The Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian the voice of the Jewish community of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Running title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Physical Description:
4 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 8, no. 41 (Dec. 24, 1982)-v. 11, no. 26 (Aug. 30, 1985).
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44606415
lccn - sn 00229548
ocm44606415
System ID:
AA00014310:00029

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
VOICE OF
JEWISH
tMUNITY OF
LM BLACH
^NTY
"Jewish floridian
VOLUME 9-NUMBER 26
PALM BEACH, FLORIDA
FRIDAY. AUGUST 19.1983
PRir.FM CENTS
Ihultz: Settlers Have
'Right' to Remain
[DAVID FRIEDMAN
/ASHINGTON (JTA)
Ktary of State George
|li/ reiterated United States
asition to new Israeli
menu being built on the
|l Bank, but stressed that
who live there now have
"right" to remain in
lea and Samaria.
II think that the principle
Jews have the right to live
It he West Bank to the
ills is an important princi-
Ind I agree," he said in an
larance on NBC-TV's
let the Press."
kltz's comment was made
response to a question
t the State Department
lent ihat it would be
tactical" to dismantle
Htlcments now there. The
icnt followed the U.S.
veto of an Arab-sponsored
resolution in the United
Nations Security Council
calling for the international
community not to provide Is-
rael any assistance that could
be used for the settlements.
IN EXPLAINING the veto,
the U.S. Ambassador, Charles
Lichenstein, said it would be
neither "practical or even
appropriate to call for the
dismantling of the existing
settlements" as the resolution
urged.
Shultz said that the U.S.
position was "perfectly
consistent" with what Presi-
dent Reagan said in his Sept. 1
peace initiative. "Insofar as
the settlements on the West
Bank are concerned, one could
foresee them staying right
where they arc, but the resi-
dents of those settlements
would live under the legal
jurisdiction of whatever legal
jurisdiction resulted from the
negotiations," the Secretary
said.
"That is distinct from what
happened in the Sinai," Shultz
added. In the Sinai all Jewish
settlements were dismantled as
part of the Eygptian-Israeli
peace agreement after Egypt
adamantly refused to allow
any of the settlements to
remain in the area it would
control.
BUT AS FOR new settle-
ments, Shultz stressed the U.S.
has "stressed consistently"
that "the new settlements on
the West Bank are not con-
structive, they don't help us at
all in our search for peace in
that region."
|eavy Security
Conference On Palestine
Set For August 29-Sept. 7
ByTAMARLEVY
iNEVA (JTA) Se-
preparations for the
rrence on Palestine,
filled here from Aug. 29
ept. 7, has moved into
Igear. It was officially an-
ked that 1,720 Swiss sol-
land 1,000 policemen will
the United Nations
flex where the conference
ike place.
Officially, the army and po-
lice are not allowed into the
complex itself because it is
extra-territorial. However, the
gardens around the complex
are the property of the city,
and thus the army and police
can be stationed there.
Meanwhile, the Swiss daily,
Le Courier, reported that a
Neturei Karta delegation from
Jerusalem will participate as
Wallenbergs Birthday
larked At UN Ceremony
*y YITZHAK RAB1
|W YORK (JTA) -
' than 100 people, among
i Naphtali Lavie, Israel's
J General in New York,
"ans Andersen, Acting
J General of Sweden in
|ork, gathered here last
Po mark the 71st birthday
Taoul Wallenberg, the
Mh diplomat who saved
estimated 100,000
nan Jews during World
II and then disappeared
l^oviet Union after being
*a by Russian troops in
[>est in 1945.
The birthday observance
took place opposite the United
Nations building. It was spon-
sored by the Raoul Wallenberg
Committee of the United
States and the Anti-Defama-
tion League of B'nai B'rith.
The observance began with a
wreath-laying ceremony at the
Holocaust Memorial Wall on
Dag Hammarskjold Plaza, in
memory of the many victims
of the Nazis whom Wallenberg
was unable to save, and then
proceeded to the Isaiah Wall
across the street from the UN
headquarters.
observers at the conference.
The sect's spokesman. Rabbi
Vloshe Hirsh, said the delega-
tion would represent "the
Jews from Palestine."
He was also quoted as say-
ing that the delegation would
condemn the "Zionist State."
It is understood that the secre-
tariat of the conference in-
tends to invite other Israelis,
such as lawyer Felicia Langer,
who are publicly active on be-
half of the Palestinians.
It was also announced that
Palestine Liberation Organi-
zation chief Yasir Arafat will
be attending the conference.
According to a UN source,
heads of states will not be par-
ticipating.
Synagogue Ripped
By Explosion
JOHANNESBURG
(JTA) A powerful ex-
plosion ripped through the
Temple Israel synagogue here.
No one was in it when the
explosion occurred, just hours
before President Marais
Viljoen was scheduled to
attend ceremonies to mark the
50th anniversary of Reform
Judaism in South Africa.
Twelve Days Remain For
1983 Federation Campaign
All members of the Jewish community are
encouraged to make a contribution to the
Jewish Federation campaign before the end of
this month.
"The 1983 campaign will be the most suc-
cessful in the history of our community because
more people than ever before are accepting
responsibility for giving," said Campaign
Chairman, Myron J. Nickman. "We hope that
at least 500 more people will respond to this
final call for a contribution," he noted.
The monies raised in Palm Beach County
support the United Jewish Appeal which
provides funds used for the social welfare needs
of Israel and remnant Jewish communities in
Europe. Locally the campaign supports the
Jewish Community Day School, the Morse
Geriatric Center of the Jewish Home of the
Aged, a Chaplaincy service, a Community
Relations Council and many more varied local
services to the Jewish community.
Contributions can be mailed to the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach County prior to the
end of the month.
Lebanon Casualties
Continue to Climb
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA)
Lebanon was wracked by
violence last weekend in which
S3 people were killed and 118
were wounded. The worst
incident was in the ancient
town of Baalbek in east Leba-
non, where at least 35 people
were killed and 65 were
wounded when a car packed
with explosives went off in the
town's central market. Local
sources said the toll might be
higher as police continued to
search the ruins of nearby
houses.
In Tripoli, a car bomb
exploded outside a mosque,
killing 19 people and
wounding 43. In Beirut, a
young girl was killed and nine
were wounded when a bomb
exploded outside an apartment
complex in the Christian area
of the city.
AN ISRAELI soldier was
wounded in an ambush as he
and another soldier were
standing by the roadside near
the Zaharani River some eight
miles south of the Awali River
where the Israel Defense Force
is being redeployed. Two
bazooka shells were also fired
at an Israel army position near
Shouafat south of Beirut.
There were no casualties, an
army spokesman said.
An Israeli soldier who was
wounded two months ago
when he was shot in an am-
bush near Bahamdoun died of
his injuries. His death brought
the number of Israeli soldiers
killed since the war in Leba-
non was launched in June,
1982, to 506, the army spokes-
man said.
Back to School Special Supplement In This Issue


Page2-A The Jewish Flondian of Palm Beach County Friday. August 19,1983
Mollie Fitterman To Chair
Women's Division Mini-Mission
Julie Cumraings. Vice
President of Education for the
Women's Division of the Jew-
ish Federation of Palm Beach
Counts, has announced the
appointment of Mollie Fitter-
man as Chairman of the
Women's Division Mini-Mis-
sion. The event, which will be
held* on Monday, September
19. at 8:45 a.m.. will acquaint
tie Presidents of Jewish
womens' organizations in this
community with the Jewish
Federation and its beneficiary
agencies. A bus tour will
include visits to the Jewish
Community Center, the Jew-
ish Family and Children's Ser-
vice, the Jewish Community
Day School, the Jewish
Federation offices and the
Morse Geriatric Center.
Mollie Fitterman, a native
of Dayton, Ohio, graduated
from Ohio's Miami University
with a B.S. in education. She
taught school in Ohio and,
also, was an executive assis-
tant for several secular and
Jewish social work organiza-
tions. In addition to helping
organize the Women's Divi-
sion in Day ton. she was a
member of the Board of
Directors of many Jewish
organizations there.
Fitterman continued her
involvement with Jewish
causes after moving to the
Palm Beaches. She co-chaired
the Women's Division Forum
Senes in 1981 and 1982. co-
chaired the Leadership Skills
Institute in April and currently
is on the Board of Women's
Division. She is a life member
of Hadassah and a board
member of the Nationa.
Council of Jewish V\ omen of
which she served as Mem-
bership \ ice President iav.
year. Fitterman has been to
Israel three times on Lnited
Jewish Appeal missions.
Sheryl Davidoff and
Marjorie Berg. Co-chairman
of the 1983 Women's Divi-
sion's Jewish W omen's
Assembly, stated that the
Mini-Mission will be in lieu of
the Presidents' Coffee that has
been held in prior years to
acquaint the Presidents iwth
the community-wide women's
educational day.
Mollie Fittenaaa
In announcing the appoint-
ment of Mollie Fitterman to
chair the Mini-Mission event,
Julie Cummings said. "Mollie
did a superb job of co-chairing
the Leadership Skills Institute
for Women's Division in April
and I am delighted that she has
accepted the responsibility of
organizing our first Mini-
Mission for presidents of Jew-
ish women's organizations.
With her leadership, I am
confident that this event will
be most rewarding for the
participants."
For more information,
contact Barbara Perry, assist-
ant director of Women's Divi-
sion, at the Federation office.
Oae hundred aeaben of the tailed Jewish Ammiv
Women's Leadership Cabiaet from across the LaitdsL
ia Ossiaiag. New York. Jaae to 12 at the Cahau'i j
National Retreat to prepare for the 1984 LJA/cmI
campaigns. Pictured above represeatisg Regie* Rgl
coafereace were {left to right] Jady Adler of Mini
Friedman of Puerto Rico sad Jalie Caamists tf PiL.tl
Coanty.
JNF Official Predicts
Israel As Mideast's Granary' in Year 2000
NEW YORK (JTA) A
vision of Israel in the year
2000 as the granary of the
Middle East, thanks to the
revolutionary use of desen
conditions and extensive land
reclamation for agriculture,
was projected here by Dr.
Samuel Cohen, executive vice
president of the Jewish Na-
tional Fund of America.
In a report issued to more
than 100 JNF national and
regional executives attending
an annual fundraising con-
terence here. Cohen stated
that by 2000. Israel will be sjcfl
on us way to becoming an
"economically independent
oasis ot peace."
Citing the extensile land-
reclamation achievements of
the JNF. which will be 99
years old in the year 200C.
Cohen based himself or.
current statistics and trends.
He predicted that by 2000 over
235 million trees throughout
Israel will have been planted,
adding to tne cover of green
and network of forests now
dotting the country. JNF's
afforestation program has
until now been responsible for
THE JOSEPH L. MORSE GERIATRIC CENTER
'ANNOUNCES
Receiving applications for admission to the 120-oed
long term care skilled nursing facility
THE NEW CENTER FEATURES
ajaaaja
For Information Writ* or Call
The Joseph L. Morse Geriatric Ceatn
4847 Fred Gladstone Drive
West Palm Beach. Florida 33407
Attn: Social Service Department
(3051471-6111
A Facility of the Jewish Home for the Aged. Inc
and
A Beneficiary Agency of The Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County, Inc.
the planting of 160 million
trees. Planting continues
apace at the rate of almost five
million trees a year, Cohen
said.
He pointed out that the JNF
land reclamation programs.
which prepare desert and
rock) terrain for agricultural
ana settlement use, as well as
conserve woodlands and
wilderness areas, have as of
this >ear reclaimed 40.000
acres. Cohen projected that an
additional 100.000 acres *il,
be reclaimed in the next I"
yea;-
Stating that JNF is now
involved in Israel in more
projects and programs than at
an> other time in its eight-
decade nistory. Cohen said
tnai in addition to afforesta-
tion and land reclamation.
JNF continues to clear the way
tor access roads linking settle-
ments in Galilee, the Negev.
and Arava. As of 1983. he
said, more than 6.000 kilo-
meters of roads have been
paved by JNF engineers. An
additional 2.000 kilometers of
road* will be completed bv
200l.
"A key aspect of JNF
work." Cohen told the JNF
fundraisers, representing 40
regional offices of the nation-
wide organization, "is settle-
ment site preparation. This
includes leveling and grading
soil and creating the*, infras-
tructure for construction. As
of 1983. JNF has prepared the
land for almost 1.000 com-
munities and population
centers throughout Israel. The
accelerated pace in the next 17
years will achieve an addi-
tional 1.600 sues prepared for
new communities."
In recent years, Cohen
noted. JNF has. in co-
operauon with other govern-
ment agencies. been
responsible for developing
new recreation'and camping
areas. In the next decade and a
half, some 60 new parks and
200 camping grounds will be
developed by JNF. many of
them adjacent to existing JNF
forests.
"Perhaps no area." Cohen
concluded, "holds greater
promise for Israel's future
development and growth than
the vast Negev desen."
There, he continued. "JNF
is involved in agricultural and
environmental research
projects that utilize desert
characteristics, such as
abundant sunlight and geo-
thermal water, and economic
irrigation methods to improve
agricultural yield and the
quality of life in this region of
severe climactic conditions."
The JNF. Cohen said, is
working with other scientists
in following up advancement-
made in solar energy,
preparing ponds for growing
sea food, perfectint
houses and using saline i
for plants and crops oil
abroad.
"JNF has created thll
for a Negev that is I
the winter vegetable I
Lurope." Cohen do
"JNr's involvement ii
these promising ad
should help Israel beco
granary of the Mideasti
viable, economically in
dent oasis oi peace by tkf
2000."
f\ Radio/TV Highlights
si
MOSAIC Sunday. August 21. 8 a.m. WP
Cnannel 5 with host Phyllis Shever Girard Jadj
(joldman. Senior Vice President of Xerox Corp.A*
28 Rabbi Harold kushner, author of "When
Things Happen to Good People."
L'CHAYIM Sunday. Aueust 21 & 28. 10:30a.m.
VYPBR 1340-AM with hos't Rabbi Mark S. Golub-
The Jewish Listener's Digest, a radio magazine.
JEWISH MUSIC AND CULTURE HOUR Sub
August 21 & 28. 10 p.m. WHRS-FM Stereo9l -
host Dr. Simon Silverman.
SHALOM Sunday. August 21 4 28. 10a.m.-WP
Channel 12 (8:30 a.m. ON TV Channel 51) withT
Richard Pentz.
CLOSE HARMONY Friday. September 2 WP
Channel 2 A group of Jewish senior citizens and agnj
of young students from the Brooklyn Friends School)
together in concert. This program focuses on music if
Arlene Symons and her work with the two chorutfj
separate and joint rehearsals and finally, in
Winner of the 1982 Academy-award for tb<
documentary short subject.
Sponsored by the Jewish Federation of Palm
Cornniy.
FomfnatsTn
FMMBXXCMT
'"SaV27
two or nm ________mfB*#L^
MLM*"


