
Tenth Annual International
Leadership Reunion and the
Inside Washington II, Oct. 24-
25, chaired by UJA National
Vice Chairman and Super
Sunday Chairman Jerome J.
Dick of Washington. The In-
side Washington program, for
donors of $50,000 or more,
will offer participants the op-
portunity to exchange views
with key policy makers and
question leading presidential
candidates.

Friday, September 16,108a/ The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 9
'..V.' '.'.......'A ..' .'-'
1 ..* -^^^^^r*^^^^
Juggling Family and Career
Topic Of JF&CS Program
Juggling family and career
is a topic Marilyn David-
Topperman will address to
Temple Israel Sisterhood on
Sept. 8. The responsibilities
and conflicts of working
mothers are of concern to all
interested in the changing
family.
Women work for a variety
of reasons nowadays; neces-
sity for income, greater auto-
nomy, and life satisfaction.
Our society still perceives child
rearing and care as primarily
women's responsibility. This
expectation may produce
stress for the working mother,
and the entire family.
Quality child care is not
readily available, nor is flex
time or job sharing a frequent
alternative in the business
world. These are some of the
problems to be raised, as well
as strategies for juggling fam-
ily and career.
Jewish family life education
coordinator, Mrs. Top-
perman, raises current family
issues in lecture or workshop
format to Jewish Organiza-
tions or those other groups.
An upcoming event will be
entitled, "Welcome Florida
Newcomers." Other programs
being planned are,
"Improving Marital Commu-
nication," and "Step-
parenting."
If you are interested in these
programs, or would like an-
other topic of relevance to the
family, for your group, please
contact Marilyn David
Topperman, at 684-1991.
Couples improve their
marital communications
Jewish Family and
Children's Service of Palm
Beach County, Inc., will be
offering a four session, "Fam-
ily Life Education Work-
shop," in October called,
"Couples Improve Their
Marital- Communications."
Through role playing,
discussion and other means,
healthy couples will have the
opportunity to develop skills
in communication.
The group will be co-lead by
Sandy Grunther and Marilyn
David-Topperman, social
workers at the agency.
For couples interested in
obtaining more information,
or in registering, please con-
tact Mr. Grunther or Mrs.
Topperman at 684-1991.
Arts-Crafts-Jewelry D7 I
Imnnrtpei F.vrlneinal\, Va8*^^e,
tbe?
Imported Exclusively
from Israel.
Military & Okeechobee
Croat Country Mall
471-4274
Susan Levine
&
Barbara Schwartz
Open:
Mon.-Thura. & Sat. 10 AM-8 PM
Frl. 10 AM-5 PM, Sun. 12-5 PM
Enter die Mazel Tov Sweepstakes
Win atjOOO catered party from Maxwell Hous^Coffee!
Let Maxwell House put $1000 towards the cater-
ing of your next special occasion Well make it a
glorious anniversary! A beautiful bar mitzvah! A
wondrous wedding1 An affair with family and
friends youll always remember" Maxwell House
is the perfect coffee to help you share the warm
A living tradition in Jewish homes for over half a century
feelings of those special occasions because it's al-
ways 'Good to the Last Drop.*" So make 5744
even happierfill out the entry form
and enter the Mazel Tov Sweepstakes
from Maxwell House todayl
Sf
OFFICIAL RULES
1. Each entry must be accompanied by the hi -
nerseal from a iar of MAXWELL HOUSE' Instant
Coffee or a 2" square from the plastic M ol a can
ol around MAXWELL HOUSE' Coffee or MAX-
WELL MOUSE* A 0 C Coffee or the words
MAXWELL HOUSE* printed in block letters on a
3" x 5" card. Entries must be on the Official Entry
Blank or a 3"I" card and mailed to: Mazel Tov
Sweepstakes. General foods Corporation, PO
Bo 3660. Grand Central Station, New York. New
York 10163
I. NO PURCHASE REQUIRED TO ENTER
SWEEPSTAKES.
I. Entries must be first-class mail, one entry per
envelope, postmarked no later than January 4.
1984 and received by January 11.1984
4. Winner will be selected m a random drawing,
on January 18.1884. from all entries received
prior to the deadline The drawing. wNI be con-
ducted by Joseph Jacobs Organization, Inc an
independent organization whose decnion is
final In the event the winner declines the prize or
If for any reason the prize cannot be awarded
after the initial drawing, a supplemental draw-
ing^) will be held to award the prize Winner will
be notified by mail Taxes on the prize are the sole
responsibility of the winner The odds of winning
depend on the number ol entries received
8. Prize consists of one Grand Prize $1,000 to
cater your party Prize will be awarded upon the
receipt of bill from caterer
8. This sweepstakes is open to all residents of the
United States who are 18 years ol age or older,
except employees (and their families) of General
Foods Corporation its advertising agencies,
subsidiaries or affiliates, or Joseph Jacobs
Organization, Inc Sweepstakes subject to all
Federal. Slate and local regulations Void where
!rohibrted By law
. For the name of the winner, tend a serif-
addressed postage-paid envelope to. Winnei s
Name, PO Box 3990, Grand Central Station.
New York New York 10163
I
I
I
9H0U *~ Uffl
MAZEL TOV SWEEPSTAKES
OFFICIAL ENTRY FORM
NAMt_
ADI)*ISi_.
CITY____
I STATE.
ZIP.
MAIL TO M.itTovSw*t^uk..
Ceaeral FocmU Corpora***
P.O. <> io
Crea4 Central Simon
N* York. New York IOIH
Eiilrm matt bf mtmi fcy lurnury It !?


Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, September 16,1983
Local Artist Designs JCDS* New Year's Greeting Ca
Artist Samuel R. Finglass
practices his philosophy, "Be
kind to each other and follow
the Ten Commandments."
Over the years he has donated
countless hours of work to
local community charities and
organizations creating their
posters, signs and newsletters.
Finglass' latest endeavor is
the art work which adorns the
cover of this year's Jewish
Community Day School's
New Year's greeting card
which has been mailed to
parents whose children attend
the school, members of the
Board, and contributors.
The card depicts happy
children participating in
various scholastic and Judaic
studies and activities which
occur throughout the school
year. It contains a New Year's
greeting from President
Shirley Dellerson
highglighting the two mile-
stones that the school will be
celebrating in 5744; the tenth
anniversary of the school and
the first anniversary of the
Benjamin S. Hornstein
Elementary and Rapaport
Junior High School at the new
campus on 5801 Parker
Avenue, West Palm Beach.
A Service
Of
Compassion
Continued from Page 3
of wine, challah, gefilte fish
and salads, was enhanced with
choral singing and piano ac-
companiment by Elsie Nach-
mear.
As the residents were ac-
companied back to their
rooms to get ready for lunch,
one lady resident asked "Why
was it so short?" No greater
compliment could have been
payed to the morning's
proceedings. The dignity of
the Service conducted by Rab-
bi Sherman, the beauty of the
Chapel, the artifacts provided
and the warmth and en-
thusiasm of the volunteers
under the direction of Shirley
Spiegel, combined for a truly
enjoyable Sabbath experience
filled with compassion.
Sabbath Services at the
Joseph H. Morse Geriatric
Center are held every Friday at
3:30 p.m. and Saturday at 10
a.m. High Holiday Services
were also scheduled at the
Center.
Anti-Nazi
Organizations
Protesting
AMSTERDAM (JTA)
Anti-Nazi organizations in
Holland are protesting against
plans by a rightwing leader to
honor a deceased Dutch Nazi
at a rally in The Hague. The
plans were announced by Jon
Glimmerveen, head of the
extreme rightwing Neder-
landse Volksunie (NVU), an
organization banned by the
authorities. He said he
organized the rally on Sept. 7,
in memory of Peter Ton, a
Dutch Nazi killed on that date
in 1940 in a brawl.
Finglass grew up in
Baltimore, Maryland where he
decided at an early age that the
life of an artist was for him.
His interest tended toward
graphic designing as a career
and, until he retired to
Florida in 1970, he created
designs and motifs for auto
shows, home shows, sports
shows, graphics and signage
for markets and department
stores, exhibits and billboards.
Over a 35 year period, he also
designed, built floats and
helped create Baltimore's
Christmas parades.
ever. For 14 yeL h lw
donating his KjJ&t
munity. He a< c
designed the large sain!?
windows for tne$J**.!
Memorial Chapel 0fi
Beach. Over 30 ctJ
organizations call on r
and he helps "hS,^
KCnahWay-,n*".!
been honored bv the li
c,b "Citizen if i
and by the North Palm a
County Region of J,
American ORT as i
many others.
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ICC News
%
ENJOY THE JOY OF SUKKOT
L .n.c children and friends are invited to come to the
P.h community Center, 2405 Okeechobee Blvd., West
B Beach Tuesday, Sept. 20 at 5:30 p.m. to help
rate the Center's beautiful Sukkoh. Hear the telling of
|story of Sukkot. Smell the etrog and shake the lulav.
Line a kosher style dinner. Dessert and drink will be
Epiied. Bring fruit to hang in the Sukkoh.
Pre registration is necessary. The fee for the evening is
wr family for JCC members and $5 for non-members.
"all689-7700 for registration and information.
flNGLE PARENTS HAVE FUN WITH YOUR KIDS!
Kititk Parents of the Jewish Community Center and
fcr children will have a fun day at "Chuck E Cheese,"
|m Beach Lakes Blvd., on Sunday, Sept. 18, at 12 noon.
\ a great opportunity for the children to meet new
Ends, and a chance for parents to exchange ideas and
Rights with other parents.
BREAK FAST AT BREAKWATER
.. Jewish Community Center Young Singles, Career
iigles and Single Parents are invited to attend a "Break
i Fast" at the Breakwater Clubhouse, 520 Executive
filter Dr., West Palm Beach, on Saturday, Sept. 17 at
Bi> p.m., adults $5, children (under 12) $2. Advance paid
tervations are necessary. Please make checks payable to
Jewish Community Center, 2415 Okeechobee Blvd.,
est Palm Beach, Fla. 33409, attention of Joan Wolfberg.
Ipor additional information call Joan at the Center, 689-
CAREER SINGLES TO "MEET AND EAT"
iMembers of the Career Singles of the Jewish Corn-
unity Center will "Meet and Eat" at the Orient Express,
|45 So. Military Trail, Lake Worth on Saturday, Sept.
|, 8 p.m., for cocktails and 9 p.m. for dinner.
For reservations call Joan Wolfberg at the Center, 689-
Friday, September 16,1983 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 11
Ground Broken On Mausoleum
To Complete Menorah Gardens
T4t WMAi-4
Gold's UmumjIuJi
NEW YEAR
WEST PALM BEACH
Ground has been broken for
the start of construction of a
mausoleum that will round out
the $500,000 development
program of the Menorah
Gardens Cemetery in West
Palm Beach.
A funeral chapel is already
under construction on the site
which, on completion, will
turn the memorial park into
Palm Beach County's only all-
Jewish cemetery, funeral
chapel and mausoleum faci-
lity.
The Menorah Gardens
Cemetery and Chapel are
owned and operated by
Menorah Chapels, which has
funeral homes in North Miami
Beach, Sunrise, Margate and
Deerfield Beach.
Mark Weissman, funeral di-
rector of Menorah Chapels in
South Florida, said cons-
truction of the cemetery
chapel is now more than 50
percent complete and a fall
opening is expected.
The 30-acre Menorah
Gardens is located on Memo-
rial Park Road off Bee-Line
Highway, just minutes from
Okeechobee Blvd., and has
served the Jewish community
for more than eight years.
To facilitate pre-need
arrangements, Menorah
Chapels has opened a Memo-
rial Center at 5154 Okee-
chobee Blvd., with infor-
mation available on both pre-
need planning and on the
memorial park facilities.