Friday, August 19,1983 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 3-A
ie Fate of Jewish Culture
In The Soviet Union
August 12, 1952, 24
L Yiddish writers, actors
Bellectuals were executed
Soviet Government.
as the ultimate in
quest to eradicate
I culture and Jewish life
I Soviet Union. Soviet
[has never veered from
al.
|jsh and Jewish Culture
rlhe Revolution of 1917
Ltly after the 1917
Bration of Rights of the
of Russia," signed by
numerous cultural in-
bns flourished, i.e.: 11
Yiddish newspapers,
M weeklies and other
lls, Yiddish theaters in
|s cities, publishing
with dozens of titles
Uly in editions reaching
jis. Although Jewish cul-
ctivities were carried out
j within prescribed party
[there was hardly a reas-
V-si/ed Jewish popula-
lithout a cultural estab-
Lnt using Yiddish, the
Ige of the "Jewish
ity." In the ensuing
land 30's, Jewish culture
j limped along as govern-
Iassistance was pinched
I stages. Soviet Dolicy
Led ambivalent for
[years. While proclaim-
ed a country of multina-
cultures, it promoted
llation, with Jewish
. the special target of
(l efforts to eliminate
discourage Jewish
h
1940's and 1950*8
'Black Years
iFor Soviet Jewry"
)he late 1940's, Stalin
to systematically dis-
Jewish culture. By
Inly one school of higher
pg remained the Jew-
achers' Institute of Kiev,
was closed later that
1949, all theaters were
to become "self-sup-
Ig," with only
fnty-group theaters"
for support. The Yid-
|ate Theater in Moscow,
K'ing considered a
fty-group theater, had
Ibsidies withheld and,
thus, the glorious tradition of
the Jewish theater in Russia
came to an end.
The campaign to crush
Jewish life and culture became
more brutal in 1949 as many
writers and poets simply dis-
appeared. These were the
"Black Years." Solomon
Mikhoels, the great actor and
community leader, was lured
to Minsk and found
decapitated by what was later
reported as an "auto acci-
dent." Writers and editors of
the last Yiddish newspaper
"Einigkeit" (Unity) and the
publishing house "Ernes"
(Truth) were imprisoned,
never to be heard from. The
fate of the most prestigious of
the Soviet Jewish writers was
reserved for the summer of
1952.
August 12, 1952
"The Night of
the Murdered Poets"
The trial which resulted in
"The Night of the Murdered
Poets" began on July 11,
1952. Among the 25 accused
were renowned Jewish aca-
demics, physicians, and the
leading Jewish poets and
writers in the USSR. They
were charged with being
"rebels," "agents of Ameri-
can imperialism" who also
wanted to separate Crimea
from the Soviet Union and to
"establish their own bourgeois
national Zionist republic."
The verdict was announced on
July 18. Twenty-four received
the death penalty; only one, a
woman, was sentenced to a
long prison term.
(For complete story see Page 5.)
Jewish Culture Today
"Tokenism"
In the 1950's, the executions
were halted, but the elements
introduced by Stalin continu-
ed, and Jewish culture has
been virtually suppressed by
his successors. Without
schools, generations of Soviet
Jewish children have grown up
ignorant of their Yiddish and
Hebrew heritage. Neverthe-
less, the USSR still has one of
the largest Yiddish-speaking
populations in the world
today, the language being
carried on stubbornly by
grandmothers and others of
the older generation. Yosef
Kerler, a Yiddish poet,
lamented in 1971 before his
departure for Israel, "I am a
Yiddish poet, and, as such,
utterly superfluous in the
Soviet Union."
Not one Jewish school has
been permitted for over 30
years. But tokenism persists.
The so-called "Moscow
Yeshiva," 15 years old,
consists of a handful of
over-age students and has yet
to graduate one rabbi.
Desire for Jewish Culture-
Hebrew Continues to Grow
Strong desires for learning
about Jewish heritage and He-
brew language persists, no
doubt the result of pride in
Israel and emigration to that
country by thousands of
families. The "Refuseniks,"
activist leaders for emigration,
have made repeated attempts
to have the study of Hebrew
recognized, but with no suc-
cess. Seminars and unofficial
classes proliferate in cramped
apartments, under growing
surveillance and KGB harass-
ment. Study groups and circles
If you have a new address or
are planning to move, please
let us know. Also, if you know
some folks who are not now
receiving The Jewish Floridian
and would like to, also let us
know. Every issue of the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County's newspaper
contains news you won't want
to miss. Simply call 832-2120.
> Palm Beach Lake* Boulevard Suite 104
I Palm Beach, Florida 33400
FISH FAMILY AND CHILDREN'S SERVICE
Vtstandlng prolesstonal and counseling agency serving tha
a" community ol Palm Batch County. Protaaalonal and
tontlalhalp la available for
naottha aging
fitetion and
Won services
Marital counseling
Parent-child contllcta
Personal problems
684-1991
Ihi .,. chargad In family and Individual oounsallng to
who can pay (Fees are baaed on Incoma and family stee)
wish Family and ChUdron'a Services Is a benatlclary agsney of
""h Fadaration of Palm Baach County.
"Despite the Soviet signature on the Helsinki treaty guaran-
teeing 'the right to identify' and the right to study one's heritage
and culture, these tokens stiU faU to provide the basic cultural
and religious essentials to ethnic survival." Russian Jews visit
the Leningrad Synagogue during Peseach of 1979 in a country
where Jewish culture and religion is not permitted to flourish.
discussing Hebrew as a lan-
guage and Jewish culture exist
in many cities, often using
primitive, homemade texts. As
education quotas and discrim-
ination in employment
markedly rise, the move
toward self-education makes
enormous strides amongst
young people who have come
to the conclusion that emigra-
tion is their only future.
No Future for Jews
In the Soviet Union
Despite the Soviet signature
on the Helsinki treaty guaran-
teeing "the right to identify"
and the right to study one's
heritage and culture, these
tokens still fail to provide the
basic cultural and religious es-
sentials to ethnic survival. It is
to be hoped that ultimately the
Soviet Government will act on
the demands of an enlightened
and outraged public opinion.
But, in the meantime, the
future of Soviet Jews is bleak
and emigration their only
hope.
Prepared by Abraham J.
Bayer, Director, International
Commission for the National
Jewish Community Relation
Advisory Council.
The Holocaust Did Not Exist
Canada's Anglican Church Reject
Anti-Semitism and Statements
By BEN KAYFETZ
TORONTO (JTA) A
series of resolutions adopted
by the General Synod of the
Anglican Church of Canada
calls on all church members to
reject expressions of anti-
Semitism and to acknowledge
"the reality that the Nazi re-
gime executed millions of Jew-
ish people and members of
other racial groups from 1937
to 1945 on account of race."
The General Synod also
urged that "courses of study
on World War 11 in all school
systems include reference to
the acts of genocide by the
Nazi regime" and that copies
of this resolution be sent to the
Premiers and leaders of oppo-
sition parties in all 10 pro-
vinces of Canada as well as to
the ministers of education in
provinces and territories.
THIS RESOLUTION was
seen by some observers as an
allusion to what has become
known as the Keegstra affair
in Eckville, Alberta. James
Keegstra, a teacher in the town
of Eckville, of which he is also
Mayor, has been instructing
his students that the mass ex-
termination of Jews during the
war was a highly exaggerated
story part of an interna-
tional Jewish conspiracy.
The Anglican's commitment
to combat anti-Semitism was
emphasized in a letter to Rabbi
Robert Sternberg, director of
the national religious depart-
ment of the Canadian Jewish
Congress, by the Rev. Brian
Prideax, ecumenical officer of
the Anglican Church. Pride-
aux wrote:
"It is shameful that such
statements (the resolutions)
should still be necessary, but
we want to assure the Jewish
community in Canada of our
wholehearted support against
bigotry and racism in our
society."
NOTICE
The teachers' workshop with Dr. Nathaniel Entin,
media specialist, scheduled for August 21 and 22 has been
cancelled. Dr. Entin will not be able to be in this area due
to minor health problems.
Women's Division
BUSINESS 6 PROFESSIONAL WOMEN'S GROUP
invites you ro join us for Dinner and o Program on
"JEWISH MOTHERS AND DAUGHTERS"
Wednesday, August 31st
6:00 9:00 PM
The Royce Hotel
1601 Belvedere Road
West Palm Beach, FL 00406
Fociliraror for this program will be Linda Werner,
Psychologist specializing in the area of Women's Issues.
Receipt of Payment by August 25th
Dinner and Program % 18.00 ___________

Limited Searing


Page4-A The Jewish Fkwichanof Palm BeachCounty Friday. August 19-19
Herzog's Unwelcome Position
Israel's President Cbaim Heraog recently
told the 22nd International Conference of
the World Union of Progressive Judaism
that while world Jewry has a legitimate
right to express its views on Israeli actions
and policies, they should keep those
discus lions within the confines of Jewish
circles.
Behind President Herzog s logic was his
warning that advice and criticism are
legitimate, bat they must be given "under
the prior understanding that the final
decision rests with those who have to bear
the consequences of any political or
military decision-'' Meaning, of course.
bRal aBjd Israelis
In essence, what Preside!ir Herzog said
i that, if you don't pay any taxes in
Israel, then you have nothing to say.
The fact is that what Israel does also
affects Jewsoutsidt of Israel. Remember
the intensity of the A WAGS debate of 1982
and the backwash of some pretty vile anti-
Semitic staff MwatTng from as high up as
the White House itself? Who took the
brunt of it bat American Jewry?
We can point to the settlements issue
and to the West Bank itself as further
samples of the relationship between the
Israeli and American Jewish mrnmnnifio;
And need we mention the war in Lebanon.
itself? What one does, affects the other, and
there is no doubt about it.
And so President Herzog s position was
somewhat arbitrary, we believe, and un-
welcome- The right of the Jewish people
ei +rxvkerr to have their opinions heard
Bravo. Rabbi Tanenbaum
Rabbi Marc H
mm food ujujb)m & -;-_- a _5
Christian groups in his effort to develop a
m generous Christian relationship
toward Jews. In his capacity as director of
the National Interrehgioas Affairs
Department of the American Jewish
Committee, he most recently haued the
Lutheran Church fo- its efforts to eliminate
anti-Semitic material from Lutheran
teaching and cohure.
We applaud these efforts, and we
congratulate Rabbi Tanenbaum Our
congratulations go to the Rabbi soedfkalh-
for refusing to quit the fight. While
weicom-z^:: r Lutheran:
faceofthegrea
:-i_r-Kti-f
Marur L _
lust do i
be -