"Until now it has been
necessary to make two sets of
arrangements if you lived in
Palm Beach County," Weiss-
man said. "The first would be
made with a funeral chapel
and the second with a ceme-
tery. This meant an inconve-
nience for the people seeking
pre-need planning. In time of
need it meant the necessity of
two ceremonies, one in town
and the second at the ceme-
tery."
The on-site facility will also
eliminate such traditional
larlshery.
It's a big
wheel with
all lovers of
tine cheese.
The flavor of Jarlsberg' Brand Cheese is as natural as the Norwegians who
^ake it The lull. rich, distinctive, nut-like taste makes it a favorite for noshing.
nibbling, serving with fruit or wine, and using it in your recipes Jarlsberg
Every good store carries it.
Also unjo) Ski Queen Brand GJeftMl cheese. Nokkelost
spiced cheese and man> other fine cheeses from Norva\.
i 1980 Ntwsoi^na Funds "r Si.wlq^_CT0690J_
funeral costs as limousine
rental, hearses, police escorts,
and chapel rentals.
Designed by architect Jay
Nunn of Miami, the con-
servatively styled chapel will
accommodate 150 people in
the lobby and family room
areas, in addition to the main
sanctuary.
SUN!
RUMS
"Sunsweet Prune Juice.
Its not just good for my body.
It just plain tastes good!'
Everyone knows that Sunsweet Prune Juice has a variety ot
vitamins and minerals. So when people see me drinking it.
they usually figure that I drink it to stay healthy Actually,
that s only half the reason Italsohappenstotaste delicious.
And why not its a rich. 100 natural fruit juice, with
no sugar or preservatives added I enjoy Sunsweet Prune
Juice often After all. how often do you find something
that s good for you and that riiftirii/rrT
tastes good, too' bUNbWtbl
To your health
Here's a good deal
on Sunsweet Prune Juice.
Good on any size of Sunsweet Prune Juice.
Retailer This coupon It redtimiblc lor I0< (plus 7< handling) when
milled to Sunsweet Prune Juice, PO Bo> 1404, Clinton, IA 52734,
provided it has been used for t purchase in accordance with this
offer. Any other use constitutes fraud Invoices proving purchase
of sufficient stock to cover coupons presented for redemption must
be shown upon request. Void if use is prohibited, taxed or other-
wise restricted by law. Cash value l/20< OFFER LIMITED TO ONE
COUPON PER PURCHASE This offer expires October 31 1984
SUNSWEET GROWERS, INC
70M50 flDD7fl?
CERTIFIED KOSHER
10
c
OFF


Pgi2 lWJwri^Phda^rfff^iBMdiOMty/Wfc|%fcpiM*gl^MW
Candle Lighting Time Friday/5iptr.6-7,1Z
TEMPLE BETH DAVID
Templr Beth Da>id of
Northern Pain Beach Coaatv
iU hold Sukkot and Simchat
Torah services at its ne
building at 4567 Hood Rd.,
Palm Beach Gardens. Rabbi
William Marder will conduct
the services and Cantor Earl
Rackoff will chant the liturgy.
Sukkot Eve.
Sept. 218 p.m.
Sukkot First Dav
Sept. 22. 10 a.m.; Sukkot
Second Day Sept. 23, 10
a.m.; Sukkot Shemini Aze-
ret Yizkor Sept. 29, 10
a.m. i
Simchat Torah Processional
Sept. 29 7:30 D.m.
Simchat Torah
Sept. 30 10 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL
Vom kippur E\e Kol Nidre
ices will be held at 7 p.m.
Friday, Sepi. 16 at Tempi*
Belh El in Fort Pierce. Th<
following da>. Yom Kippui
liturg\ will resume at 10:3(
a.m. At 3 p.m. Yiskor ser\-
. in remembrance of those
who have passed through
transition, will be conducted.
Additional information may
be obtained by contacting the
Temple office.
TEMPLE BETH EL
SISTERHOOD
Samrda}. Sept. 17 Seater
HaU Beth El Sisterhood of
West Palm Beach will have a
breakfast for its members,
catered by Frank Allerhand,
following Yom Kippur serv-
ices. Esther Barrish is chair-
person. Donation $8 per
person.
Taesday. Sept. 20.1 p.m.
Sisterhood first fall 1983
meeting will be held in Senter
HaU. Rosemary Shaw, VVEAT
talk show host will be guest
speaker. Ms. Sandy Singer,
program chairperson. Mem-
bers and guests invited.
Erev Saccoth, Wednesday.
Sept. 21 Sisterhood Board
members and their family will
hold a Succoth supper in the
succa on the Temple grounds.
Ms. Sheila Stark, chairperson.
Temple Beth El began
all classes in both Religious
School and Sunday School on
Sunday morning. Sept. 11. All
children met for a special
assembly and orientation ses-
sion at 9:30 a.m. Since the first
day of school was after Rosh
Hashanah, the first experience
for this school year was the
Junior Congregation Services
on Rosh Hashanah. Services
for children in Grades 2 and 3
will be held in the Youth
Lounge from 10:15 a.m. to
11:30. At 11:30 these children
joined the children aged three
to six for a snack and plav ses-
sion. Mina Anafi led the Serv-
ices for grades 2 and 3.
Children in Grades 4
through 8 met for services
from 10:15 until 12:30 in
the Appieman Chapel under
the leadership of the Educa-
tion Director, Ruth Levow,
assisted by graduates of the
Hebrew School and members
of the 8th grade.
Temple Beth El now has its
own school bus, through the
generosity of Temple Beth El
Sisterhood. The bus will nick
up children who are registered
for this service, starting on
Tuesday, Sept. 13 at their
schools'. Bus service will be
available every Tuesday and
Thursday that Religious
School is in session, to those
children who are registered in
advance for this service.
There will be Yom Kippur
Junior Congregation Services
on Saturday, Sept. 17 accord-
ing to the above schedule for
Rosh Hashanah.
On Sunday, Sept. 18, the
children of the Religious
School will begin to decorate
the Sv nagogue Succah, and on
Tuesday, Sept. 20 the
decorating will be completed
with a pizza-ice cream party
for members of Kadimah and
LSY who assist in the
decoration project. Rabbi
Howard J. Hirsch will speak
to the students about the
meaning of the Sukkah as well
as the importance of the
Holiday of Sukkoth. To
continue the celebration. Can-
tor Elaine Shapiro w ill assist in
the singing of Sukkoth songs.
Students in the Religious
School will perform the Mitz-
vah of "bentsching" etrog
each school day in the Sukkah,
as well as having the opportu-
nity to eat in the Sukkah which
they will have helped to
decorate.
Temple Beth El is pleased to
announce that the Religious
School staff consits of Mina
Anafi, Jerri Plainer, Shoshana
Walner and Gary Kessler. The
Sunday School staff consists
of Irene Katz. Floryn Needle
and Dee Kaplan. Ruth Levow
L'clwim to life
is the Education Director of
Temple Beth El. For informa-
tion about registration and en-
rollment, please call Levow at
the Temple office, 833-0330.
TEMPLE ISRAEL
To begin the Sukkot Festi-
val, on Wednesday evening,
Sept. 21, the Sisterhood of
Temple Israel is inviting
members of the congregation
to share as a community in a
| covered dish supper. The sup-
per in Schwartzberg Hall will
begin at 6 p.m. and will pre-
cede the Erev Sukkot service in
the sanctuary at 7 p.m. Tradi-
tionally at Temple Israel, the
consecration ceremony for
children first entering the reli-
gious school is conducted
during the Erev Sukkot serv-
ice: hence the earlier hour of 7
p.m. approximately 24 young-
sters will be consecrated this
vear. On Thursday morning,
Sept. 22, at 10:30, Sukkot
service will be conducted by
Rabbi Howard Shapiro with
Susan Weiss the cantorial
soloist.
Sukkot at Temple Israel
marks the beginning of the
congregation's food pantry
Program sponsored [
Temple social action by
tee chaired *& JH
Cohen. Tcmp|e % M,
only synagogue tnl ls'
County. Kalm
ber and October m H
the congreStbn^H
asjed to bring food* *
they come to temple 0 1
k, meetings 0r ?*"
school. or rel'w
- Anyone *\..
cipients. "***
"Last yea, we
quota," said Rabbi
This year the need is2
and our quota is larger I
certain our members
respond generously."
Sukkot comes to an.
with Simchat Torah and
concluding service,
*Kednesda> evening, Stp,.!
The Simchat Torah service,
begin at 7 p.m.
school children will D
Continued on Pig, 15
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Friday, September 16,1983/ The Jewiah Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 13
V


Page 14 The Jewish Floridian of Pahn Beach County Friday. September 16. 1983
The Rabbinical Corner
DEVOTED TO OCCUSaOM OFTfCMES AMD BSUES HELfMWT TO XWCWUFE. PaST AND PHESEKT
Commitment To Action
B> RABBI
EMANLEL EISENBERG
Temple Beth Saoioea
Lake Worth
The Jewish community ai I
large, and many of us, nave
just completed the cycle of the
High Holy Days when every
Jew attended the svnatoeur
services, listened diligently to
the sermons of their spiritual
leaders ith the hope that G-d
epted our fervent prayers
and granted us pardon,
forgiveness for our sins and a
happy and healthy Ne Year.
But the question that comes
after the High Hol\ Days, and
the Holiday of Succos is
"Whai about our com-
mitments to ourseKes. our
communit>, to Judaism, to
Bar Mitzvah
Gr*SS Alan Tartakow
GREGG TARTAkO*
Gregg Alan Tartakow, son
of Mrs. Ronni Epstein of
Wellington, and Dr. Dennis J.
Tartakow of Jupiter, will cele-
brate his Bar Mitzvah on Fri-
day evening, 7 p.m. Sept. 23
and Saturday morning, 9:30
a.m., Sept. 24 at Temple Beth
El, West Palm Beach.
Gregg will symbolically
share his Bar Mitzvah with
Joseph Essas of Moscow, who
has been denied his heritage.
Gregg is an 8th grade stu-
dent ai the Jewish Community
Day School. He served as a
representative to the Knesset,
which is the student body of
the school. Gregg's interests
are computers and aerospace.
His grandparents, Mr. and
Mrs. Lewis Acker, are resi-
dents of Royal Palm Beach,
Fla.. and Mr. and Mrs. Willis
Newins are residents of Long
Island. VV
HalR.Waoff
HAL R. VENOFF
Hal R. Venoff, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Fred Venoff of Palm
Beach Gardens, will become a
Bar Mitzvah on Sept. 23 at
Temple Israel. Rabbi Howard
Shapiro and Cantonal Soloist
Susan Weiss will officiate.
Hal is in the 8th grade at
Howell Watkins Junior High
School and enjoys baseball
and computers.
Rabbi Emanuel Eisenbert
Israel and to the survival of
our people1"
We are :old that Sit. Moriah
was the place where Abraham
accepted and was determined
to obe> G-d's command to
sacrifice his son Isaac. Why is
Mt. Moriah a center of
holiness and what mai.
J that Abraham showed
his willingness to commit
himself to G-d's word? Com-
mitment, dedication and self
sacrifice; that is what Moriah
connotates and that is what
makes it hol>.
Commitment is one of the
most sacred ideals in Jewish
tradition. If we were asked
what we need most today we
would have to say it is the
spirit of Moriah com-
mitment. We need it in the
synagogues, our lives and in
our community.
The synagogue has always
been the powerhouse, and the
center of the life of our
people. Our country indeed is
blessed with wonderful insti-
tutions. We have Jews who are
involved in a multitude of
causes. But what is the source
of power? If there is a philan-
thropy it is the synagogue that
trained the Jew in Tsadakah.
If there is a State of Israel
today, it is because the
jcogue perpetuated the
ideal of Zion. Throughout our
history, in our prayers, our
studies, our rituals, the
memory of Israel was per-
petuated. Yes, the synagogue
is the powerhouse and we must
strengthen it and restore it to
it> historic role.
But there is another
tremendous resource the
home. If the synagogue is the
powerhouse, the home is the
generator. "Mah Tovu
Ohelocho Jaacov," How
goodly are they > tents, O
Jacob. This is a tribute to the
power of the Jewish home.
One cannot conceive of Jewish
life without the inspiration of
the Jewish home. The lewish
home, with its Mezuzah on the
doorpost, the Shabbat table,
the Kiddush and the
Havdalah; the Jewish home
with its moral, spiritual and
ethical values.
If there is something that we
should get out of the "Yamin
Noraim," the Days of Awe,
spirit and prayers, it should be
the spirit of Moriah, for action
to rebuild the Jewish home
and give it the sanctity it
always had. This would slow
down the disintegration of the
Slishpacha, the breakdown of
the Jewish home.
\\ e as parents must make
every effort to give a good
Jewish education to our
children, and We in ,.
munity must be resJ-,'
*** ,0 that ih. N
P* to afford > -
educate all 0f deM*I
the foundation*??,*'
gues, Jewish schools CL
institutions, etc aH ?!
a strong Jewish cdm;^
Butnow.tcaUstouS
Commitment f0r .f*
of Moriah ,0 fii*'
society-a greater aJI
Jewish Community A
be the worthy succe^ .^
he great Jewbn^f
preceded us: Babylonia,'
and Eastern Europe. '"
Our goal for the future,
be more than just ,
munity of Jews. wt
strive to build a coma.
that shall be vibrantTe
dynamic, united in purpo,
the survival of JudaisnT
the glory of G-d.
YOUR OPINION COUNTS
Tell us What you Think!!
Send letters to:
The Editor, Jewish Floridian
501 South Flagler Dr. #305
W. Palm Beach, FL 33401
Religious directory
CONSERVATIVE
I'm Tora* Congregation
1401 N.W. 4th Avenue. Boca Raton. 33432 Phone 392-8566
Robb. Theodore Feldmon Sobboth Services, Friday 8:15 p.m..
Saturday 9 30 o m
5438 Grove Street. West Polm Beach 33409 Phone 684-3212
Robb. Isooc Vender Wolde Cantor Mordeco. Spektor Doily
8:30 a.m. and 7 p.m. Friday: 8:30 a.m.. 5 p.m.. and a late
service ai 8:15 p.m.. followed by Oneg Shabbat. Soturdoy: 8:30
a.m.. 7 p.m.. Mine hofollowed by Sholosh Suedos.
eta aoaesi of Boyntea Beeca
501 N.E. 26 Avenue. Boynion Beach. Phone 734-0802. Rabbi
Avrom I. Drazin Sobboth services. Friday 8:15 p.m., Soturdoy 9
1470 Golden lakes Blvd.. West Palm Beoch 33411. Phone 689-
9430. Rabbt Joseph Speiser. Doily Services 8:15 a.m. and 530
p.m. Sobboth services Friday 8:15 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m.. 5 p.m.,
Mmcho followed by Sholosh Suedos
TtMBM Beta DOTH
4657 Hood Rood. Polm Beoch Gordons 33410 Phone 694-2350
Rabbi W.lliom Morder. Cantor Eorl J. Rockoff. Sobboth services
Friday 8pm.. Saturday 10 a.m.
Tetaple Beta FJ
2815 No. FlogJer Dr.. West Polm Beoch 33407 Phone 833-0339
Rabbi Howord J Hirjch. Cantor Elaine Shapiro Sobboth services
Fridoy 8 15 p.m Saturday 9:30 am Daily Mmyan 8:15 am,
Sunday and legal Holidoys 9 a m
224 N W Avenue ~G ". Belle Glode 33430 Sobboth serv.ces
Fr.doy 8 30 p.m.
Teek Beta Seoloe,
315 N A" Street Loke Worth 33460 Phone 585-5020 Robbi
Ernonue. E'Senberg. Contor Jacob Elmon Serv.ces Monday and
Thursooy 8.15a.m. Fridoy 8 15p m Soturdoy 9 o m
Teo.e4e Beta Zio*
lions Club 700 Cornel* Dr.. Royal Palm Beoch, Sobboth Set-
..ces Fnooy 8 p.m.. Soturdoy 9 am Robb. Nothon Zel.ier
Cantor Choim Boltuck Phone 793-9122
Te.pk B'Mi Jacob
2177 So Congress fere.. West Polm Beoch 33406 Phone 433
5957 Robb. Dr Moms S.lbermon Sobboth services Fr.doy 8
p.m Soturdoy 9 a.m.. Mondoy through Thursooy 9 o m
B
190 North County Rood, Polm Beoch 33480 Phone 832-0804
[vldtliSCh0,,^.C!^0oD0y,d ^"^^ Sobobth sarv.ee*
Fridoy 8.30p.m Saturday 9 o.m
Tt
5780 West Atlontic Avenue. Detray Beoch 33446 Phnn. ma
Tm Treasure Coast Jewish Canter
(Mortm County) 3257 S.E. Salerno Rood (opposite Winn-DiJ
Stuart. Fl 33490. President lief Graze 1-287-7732 Friday sera
8 p.m.
CONSERVATIVE LIBERAL
Temple Eternal Liakt
Boca West Community UMC. 8900 Boca West. Glades Rood|l
mile west of Boca Turnpike). The free Synagogue, P.O. tail
Boco Raton 33432. Phone: 368-1600. 391-1111 Robbi Beniowj
Rosayn. Sobboth services. Friday 8:15 p.m.
ORTHODOX
Century Villoge. West Palm Beoch. Phone 689-4675. Sobbdl
services 9 o.m. and 5 p.m. Daily services 8:15 o.m. ondfctj
p.m.
551 Brittany I. Kings Point, Delroy Beach 33446 Phone 499-740
or 499-9229. Horry Silver. President. Doily serv.ces 8 o.m ondS
p. m. Soturdoys and Holidoys9 o. m.
TWRerenaT.
Tttftsfi
at St. Jude Church (Porrish Moll). 204 U.S. H.ghwoyOneSotAj
Tequesta 33458. Phone 747-4235. Presideni Jeanne Tond* j1
Services the second and fourth Fridoy of every month, 8 p
Teaiak Beta B ef Beca Ratea
333 S.W. Fourth Avenue. Boco Roton 33432 Phone 39'* ,
Robbi Merle E. Singer. Cantor Martin Rosen. Sobboth mvaj
Friday 8:15 p.m. Toroh Study with Robbi S.nger, Saturday*"
a.m. Sobboth morning services 10:30a.m.
Tttapie Beta Saatoa.
St. Helen's Porish Hod, 20th Avenue and Victory Blyd-^i
Beoch 32960. mailing address: P.O. Box 2113, Vero Beoc" B
32960 Rabbi Stephen Adams. Phone 1-569-0180
Tea.a4e Beth Tore*
ot St. David's in the Pines Episcopal Retreat, Forest Hill Blvd.
Wellington Trace. West Palm Beoch. Moiling oddrtss
Lantern Tree lone. West Polm Beoch 33411. Fr.doy IP"***]
p.m Robb. Steven R. Westman. Contor N.cholos Fenokel.m
793-2700
1901 No. Flagler Dr.. West Palm Beoch 33407 Pnon,8^S
~wb. Howard Shapwo, Cantonal Soloist Susan Weiss *>
ices, Fnooy 8 D m
Rabb
serv
ot St. Catherine's Greek Orthodox Church Social Ho .
Woshmgton Rd at Southern Boulevord. Rabb. Jot l jj|
Cantor Rita Shore. Mailing address 1407 H* l0" '
Worth 33463 Phone 965-777S.
ot Coson-United Methodist Church, corner of lok,J^tll 2*
Swmton Ave.. Delroy. Phone 276-6161. Mailing ooo
N.W. 9th Street. Delroy Beoch 33444. Robbi Sam*'
Ft .day service* 8:15 p. m.


I
lagogue News
Friday, September 16,1983 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 15
at
Continued from Page 12
,he Torahs, waving their information are available
A special procession will Temple isracl> 833-8421.
Umon'wTo aTno" During the Shabbat worship
' \rd in orocession in services on Friday night, Sept.
10 mn nf he hohday n 2 the ffic of the Temple
rall0n of the holiday. w j^ Sisterhood B h
reJS8our Soviet br'oX hood and Youth Group were
in.cl"? U- Bnhh! Shan- installed with the new officers
Rabbi Shap-
ed sisters
uplained.
, part of the ceremony
the
Torah
, win unroll a
letely encircling the con-
lion and enveloping them
e tradition, beauty and
mofTorah.
Howing the service a spe-
neg will be celebrated in
emple pation under the
ah, built by the Temple
group and decorated by
hildren of the religious
... Candied apples will be
ed the children in attend-
Imcluding Sukkot service
[Yiskor will be conducted
Thursday morning, Sept.
10:iu. i ne public is cor-
invited to attend all
tup services for Sukkot
[to accept the good wishes
he congregation and its
hi. Chag Samcach, a
\y holiday!
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Jeiiher Bar-Bat Mitzvah
Iconlirmaiion need be the
lination of one's Jewish
faiion," said Ceceil Tish-
director of education at
Ipli' Israel religious school.
mplc Israel is pleased to
(sor lor adult learning
College for Jewish Edu-
irollmenl in the college is
i lo all adults who want to
|ricikc the joy of learning.
first semester will run
i October through Uecem-
|Second semester will run
Januarv through March.
tr-semester charge will be
[sed: S25 tor temple mem-
j and $35 lor non-temple
pers. The Ice will entitle
feuisiiant lo lake any and
kirsc
sampling of the courses
red is "a page from the
psh; Talmud for Bcgin-
How to be a Mensch; Be-
r and Iniermcdiatc He-
Ihe March of Jewish
f; When Bad Things Hap-
lo Good People; Hate
CPsin America."
fulls completing the inter-
laic Hebrew course may
ii work toward Bar-Bat
pah. Moreover, adults
[never have been confirm-
iiay wish to further their
|ation.
allege faculty will be
Posed of Rabbi Howard
piro ol Temple Israel;
Oi Edward Conn; Rabbi
lUvitan; Rabbi Irving B.
Pi Rabbi Emeritus of
e Israel; Mr. Mordecai
headmaster of the
1 Community Day
Mrs. Ceceil Tishman,
and Temple Israel board of di-
rectors. The worship service
was dedicated to the consecra-
tion of the new officers and
Rabbi Howard Shapiro in-
stalled the new administration
in special ceremonies.
Elected to lead the congre-
gation of Temple Israel as its
president this year, is Barbara
Ackerman, who has been a
member of Temple Israel for
26 years. She and her hus-
band, Jack, were married in
Temple Israel by Rabbi Irving
B. Cohen who is now Rabbi
Emeritus. Barbara is happiest
talking about her wonderful
children, Lori and Scott!
Wallis Sherman will serve as
president of Temple Israel Sis-
terhood; Stephen Goldstein
was installed as Brotherhood
president; serving as Youth
Group president will be Robin
Kandel.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
Temple Emanu-EI, of 190
North County Rd. in Palm
Beach, will be having registra-
tion for Religious School on
Wednesday, Sept. 21, at 4
p.m., with the first day of
classes to be held the following
Sunday, Sept. 25, at 9:30 a.m.
The Religious School offers
a complete program for child-
ren from Kindergarten
through eighth grade. For the
younger children, who will
meet once a week, on Sun-
days, there will be a compre-
hensive program featuring an
introduction to Hebrew and
the Jewish faith, arts and
crafts and stories reflecting
Jewish values and heritage
from the Bible and Jewish lit-
erature throughout the ages.
The children from grades
three through eight, who will
meet twice a week, on
Wednesdays and Sundays,
there will be more emphasis on
the study of Hebrew and
Torah, a positive Jewish
identity and love of heritage,
as well as the study of Jewish
History.