Zis-:^
ry of the bin

fMs.--L_-.-r.-
ttuj
But Rabix Ti
and beyond
so Chrtscianit> .tself arc
the frazkjv and rankhr anb-Semitic
Iof the New feuneaa. both of
Bravo, Rahca T
The Minnesota Law Upheld
B. ROBERT E SEGAL
Recent dr.;
.- i ;-, -a: -i :

i--;.->.r-:-e::--:
NASA, -
....::..: :..:i.:.t j ::-
: i-
.-_ .:--; s.~: rut :r
- [ ; : S.r":-;
cr -l _-c ; ~ .--
i- -;_- .:. ;- : -
M :. :.a.:.
-: ;--:-
Firs: \-er.da.ent sent spav
aiag into limbo.
._- hum 29, -ha hfajueai
. i n declared that a state tax
_;__. : ';- i-Ctjamkm z\-
-.stitutional despite
Ac fact thai sectarian schools
:.-?- rnefits.
The ... ?.on disappointed
those residents of Minnesota
?pose a state la*
i-'j a\ _e noaof am
S" pa child for the cost
Heaacatar> and secondary
tchool education. nether
:.r -
as for the majont> of
. "-:.-. ..-_--.. \>>ociaie
R.haquisf
- at the Mi
Readers Write
EDITOR
T'-z .': .j.-
t -random Tbont-ts
I ould In ~.?poni
-. Je.-,i Ftwnhnu
M_r.j Li
V .;
help m> busbar., -ah these
I happen to lo*e
mo*:sg the lac. lagan..
for the legs).
w and 1 ioe pumping b> o*n
- -
ausband soae moue> we
need a gardener aad we
--" peasm gas. I
"'t mine taking oat the
r-"-r- it >Oth mi
, He has the coasiderauoa to
-dpahthe
..... ..-.-
~ -ciasioa. if anyone
alls me an Aaterican
_a_g_
.. .
'; if ihe> loio- Mrs.
-: 1 mil: |. be
. am m> aarbaajt
-a>;
- ^na theai dowa iih m\
are axli. aaaowci
-I i -.;-;,
y
t\f-
Ssnceteiy.
Mrv.DONN\iALANJ
tLOCK
sotala* li^aadaasmucij
balances off u\ *^
private school taiioi'
savings the parents of i
school childrea nay
such items as note
pencils and gya sh
Associate Justice
Marshall pointed out
dissent. Minnesota Tui
ho cnd their *ob
public shcoob au> notd
tuition expenses becaiwi
-..- ~.-i
1 be vk-.:>K)n in the Mil
**a ^*>c IoUo-
auaih the benate Fi
Commiuce Il-to-" vote I
proxmg PresideBt Re
proposed iegislatioi
- -.-- r^rcn:-
i lal
parochiaO ekacatar);
otkL*> .hoob
pottos oi the tuitw
Iiom ;bcir iederal
BUM
It cn't gomg to !
puNtc tchooh." tbePia
said.
s It s Reagu
ho has roomed a
-.^: --"'--
nation's nuponant oetu
iton. Can he pc
aware of the
cuts he adauabtrii
maii edoal aid |
scfaooh 25 --;m andj
Mag to to higher)
flitting a loss of top
.ti ai a Jr.
need?
Can he be oW
bJhnn m tax roeatf I
coaipansMg ha 9
schools is ornam to p*]
B thebadfcuori
ears oc :- ; m-_-
- -i-i- i
Jewish floridian
i""; : c -
i" : ;
: a.a?* You
ktal be able to
I oald rather
cieaa. and he
l>-
^-1,
M for Mrs Loat's
oi utsdoai. I am not of the
Ofaaaoa. Jewtsh gvb
thnuid 1. take oat the aar-
aafet 2. no. hwas; 3
gas 1 do al three, peat



Friday, August 19,1983 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 5-A
ugust 12,1952
The Night of the Murdered Poets
On the night of Aug. 12, 1952, 24 leading
Ijewish poets, writers, and intellectuals were ex-
ecuted in the basement of Moscow's notorious
Lubianka Prison. These were not random exec-
utions, but the culmination of a calculated cam-
paign to eradicate Jewish life in the Soviet
Union.
By SHEILA LEVIN,
CAROL SA1VETZ, and
JOELJ.SPRAYREGEN
in his despair for the murdered poets, Chaim
fade, their wartime comrade, wrote, "The
ting have forgotten you and me and the hour
|our grief. your darkly murdered tongue,
pnced by a hangman's noose is no longer
ird That poetic prophecy, written after
executions, must not be allowed to be fili-
al.
he repercussions of Aug. 12, and of the
ire 1948-1953 period, when the Soviet Gov-
mcnt effectively demolished the remnants of
Jewish community, provoked Soviet Jews to
to retain their Jewish identity. In the void
atcd by the destruction of Jewish life, the So-
s did not take into account the determined
obdurate nature of the Jewish people.
N 1942, THE Soviet Government had or-
ized the Jewish Anti-Fascist Committee to
ist wartime support in the fight against the
l/is from Jews in the West. Yiddish writers
artists selected by Stalin to lead the Com-
ttee also were those who later became the
urns of his terror that came to be known as
"Black Years" following World War II.
olomon Mikhoels, director of the Moscow
dish State Theatre, was named chairman of
Jewish Committee. He was joined by writers
from the early days of the Soviet State had
ed wholeheartedly in the work of building a
communist social order and of bringing
s out of the narrow, hostile world in which
y had been forced by Tsarist Russia.
everal of them had left Russia in the wake of
pogroms and upheavals of the revolutionary
iod, but returned voluntarily as the new
iei Government restored order. Many Soviet
dish writers communicated the Communist
sage to the hundreds of thousands of Soviet
s whose mother tongue was Yiddish,
n time, due to the absence of other Jewish
liiuiions during the traumatic wartime
iod, Soviet Jews came to look upon the
jnimiitce as the symbol of Jewish conscious-
in the USSR.
I IK HOELS addressed "Brother Jews"
Jughout the world. Peretz Markish said,
re arc one people, and now we are becoming
: army." Colonel Itzik Feffer recalled
Kiel's vision of a mighty nation arising from
valley of dry bones.
Committee manifesto was addressed to
ir Jewish brethren the world over."
hoels and Feffer were dispatched on an
rial mission to the U.S. and they were heard
wny cities by about half a million Jews.
ey urged and received moral and financial
fpor!,or lne Soviet war effort and promised
|t "firm brotherly relations" would persist
>ng Jews throughout the world after the
likhocls, as one of the leading creative Jewish
fsonalitics of the era, was among the first to
jnd the anguished alarm of "solidarity." He
led for the united front of all Jews in the face
Jotal annihilation, in the battle against
cism and as part of the freedom-loving peo-
|ol the world.
lut in 1948, Jewish solidarity, which had
n so important in the Soviet struggle against
cism, was no longer needed or desirable. It
i viewed as divisive to a regime characterized
Russian chauvinism.
The solution to this "Jewish problem" was to
i he suppression and obliteration of all traces
Jewish culture. And the reign of destruction
in with Solomon Mikhoels.
likhocls had been sent to Minsk on an offi-
1 mission as a member of the Stalin Prize
"nittee. Late at night on Jan. 13,1948, he
summoned from his hotel room by a Com-
Inist Party official.
THE NEXT MORNING, his bruised and
bloody corpse was found near the railroad
station. The reported "accidental death" was
eventually discovered; the Soviet secret police
had killed Mikhoels by running him over with a
truck.
The murdered Mikhoels was given a magnifi-
cent funeral in Moscow by the government. His
body lay in state at the Jewish State Theatre,
and tens of thousands of Jews came to pay their
last respects in death. The dishonesty of the of-
ficial report of "death by accident" swiftly
became apparent.
On Sept. 21,1948, Ehrenberg writing in
Pravda delivered the opening blows of the new
anti-Jewish campaign. He warned Soviet Jews
that their identifying with Jews in other coun-
tries would prove their disloyalty to the Soviet
Union.
The Jewish Anti-Fascist Committee was dis-
banded and there followed the liquidation of
the Yiddish Ernes publishing house, the bi-
monthly Heymland, Yiddish newspaper in Kiev,
Jewish libraries, the last two Yiddish schools,
professional theatres, and amateur artistic
groups. Jewish books disappeared into "re-
stricted collections" in libraries.
What was left to the authorities was now the
removal of key Jewish personalities. In the
winter of 1948-49, the Soviet secret police ar-
rested hundreds of writers, poets, artists,
musicians, and government and party officials.
WHILE THE exact toll is not known, one ac-
count offers the figure of 431 outstanding Sovi-
et Jewish artists arrested during this period. The
families of the prisoners wives, small chil-
dren, fathers, sisters, in-laws, aged parents
were exiled to Siberia or left as social outcasts
without means of support. Most of the prison-
ers died in Soviet labor camps.
Somehow the remainder of the most promin-
ent writers and poets survived in the camps until
the cataclysmic summer of 1952. They included
Peretz Markish, poet and novelist, age 56; Itzik
Feffer, poet, age 51; Leyb Kvitko, poet, age 61;
Shmuel Persov, linguist and writer, age 62; Da-
vid Hofshteyn, poet, age 63; Itzih Nusinov,
philologist and university professor, age 63; and
David Bergelson.
On July 11, 1952, these writers were among
the 25 Jews brought to trial in Moscow. The
other known defendants were Solomon Lozov-
sky, age 74, member of the Central Committee
elected by the 18th Party Congress (1939),
served for a time as deputy foreign minister;
Binyamin Zuskin, distinguished actor, succes-
sor to Mikhoels as the last director of the Mos-
cow Yiddish State Theatre; Eliahu Spivak, head
of the Department of Jewish Culture of the
Ukrainian Academy of Sciences until its liquid-
ation in 1949; and Lina Shtern, 74, the only
woman defendant, a biochemist and member of
the USSR Academy of Sciences.
Considering the positions of those involved,
the charges brought against them were ironic
and tragic. All 25 were charged with being
"enemies of the USSR, agents of American im-
perialism, bourgeois nationalist Zionists and
rebels who sought by armed rebellion to
separate the Crimea from the Soviet Union and
to establish their own Jewish bourgeois nation-
alist Zionist republic there."
THE TRIAL ended July 18,1952. The
defendants refused to plead guilty. According
to some accounts, Markish and the aged Lozov-
sky showed particular valor in forcefully de-
fending themselves, claiming that the prosecu-
tors were the real criminals. All 24 male defen-
dants were sentenced to death; Lina Shtern was
sentenced to life imprisonment. She was subse-
quently released and died in 1958 at the age of
90 without ever revealing the circumstances of
the 1952 trial.
The Soviet policy left Soviet Jews bereft of
poets, writers, actors, teachers, leaders, the-
atres, artists, and communal institutions of any
kind. Even the Yiddish linotype machines had
been smashed.
There was no one left to give voice to simple
grief, much less to what was left of Jewish na-
tional and religious sentiments. The next gener-
ation might still be Jews, but they would be
dumb and mute Jews, without poets, without
songs. Soil seemed.
The crimes committed against the Jewish
writers have never been publicly acknowledged
by any official Soviet source. Even during the
period following Stalin's death, when many of
his other crimes were denounced, the night of
Aug. 12 was not recognized.
While this absence of official Soviet recogni-
tion may be a function of the involvement of
post-war Soviet leadership in the crime, it also
represents a commitment on the part of the
present Soviet leadership to a perpetuation of
anti-Jewish policies: Jewish culture remains
under sentence of death. The Soviet Govern-
ment continues to suppress identification even
of the graves of the writers.
The Jewish generation which grew to
maturity in the USSR after 1952 was the
crucible in which the success of the Soviet
Jewish policy was tested. We now know this
generation of Soviet Jews has not been found
wanting in its dedication to Jewish survival.
Because they have been deprived of the tools
of survival which most other Soviet minorities
enjoy schools, publications, seminaries,
poets, writers, artists, two languages Soviets
Jews today insistently proclaim what Itzik Fef-
fer proudly declared, in one of his last poems,
"I Am a Jew."
Join Us at the Temple Judea
Open House Friday at 7:00 p.m.
Candy Fischer, membership
chairperson, husband Dr. Lee
Fischer and family.
Services 8:00 p.m.
St. Catherine's Cultural Center
Corner of Southern Blvd. & Flagler
Memberships and High Holy Day
Tickets now available.
Rosh Hashanah begins Sept. 7th.
Learn about our outstanding Religious
School, Youth Program, Young Couples,
Good Timers, XYZ Club
and Single Parents Program.
Rabbi Joel Levine* Cantor Rita Shore Dr. Jeffrey Faivua, Preeidrat
966-7778 UAHC AflBbto CoagngatioB


Ciibbtj Friday
19.1983
New Immigrants Present
Housing Problems
Around
theTbwn
By CINDY AYF.
OS \LX JT A) -
I: a said that "good sraays
* -:.- rau
case at brad at
onaahavei
arj auaioers.
aaatr/ front "
vs. Tk itfficair* at
M
pteaaed to
anvnagc of
D**is.ic- of Ted
A"*SaU*J
ana fo-
trwty of Florida
right across the street f i
*>**<* Boca Ra^i
*** aceadej
"^-^--iora,^,