For Junior High School stu-
dents, there will be further
emphasis on a positive Jewish
identity, with studies of Israel
and modern Jewish History,
as well as preparation for Bat
and Bar Mitzvah.
During registration, there
will be a demonstration lesson
featuring new team teaching
concepts, with Hebrew being
taught by Florence Poel,
Jewish History by Muriel
Stern and Tamar Barsky will
offer a model lesson for the
younger children.
We have an exceptionally
ber will be held at the home of
Hy and Elsie Sokol, 426 Lake
Carol Drive in Golden Lakes
Village.
One of the purposes of the
Adult Bar-Bat Mitzvah pro-
gram is to educate participants
to interpret and understand
their Torah portion and to en-
able them to feel comfortable
liturgically in the majority of
Jewish houses of worship
world wide.
Conversion Class will meet
every Thursday evening at 6
p.m. beginning Sept. 22 at the
home of Rita Sommers, 250
Lake Constance Drive in
Golden Lakes Village. Rabbi
Levine instructs the class in the
educational and emotional
aspects of Judaism. The con-
version program includes full
participation in Temple Judea
activities and most important
regular attendance at Sabbath
and Festival Services. May
Goodstein, Temple Judea's
new outreach chairperson will
assist potential Jews by Choice
in integrating into the syna-
gogue and the Jewish commu-
nity. Mrs. Goodstein will meet
with the class and discuss the
problems involved in choosing
Judaism and in observing Ju-
daism. Relationships with
Jewish spouses, Jewish rela-
tives, and gentile members of
the family will be included in
the outreach program. Each
potential Jew by Choice will
be adopted by a family which
has been previously involved
in a conversion program.
Rabbi Levine will utilize recent
books and materials published
by the national outreach
program of the Union of
American Congregations in
enhancing Temple Judea's
conversion class program.
For more information about
Temple Judea, call the Temple
office at 965-7778.
IfL0fJduca,ion of Tcm' caring and dedicated teaching
"ael; Ms. Marilyn David-
Fman, outreach worker,
S" ramjiy and Children's
W Ms. Louise Shure. di-
2. an'-Defatnation
ue. and Mrs. Varda
picls"ae.reW inStrUCtr'
gj will be conducted on
nesday mornings from
ven? anrd on w*dnes-
jvenlngs from 7:00.9:00
Mi ion to the Wednesday
here w,|| be a SundaJ
2 ?3SS wi,h ^eakfast
l"f a monthly luncheon
frL t Plc ,sracl with
ThlV0? Jay's Restau-
'" luncheon will be by
ra'ion only with
a $5
staff, with teachers who are
mature and sensitive, and with
each teacher having at least 25
years of classroom teaching
experience," stated Rabbi Joe
Chazin, spiritual leader of
Temple Emanu-EI, who will
also serve as Educational Di-
rector.
TEMPLE JUDEA
After a High Holy Day re-
cess, Temple Jadea's popular
Adult Bar-Bat Mitzvah class
and Conversion Class will
resume.
Adult Bar-Bat Mitzvah
Class will meet every Monday
evening at 8 p.m. except the
first Monday of the month be-
ginning Sept. 19. Classes
during the month of Septem-
Sukkot Services will be con-
ducted on Wednesday, Sept.
21 and Simhat Torah Services
will be conducted on Wednes-
day, Sept. 28 at Temple Judea
beginning at 8 p.m. at St.
Catherine's Cultural Center,
at the corner of Southern
Blvd. and Flagler Drive. Rabbi
Joel Levine and Cantor Rita
Shore will officiate.
During Sukkot Services,
Rabbi Levine will consecrate
all new religious school stu-
dents. Judge Edward Fine,
principal and Bernard Good-
stein, Religious School chair-
person will assist Rabbi Levine
in the ceremony. Temple
Judea's Sukka will provide an
inspirational setting for the
consecration ceremony.
Temple Judea's religious
school is currently meeting on
Sunday mornings and on
Wednesday evenings begin-
ning Oct. 5 at the Jewish
Community Day School, on
Parker Ave., south of South-
ern Blvd.
Simhat Torah Services will
include the congregation's an-
nual observance for Oppressed
Jewry. Through the coopera-
tion of the South Florida Con-
ference on Soviet Jewry,
members of the congregation
will receive information sheets
about the current deplorable
situation experience by refuse-
niks in the Soviet Union. The
"El Moleh Rachameem" and
the "Kaddish" will be recited
by candlelight provided by
Yizkor Memorial Lamps in
order to honor all Jews who
have perished during times of
persecution. Terry Rapaport,
Social Action chairperson, is
coordinating the congrega-
tion's Soviet Jewry program.
For. more information, call the
office, 965-7778.
Torah Moving
Ceremonies
The congregation of Temple Beth David held a Hachnasat
Hatorah recently to welcome the Torahs to their new
synagogue at 4657 Hood Road in Palm Beach Gardens.
Passersby turned their heads as members of the temple
took turns carrying one of the Torahs from Westminster
Presbyterian Church on Burns Road and Military Trail,
where the congregation has held services for the past five
years, to the intersection of Hood Road and Military Trail.
There they were met by nearly 300 congregants who joined
together to bring the temple's three Torahs to their new
home. Three musicians led the procession which included
dancing and singing and much happiness for the
congregants who now have a "home of their own."
Leaving the church to beging the several mile march are
Jack Kaplan [left to right], past president of Temple Beth
David; Harriet and Sy Fine, founding members of the
congregation; Vivian Ganz, founding member; and Len
Gilman, president. Children of the congregation assist by
carrying the four corners of the chupah raised high over
the Torah.
In a ceremony held prior to the beginning of Selichot
services, the doors of Congregation Beth Kodesh of
Boynton Beach are officially opened as members par-
ticipated in a Torah processional. Their three Torahs, one
of which is a Holocaust Torah, were carried from NE 22nd
Avenue and 1st Court in Boynton Beach to the new temple
at 501 NE 26 Avenue. The congregation has met at the
Congregational Church in Boynton Beach since 1977. The
Torah processional of over 500 jubilant members and
friends stopped at the doors of Congregation Beth Kodesh
to affix a mezzuzah which was made and donated by the
temple's ritual chairman, Max Chnka. Rabbi Avrom L.
Drazin [left] reads a prayer while [left to right] board
member Archie Zacks and past president George
Pasternak carry the Torahs. Sam Dolman [right], board
member, holds the chupah over the Torahs.
Area Deaths
aiNona
Barnard, 78, of SMS W. Croaley Drive.
W**t Palm Batch. Lavttt-Wataatoln
OuaranUe Security Chapal. Waat Palm
Baach.
MR
Judith, 73, of Norwich B-M. Oantury
VUlaga. Wort Palm Baach. Lavttt-
Wahutatn Memorial Chapel. Waat Palm
Baach.
HEIFLER
Louie, 6, of l El Portal, Bparaah Lakes
Point of Port St. Lucia. Levitt-Welneteln
Guaranteed Security Plan Chapal. Waat
Palm Baach.
KLIINMAN
Edward A.. 71. or Norwich rus. Waat
Palm Baach. Levitt-Welneteln
Guaranteed Security Plan Chapal. Waat
LICHTHN
Irving, SS, of Andover fltt, Oantury
VUlaga. Waat Palm Baach. Rlveralda
Memorial Chapal, Waat Palm Baach.
LIPMAN
Bud A., of Palm Baach. Rlvaralde
Guardian Plan Chapal of Waat Palm
Baach.
MMPP
Claire, 4, of SS06 Summer Sky Lane,
Lake Worth. LevlttWelniteln
Ouarantaad Security Plan Chapal. Waat
Palm Baach.
SEIDINBERQ
William, 71, of WaUtngton B-SOt. Waat
Palm Baach. Levitt-Walnateln
Ouarantaad Security Plan Chapal. Waat
Palm Baach.



Page 16 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, September 16,1963

VANTAGE
THE TASTE OF SUCCESS}
_____4k
**
Great Taste
with Ultra LowTar.
That's Success!
Warning: The Surgeon General Has Determined
That Cigarette Smoking Is Dangerous to Your Health.
5 U: Oi n^ nicow p eigwB, Jv FTC mho4


Friday, September 16,1983 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 17
jin's Resignation: He Simply Cannot
Bear the Responsibility Any Longer
By GIL SEDAN
bRUSALEM (JTA) -
nier Menachem Begin an-
ced that his decision to
kn is final because "I
L cannot bear the re-
[sibility any longer." He
rejected intensive efforts
s Likud coalition partners
rsuade him to change his
, But his colleagues did
ince him to postpone sub-
a formal letter of
ation to President
Herzog which would
his resignation legally
ling.
e was no indication as
long it would be before
.'submits the letter, but it
assumed he would do so
ing
bin
as soon as all the coalition
partners agree on his suc-
cessor. Begin apparently wants
to avert a situation in which
the President would ask the
Labor Alignment to try and
form a new government. If all
the coalition partners agree
beforehand on the new can-
didate for Premiership, the
President would have no
choice but to ask that person
to form the new government.
BEGIN'S FINAL decision
Aug. 30 ended two days of in-
tensive consultations and
speculation about the Pre-
mier's intention to resign. The
Premier first announced his
move at the end of a routine
Cabinet session, catching the
ministers and the nation by
surprise.
Until the last minute of the
consultations at the Premier's
office it was not clear whether
Begin would in the end give in
to the pressure to remain in
office. But as the three-hour
consultations ended, Begin
said he was determined to re-
sign.
Begin said he was moved by
the statements and appeals of
the Cabinet ministers and
other key officials of the coali-
tion parties to get him to re-
verse his decision. "I would
like to stress that I do not
blame anybody for my resig-
nation," Begin said.
He then disclosed for the
first time the reason for his
n David
;rael's Comprehensive Rescue Service
|agen David Adorn in Is-
is a public society,
|ded in Tel Aviv on May 7,
MDA's first home was a
bidated hut on the corner
Rothschild and Nahalat
lamin Streets in what was
] the center of town; at the
the Society's resources
listed of a small truck
terted into an ambulance
1 several dozen dedicated
uteers.
IDA was established as a
}li of the murderous riots
1929, when farms and
in settlements, totaling
le 170,000 of the country's
|ish population, were
eked by gangs of Arab
Crisis and found to be
jing in even the most
Jeniary first aid services.
|he years which followed,
Society grew and
|rished, especially in the
of the second wave of
, which broke out in April
and lasted till the begin-
of 1939. During World
,11, Magen David Adom's
jces were granted a certain
pmacy by the British Man-
authorities; photographs
that period show Magen
pd Adorn volunteers in
pi uniforms.
agen David Adorn became
1 medical service of the
anah, and MDA members
w as tirst-aiders alongside
Haganah fighters
"gnnout the 1930's and
[s. With the establishment
F Mate of Israel, some of
pociety's most important
fbers and volunteers were
fig those setting up the
I'ral Corps of the Israel
isc l-orces.
Jje growing needs and
foping population of the
I Mate brought about a
[""growth in MDA. New
fn and stations sprang
fhfoughout the country;
1 ,rst modern ambulances
purchased; and the
L d' first aid- ar|d
aid. instruction services
ICXPanded.
David
fn s ambulance fleet, the
T Public service
"rV. numbers
in
649
the
and
includes standard ambulances,
mobile intensive care units,
mobile field First aid units and
bloodmobiles. O.' this fleet,
295 standard ambulances are
posted in kibbutzim, large
public enterprises, and
isolated border settlements.
MDA's ambulances are
modern and well equipped
with the latest advances in
medical technology. They are
manufactured in the United
States in accordance with
specifications drawn up by
MDA in Israel in light of the
experience accumulated by
MDA in its rescue operations.
MDA operates 46 first aid
stations, most of them
modeern, on a 24-hour-a-day
basis. These are located
tliioughout Israel and effec-
tively close the geographical
gap between distant hospitals;
moreover, they make up for
the fact that Israel's Sick Fund
Clinics do not operate in the
lunchtime hours, at night, or
on weekends.
Magen David Adorn is
Israel's emergency medical,
blood, ambulance, disaster
service and official Red Cross
Society. It is responsible for
collecting, processing and
providing every hospital in the
country with over 85 percent
of their blood needs.
The American Red Magen
David for Israel is the only
support arm of the MDA in
the United States. It was
incorporated in New York
City in 1940 and rapidly
spread across the country. Its
148 chapters today total
30,000 members with 90,000
considered contributing
members.
The local chapter of
ARMD1, Natanya, chaired by
Harry Lerner, celebrated its
second anniversary in June
1983. Over the past two years,
the chapter has grown to a
membership of over 400 and
has received a certificate of
merit for meeting all of its
goals and obligations required
by the national organization.
Netanya chapter has pledged
$10,000 to a new $12 million
underground blood processing
facility being built in Tel Aviv.
Three thousand dollars have
already been sent towards the
project.
Those interested in learning
more about ARMDI are in-
vited to attend the next
meeting which will be held on
October 26, 12:30 p.m., at the
American Savings Bank, West
Gate. Soshana Flexser will
entertain with Israeli and
Yiddish humorous anecdotes
and will play the autoharp.
For more information
contact Harry Lerner at 686-
7907 or the Southeast District
Office, Robert Schwartz,
director, 16499 NE 19 Avenue,
North Miami Beach, FL
33162.
decision: "I simply cannot
bear the responsibility any
longer. If I believed that there
would be a chance to continue,
I would have considered it dif-
ferently. It was not a sudden
decision. I am asking you. to
allow me to present my letter
of resignation to the President
today." He then asked those
present to continue to serve as
a unified coalition after his
resignation.
BUT BEGIN'S desperate
plea was rejected. Yaacov
Meridor, Minister for Econ-
omic Coordination, a long
time friend of Begin, said, "I
turn down your request, Mr.
Prime Minister." Begin re-
sponded, "Okay, I will do it
then without your consent."
He then began to write his let-
ter, mumbling toward
Meridor, "Yaacov, it will not
help you."
As the letter was sent to an
adjacent room to be typed,
Justice Minister Moshe Nissim
was the first to suggest that
Begin postpone formally
resigning. "This is much too
serious a decision," he said.
"Give us time out for several
months."
Aguda Knesset member
Menachem Porush suggested
that perhaps the upcoming
High Holy Days would give
Begin a chance to rethink his
decision. But former Defense
Minister Ariel Sharon, Tehiya
MK Geula Cohen, and Haim
Druckman of the Matzad
(Religious Zionist) Party said
the time was ripe for new elec-
tions.
Finally, Finance Minister
Yoram Aridor proposed a for-
mula that was accepted. He
reminded Begin that even if he
resigns he would still have to
head the caretaker government
until an alternative govern-
ment is formed. Therefore,
Aridor suggested, Begin
should remain in office until a
new coalition is formed which
would allow "a smooth and
comfortable transition."
Begin accepted this sugges-
tion, but he stressed that this
could not be a prolonged
process.
A SUGGESTION to im-
mediately sign a draft agree-
ment by all the coalition part-
ners to continue under the new
Premier the Herut movement
would designate was dropped
when Cohen and Aguda MK
Avraham Shapiro objected. It
was decided therefore, that all
Herut ministers would meet
this evening to name their can-
didate for the Premiership.
Should the Herut Party fail
to agree on a candidate and
should the coalition partners
decline to accept that person if
a candidate is named, the
likelihood is that there would
have to be new elections. "No
government, whether headed
by Begin, another Likud per-
son, or the Alignment, can
continue to govern without
new elections," Cohen said.
Shortly after the session
with the coalition repre-
sentatives ended, Begin left his
office. He made no statement
to reporters and entered his
car and went home. When he
arrived, a crowd of supporters
cheered him. But again. Begin
made no remarks and dis-
appeared inside the house.
Police kept demonstrators in
support and in opposition to
Begin separated and at a safe
distance from the Premier's
residence.
JORDAN MARSH
WISHES YOU A
HAPPY NEW YEAR
FILLED WITH PEACE
AND CONTENTMENT
We hope the coming months will be
filled with many shining moments.
Including the warmth of new friendships
and the joy of old ties with those you
love and surmounting them all,
the happiness of dreams come true.
lordan
Jmarsh
FLORIDA
kuM*o* Miaouom
USE YOUR JORDAN MARSH CHAtOE CAHO. AMEMCAN EXMKtt. MNfRS CUM. WE WELCOME THEM All!
SHOP DAILY, 10 AM TO 9 PM: SUNDAY. 12 NOON TO 5:30 PM


Pgel8 The Jewish Ftondaan of Palm Beech County Friday. September 16, 1983
Behind the Headlines
Collecting Jewish Folktales, Folklore
By CINDY kA YE
JERUSALEM (JTA)
The world's largest coDectioa
of recorded Jewish folklore
came under the care of the
Department of Hebrew and
Comparative Literature at the
University of Haifa on Sept. 1.
Consisting of more than
15,000 recorded Jewish and
Arabic folktales, the Israel
Folklore Archive founded
in 19SS has labored to
collect examples of Jewish
folklore from many countries,
with the emphasis on the
folklore of Sephardk Jewry.
According to Dr. Aliza
Shenhar, head of Haifa
University's Department of
Hebrew and Comparative
Literature, the university "is
the best place for ihe archive.
For academic reasons, 1 fed
that it must be here. We have
been working with it for years
and now that it will be situated
at the university, we can
develop it more effectively. By
being here, it is also a great
benefit for the students, since
they will not have to leave the
university to conduct their
research."
Jewish folklore, under
Shenhar's guidance, has been
the subject of two major
projects over the past 10 years.
In 1979 a compilation of a
year's worth listening and
recording sessions of members
of the community of Beit
Shear, a predominantly Se-
phardic development town 43
miles south of Tiberias.
resulted in the publication of a
book. "Folktales of Beit
Shean." authored by Shenhar
and Haia Bar-Yitzhak.
Determined to build upon
their success, the staff of the
folklore unit of Haifa Univer-
sity next embarked on a three-
year program to record the
folktales of the residents of
Shlomi, a development town
near Israel's northern border.
The difference between the
two projects is in the presenta-
tion of the collected and
compiled material. In "Folk-
tales from Shlomi." also
authored by Shenhar and Bar-
Yitzhak, the folktales are
printed in the speaker's native
language, Moroccan Arabic
with a Hebrew translation.
Shenhar explained that
"only in their native language
could these people really begin
to convey the beauty of the
tales. All the nuances and
details were brought out and
revealed. The tales are so very
beautiful that we wanted to
avoid doing the book only in
Hebrew. In Hebrew the story-
teller is uncomfortable and the
folktales come out too sim-
ple."
When "Folktales from
Shlomi" was published a copy
of it was presented to former
President Yitzhak Navon. He
praised the method of
presentation as a way to
preserve a portion of the
Sephardk Jewish heritage,
especially the heritage of those
Jews who immigrated from
Morocco.
Shenhar is presently
working to record Jewish
versions of the story of
Cinderella. "People are very
aware of the story of Cinder-
ella as was told by the brothers
Grimm and by the Walt Dis-
ney movie." she said. "Every-
one know s of it primarily in its
European setting. However, a
traditional folktale about this
subject has also been a pan of
Jewish folklore. Most versions
appear to have originated in
Morocco, and the story is one
of the most common tales that
mothers tell their daughters."
Although most of her work
has been in the collection of
those folktales which have
been passed from generation
to generation. Shenhar is also
involved in the collection and
recording of modern Israeli
folktales and folklore.
"I am trying to collect
modern folklore in Israel while
it is still in the process of being
created." Shenhar said.
"When one listens to the
modern tales, it is possible to
see how strictly modern activi-
ties are being toW in the tradi-
tional form and style."
Folktales, she explained,
further, "are most of all a
means of communication. The
artistic element is needed, not
just the information ... It all
depends on how the voice is
used, the poetic elements
employed by the storyteller,
and the use of a properly-
created sense of drama."
THE JOSEPH L MORSE GERIATRIC CENTER
'ANNOUNCES
Receiving applications for admission to the 120-oed
long term care skilled nursing facility
THE NEW CENTER FEATURES
JOSEPH L. MORSE GERIATRIC CENTO
of the m
Jewish Home for the Aged of
Palm Beach County, Inc.
VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES
Activities with Residents:
Arts and Crafts, Readers, Menders-Labekrs F*h
(days, evenings and weekends). ^^
Escorts:
To transport residents within the Center and into a,
community (days, evenings and weekends). *
Religious Services:
To assist residents in attending services (Friday if I
ternoon and Saturday morning).
Contact Volunteer Services, 471-5111 ext. 155.

!*-*
'"'
-am
For Iufbnmmtiom Writ* or Call
oac**. L Mart* Geriatric Ceaier
4847 Fred Gladstone Drive
West Pahn Beach, Florida 407
Atttc Social Service I
(3051471-6111
A Facility of the Jewish Home for the Aged. Inc
and
A Beneficiary Agency of The Jewish Federation
J
RELIGIOUS SCHOOL OPEN HOUSE
YOU AND YOUR CHILDREN ARE CORDIALLY INVITED TO ATTEND OUR
REUGIOUS SCHOOL OPEN HOUSE WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER 21, AT 110
P.M. LEARN ABOUT OUR UNIQUE SCHOOL PROM OUR RABBI AND
FACULTY AND OBSER VE OUR TEACHERS OFFER MODEL LESSONS.
'Individual attention in small classes
* Close involvement of parents and Rabbi
* Dedicated professional teachers
* United Synagogue Curriculum
* Full Bar/Bat Mitzvah program
* Wednesday and Sunday classes
* A warm, caring environment
designed to strengthen your
children's Jewish identity
rwH QSJSJSjIhSJMsg
ALANH.CUMMINGS
PRESIDENT
FOR INFORMATION
832-0804
190 N County Road, Palm Beach, FL. 33480
RABBI JOEL CHAZIN
EDUCATIONAL DIRECTOR
Read these statements and you'll
understand why Israel is so
important to the Jews.
1945k*
"The Jews.
General George S. Pmtton referring to
the smrrhars of the Holocaust
to the refugees I
t have bjjjh of thesa
they ess*
New York.1
British Foreign Minister Ben*
Ike Jews at tk
that weds sat
-Report to President Truman
1948
-VVewiipaaishtheJewsiaawsvtkersa
dUskes by striking atttadr P**ett-"
Sir Emm Barker, British Coniautawtru
am the am of Israels ladtaeadeact
Dran from hitherto secret documents placed in the custody of
the author bv David K Niks, a close aide to both Roosevdt
and Truman, and scores of interviews here and in Europe and
Israel, this book is about the 400.000 survivors of the
Holocaust and thar dreams It :s about organizations like
B-Rurha mat rescued the homeless of Eastern and Central
Europe through aa underground network headquartered in
Patesune, it is about a phantom armv created to spirit
thousands of Jews past a Bnnsh Mart determined to block
sanigraooa ko die promised land It reveals fully the rok
of Sues in President Truman's support of Israel And it
shows the indifference of those who stood bv whik
-Displaced Persons" from Hitlers death carnps were
held under guard against their will
Redemption of the I mutinied re-creates the heroic
story of those who survived the Holocaust with a rare
combinaoon of sensitivity historical accuracy, and a
master historian's gift for fine wnung
nwaitteu
Nhrjnil SsKhai
ST. MARTIN -S/MAREK
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Friday, September 16,1983 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 19
lance Joins Writers Guild': His Book
Reveals a Score of Old Carter Rivalries
|, DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
I Mow that Cyrus Vance has
Lhed in with his account of
i tenure as President Car-
's Secretary of State, "Hard
koices," all three of the chief
[hitects of the Carter
^ministration's foreign
llicy Carter, Vance, and
Lgniew Brzezinski, who was
Itional Security Adviser
ye published books.