- ^5
:::-i
mm
e for lug* school ar: Lari
of Forest Ml Higa School
geadaag the Lar*ers*y of Florida aad paa
- -i
Lon. liaghnr of Mary aad
i: Fortsi HO. She was e^*iMfa t
il
1
as I
:' r^-oeat of hi
-'
Ghaa
1:1
EBB* .' -.
:
H -:*-
- Lam MiMHajl
.... :- Eady >ax raj
--:- Rath aad mpMI
asae"*i
r
-
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" -J : .-'.- : :.t
a irr-; i.; .
lr .""" .";":*:": .,
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i. : ~ -: ~ t i- -
; I-i-" ar =- i i d
; re" r -;- : -;.:.--' nrrj

aad
poultry trig* as
:ers a/: :r::;'
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Bttterta: the
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leuaaal trend
=-" i Pah
k JK Jeaafc Cai
iht -Sa
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' -
ahaaraDoa oeaners hesaag at
liaiiii. af "------rg
Lit- ": ."' : BBBBdhj
daeai hncx o: sc ne^ aor
>Eag asec "or ouer Tur^cses.
juc3 ti K'iia: haasatg -ti-
"rr. -rj;c:- a. \ar_i aoc Oder
foras ; ri. ?'.c *c ^.-.ni
Rabat aaaed that at Lxyar
Siiiesxcna. ne irsc-occn oea-
xr was ?iac=c invar- je sr-
.anadkri n ^i i -txll
3 i'l^aO'C : re -r-T-ro saai
n : losc-r-oa ossrsrs.
UJD> EXPtAi>D .oac
sneg l^rfsa \gsnr< ~incs i_-:
x jcic so arcat
aar s sot as
occcn vicac ixaacaas
i.ira =tacrr?acfis n iacruge
:-
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i" :
aoc ii
P^*g
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-- x-a--
SHES HaBpyBtrthiaytaSMl
Hani To* oa the reosat aiaiini i EakOdl
- La>hy aad Asdharl ahaaat i*[
soa ot Eetya aad Maaiiri Baran .. Mkttl
.:- : Mao aad FWyd U:-vi
ekoaae back froaa Ksqcs. bj Dr Eageae asdLht
. i
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to.: adaOBK .-; :; :r n-
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re n.--.- i z*:
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444.
rartneu raaed -<; ~nrj zt 3< caj r>.;c ioc ; -
oum ic r-na..: :inr=-; oon : -; ; -;~
i "i ; a.-; :r :-:: :: ..oi: i : -_-- _-;S.;. ^
Haaaag VLn raor. r '. -;m \"'-ca
For Holiday Greetings
CaU'Staci
588-1652
arr staaMsad at lea
-mic! i afasr aa
i w uca a 3e Mpja>
Tia.g amount ot cane a ata
so aascr? neai. Ramn aoo
-By aea auny haae faanc
cm aac u iiira-r Hesirw >SLd| Bm _ic
mmac :' :dm .ea^ng irair
ss ncous tab decreases re-
oauae oucac iousbbj m mat
-rani? I'aiame.
Preseat-y Tie i' at an aosoroccn osnter s one
year \ anad oer-rttrag- af
abax have s^iea aayed as dag
o yaats. at atdon s rw
sharsajc af haaaaaf, aaaae
ahta -eaaa aacaaae x ie
taaBsaaac at ia% at avanht

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Fun Ships
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^^'^s rax)8C tr *ie o* crce cf *xr cr^se
'^- ccr^csrcr r ^citerge ^e occs r:\ji jomoing cosrxx.
^rll Id cecrocjcr h.e ei f^MnnoK nggr^i/-
3carce il ~>e *ee -xx zt -xnrt; t: ff^ree
re ocrce ceres zr r or oui^rflc dEO-


Friday, August 19,1983 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 7-A
New Automobile
Air Conditioning
System Designed At
Tel Aviv University
new
Dning
automobile air
system has been
ed and developed by Tel
niversity scientist Prof.
chai Sokolov, which
s the heat generated and
tly wasted by the car,
t requiring additional
and expense for fueling
ith no strain on the
|lay, only about one third
fuel burnt by an auto-
i is utilized for powering
ntor to turn the wheels,
[two thirds of the fuel is
Approximately one
j)f the energy is expended
in the exhaust system,
i the other third is ex-
on cooling the motor.
entional air conditioning
[today in automobiles
\o\ take advantage of the
heat, requires addi-
power and thereby in-
the car fuel consump-
|y 10-20 percent. It also
a greater strain on the
which is beyond the
It> hi small cars, and as a
Ismail cars cannot be air
lioned.
system developed by
|Sokolov of the Faculty
iginecring utilizes an
blion refrigeration cycle,
tess which does not re-
ity Will Not
it Public Halls
Neo-Nazi
lanizations
DAVID KANTOR
INN(JTA) The city of
jlun is standing pat on
tision not to rent public
lo the neo-Nazi National
fcralic Party, thereby
jig two municipal court
handed down last
t. City officials intend to
Jheir case before higher
;authorities in Frankfurt
fparenily alarmed by the
fs intention to make the
center of extreme right-
political activity in
lany. City officials were
|sed by the strong media
Jge both in this country
labroad of a meeting
in the year of a former
|nit in a town-owned
hall in Bad Hersfeld.
|then, Bad Hersfeld off>-
mnounced thai ihey will
[Mow meetings of former
ambers in their town.
[E NPD has successfully
' in the courts that since
a legal organization
fling openly, Frankfurt is
W to make its public halls
|ble to the parly for
fntions and other politi-
tivities.
Frankfurt officials have
edly stated thai Ihey arc
' by the fact that the
is classified by the
[al internal security
e as an extreme righl-
Itoup.
quire mechanical compres-
sion, but uses the wasted heat
as its energy source. At the
same time, almost no changes
are required in the car engine.
The new system is, therefore,
free of running cost and is
suitable even for small
engines. The invention has
been patented in Israel,
U.S.A., England and other
countries.
The new system is presently
at the laboratory stage and is
not available commercially,
but offers hope for more
comfortable and safer driving
for small cars and cheaper
cooling for large cars.
Prof. Mordechai Sokolow operates his new automobile air conditioning system.
AN OPEN LETTER
To the consumer of kosher foods
from the President of
Empire Kosher Poultry, Inc.
KOSHER
Empire
POUUTRV
Sin*""*-'*-"*......M
Ka8Mutb. a, products aw curre a,iopmet
our W-^^ "l0ian8 S^SS* ^rtTOl-
-22S?SSSSwSp.**
personal lewr. ^ gnalom,
BMpibBko8hBrwui.TOt,c.
Murray>
President
OVER FORTY YEARS OF
^steht mem**!*!?*


HMMIbhI
Page 8-A The Jewish Floridiap of Prim Beach County / Friday, August 19,1983

Organizations in the News
HADASSAH
Z'hava Hadauah of Golden
Lakes Village There are still
some openings for great trips
in November, so hurry and
make your reservations with
SylviaGlay!
The first trip is to Epcot,
Nov. 6, 7, 8 for three days and
two nights. The first day will
be at Circus World, with
dinner at the famous "Top of
the World," second, dinner
and show at Shakespeare
Tavern, and the third, dinner
at Chalet Suzanne. You will be
spending glorious days at
Epcot.
The second trip will be the
Thanksgiving weekend, Nov.
23, 24, 25 with the first day at
St. Augustine, second on the
Sea Escape, and the third at
Silver Springs. Great meals
and shows are included to add
to your enjoyment!
Tikvah West Palm Beach
Chapter of Hadassah are
planning the following activi-
ties for the year:
Sept. 19 Regular meeting
at Anshei Shoiem 1 p.m.,
Boutique 12:30 p.m. Conven-
tion Report by Laura London,
president.
Oct. 17 Regular meeting
at Anshei Shoiem 1 p.m.,
Boutique 12:30 p.m. An inter-
esting and informative Hadas-
sah film will be shown.
Oct. 24, 25, 26 Epcot
trip. For reservations call
Pauline or Regina.
Nov. 16 Pal Joey at the
Royal Palm Dinner Theatre.
Call Celya.
Nov. 22-27 New Orleans
trip six days, five nights.
For reservations call Martha
Sheffrin or Regina.
Nov. 24-27 Thanksgiving
weekend at the Sea Gull Hotel.
For reservations call Martha
Fein or Regina.
Dec. 4 Flea Market at
Millers Supermarket Grounds.
Save all your "hard" goods.
Dec. 30, 31, Jan. 1 New
Year's trip. For reservations
call Regina.
Jan. 11 Annie at the
Royal Palm Dinner Theatre.
Call Celya.
Yovel Hadassah West Palm
Beach Chapter events:
Oct. 5 Buccaneer Hotel
Singer Island luncheon and
one and a half hour boat ride
on the Island Queen. Trans-
portation and gratuities in-
cluded in one low price. For
delicious and delightful day,
please phone Pearl Rosen,
Sheffield C 61 or Jean Tobin,
Sussex K 214.
Oct. 30-Nov. 1 Key West
trip three days, two nights.
Deluxe accommodations, fine
dining, full sightseeing, trans-
portation and gratuities in-
cluded. For reservations,
phone Jean Tobin, Sussex K-
214.
Nov. 24-27 Gala Thanks-
giving Week-end. Fine Kosher
cuisine at the Tarleton Hotel
in Miami Beach. Transporta-
tion and gratuities included.
Please phone Bessie Hoffman,
Greenbrier A or Bertha Kap-
lan, Somerset F-l 10.
WOMEN'S AMERICAN
ORT
Century Chapter of ORT
announce coming events for
the year:
Oct. 22 Saturday matinee
"Pal Joey" at the Royal Palm
Dinner Theatre.
Oct. 31-Nov. 2 Epcot
Trip being planned.
Dec. 21 Wednesday
matinee musical "Bye Bye
Birdie" at Burt Reynolds Din-
ner Theatre.
Dec. 30, 31, Jan. 1 New
Year's Trip being planned to
West coast.
Women's American ORT
West Palm Chapter coming
events:
Oct. 17, Monday
Luncheon-Card Party at The
Captain's Galley at Century
Corners, 11:30 a.m. Many
prizes. Call for tickets Anne
Gellenor Betty Gold.
Nov. 5, Saturday
Luncheon-Theatre Party at
Royal Palm Theatre, Show
"Pal Joey" Call for reser-
vations Eva Levin or Betty
Gunther.
Nov. 11, Friday Flea
Market Please save all rum-
mage and items that
are
HIEHHDLSDnSS
flora
Rosh tlashanah Sept. 7. 8. 9
Yom Kippur Sept. 16, 17
Spend the holiday in Fort Uuderdale's
favtrtte hotel. Package includes: deluxe
accommodations for 5 nighU, 8 kosher
meals and tickets for religio
tl Ji !J I? W Por comD,et<*
jXZi / TV and reserva
*L"Tt>WU 4725600
pe^Kson L
kPLANTAflOl
1711 M. University Drive
Plantation. Florida
salable, for this important
ORT day.
Nov. 24-27, Thursday to
SundayThanksgiving Week-
end Depart Thursday for
Cape Canaveral. Then cruise
on Scandinavian Line ship
among lush surroundings. On
Friday breakfast at Holiday
Inn-Lido Beach then set sail
aboard Sarasota Bay ship
to St. Armand's Circle, etc.
Dinner and exciting show
Golden Apple Dinner Theatre.
Saturday Non stop enter-
tainment Ringling Bros.
Museum Famous Adamic
Restaurant Floor Show .
Old Heidelberg Castle, etc.
etc. Sunday to Fantasy
Isles, to Famous Waltzing
Waters; then Naples Dinner
Theatre Call A. Shelton
or Gus Dickstein for reserva-
tions.
The Lake Worth Covered
Bridge Chapter of ORT will
open the new season with the
following officers:
President, Tessie DeMaria;
Vice President Education, Ida
Aronstein; Vice President
Proggramming, Lillian Serra;
Vice President Honor Roll,
Renee Lomars; Financial Sec-
retary, Rose Rader; Recording
Secretary, Claire Segall; Cor-
responding Secretary, Ceil
Langsner; and Treasurer,
Selma Siegel.
For their opening meeting
on Thursday, Sept. 1, at 12:30
p.m., one of the newest films
on the activities of ORT will
be shown, "Nothing But The
Best."
There will also be a report
on the recent convention held
in Miami, given by Lillian
Serra who attended as a dele-
gate of this chapter.
B'NAI B'RITH
WOMEN
B'nai B'rith Women Chai
Chapter will have a member-
ship coffee at the home of
Helene Lustig, 4855 Juniper
Lane, Palm Beach Gardens on
Tuesday evening, Aug. 30, 8
p.m. all people interested are
invited.
The B'nai B'rith Women of
Boynton Beach are having
some exciting events taking
place in the next few months: i
A Rosh Hashonah Holiday
at "K on over Ramada Renais-
sance Hotel," Miami, Sept. 7
to Sept. 10. A S25 deposit will
guarantee your reservations.
An afternoon at Royal Palm
Dinner Theater, featuring
"Pal Joey" for choice seats
make your reservations nwo as
we have a limited amount of
tickets.
A Fun Ship Cruise on Nov.
5 to Nov. 12 (seven nights) on
board the "Festivale." For
inside rooms $599 per person,
outside room S649 per person
double occupancy, port tax
$20. Ports of call, Nassau, St.
Thomas and San Juan.
For further information on
all of the above affairs, please
call Mildred Perry vice presi-
dent fund raising, Edith Bec-
ker co-chairman and Miriam
Pearlman president.
Ohav Chapter No. 1623,
B'nai B'rith Women, Golden
Lakes Village monthly
meeting Sept. I, 1 p.m. Ann
Film an on "Love and its rela-
KONO
tion to money." Ref.M.
served. Oct u T*".
Royal Palm j^***
for "Catch me if vrnTh
American Mbr,*, w.
en .WtbontChapterwiUi
the first meeting ;fth*"
on Sept. 14 at l nl
Bank, Westgate, CV nS
ments. All invited.
Sunday, Sept. 25 at I
Luncheon ana Card Pan,
the Party Room at thVfl
house, CV. ec*
Gala week-end-f0Ur(|
three nights Fridav n
21-Monday, Oct. M
ton Hotel, Miami I
Fabulous time awaits i
Early reservations for Ch
rooms.
Chanukah Dinner
and Entertainment
day, Dec. 1 at 5 p.m. a,
elegant 40 Karots Ko
Catering Reservations.
MADA
ANCL
HOTEL
SHARE THE HIGH HOLY DAYS WITH US
THREE SPECIAL PACKAO.ES
FOR THE HOLIDAYS
DELUXE ROOM
KOSHER MEALS
TEA ROOM DAILY
ENTERTAINMENT
Tf CHAISE LOUNGE
TENNIS A QOLF
Wcfccraua Caserns
CMMltaatt
Oott not inciudt la* and lip
RELIGIOUS SERVICES
CJLATT KOSHER SUPERVISION
O.R.C. AND
IK
NAT10HIU.
MMUIK
Rosh M.,sh.,n.,h Yom K,pc
'. 0AVS 11 NIGHTS
' 'tta SEPT ifcth
s550
i'*.t vnqlr
Rosh Hashanah
AYS 4 NIGHTS
;'T ?lh SEPT inn
s240
5J10 Mnqlr
Yom Kippur
DAYS 7 NIGHTS
I ; I6lh SEPT 18th
On tha Ocean II $445 Collins timut
Miami Bsach. FL 33140 13051 MS 1500
120
Ml
\J
4 115 vnqlr
^Mllini|IMMIITIIMMIMTMIII8IIIHHinP
A-AAbbT ANSWERfoNf
A Division of
'ARINGADING" ANSWERING SERVICE
Computerized Switchboard Live Operators
WE ANSWER FAST!
439-0700
213 No. Dixie Highway, Lake Worth, FL 33460
w.tnii..nnmmmmauJA,iumum
iiMy great-
grandfather
invented
Gulden's Mustard
Glaze
to cup honey
K cup Gulden's
Spicy Brown Mustard
w cup beer
I teaspoon horseradish
Glazed Corned Beef
S pound corned beel
bnskel
* carrots, culInto I inch
slices
I onion, quartered
I bay leal
I isrlic flow, crushed
FUcemeai in brae sauce pot; cover wuh cold water Add
carrots, onwn. bay leal and prlc. heat MMmTmb
in small uuceosn. combine honey, mustard, beer aid^'
horseradish Uwbta,,,,,,,, ^
occaaonally PUce meat on rack ,n 0^auSl2n jZJ
ome ,Ute over meat. and bake JSOT ZT* *"
lor M minutes, bastinf occasionally
*iw*|me CHARLIE GULDEN
It's his recipe
that makes
these recipes
so delicious!**
Potato Salad
7 potatoes, peeled,
boiled and cut up
h Clip chopped onion
to cup chopped celery
to chopped tomato
W cup imitation bacon bats
to cup mayonnaise
% cup GikJens Spicy
Brown Mustard
2 tablespoons tamfon DsMMi
1
Coaabiae potatoes, onson. celery,
lomato and nutation bacon bils Blend
maronaa.se. tmsttard. viaejsr and sup'
Abo* < haH hour before serving .toss
potato salad wsthdressBuj Serves 6.