The Vance book, as did
ler's memoirs, "Keeping
iih," and Brzezinski's
lower and Principles," con-
firms that there were differ-
ences over foreign policy with-
in the Administration, partic-
ularly due to the rivalry
between Vance and Brzez-
inski. But the one area where
there seemed to be coopera-
tion and agreement was the
Middle East.
Even before Carter took
office, he and Vance agreed
that the United States would
have to play an active role in
seeking a Middle East settle-
ment. "Without question, the
bedrock of the Carter Middle
East policy would continue to
be our commitment to Israel's
security," Vance wrote. But
he adds:
"WE AGREED, however,
that the critical importance of
stable, moderate, pro-Western
regimes in the Middle East and
access to Arab oil meant that a
return to a passive U.S. pos-
ture was not realistic. The
United States would have to be
a fair and active mediator be-
tween the parties if there was
to be any chance of a genuine
peace. Playing this role would
necessarily require serious at-
tention on the part of the
mediator to both sides of the
dispute and a sincere effort to
On the Book Shelf
it Muses Flee Hitler:
illural Transfer and
liptation 1930-1945. Edited
Jarrell C. Jackman and
aria M. Borden. Washing-
D.C.: Smithsonian
btitute Press, 1983. 348 Pp.
[95 paper, $17.50 cloth.
n MORTON I. TEICHER
[wish Floridian Book Editor
In 1980, on the 100th anni-
[sary of Albert Einstein's
ih, the Smithsonian Insti-
lion held two meetings in
nor of that occasion. The
etings lasted a total of five
ys, and 29 scholarly papers
re delivered. The subject
i the experience of refugees
|o fled from the Nazis. Not
refugees were considered.
meetings focused on the
lists, scholars, scientists and
ellectuals who managed to
ape.
The questions discussed
|luded the following: "What
this diaspora of savants
Ian to the receiving coun-
ts? How were the fruits of
w intellects affected by
lug planted in new soil?
f* did they succeed or fail in
ablishing new niches for
Imsclves in new
(^graphical and human
kironments? How would the
Irld later profit from the
kue and nurturing of such
km?"
)EALING WITH these
cstions was certainly an
propriate way to pay tribute
lAlbert Einstein, perhaps the
pt lamous refugee of all.
was 54 years old when
Her came to pwer and,
lunaiely, was in the United
lies on a visit at that time.
never returned to Ger-
y. He considered invita-
n* to settle in England,
fee. Belgium, Spain, Israel
M.nc United States before
poing to go to the Institute
Advanced Study at
|ton. His scientific
fievements both before and
" e became a refugee have
"igcd the world.
gi all refugees were so
'"ate as Einstein; the
* Presented at his birth
"imal meetings review
F ^Pf'ences. Nineteen of
Lf P3!* have been
PJfd lor this volume. One
he co-editors, Carla M.
hn Wolks al the Smh-
mm. The other co-editor,
IbLi Jac*nian, has
h hed on the experiences
ifcJmln refugees i ,
'orn.a; he gave a paper on
Object at the meetings
11 aPPears in the book.

The presentations are
arranged into three groups:
Background and Migration;
The Muses in America;
Cultural Adaptation in World
Wide Perspective.
AMONG THE four papers
in the first section, two stand
out. One deals with the said
story of United Slates policy
towards refugees and the other
with a specific instance of how
that policy was circumvented
by an Emergency Rescue
Committee. American immi-
gration restrictions sharply
limited the number of refugees
who were admitted.
There was one loophole
which made it possible to
grant emergency visitors visas
to "persons of exceptional
merit, those of superior intel-
lectual attainment." Using
this provision, the Emergency
Rescue Committee managed
to get "one thousand carefully
screened artists, musicians,
writers, scholars, politicians,
labor leaders and their families
to leave France either legally
or illegally."
The second section, The
Muses in America, has eight
papers and, in many ways, is
the most interesting part of the
book. It opens with a discus-
sion of the refugees in
California, most but not all of
whom, had some association
with the movie industry. Some
had great difficulty in
adapting to what they con-
sidered as "lowbrow,"
compared to their "high
culture." Arnold Schoenberg,
the composer, was a prime
example; he refused to write
music lor films, and he died a
bitter man. Others made their
mark in Hollywood, becoming
rich and famous.
SOCIAL SCIENTISTS,
writers, musicians, architects,
physicists, chemists and
mathematicians are each the
subject of an article in this
second section. It is breath-
taking to recognize the great
names and the great contri-
butions in each of these fields.
Our arts and our sciences have
been profoundly influenced by
the work of refugees. We can
only reflect ruefully on what
might have been had we been
more hospitable.
There are seven papers in
the last section dealing with
what happened to refugees in
other parts of the world. Two
deal with Canada; two with
Latin America and one each
tells about Switzerland, Great
Britain and Shanghai.
One of the two articles on
Canada is written by Irving
Abella and Harold Troper. It
is a condensation of their
book, "None is Too Many,"
and it retells the unhappy story
of Canada's miserable record
in failing to admit refugees
prior to 1948. The authors
conclude: "At a time when the
consciences of all the Western
democracies were tried and
found wanting, Canada was
no exception. We differed
only in that we behaved worse
than most."
THE SWISS and the British
were a little better but not
much. Shanghai, oddly
enough, was the only place
where, for a time at least, free
immigration was permitted.
Some 17,000 refugees came,
and during three of the seven
or eight years that refugees
were in China, the community
flourished. There were
Yiddish plays and a
newspaper, the Shanghai
Jewish Chronicle. All of this
disappeared with Japanese
occupation, and the refugees
themselves disappeared from
Shanghai when the war ended.
One of the Shanghai Jewish
refugees was Michael Blumen-
thal, former Secretary of the
Treasury.
address the Palestinian prob-
lem.
"Because of the intimate
American association with Is-
rael in previous Middle East
peace efforts, for Carter to
adopt an activist, balanced
policy carried a significant
political risk. He could be seen
both at home and in Israel as
tilting toward the Arabs and
pressuring Israel to make dan-
gerous territorial conces-
sions ..."
Vance goes on to say that
"The President and I were
convinced that no lasting solu-
tion in the Middle East would
be possible until, consistent
with Israel's right to live in
peace and security, a just
answer to the Palestinian
question could be found, one
almost certainly leading to a
Palestinian homeland and
some form of self-determina-
tion."
TO THAT END, Vance
makes clear the Administra-
tion sought for a way to bring
the Palestine Liberation Orga-
nization into the Mideast
negotiations, only to be frus-
trated, as has the Reagan Ad-
ministration, by the PLO's re-
fusal to do even the minimum
required of it by the U.S.
The position that Vance
outlined as the Carter Ad-
ministration prepared to take
office was essentially the same
one it followed for the entire
four years. The Carter Ad-
ministration remained wedded
to seeking a comprehensive
settlement, rather than a step-
by-step approach, a position
that the Reagan Adminis-
tration also believes in prin-
ciple. The Carter Adminis-
tration pushed the compre-
hensive approach after Egyp-
tian President Anwar Sadat
went to Jerusalem, when he
realized an agreement could
not be reached through a gen-
eral settlement, and even after
the Camp David agreements.
YET, Vance learned on his
first trip to the Mideast, that
while Egypt and Israel were
not far apart, "the real prob-
lem was disunity among the
Arabs." However, it does not
seem that Vance ever learned
what an Israeli official tried to
point out to reporters in
Washington earlier this year,
that there is no consensus
among the Arabs except
enmity toward Israel. On
everything else they disagree,
and so peace can only be made
with each country separately.
Vance's book confirms that
the major issue which strained
U.S.-Israel relations during
the Carter Administration was
the establishment of Jewish
settlements in Judaea and
Samaria. But Vance does not
reveal in his book any of the
deep anger over the issue that
Brzezinski. in his memoirs, at-
tributes to him.
Vance, who maintains that
"Hard Choices" is not a dip-
lomatic history or a memoir,
does not go into the criticism
of personalities that charac-
terized the Brzezinski book.
He has kind words to say for
Premier Menachem Begin and
for former Ambassador
Simcha Dinitz who was
savaged by Brzezinski.
BUT THE Israeli who
Vance admired most and for
he seems to have a genuine af-
fection was the late Moshe
Dayan, with whom he dealt as
Israeli Foreign Minister. The
Israelis, including Begin, al-
ways liked Vance above all the
Americans with whom they
dealt with in the Carter Ad-
ministration because they con-
sidered him to be a gentleman.
It was this characteristic
that Brzezinski criticized in his
memoirs. Yet one would wish
that Vance was less gentle-
manly in "Hard Choices,"
which was written in the style
of a State Department press
briefing. While there is no
need to go into how U.S. of-
ficials really felt about foreign
leaders, as Brzezinski did,
Vance could have provided
more details about the events
he covered.
He also left some things out,
such as Andrew Young's
resignation as U.S. Ambas-
sador to the United Nations
after deceiving the State De-
partment about his meeting
with a PLO official, and the
1980 U.S. vote for a UN
Security Council resolution
condemning Israel which
Carter subsequently reversed.
Vance was directly involved in
both controversies and it
would have been useful to
have his views on such impor-
tant events.
The dryness of the Vance
book has brought it less atten-
tion than the Brzezinski or
Carter accounts. Yet all these
books should be read, partic-
ularly by those with a special
interest in the Middle East, be-
cause they tell not only how an
official views the events in
which he participated, but
how foreign policy is made.
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Page 20 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/ Friday, September 16,1983
Ancient Town of Timnah, Where Samson Fought Lion,
Reveals its Secrets to Archaeologists
JERUSALEM When
Samson slew the lion and did
battle against the Philistines in
the 12th-l 1th Centuries BCE,
the Philistine town of Timnah
was characterized by brick
walls constructed on stone
foundations.
This was revealed in the
just-concluded sixth season of
excavations at Tel Batash
identified with the Biblical
town of Timnah in the
Sorek Valley west of the Israeli
development town of Beith
Shemesh. The dig is sponsored
by the Southwestern Baptist
Theological Seminary in Fort
W^rth, Tex., in collaboratio
with the Hebrew University ol
Jerusalem.
EXPEDITION director is
Dr. George L. Kelm, of the
Baptist Seminary, while the
archaeological director is Dr.
Amihai Mazar, of the Hebrew
University's Institute of
Archaeology. In the 1983
season, a supervisory and
technical staff representing the
two institutions, together with
about 45 students and lay
volunteers, excavated at the
site for over four weeks.
A key discovery relating to
the time of Samson was a large
fortified structure exposed be-
Israel Will Totally Withdraw
From LebanonDulzin
By MICHAEL SOLOMON
MONTREAL (JTA) -
Leon Dulzin, chairman of the
Jewish Agency and World
Zionist Organization Execu-
tives, said here that "in the not
too distant future Israel will
totally withdraw from Leb-
anon, letting Syria stay
there." In Dulzin's opinion,
this would constitute a basis
for a long-range agreement
between Syria and Israel.
He told the Zionist Orga-
nization of Canada that
"there is no future for Leb-
anon as a slate." He said that
the war in Lebanon "was a
most difficult but also a very
important one for Israel and
that, with the exception of
Syria and Libya all Arab states
are willing to start a dialogue
with Israel."
The Zionist leader stressed
"the honeymoon" relation-
ship Israel enjoys today with
the U.S. following the Reagan
Administration's terrible dis-
appointment with the so-called
moderate Arab states whose
words and promises have
proved unreliable would con-
tinue.