Friday, August 19,1983/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 9-A
I
I
We're Making
American History.
A*-
American Ingenuity Works.
During the past two years, significant changes have
occurred in the savings and loan industry. These changes
are the result of economic factors, higher interest rates and
federal deregulation.
April-June, 1983: the second highest quarterly
profit in American Savings history.
Through management planning, operational efficiencies
and acquisitions... American Savings has dramatically
reversed a $13 million loss for fiscal 1982 into a $9.5 million
profit for the first nine months of fiscal 1983. For the third
quarter (April-June, 1983), net income was $6.1 million.
These results continue the positive earning trend at
American Savings and underscore managements
achievement of balanced growth, improved customer service
and a stronger market position.
Diversification: a significant contribution to
earnings.
As part of our long-range planning, American Savings
acquired a substantial interest in General Homes
[^fgepent Corporation of Houston, Texas, the 4th largest
homebuUder in the United States. The Association's equity
in the earnings of General Homes totalled $5.9 million
profit for the first nine months of fiscal 1983.
Positioned to meet future challenges.
For the 12-month period ending June 30,1983... net
worth increased to $132 million from $39 million. Equally
significant, assets increased nearly 25% to $2.9 billion.
This current net worth level places American Savings
among;the nations strongest capitalized savings and loans.
We believe that our financial strength, coupled with
management depth, uniquely positions American Savings
to seek out new and exciting opportunities for increased
growth and profitability in the future.
American Savings, the third largest savings and loan
association domiciled in Florida, and the 29th largest in the
United States, is listed on the New York Stock 1
For a quarterly report on American Savings, or a
discussion of your individual savings or mortgage loan needs,
visit any of our 55 locations. Our staff will provide the same
professional service and personal attention that has been
the hallmark of American Savings for over three decades.
Thars how we made American history.

El
MAKE MONEY THE AMERICAN WAY
AMERICAN SAVINGS


Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, August 19,1983
Pioneer Women /Na'amat
Insuring Dignity of the Individual
Pioneer Women/Na'amat
was founded in the United
States by Labor Zionist ac-
tivists in 1925 as a sister
organization to Na'amat, Is-
rael's Movement of Working
Women and Volunteers. It
numbers among its founders
and early leaders Rachel Ben
Zvi, former first lady of Israel,
and Golda Meir, former prime
minister.
In Israel, Na'amat's 750,000
members make it that coun-
try's largest women's organ-
ization, strengthening the na-
tion and enhancing the quality
of life through a network of
more than 1,000 educational,
vocational and social service
centers. As a world move-
ment, Na'amat has branches
in Argentina, Australia, Bel-
gium, Brazil, Canada, Chile,
England, France, Mexico,
Peru and Uruguay.
In the United States, Pion-
eer Women/Na'amat's 50,000
members in 500 clubs across
the country help support the
work of Na'amat in Israel and
also carry out educational and
social action programs on
major domestic issues in-
cluding the struggle to advance
the rights and status of
women.
The work of Na'amat is the
expression of its Labor Zionist
philosophy. Since its founding
some 60 years ago, Na'amat
(originally called Moetzet
Hapoalot) has been committed
to creating a more equitable
society and to establishing
equal rights for women in
Israel. Toward this end,
Na'amat operates a network
of institutions and carries out
a broad variety of programs
for mothers, children and
young people. A major
purpose of these activities is to
help narrow the social,
educational and cultural gaps
that exist in a nation corn-
Pioneer Women/Na'amat will hold its
28th Biennial Convention at the Hyatt
Regency in Baltimore, Maryland, October
16-19.
Plenary sessions on Women's Rights, the
Effects of Reaganomics, and Constitutional
Challenges are scheduled for the convention.
Workshops will also be held on Labor
Zionism in the '80s, Oppressed Jewry, and
American Jewish Identity.
Masha Lubelsky, Secretary General of
Na'amat, will deliver a major address on
recent developments in Na'amat's services in
Israel. Na'amat operates day-care centers,
day-night homes, community centers,
vocational training schools, clubs for Arab
women and free legal counseling for women.
Palm Beach Council will be represented by
its newly elected president, Shirley Fayne of
the Kinneret Club in Delray Beach.
Meamme at a Na'amat d.y-care center in
posed largely of immigrants
from widely disparate back-
grounds and cultures.
Na'amat was the first Jew-
ish women's organization to
conduct educational and social
services for Arab and Druze
women in Israel, in
recognition of the important
role these women play in the
nation's society. These servi-
ces are carried out by
Na'amat's Arab Women's
Department, established
several decades ago.
The first club of Pioneer
Women in Palm Beach
County was organized by Rae
Hornstein in 1971 and named
for Golda Meir, the former
Prime Minister of Israel and
National Secretary of Pioneer
Women, 1931-33. From a
beginning membership of
thirteen women, Pioneer Wo-
men in this county has grown
to 1000 women organized in
nine clubs. Four years ago,
these chapters became the
Palm Beach Council and Rae
Hornstein served as president
from its inception until last
Bank Fined $108,000
For Participation
in Arab Boycott
year. The new president is
Shirley Fayne.
Individual clubs hold
various fundraisers for Israel
including card parties and
raffles. Pioneer Women serve
as volunteers in the com-
munity and have a voice in
public affairs as relevant issues
arise. The National Conven-
tion will be held this year in
Baltimore, Maryland on
October 16-19.
For more information on
Pioneer Women/Na'amat
contact the Palm Beach Coun-
cil, 3767 Bldg. Lake Worth
Road, Room 108, Lake
Worth, FL 33461, telephone
433-0644.
Pioneer Women/
Na'amat Clubs *
Club/President/Phone
Number
Golda Meir/Esther Lit-
wak/689-2171
Orah-1 srael/A n n
Engelstein/968-7363
Ezrat/Celia Levinson/968-
2393
Theodore Herzl/Freda
Goldfarb/965-2830
Cypress Lakes/Rae Hoff/683-
5054
* Located in Palm Beach
County north of Delray
Beach.
At a Na'amat vocational high school, a
student is instructed in the use of a
microscope.
Jewish
Community
Center
of the
Palm
Beaches
2415
Okeechobee
Boulevard
WPB
689-7700
V
GENERATION
TO
GENERATION

WASHINGTON (JTA)
The Commerce Department
announced that the Bank
America Corp., one of the
nation's largest banks, agreed,
without admitting any wrong-
doing, to pay a S 108,000 fine
stemming from charges that it
violated federal regulations
banning aid to the Arab boy-
cott of Israel.
The Department said the
fine was the largest ever im-
posed on an American bank
and the ninth penalty imposed
for such an offense in the past
10 months. The Department
said that, since October, 1981,
12 other banks have paid a
total of $535,000 in fines, in-
cluding $24,500 paid Monday
by the Bank of New York.
THE COMMERCE De-
partment had charged that the
Bank America International
subsidiary handled eight
letters of credit issued in banks
in Middle East countries which
boycott Israel. Federal law
bans participation by Ameri-
can firms in the boycott of
Israel.
A letter of credit is a bank
document which guarantees an
exporter payment for goods
shipped. Officials said such a
letter could help the anti-Israel
boycott by requiring that the
goods covered by the letter of
credit did not come from Isra-
el or that the ship carrying the
goods had not stopped at an
Israeli port.
The incidents charged
against the Bank America oc-
curred from January, 1980
through October, 1982. A
bank spokesman said that
"considering the volume of
letters of credit that were
handled during the period, it is
possible inadvertent and unin-
tentional processing errors
could have been made." The
spokesman said the bank
would- comply with federal
regulations on the boycott in
the future.
RELIGIOUS SCHOOL OPEN HOUSE
TeAnfUe
REUGmul%!^FJ* ARE CORDIALLY INVITED TO ATTEND OUR
PMLR^S^fSSAP^!iH0VSB ^BDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, ff
FAO^^mSSSLSSii.Um^UB SCHOOL FROM OUR RABBI AND
fALULTYAND OBSERVE OUR TEACHERS OFFER MODEL LESSONS
Individual attention in small classes
23SSS225 f pannia Rbbi
Dedicated professional teachers
United Synagogue Curriculum
Pull Bar/Bat Mitzvah program
Wednesday and Sunday daw*
A warm, caring environment
designed to strengthen your
children's Jewish identity
and commitment
ALAN H. CUMMINGS TO* INFORMATION B ABnI J0EL CHAZIN
PRESIDENT 832-0804 EDWASaLDIBEC)
_____________190 N County Road, Palm Beach, FL. 33480


Friday, August 19,1983/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page U-A
iKampehnan Hopes But Doesn't Expect
Soviet Human Rights Improvement
Wedding
py DAVID FRIEDMAN
VASHINGTON (JTA)
vlax Kampelman, the chief
States delegate to the
Jrid Conference on Securi-
nd Cooperation in Europe,
j here that he was
cful though not expectant
the "provisional agree-
,.f reached in Madrid last
nth would lead to the im-
minent of the human
[its situation in the Soviet
on.
,Ve like the agreement,"
npelman said at a briefing
foreign correspondents.
he said signing an agree-
Li is not enough. "Agree-
hts are more important
^n they are lived up to," he
. The agreement is ex-
ited to be signed in Septem-
fampelman said that during
course of the Madrid
|ow-up conference, the So-
Union "Learned" that
do hold them account-
t" for the provisions of the
Helsinki accords. "The
iet Union fully under-
]ids that if they wish to con-
fute toward improving the
Lospherc with the United
kes, it is essential that they
Iress, for example, the hu-
nitarian concerns that we
cibly brought to their at-
hon for two years and ten
aths."
ii a press conference, foi-
ling a prayer vigil on the
of the Capitol, the day
are the provisional agree-
nt was approved in Madrid,
ftal Sharansky expressed
fear that if the United
(les signed this agreement, it
iild endanger her husband,
atoly, and other Jewish ac-
sts and dissidents impris-
I in the Soviet Union.
jhe repeated this fear in an
|cle published in the Wash-
ion Post. "If the USSR
that the West is willing to
h agreement without re-
ing actual and concrete
icessions, the Soviets will
still more free to suppress
ian rights" Mrs. Sharan-
wrote. "The result will be
to protect human rights
to destroy them."
ampelman said that he had
wh Mrs. Sharansky at
State Department, and
|gnt to reassure her. But he
sed that the Madrid con-
l was never aimed at ar-
f at agreements that
'd deal with individuals by
(fowever, he pointed out
he plight of Sharansky
J otner prisoners, Jews and
iJews, m the USSR was
istantly raised at Madrid by
P and other Western
Ikesmen. He said it was
*d that the Madrid confer-
c.could lead to their release
JJtt still hoped that it may
[ampeiman said the United
[ believes that the con-
[7 lmPnsonment of Sha-
fi y and some other Hel-
[' agreement monitors, as
as the harassment of the
[inat are not in jail, "is not
I a gross violation of
CL5ta?dLrd*but a *ross
fV,10n of the Helsinki Final
But he said that no one ex-
pected that the conference
would change "the brutal and
totalitarian"nature of the
Soviet Union so that "it be-
comes a more humane
society." He said that, in his
final remarks in Madrid on
July 18, he charged that the
Soviet government is
"engaged in acts of anti-
Semitism" and that repression
there now is worse than at any
time since the Helsinki accords
were signed in 1975.
However, Kampelman said
he had faith in "words"
because they set forth stan-
dards which countries should
try to reach and by which
countries "can be judged." In
addition, he said he believed
the Madrid agreement has
some enforcement
mechanisms which the Hel-
sinki accords do not.
But above all, Kampelman
cautioned patience, saying he
believed moral and political
pressure and public opinion do
have an effect on the Soviet
Union. "I do not think that
they relish being a power
which is looked upon by so
many other powers as a
pariah," he said.
"I am hoping the time will
come when this insecurity
upon their part which leaves
them to be prepared to
weather that punishment .
will be less pronounced so that
they will be free to be able to
accommodate these concerns
upon the part of the West."
Speaking in New York, at a
meeting convened the the Na-
tional Conference on Soviet
Jewry, Kampelman pointed
out that the Madrid talks
made some improvements
over the original Helsinki ac-
cords, specifically with regard
to human and religious rights
and "human contacts,"
notably family reunification.
He stressed that Madrid was
not a forum at which any
nation, including the Soviet
Union, was prepared to make
major alterations in its emi-
gration policy. He added,
however, that it served as the
only continuous forum for
U.S.-Soviet dialogue in recent
years. Kampelman asserted
that the campaign on behalf of
Jews in the Soviet Union is
being conducted on many
levels, private and public.
TIFFORDFUSS
Mrs. Dorothy Tifford of
Tamarac, Florida, announces
the marriage of her daughter,
Shari to Jonathan A. Fuss,
son of Mr. and Mrs. Isadore
Fuss of West Hartford,
Connecticut, on June 26. The
ceremony was conducted by
Rabbi Harold Silver.
Mrs. Fuss is a graduate of
the University of Hartford
with a degree in special edu-
cation. Mr. Fuss is a graduate
of the New England Institute,
Boston, Mass. He is a director
for Menorah Gardens and
Funeral Chapels in West Palm
Beach. The couple spent their
honeymoon in Bermuda and
reside in Palm Beach Gardens.
Mrs. Jonathan Fuss
Dutch Daily
Called Kissinger
'Frustrated Jewboy'
AMSTERDAM (JTA) Letters have been deluging the
leading Dutch daily, NRC Handelsblad, in protest against a
cartoon of former U.S. Secretary of State Henry Kissinger
which carried a caption, "Frustrated Jewboy Responsible for
United States Central American Policy."
The cartoon, by Frits Mueller, appeared after President
Reagan named Kissinger to chair the National Bipartisan
Commission on Central America. In an earlier cartoon, Mueller
depicted Kissinger as a very ugly Jew.
Several letter writers, both Jews and non-Jews, protested
against the description of Kissinger as a "Frustrated Jewboy."
The newspaper has so far refused to apologize, nor has Mueller
apologized or reacted in any way.
You Are Invited
Every Jewish Family Should Identify
with a Jewish Address
Temple Beth El Invites You to Affiliate
with Us and Truly be a Part of
the Jewish Community
Rabbi Howard J. Hirsch would be
delighted to meet you on
August 17th
at the home of Barbara Wunsh
1711 Laurel Lane, Lake Clarke Shores
at 7:30 P.M.
Belonging to a synagogue is a duty
Belonging to Temple Beth El is a Privilege
Come learn all about us
Call Barbara at 9670554 or
Temple Office 833-0339
JOSEPH L. MORSE GERIATRIC CENTER
of the
Jewish Home for the Aged of
Palm Beach County, Inc.
VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES
Activities with Residents:
Arts and Crafts, Readers, Menders-Labelers, Feeders
(days, evenings and weekends).
Escorts:
To transport residents within the Center and into the
community (days, evenings and weekends).
Religious Services:
To assist residents in attending services (Friday af-
ternoon and Saturday morning).
Contact Volunteer Services, 471-5111 ext. 155.
*
TEMPLE BETH EL
U.S.Y.
For AH Jewish Youths Grades 9-12
OPENING PROGRAM
Sunday, August 285:30 to 8:30
UNLIMITED PLAY
VIDEO GAME NIGHTandB.B.Q.
FREE: If you pay your dues at the door
if not $3.50.
At- STARS & STRIPES VIDEO CENTER
Northlake Blvd. just east of 1-95
Info: Sharon Slomowitz 833-3426
Sharyn Steinberger 967-6811
*S^>
Slichot8:30p...Sp4.3
Roah Haahana
(Ew) WA By*. 8 pa. Saj*. 7
Tkmrm. .m. Sept. 8
Fri.8....Spt.
YomKippur
Fri. 7 p.m. Spt. 16
(Yixkor) Sat. 9 .m Spt. 17
">
LION'S CLUB BUILDING
700 Camellia Drive Royal Palm Beach
Rabbi: Nathan Zelizer
Cantor: Chaim Baltuck
Tickets
Beatrice Mishki
Eli Rosenthal -
793-9122
3-0643


-
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Fraaay
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On the Book Shelf
The Policies of Indifference
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CUSSES
TRANSLATIONS
5 = as 5-
Hcrwmrd J. Wiener. PA,
:*5e* ana HIW
JCC News
w
GET IS THE SWIM
On Sunday. Aug. 2JM 10 a^. the Young Singles of,l
Jewish Community Center vfl meet at the jrr i
Okeecbobee Blvd.. Wen Patas Beach and travel L?1.
-SU Flags Atlanm" Hotty^od for a fuU da?J
evening of ater sports aad pleasure. Come join th 21
Fee is M-95 pins tan transponatioa and yoir food i
reservations and mforaaarjoa cal Joan Wolfben a,
Center. 6S9-7700. Sormaa Landemaa. 684-9479 or j.
Dreyfus. 639-*483. VOrJ
EVENING AT BRISTOL^ LOtNGE
On Saturday night, Aug. 20 at 9 p.m.. the YountSinri-l
of the Jewish Community Center i0 meet at "BrZl
Lounge" m the Sheraton Ian, 3200 No. Ocean Dr S3
Island for dancing and drinks. No cover charge and SI
drinks are 75 cents less on Saturday night. Come owl
come all! For further mformation call Joan WoUhml
689-7700.
AN EVENING Of HYPNOSIS
AU Singles Groups of the Jewish Community CenterjBi
inched to "An Evening of Hypnosis" on Tuesday Aid
23 at 7:30 p.m. at the Center. Jota us and find out hou|
increased your potential for nfe through Hypnosis.1
Donation is $3.
Art*-Craft*-JewHry
Impnrted Exclusively
from Israel
the?
Burqrn
Susan Levine
&
Barbara Schwartz
SOkMCtobM
Country MaJl
471^274
Opart:
Mor.-T>vs. i Sit. 10 AIMPMl
Fn. 10 AIM PU. Sun. 12-5 PW f
Waldman
HOTEL
NliamiBi'sFii>eGknKo6J^Cttisitje:
~H1GH HOLIDAY ^ECLXLS
ROSH HASHAXA YOM KJTPlTi
12 Days- 11 Nights
PtOM
Snot 7-iS 2
3 -nears Sat. ar>d
cms rouoec
310 r
* SPUT STAY
7 Days 6 Nights
Sen 7-n and Sac*. 16-Ul
FIOM
*230r
4MM
TmmmaMmmt mm*****
SERVKES CONOUCTED BY REJIOWNED CANTOR
L\RLY REStRVAiTOXSSlWOfflD
Pfc ON THE OCtAN ATOti STREET _
THE FAMILY JACOBS' KOSHER
*c-.*rrtitnS See a a" i
2*t+lCOUJ*S
nttAaU BEACH
GALA SHOW
St*****1,

ina*^"!
OaayflanaaajPJ ca cm* ^*^
HIGH HOLY DAYS
11 Mgftrts Hi Taab Dtys
$340."SEPT.7toiath
P^JLajSnaaSttyl
I