Regarding the solution of
the Palestinian problem,
Dulzin said "there will never
be another new Arab state in
the region." Peace in the re-
gion will be achieved only
through negotiations between
Israel and Jordan, not be-
tween Israel and the Palestin-
ians.
On other matters, Dulzin
forecast a government of
national unity in Israel whose
primary objective will be to
deal with the thorny issues of
the standard of living which
has been hard hit by rampant
inflation, with the intensifica-
tion of immigration from the
diaspora and with Jewish
education around the world. It
was decided by the Zionist
Organization of Canada that a
number of scholarships be
awarded to Canadians study-
ing in Israel.
Two Arrested for Devising and
Circulating Anti-Semitic Game
months ago when copies were
mailed to institutions all over
Germany, including Jewish
communities. Twelve copies
were confiscated by the police.
According to Wilhclm Sat-
tler, Prosecutor for the federal
state of Saarland, the accused
man is from the Homburg
area of Saarland. He quit his
police job and has been
making his living as a "na-
tional author." Saltier would
not release his name because
he has never been registered as
a neo-Nazi activist.
The prosecutor said the
woman, unemployed, drew ihe
game on the man's instruc-
tions.
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) A 35-
vear-old former policeman
and his 29-year-old woman
friend have been charged in
Zweibruecken with devising
and circulating an anti-Semitic
game in which six pawns rep-
resenting six million Jews are
moved by throw of dice to
squares marked with the
names of Nazi death camps.
The names of the accused were
not disclosed.
The charges rest on a West
German law forbidding racist
propaganda and the display of
Nazi symbols. The hand-
drawn game surfaced several
HOWARD A. SCHNEIDER, M.D.
Announces the opening of his office
for the practice of
Internal Medicine and Rheumatology
At
Courtyard Gardens
Suite 104
2560 RCA Blvd.
aic u. Palm Beach Gardens, Fl. T .
Office Hours ,,..n Telephone
ByAppt amm 694-2223
low later city gates. This
complex of large square rooms
was
the 8th-7th Centuries BCE.
During that period Timnah
was situated on the border be-
tween the Kingdom of Judah
and the territory of the Philis-
tines centered at nearby
Ekron.
TWICE, the city was de-
stroyed: once during the Assy-
, dated by fragments of rian invasion under Sennac-
ryPcaUy decorated Philistine herib in 701 BCE and aga.n
prnteryf and possibly may during he Babylonian con- The remains of the7U
have formed part of the gate quests at the end of the 7th tury Clty compri$e ^
posed. They were bull,,,,
s reel which adjoined ?
tifying the city. WaJt
IN THE destructions
very .mportant co c h
objects has been rccove
eluding hundreds of real
pottery vessels, inscrib*
weights, metal objects
urines. '
structure of the Philistine
town.
Originally founded during
the Middle Bronze Age, the
town was at that time fortified
with massive earthen ram-
parts. During the Canaanite
period in the Late Bronze Age,
the city was
a victim of the
Century BCE.
The Sennacherib attack is
reflected in the discovery in
previous seasons of excavation
of a large storeroom complex
containing storage jars stamp-
ed with the characteristic royal
seals of the Judean kingdom
(lemelech "belonging to the
lilt tll> a.i a .n-ii,,. v...-------------___ .
period of turmoil and political King"). Thirteen jars of this
instability that afflicted the type have been restored since
the discovery of this building.
The excavation has also re-
covered similar spectacular
evidence of the Babylonian
conquest. The stone and brick
buildings of the 7th Century
BCE town were totally de-
region. The excavations have
revealed five super-imposed
strata of comprehensive
destruction marked by in-
tensive conflagration.
A LARGE collection of im-
portant finds, dated to the slr0yed by a massive fire. The
15th and 14th Centuries BCE, nouses 0f this period were
have been recovered from the buj|t wjtn the series of stone
destruction debris. The close pj||ars typical of Judean ar-
succession of these disruptions chjtecture. Portions of five
of Timnah's urban life reflect
the inter-city rivalries, political
conflicts, and guerrilla attacks
by marauding bands which
were characteristic of this
period.
During the time of David
and Solomon in the 10th Cen-
tury BCE, Timnah may have
been an Israelite town. Bur-
nished pottery typical of this
period is associated with the
remains of large structures ex-
posed in the excavation. The
city i'ate of that time was
probably constructed with two
large stone-built square towers
which defended a three-meter
wide central gate passage into
the city.
Most imposing of all arc the
remains of the fortified city of
such buildings have been ex-
best examples of
during the period 1
Divided Monarchy ev
cavated in Israel
stitute a highly' ,
contribution to the aid
ologyofthelronAgein|
One unusual offshoott
excavation is the establish
of an archaeological mu
on the campus of the'
western Baptist Theo
Seminary in Fort W(
The museum, which
opened to the public in Mai
1983 is a self-teaching diji
It is the first extensive]
chaeological collection in 1
United States highlight^
single excavation in Israel.
Final excavation report^
presently in progress,
plans call for the continu
of the project in June,!
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IF Medics Used Hypnosis
Treat Battle Fatigue
Friday, September 16,1983 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 21
By HUGH ORGEL
L AVIV -(JTA)- The
|i Defense Force medical
Is successfully used
[0Sis and suggestion to
| battle-fatigued (shell-
Iked) soldiers at front area
Iment centers during the
Vion war, returning them
" recovered to their battle
t within a day or so, with-
[ny after effects.
,e treatment was described
week at the week-long
[national congress of the
H and Luropean societies
ypnosis in psychotherapy
[psychosomatic medicines
ling at the Rambam hos-
lin Haifa. The conference
ling attended by some 250
hologists, psychiatrists,
ficians and dentists, in-
^ng 150 delegates from
lad.
A. Levy and M.
Neumann, of the Tel Aviv
University medical school,
said that on the basis of earlier
experience in the Yom Kippur
War, doctors this time treated
their patients at a military
installation set up close to the
front line, under full war
conditions of uniforms and
discipline.
The doctors said that the
uniforms, military discipline,
timetables and rifle fire made
for a realistic atmosphere and
made it possible to treat sol-
diers and return them to their
units in little more than 24
hours.
Hypnosis also made it pos-
sible to uncover the soldier's
unconscious guilt feelings
about surviving while a com-
rade was killed, helping to
instill in him the feeling that he
did rightly by at least saving
himself, the doctors said.
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Page 22 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, September 16,1963
Shamir b Still Man of the Hour But Begin Still Won't Vacate Stage
JERUSALEM Israel's
Foreign Minister Yitzhak
Shamir may be the Likud
Party's new choice as Prime
Minister to succeed Menachem
Begin. But Begin, as of late
Tuesday, was still delaying
submitting his resignation in
writing to President Chaim
Herzog a formality without
which the resignation does not
become official.
One of the reasons for the
delay, it is explained here, is
that Shamir appears to be
having increasing difficulty in
putting together a new govern-
ment.
The ruling Likud Party of
Prime Minister Begin is at-
tempting to court members of
the opposition Labor Party.
Labor spokesman Yossi Beilin
has already acknowledged that
his party wants to remain
within the ranks of the Likud
coalition.
OTHER PARTNERS, or
potential partners, include the
National Religious Party and
TAMI. It was TAMI that
originally threatened to bolt
Likud, a gesture that was ap-
parently the last straw in
Begin's decision to resign. As
of early this week, TAMI still
appeared to be avoiding talks
with Likud.
The Herut Party nomina-
tion of Shamir came last Fri-
day, when he defeated by a
436-302 vote the bid of Deputy
Prime Minister David Levy in
the party's central committee.
In an acceptance speech that
did not end until 2 a.m.,
Friday, Shamir said that his
acceptance of the post was a
"temporary trust" which he
would willingly return to Be-
gin "whenever he wishes it."
Shamir made it clear from
the start that he intended to
continue the policies of Be-
gin 's government. "This gov-
ernment has to continue its
work, its glorious activity,"
Shamir said. Speaking of
Begin's achievements, he said
that the present Prime Minis-
ter's six-year tenure "fortified
Israel made peace with
our neighbor in the south
(Egypt)
nuclear
(Iraq)
* fta
he
mo
U.S. Protection for Jew In The Holy Land Under
Ottoman Rule Reported At Scholars Colloquium
By HELEN SILVER
WASHINGTON (JTA)
The United States provided
protection for Jews arriving in
the Holy Land during the Ot-
toman rule in the late 19th and
early 20th century, according
to papers based on long for-
gotten American Embassy
records which were reported to
scholars at the three-day Sec-
ond International Scholars
Colloquium on America-Holy
Land studies which ended
here.
More than 100 scholars
from Canada, Israel, Britain,
the United States and Turkey,
took part in the colloquium,
sponsored by the American
Jewish Historical Society, the
National Archives and
Records Service, where most
sessions were held, and the In-
stitute of Contemporary Jewry
of the Hebrew University.
Officials said the centuries
old relationship between
America and the Holy Land,
prior to 1948, when Israel was
proclaimed, has been the
subject of a new field of study
in recent years. The first collo-
quium was held in 197S.
During the meeting, the
scholars exchanged informa-
tion on their latest findings
contained in hundreds of
pamphlets and books written
by archaeologists, historians,
scientists, Biblical scholars,
American consuls, novelists,
missionaries, tourists and set-
tlers and builders of the Holy
Land.
British scholars reported
that British libraries have also
been found to house a rich
source of material about
America and the Holy Land,
as well as about late 19th
century attitudes toward the
Jewish return to Palestine in
Status of Village Leagues In Doubt
Following Doudin's Resignation
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
The resignation of Mustapha
Doudin as the head of the gov-
ernment-backed Village
Leagues on the West Bank,
leaves the future status of the
Leagues surrounded in un-
certainty.
Doudin, of Hebron, was the
strong man of the Leagues
which was the only Arab org-
anization in the occupied terri-
tories to openly call for a dia-
logue between Israelis and
Palestinians, and for Palesti-
nian resignation of Israel's
right to exist.
But with the appointment of
Moshe Arens as Defense
Minister there was a decline in
the prestige and influence of
the League among local
authorities. Whereas Village
Leagues leaders demanded
that they be recognized as a
political party the present Is-
raeli defense administration
sought to have them limit
themselves to municipal ser-
vices to the villages.
This had led to a recent
dispute between Doudin and
the civil administration in the
territories which wants greater
control over the manner in
which the Leagues spend
funds allocated to it from the
government. The Leagues
were established by former
Defense Minister Ariel Sharon
to act as a counter to Palestine
Liberation influence in the
territories.
Doudin recently ran into
conflict with the younger
members of the Village
Leagues over an article in a
Leagues publication which at-
tacked Israel and Jordan and
was said to have reflected
Doudin's personal views of the
present situation.
The attack on Israel and
Jordan was explained as part
of Doudin's long-running-
feud with Jordanian Premier
Mudar Badran thai goes back
to when Doudin was a Jor-
danian Cabinet minister. Anti-
Doudin elements within the
Leagues argue that such at-
tacks could jeopardize their
political and economic in-
terests. Several key West Bank
Arab political figures express-
ed satisfaction with Doudin's
resignation. They said this was
a natural result of the new De-
fense Ministry policy to shift
emphasis back from the
Leagues to the towns and pro-
Jordanian elements.
both Britain and the United
States.
Israeli scholars delivered
papers about the numerous
documentary sources found in
Israel, including items from
the 19th century Eretz Yisrael
Hebrew press.
Dr. Moshe Davis, director
of the Hebrew University In-
stitute, told a press conference
at the Israel Embassy here
that, since colonial days,
Americans have been
"fascinated" by the life,
culture and history of the Holy
Land. He said the "wealth of
material" being unearthed on
this topic is "a vast untapped
mine."
Davis said that "in Ameri-
can thought and action, Holy
Land ideas have been a perva-
sive force since the earliest
days of the American settle-
ment." He said the Holy Land
imagery was "strongly ex-
pressed in literature hymns,
spirituals, public oratory and
common parlance."