>niorNews
[tIe JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
Friday, August 19,1983 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 13-A
4---------_____________________________________________________________________________________
The Minnesota Law Upheld
Aging.
HRS,
importation,
rhe JCC-CSSC is funded in
[ b Title II of the Older
ericans Act awarded by
Cifstream Areawide Council
Florida Department
the Department of
Jewish Feder-
M and client contribution,
abling us to provide a
kiety of services for the older
lull Our Services through
lie 111 of the Older Ameri-
nd is available for per-
ns 60 and over.
TRANSPORTATION
Transportation is available
persons 60 years or over
[o have no cars and cannot
:1he public transit system to
io doctors appointments,
Ispitals and nursing homes
visit spouses, treatment
biers and the JCC Kosher
Inch Connection.
JCC KOSHER LUNCH
CONNECTION
iKosher lunches are served
onday through Friday at the
along with daily stimu-
1 programs and an oppor-
iiiiy to meet and greet new
old friends. There is no
but participants are en-
gaged to make contribu-
at each meal. Call 689-
for information or reser-
Meals arc also delivered
lly to persons who are home
fund, lor information call
9-7700.
have tentatively sched-
Ithe following programs:
\ug. 22 Palm Beach
bod Bank bringing in a
lii called "The Best That's
|You."
^ug. 23 Red-Nurse, Teri
/ Blood Pressure
ecning.
ug. 24 Nutrition Edu-
)n Nina Brookner.
ug. 25 Games
ug.26 Sing-a-long.
ug- 29 Discussion
pup leaders Leroy and
i Stein.
^ug. 30-Games
*ug- 31 To be an-
linced.
Sept. I Dr. Sandala
labetesand the Foot."
ept. 2 Aaron Savith
'calisi.
ONGOING
SI MMF.R CLASSES
AND
DISCUSSION GROUPS
[Rmind Table Talk for Men
Id Timel) Topics for Women
I'uesday, 1:30 p.m. Aug.
and 30.
[Speakers (Tub -Thursday,
Urn. Aug. 25 and Sept.
|L'P ReadinR Tuesday, 4
to-> 5:15 p.m., Aug. 30.
SECOND TUESDAY
ACTIVITY
|%; 21 Sunday. Flea
fwei. Save your Household
Ts lor the JCC. Call Sam
|b"i. 689-7700.
riy1' 3 "~ Lunch ard card
A 21 Lido Spa trip.
P am Rubin for informa-
hARP Defensive Driving
LvVJ,he ,cc -two scs
rnsSept. |4 and 15-1:30
I ii!1 "I.- Boln sessions must
Laended l0 receive certifi-
LcrS' for discount on
(Ed insunce from
1,?'^ or Hartford In-
K Companies. $7 in-
lu'onal material fee to be
made out to AARP and this
check to be mailed to Jewish
Community Center, 2415
Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm
Beach, 33409. Call Marcie
Frisch at 689-7700.
Artist of (he Month Bea
Bunze
During August we will have
a very special exhibit. Hanging
collages from various re-
sources of nature will be on
display in our Senior Center.
Don't miss these unusual ar-
rangements of sea and plant
life. We are privileged to have
Ms. Bunze display her work
during the summer months.
She has been our Yoga in-
structor for many years, and
this is another talent she brings
to the JCC.
Works of Senior Artists are
displayed at the JCC. Seniors
are invited to call the Center if
they wish to exhibit their art.
Artists may price their indivi-
dual work giving people an
opportunity to purchase any-
thing they wish. We cordially
invite Seniors who wish to
exhibit to call the Center for
further information at 689-
7701.
Con tinned from Page 4-A
urban schools? Does he fail to
see that while private schools
are free to escape the burden
of accommodating handi-
capped children, the public
schools must constantly face
up to that expensive responsi-
bility?
Is it possible that the Presi-
dent didn't think twice befoe
he blamed "federal control"
of the schools particularly
as to the (court) order for de-
segregation for what he
calls losing sight of the main
purpose of education?
When he made his plea for
tuition tax cuts for all private
schools a year ago, Reagan
said: "I would like to think
that we are offering help to the
inner-city child who faces a
world of drugs and crime, the
child with special needs and to
families who still believe the
Lord's Prayer will do them
less harm in the schoolroom
than good." This inaccurate
reference to "special needs"
combined with the irrelevant
plug for Christina piety in
classooms drawing children of
non-Christina faiths is cause
for true astonishment.
Even Senator Pat Moynihan
Pr-tt-iq Cmrttmr
We Make You
Look Good!
a
f,
Complete printing, copying 4 bindery service
Free pick-up 4 dmlhrmryot your order
586-6220
107 South Dixie Hwy. Lake Worth, Fl. 33460 Tl
f
f
f
,1
I

Attention Fund Raisers
Make Money For Your
Organization
Bring Your Group
For A 3 Day Trip
HOTEL
HEALTH
RESORT
(305)-538-4621
40 Island Ave.
Miami Beach, FL33139
STATE OF
ISRAEL BONDS
BOUGHT AND SOLD
Invest in
Israel Securities

WE'RE SPECIALISTS IN
ISRAEL SECURITIES
***
TRANSACTIONS DAILY VIA TELEX
TO ISRAEL STOCK EXCHANGE
^>V em ASuftMdwryoia
Leumi
Bank Lmw MMM MM
NASD
18 East 48th Street
New Yotk, N.Y. 10017
Securities (212)759-1310
ation Toll Free (800) 221-4838
(D., N.Y.), a proponent of the
tuition tax credit plan, has
been impelled to remind the
President and other Adminis-
tration officials that they are
making "overblown" claims
of how the tax credits would
solve the nation's educational
ills.
The educational welfare of
some 41,000,000 public school
children is affected by the at-
tention or lack of attention we
offer those schools. And at a
time when we face heavy com-
petition from the Soviet Union
and other nations in the race
for technological supremacy,
it is painful to note that the
San Jose, Calif., Unified Pub-
lic School District, in the
center of that state's high-
technology, industrial com-
plex, has just let the nation
know it is involvent.
YOUR OPINION COUNTS
Tell us What you Think!!
Send letters to:
The Editor, Jewish Floridian
501 South Flagler Dr. #305
W. Palm Beach, FL 33401
TEMPLE BETH EL
The Conservative Congregation of the Palm Beaches
2815 North Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach 833-0339
HIGH HOLY DAY SERVICES
ROSH HASHANAH
Wednesday Night Sept. 7
Thursday Morning Sept. 8
Thursday Night Sept. 8
Friday Morning Sept. 9
YOM KIPPUR
Friday Night Sept. 16
(Kol Nidre)
Saturday Morning Sept. 17
(MinhaandYiskor)
8:00 p.m.
8:30 a.m.
7:00 p.m.
8:30 a.m.
7:00 p.m.
9:00 a.m.
5:00 p.m.
Howard J. Hirsch, Rabbi Elaine Shapiro, Cantor
Samuel Wadler, President
LABOR DAY WEEK-END CELEBRATION
5 days & 4 nights
$110
PLUS TAX &
GRATUITIES
INCLUDING
MEALS
4 days & 3 nights
$85
Reserve Now For The
HIGH HOLY DAYS & SUCC0TH
Services Will be Conducted by Cantor Herman Klein
Labor Day-Rosh Hashanna
ioH.w. oniK,. SPECIAL plus tax*
10 days 9 nights gratuities
Sept.2-11 $OQfi* INCLUDING
from ^ VJ \J n,Mfl DEALS
50 of 2S0 rooms **
Tennis Facilities Sauna Handball Volleyball
Olympic Swimming Pool Full Block of Private Beach
. % TVinAIIRooms
CeA Jl APPROPRIATE eMTERTAIMMENT
My tanks* hi tar
SPACIOUS 0CEANFR0NT SYNAGOGUE
IKOSMCft
r! __.......
g^. THE MUITI-IMUHM DOLLAR
CRQUltt
San*sma awia4iiisi **
v.tlons Phone: 1 -538-9045 or 531-5771.
Your Hosts. MIcrtMl LoStowttz A Alsa SmMow
I
r-


Page 14-A The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, August 19^1983
Synagogue News
Candle Lighting Time Friday, August 19-7t35pm

CONGREGATION
BETH KODESH
SISTERHOOD
The Sisterhood of Congre-
gation Beth Kodesh will hold
their first meeting of the
season Tuesday, Aug. 30 at
12:30 p.m. at the Congrega-
tional Church, 113 N. Federal
Hwy., Boynton Beach.
CONGREGATION
AITZ CHAIM
SITERHOOD
Sisterhood AITZ Chaim:
Board Meeting Thursday,
Sept. 1, 10 a.m. General
Membership Meeting Sunday,
Oct. 2, 10 a.m.
Sisterhood Aitz Chaim
taking reservations now for
Nov. 11-14 weekend at Shore
Club, Miami Beach; double
occupancy; transportation and
gratuities included. For reser-
vations please contact Helen
Branfonbrener, Bedford D 84
and Manya Goldberg, Sussex
L 240, C.V., West Palm
33409.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
Lake Worth
Saturday night, Sept. 3,
Temple Beth Sholom will
usher in the season of the High
Holy Days with the impressive
and meaningful Slichot serv-
ices a time for self examina-
tion and repentance prior to
the Holy Days of Rosh
Hashana and Yom Kippur.
Program 9 p.m. Social
gathering and the showing of a
most interesting film that will
reach everyone. At 11:30 p.m.
the congregation will enter the
Sanctuary for the Slichot serv-
ice. Refreshments by Temple
Sisterhood.
TEMPLE JUDEA
Office Opens
The Temple Judea office is
., now located at the Village
Market Shopping Center at
the corner of Haverhill and
Okeechobee Roads. Office
hours are Monday through
Thursday, 9 a.m. until 4:30
p.m.; Friday, 9 a.m. until 3
p.m. and Sunday from 10 a.m.
until noon.
Membership information,
High Holy Day Tickets, High
Holy Day prayer books, and
extensive information about
the congregation's Brother-
hood, Sisterhood, Junior and
Senior youth groups. Young
Couples Club, Good Timers,
XYZ Club, and Single Parents
program will be avaifable.
Reservations will be ac-
cepted for the Royce Hotel
events and for upcoming
membership teas. The tele-
phone number will remain the
same.
Religious School to Meet
Temple Judea's Religious
School will be utilizing the fa-
cilities of the Jewish Commu-
nity Day School beginning
with opening day, Sunday,
Sept. 11 from 10 a.m. until
noon. The Day School is
located on Parker Ave., south
of Southern Blvd. Wednesday
4P evening classes will also be
held at the Day School and
will begin on Oct. 5 from 7
p.m. until 8:30 p.m.
Open House
Temple Judea will host a
special Open House on Friday
evening, Aug. 19 beginning at
7 p.m. at St. Catherine's Cul-
tural Center, at the corner of
Southern Blvd. and Flagler
Drive. Services begin at 8 p.m.
with the regular junior and
adult oneg shabbat following.
At the Open House, pro-
spective members will be
invited to join in a Kiddush of
wine and challah and learn
about the extensive program-
ming already in progress at
Temple Judea. Rabbi Joel Le-
vine, Cantor Rita Shore, and
Dr. Jeffrey Faivus, Temple
president will be available to
answer questions. Affiliate
presidents, Edith Grushow,
Sisterhood; Marshal Meltzer,
Brotherhood; Jean Fritz,
XYZ; Lloyd and Judy Winer,
Good Timers, Dan Vogel,
Youth Group; and representa-
tives from the young Couples
Club will be present to explain
to newcomers their various ac-
tivities. Goldie Bershad will
explain the Temple's new
single parent social group.
Robert Carton will describe
the new program for children
of single parent and blended
family homes.
Temple Judea places a great
deal of emphasis on youth
related activities. Judge
Edward Fine, Religious
School principal, Sherry Mit-
teldorf, Youth Director and
members of the faculty will
answer questions regarding
these area.
During Services, Rabbi Le-
vine and Cantor Shore will
present a teaching sermon on
Music of the High Holy Days.
The congregation will learn
specific musical responses
which are only used during
this sacred season. This
teaching session will enhance
the participatory nature of this
year's High Holy Day wor-
ship.
Art of Grandparenting
Rabbi Joel Levine will ex-
plore the Art of Grandparent-
ing at the Rabbi's Nosh, Mon-
day, Aug. 22 at 3 p.m. at the
new Royce Hotel at the corner
of Australian and Belvedere.
This will be an open discus-
sion. Candy Fischer, member-
ship chairperson, invites pro-
spective members to attend.
Reservations are $3 per person
and must be sent in advance to
529 Muirfield Drive, Atlantis,
33462.
Mrs. Fischer also invites
prospective members to attend
a special tea in the Lands of
the Presidents on Wednesday,
Esther Banish [fourth from left), treasurer of Temple hi
Sisterhood, presents a check from Sisterhood to St
[third from left), president of Temple Beth El, for thr.31
of a 15 passenger bus. The bus, a first for the codreV.5I?!5
be used to provide transportation for the religiousleSa
the youth groups and for residents of Century VUUkIbiIi
transportation to Friday evening services beginninroi X2
25 when the temple returns to the 8:15 p.m. service u^S
Also taking part in the informal ceremonies in front of S
are [left to right] Larry Goldberg, youth director sX
iff, member of the Board of Trustees and felSj
bus
Schiff
Education; and
Temple Beth El.
Rabbi Howard Hirsch, spiritual k
Aug. 24 at 7:30 p.m. Details
are available at the Temple
office in the Village Market
Center, Haverhill and Okee-
chobee.
"The Return of the Jeddi"
Rabbi Joel Levine will speak
on "The Return of the Jeddi"
at Temple Judea Sabbath
Services, Friday, Aug. 26 at 8
p.m. Cantor Rita Shore will
chant the music.
This sermon will help chil-
dren and teenagers prepare for
8ME" themes of the i
Holy Day season.
Grandparents are especiall
encouraged to attend in orj
to help them explain morcd
fectively to their grandchild
what the High Holy rjj
season is all about.
The regular Oneg Shabh
follows services. For more i
formation, leave your nan
and telephone number 3
the Temple office.
Religious directory
CONSERVATIVE
B'noi Toroh Congregation
1401 N.W. 4th Avenue, Boca Raton, 33432. Phone 392-8566.
Rabbi Theodore Feldman. Sabbath Services, Friday 8:15 p.m.,
Saturday 9:30 a.m.
Congregation Anshei Sholom
5348 Grove Street, West Palm Beach 33409. Phone 684-3212.
Rabbi Harry Z. Schectman. Cantor Mordecai Spektor. Daily: 8:30
a.m. and 7:30 p.m. Friday: 8:30 a.m., 5 p.m. and o late service
at8:15p.m., Saturday: 8:30a.m., 7:30p.m., Mincha.
Congregation Bath Kodesh of Boynton Beach
at Congregational Church, 115 No. Federol Highway, Boynton
Beach. Phone 737-5756. Rabbi Avrom L. Drozin, Sabbath ser-
vices, Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.
Golden Lakes Temple
1470 Golden Lakes Blvd., West Palm Beach 33411. Phone 689-
9430. Rabbi Joseph.Speiser. Daily Services 8:15 a.m. and 5:30
p.m. Sabbath services Friday 8:15 p.m. Saturday 9a.m., 5p.m.,
Mincha followed by Sholosh Suedos.
Temple Bath David
4657 Hood Road, Palm Beach Gardens 33410. Phone 694-2350
Rabbi William Marder, Cantor Earl J. Rackoff. Sabbath services
Friday 8 p.m., Saturdoy 10a.m.
Temple Barb El
2815 No. Flagler Dr., West Palm Beach 33407. Phone 833-0339
Rabbi Howard J. Hirsch, Cantor Elaine Shapiro. Sabbath services
Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9:30 a.m. Daily AAinyan 8:15 a.m.
Sunday and legal Holidays 9a.m.
Temple Beth Sholom
224 N.W Avenue "G", Belle Glade 33430. Sabbath services
Friday 8:30 p.m.
Temple Beth Sholom
315 N. "A" Street, Lake Worth 33460. Phone 585-5020 Rabbi
Emanuel E.senberg Cantor Jacob Elman. Services Monday and
Thursday 8:15a.m. Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9am
Temple Bath Zion
lions Club, 700 Camelia Dr., Royal Palm Beach, Sabbath Ser-
vices Friday 8 pm Saturday 9 a.m. Rabbi Nathan Zelizer
Cantor Choim Baltuck. Phone 793-9122.
Temple B'noi Jacob
2177 So. Congress Ave., West Palm Beach 33406 Phon. 499
?m7 ssiDr, "^yscE:sabbo,h "SiTsyft
p.m.,Saturday9a.m.,MondaythroughThursday9a.m.
Temple Emanu-EI
i?hhNT\CrT,y R?d' Plm Beach 3348 *"" 832-0804
Rabbi Joel Chaim. Cantor David Dordashti. Sababth service
Fr.day 8:30 p.m..Saturday 9 a.m. OrvieOe,
Temple Emeth
3530 ^ *-*nW*' ?el,Qy Bech 33446 Ph 498-
3536. Rabbi Bernard S.lver, Cantor Seymour Zisook Sabbath
services, 5 p.m. and 8 p.m.. Saturday and holiday 8 45 am
Daily M.nyan, 8:45 a.m. and 5 p.m.
The Treasure Coast Jewish Canter
(Martin County) 3257 S.E. Salerno Road (opposite Winn-DixwL
Stuart, FL 33490. President Lief Grazi: 1-287-7732. Friday servict |
8 p.m.
CONSERVATIVE LIBERAL
Temple Eternal Light
Boca West Community UMC, 8900 Boca West, Glades Rood (1
mile west of Boco Turnpike). The free Synagogue, P.O. Box3,
Boca Raton 33432. Phone: 368-1600, 391-1111. Robbi Benjomii
Rosayn. Sabbath services, Friday 8:15 p.m.
ORTHODOX
Aitz Chaim Congregation
Century Village, West Palm Beach. Phone 689-4675. Sabbo*
services 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. Daily services 8:15 a.m. and6:31
p.m.
Congregation Anshei Emuna
551 Brittany L. Kings Point, Delray Beach 33446. Phone 499-740?
or 499-9229. Harry Silver, President. Daily services 8 a.m. ondS
p. m. Saturdays ond Holidays 9 o. m.
RfFOffAt
Tfce Reform Temate of Jenifer Teqetsfo
at St. Jude Church (Parrish Hall), 204 U.S. Highway One Sou*.
Tequesto 33458. Phone 747-4235. President Jeanne Torschw
Services the second and fourth Friday of every month, 8 p.m.
Temple Beth El of Boca Raton
333 S.W. Fourth Avenue. Boca Raton 33432. Phone 391-8900
Robbi Merle E. Singer, Cantor Martin Rosen. Sobboth w**
Friday 8:15 p.m. Torch Study with Rabbi Singer, Saturdoy9:15
a.m. Sabbath morning services 10:30o.m.
Taajolt lath Shalom
St. Helen's Parish Holl, 20th Avenue and Victory Blvd., Vwo
Beach 32960, mailing address: P.O. Box 2113, Vero Beoch, H
32960. Rabbi Stephen Adams. Phone 1-569-0180.
Temple Bath Torah
at St. David's in the Pines Episcopal Retreat, Forest Hill Blvd. onj
Wellington Trace, West Palm Beoch. Moiling address: (
lantern Tree Lane, West Palm Beach 33411. Friday *"*"*
p.m. Rabbi Steven R. Westman, Cantor Nicholas Fenakel rw
793-2700.
Temple Israel
1901 No. Flagler Dr., West Palm Beach 33407. Phoetttjjjj
Rabb. Howard Shapiro, Cantorial Soloist Susan Weiss. 50"
services, Friday 8 p.m.
Temple Judea
a' St. Catherine's Greek Orthodox Church Social HoM|
Washington Rd., at Southern Boulevard. Rabbi Joe I. w
Cantor Rila Shore. Mailing address 1407 Mth Lor*
Worth 33463. Phone 965-7778.
Temple Sinai
01 Coson-United Methodist Church, corner of lake Ida ^
Swmton Ave., Delray. Phone 276-6161. Mailing oddrw
NW. 9th Street, Delray Beach 33444. Rabbi Samuel
"'day services 8:15 p.m.