Davis told the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency that one of the
goals of the exploration by the
scholars of the current fin-
dings and research was the
hope of establishing university
teaching programs in this dis-
cipline.
Another session dealt with
the America-Holy Land theme
as expressed among different
religious and cultural elements
in the American society
American Jews, Blacks, Evan-
gelical Protestants and
Catholics.
[ras,ructu;e1ofUidh;,;dm^
Jsrael (the PalesSS
Organization)
strengthened Wui,
mentinthelandofif^
The 68-year-old ShaBi,j
born Yitzhak YnSl
uz noy, Poland *
English and French?/
educated at a JewJ "
and as a youth
Betar, the Zionist
founded in Ra
Vladimir Ze'evJaboll
SHAMIR EMIGRAT
Palestine in 1935 at,
where he adopted the |
"!me,^amir- *h'cli
thistle" or "flint." \
later head of the Lehi c
zation, known as tM
Gang during the days |
British mandate.
Twice arrested by the Bti
he escaped twice, the i
time from a detention c
British-held Eritrea on t.
Sea in East Africa, by I
inside an empty water i
which took him to the 1
colony of Djibouti.
When Israel achievedi
pendence in 1948, he rtti
and went into private bin
In 1955, he was
Mossad as a secret agent jj
for 10 years he operated
of Paris. He is reportei]
have served Mossad as 4
director general until 15
In 1970, Shamir
Herut and was elected ioj
Knesset three years later.]
became Speaker i
after the Begin Likud c
victory in 1977.
HE WAS named tos
the late Moshe DayanuH
eign Minister in March,
In that capacity, he vig
opposed the Camp
accords, declaring that I
had not driven a hard <
bargain with Egypt.
Shamir's immediate
culty in becoming PrimeII
ister stems from the f
Herut holds only 24
the Knesset. But its Likudlj
controls 46 votes. Whiko
tion partners have in pri
since the Friday
agreed to support S
nominee, individual!
are threatening to t
RCMP Asks Nazi-Hunters
to Provide Material
For Probe of Keegstra
MONTREAL (JTA)
Joseph Riwash, a Nazi-hunter
and authority on the Holo-
caust, has been asked by the
Royal Canadian Mounted Po-
lice to provide material for an
investigation of Jim Keegstra,
a former Alberta high school
teacher suspended last spring
for insisting in the classroom
that the Holocaust never
occurred.
Riwash, a Montreal resi-
dent, is the author of "Resist-
ance and Revenge" which i<
compulsory reading for
students of the Holocaust at
McGill University and the
University of Montreal. He
served as an investigator with
the legal department of the
U.S. army in Germany from
1945-1939. His files were used
in the prosecution of Adolf
.....-....................
Eichmann in Jerusalem.
Keegstra, 48, taught junior
and senior high school
students in Eckville, a small
village in northern Alberta of
which he also served as
Mayor. He is an official of the
Social Credit Party which once
espoused anti-Semitic views
but has long since renounced
them. He preached to his
classes that the Jews are the
root of all evil and contended
that Jesus was not a Jew.
Keegstra was suspended by
the Alberta school authorities
after Eckville parents com-
plained he was indoctrinating
their children with anti-
Semitic propaganda. Eckville,
with a population of 900, has
no Jewish residents. Efforts to
remove Keegstra as Mayor
failed.
.v.v.v.v.v .w.v............
TOjwyn lari^p row roi
May the new year bring your way
New unexpected things each day
New joys, new dreams, new plans to make
New worthwf*eU*iga to undertake
And may rt bring you peace of mind
Success-me real and lasting kind
The grft of health, the joyo* friends
And happiness that never ends
-ReuMn and Donna Lou Aakew

.......


Friday, September 16,1963/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 23
the Strategic Town of Bhamdoun
JNF Announces New
Is Taken By Druze Soldiers
Lhughorgel
I AVIV -(JTA)- The
c town of Bhamdoun
Shouf mountains of
Lebanon fell to Druze
supported by Synan-
i Palestinian and
leftist forces.
,un commands the
[Damascus highway and
was a serious setback
central government in
The Lebanese army
\i to be holding its own
| Beirut.
fall of Bhamdoun came
1 heels of the withdrawal
faeli forces from the
mountains to new de-
fines on the Awali River
ft Lebanon. There were
k of mass slaughter of 40
[residents of Bhamdoun
by the Phalangists. There were I
also reports that about 600
Phalangist militiamen had
been killed or wounded in the
battles for Bhamdoun.
Meanwhile, two more U.S.
marines were killed and two
were wounded when mortar
shells fell on their position at
the Beirut airport. The latest
casualties brought to four the
number of marines killed
while serving in the multi-
national peace-keeping force
in and around Beirut.
But Defense Secretary
Caspar Weingerger indicated
in Washington that the
marines would remain in Le-
banon despite the casualties
and mounting demands in
Congress to bring them home.
"I would say that the mis-
sion we went there for has not
been completed," Weinberger
told reporters before leaving
on a trip to Central America.
Undersecretary of State
Lawrence Eagleburger said it
was important that the mar-
ines remain in the multi-
national force which includes
Italian and French units and a
small British contingent. "The
marines can take care of them-
selves," he added.
In the shadow of the mili-
tary defeat at Bhamdoun, Pre-
sident Amin Gemayel held
urgent talks with U.S. special
envoy Robert McFarlane.
Sources said McFarlane
delivered a message to
Gemayel stating the U.S. po-
sition. The contents were not
disclosed.
Locations For Tree
Donation Envelopes
Sandinistas Vow They'll Return
Synagogue To Nicaragua's Jews
YORK (JTA)
Inti-Defamation League
lai B'rith has said it wel-
] the Nicaraguan govern-
assurance that the
fs only synagogue will
back to its congre-
pledge for the
fs return and
\nces relating
Iguan Jews were
syna-
other
to
made
Intonio Jarquin, the
guan Ambassador to
iited States, at a meeting
; ADL leaders in Wash-
The diplomat
dedged during the
that a mistake had
nade when authorities
[the synagogue following
luly, 1979, Sandinist
lion.
IN RESPONSE to Jarquin's
remarks, Kenneth Bialkin,
ADL's national chairman,
stated that the "record of the
government of Nicaragua will
be determined by actions, not
assertions Nicaragua
should do what is right, just
and fair, acting on the basis of
facts."
The meeting was held to
discuss charges made by ADL
last May that the Nicaraguan
Jewish community had fled
because of Sandinist anti-
Semitism and the confiscation
of Jewish-owned property, in-
cluding the synagogue. The
ADL had first raised the issues
in a private meeting with Nica-
ragua's Foreign Minister,
Miguel d'Escoto, in October,
1981.
IF Guard Wound
Ansar Prison
i i
Camp
AVIV (JTA) An
[Defense Force guard at
Misar prison camp in
I Lebanon war wounded
a riot among the Arab
cr-detainees. Four of
nates were wounded by
/ired by the guards to
|ne disturbance.
army spokesman said
in inmate was caught
'rying to escape, and
inmates stoned the
h hitting one of them in
lead. The guards were
fd to fire warning shots.
nation of the camp
"res, with tents and huts
Put on tarmac and
II bases to prevent the
of escape tunnels, is
130 Jews
iveUSSR
YORK (JTA) -
JJjnal Conference on
wry reported that 130
i.M.Pe-"n'Ued t0 ,eaVC
^Vn'on/n August. 37
,n July. Since the
nearly completed, army
sources said. During the relo-
cation process, numerous tun-
nels were found, some of them
near completion to areas out-
side the camp perimeter.
In other developments, a
French soldier serving with the
multinational peacekeeping
force in Beirut was killed and
two other French soldiers were
wounded this morning when a
French army truck was hit by
gunfire in an ambush. Yester-
day, two American marines
were killed and eight woun-
ded, and an Italian soldier was
wounded during heavy
shelling in the Beirut area by
warring Shiite Moslems and
Christian Phalangists.
According to Abraham
Foxman, ADL's associate na-
tional director and head of its
International Affairs Division,
Jarquin's statements were the
first substantive responses to
ADL's complaints. Foxman
said that positive elements in
the Ambassador's remarks
included the following:
HE DENOUNCED anti-
Semitism as "morally rep-
rehensible" and declared it is
contrary to Nicaraguan law;
pledged to clarify the status of
Jews in exile by informing
ADL of any charges pending
against them and said those
who have no charges against
them would be welcomed back
to Nicaragua; and suggested
that those who have no
charges against them should
petition the Ministry of Justice
for the return of their con-
fiscated property, as has been
successfully done by some
other Nicaraguans.
At the meeting, Bialkin
urged that the government of (
Nicaragua takes specific steps
to insure the security of Jews
wishing to rejoin the few
members of the Jewish com-
munity who remained in the
country despite intimidation.
Jarquin was also told that
some Nicaraguan Jews plan to
file complaints with the Inter-
American Commission for
Human Rights charging that
their property was confiscated
without trial on the basis of
false allegations.
The ADL group requested
that Nicaragua allow the Inter-
American Court of Human
Rights, an international tri-
bunal, to be the final arbiter
over any human rights viola-
tions found by the Commis-
sion. This procedure, it was
pointed out, is consistent with
the American Convention on
Human Rights to which Nic-
aragua is a signatory.
The greater Fort Lauderdale
Council of the Jewish Nation-
al Fund has announced that
envelopes for its Israel Affore-
station Program are available
at five new locations in
Broward and Palm Beach
Counties.
Envelopes are used to
contribute to the Fund for
planting trees in Israel to com-
memorate a birth, wedding,
bar or bat mitzvah, anniver-
sary or other occasion.
In addition to the JNF re-
gional office at 800 W. Oak-
land Park Blvd., Suite 201 in
Fort Lauderdale, the en-
velopes are now available at
Menorah Chapels facilities in
Sunrise, Margate, Deerfield
Beach, and West Palm Beach,
for added convenience of area
residents.
Menorah Chapels has long
been active in the Fund's tree-
planting efforts through the
Jewish Funeral Directors of
America Forest at Lahav in
the Negev Desert.
A special project of the
Greater Fort Lauderdale
Council of the JNF will
enhance the acacia forest al-
ready being created near
Lahav. Many Broward and
Palm Beach residents are al-
ready working to complete a
SI million recreation area to
improve the quality of life for
new settlers.
Information on the re-
creation project is available at
the JNF office. Envelopes for
tree planting are at the follow-
ing Menorah Chapels lo-
cations: 6800 W. Oakland
Park Blvd., Sunrise; 5915
Park Drive, Margate; 2305 W.
Hillsboro Blvd., Deerfield
Beach; and at the Menorah
Memorial Center, 5154 Okee-
chobee Blvd., West Palm
Beach and Menorah Gardens
Cemetery and Chapel, 9321
Memorial Park Rd., W. Palm
Beach.
Trees donated may be
credited toward JNF goals of
the donor's favorite charity,
such as temple Sisterhood or
B'nai B'rith.
I R. WUNRAUB & Co., Inc.
Insurance Agents
& Consultants
Insurance Exchange of the America's
245 Southeast First Street, Suite 310
Miami, Florida 33131 (306) 381-9877
NJ. (201)888490r>N.Y. <212)56070
Telex 642184
May You and Your Families Enjoy a
New Year with Peace, Health and Happiness.
Camp Mountain Lake
Hendersonville, North Carolina
P.O. Box 4450
Miami Beach, Fla. 33141
ALVIN ANO NANETTE SAVAQE
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Jaimy H. Bensimon M.D., P.A.
Medical Director of the
Joseph L. Morse Geriatric Center,
is pleased to announce the opening
of his office for the practice of:
CARDIOLOGY AND INTERNAL MEDICINE
Mora* Geriatric Center
4847 Fred Gladstone Drive
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Tel 306-471-6111
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Page 24 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, September 16,1983 j
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