Friday, August 19,1983 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 15-A
temple Beth ei Concert Aliya Official Explains
Basis For 'Mivtza Elef
ln Wednesday evening,
., 24 at 8 p.m., Temple
X El of West Palm Beach
([conclude its "Music For A
[timer Evening" programs
lh raconteur and singer par
tellence, Dario Cassini.
Dario Cassini is a master of
t art of Bel Canto. He is a
Lge of the beloved tenor
kiamino Gigli. Dario sings
tight different language and
t been praised by critics all
I,, the world for his great
ce and dynamic personal-
Mr. Cassini has sunR the
lor roles in Rigoletto,
isca, Pagliacci and Boheme
the San Carlo Opera as
as concertized with the
Inland El Paso, Madrid and
|me Symphonies. In addi-
i to performing at the finest
ht clubs in Las Vegas, Mr.
tssini sang in the 20th Cen-
movie production of
Her She's Mine' with
limy Stewart and on televi-
,n in the Ed Sullivan, Jackie
[tason and Danny Thomas
ows.
The concert will be per-
Dario Cassini
formed in a cabaret style with
light refreshments served.
Tickets may be purchased at
the Temple office or on the
evening of the performance
for $7.50 per ticket. For more
information please the Temple
office.
Bar Mitzvah
RONALD GREENFIELD
Ronald Greenfield, son of
jr. William Greenfield of
Wellington and Mrs. Ruth
Ireen field of West Palm
Each, will become a Bar
tzvah on August 20 at
bmple Beth Sholom of Lake
forth. Rabbi Emanuel Eisen-
prg and Cantor Jacob Elman
I officiate.
IRonald is a student at the
kwish Community Day
fchool and the Florida Air
cademy.
ERIC KURIT
iLric, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Irncrd Kuril of West Palm
pch, will be called to the
prah on the occasion of his
br Mil/van on August 27 at
bmple Beth El, West Palm
pach. Eric attends the Jewish
immunity Day School and is
nember of the Knesset. Eric
in the Kadima group at
Eric Kuril
Temple Beth El and is in-
terested in computer science.
HOWARD A. SCHNEIDER, M.D.
Announces the opening of his office
for the practice of
Internal Medicine and Rheumatology
At
Courtyard Gardens
Suite 104
2560 RCA Blvd.
OfficeHours P"ni Beach Gardens, R. Mephone
ByAppt 33410 694.2223
JERUSALEM (JTA) P?jnted ,out: 4."rh1erc,lare **"
million Jews in the West who
Yossi Harel, spokesman for
the aliya department of the
Jewish Agency in Israel, said
here in a statement to the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency
that his department had estab-
lished "Mivtza Elef" (Project
1000) "in order to give fami-
lies the opportunity to see and
know Israel before they decide
on aliya."
Harel, who is also a member
of the steering committee in-
volved in Project 1000,
could move wherever they
want. We would like them to
come to Israel; however they
have to be prepared to come.
We want them to see the value
ofworking, housing, and edu-
cation in Israel. We call this
process 'aliya in stages,' or
more colloquially, taste it be-
fore you eat it."
Harel was responding to an
article by Cindy Kaye, a JTA
correspondent in Jerusalem,
Missionary Groups
Persuade Jewish Children
to Christian Summer Camps
NEW YORK (JTA) He said parents calling for
More than 100 Russian Jewish more information can be con-
children are attending a Con- nected with Yiddish-speaking
necticut camp operated by
missionaries, according to the
Task Force on Missionaries
and Cults of the Jewish Com-
munity Relations Council of
New York.
Seymour Lachman, Task
Force chairman, said, "We
have found that some mission-
ary groups are engaging in a
concerted outreach campaign
to persuade Russian Jewish
families to send their children
to Christian summer camps,
where children are inevitably
more susceptible to indoctri-
nation."
HE SAID such recruiting is
particularly strong in the
Brighton Beach area of
Brooklyn, where new Russian
Jewish settlers are approached
on the boardwalks, in the
park, and even in their homes.
Demonstrators
Demand Israel
Withdrawal
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Dozens of reserve soldiers and
members of a group called
'Parents Against Silence"
demonstrated outside the
Premier's office here to
protest against the continued
Israel Defense Force presence
in Lebanon and demanding
that it withdraw from that
country before winter.
The demonstration took
place as reports came in from
Lebanon that an Israeli army
position near Shouafat south
of Beirut came under fire and
that an Israeli soldier was
wounded in an ambush near
the Zaharani River some eight
miles south of the Awali
River.
staff members, and the
parents are told the camp is
Jewish. He said the fees
charged by the camp are as
little as five to ten dollars a
week.
From a teenager who posed
as a camp counselor, the task
force learned that of the 200
Russian Americans attending
the camp, more than half are
Jews. Nine of them were bap-
tised on July 3, Lachman said.
who described the positive ele-
ments of the project, including
some of the problems encoun-
tered by some of the partici-
pants in it in the Aug. 4 issue
of the Daily News Bulletin.
PROJECT 1000, which was
introduced this summer by the
Israel Aliya Center of North
America in cooperation with
30 other American Jewish Or-
ganizations, is aimed at ex-
posing American families to
life in Israel. The program
offers two month-long ses-
sions to bring a total of 1,000
families to Israel in a variety
of capacities, hoping that the
participants would become in-
terested in aliya.
Referring to some of the
criticisms of the participants,
Harel said: "Without
checking out every individual
complaint, I can't say how ac-
curate they are or how objec-
tive. However, I will say that
we have to work on the area of
organization.
"This is the first year that so
many families have come on
this program 250 families
comprising 14 groups in July
and August. Next year we
mean to strengthen our orga-
nizational level. Despite the
problems we encountered this
summer we are glad the fami-
lies come and look forward to
more people next year."
Area Deaths
BERKOWITZ
Sidney, 77, of Wellington B-108. West
PUm Beach. Riverside Memorial
Chapel, West Palm Beach.
COHEN
Lillian, 81, of 12730 Spinnaker Lane,
Wellington. West Palm Beach.
Riverside Memorial Chapel, West Palm
Beach.
FINKELSTEIN
Rose, 96, of Camden 171. Century
Village, West Palm Beach. Riverside
Memorial Chapel, West Palm Beach.
GREENBERG
EVA, 88. of 8038 N.W. 32nd Ave.. Boca
Raton. Riverside Memorial Chapel.
West Palm Beach.
JANIS
(Janotaky). Anne, 78, of Waltham E-108
Century Village. West Palm Beach.
LevUt-Welnsteln Memorial. West Palm
Beach.
KAZER
Ben P.. 71. of 10106 42nd Terrace,
Boynton Beach. Riverside Memorial
Chapel, West Palm Beach.
KINO
Rhoda. 78, of Caaa Bianca Hotel. Miami
Beach. Riverside Memorial Chapel,
West Palm Beach.
LINDERMAN
Hyman, 78. of 408 Golden River Drive.
West Palm Beach. Levltt-Welnsteln
Memorial Chapel, West Palm Beach.
MARKOWITZ
Louis E.. 3800 N.E. First Lane. Boynton
Beach. Riverside Memorial Chapel,
West Palm Beach.
MARKOWITZ
Norman P.. 68, of 836 88th St., West
Palm Beach. Levltt-Welnsteln
Memorial, West Palm Beach
MEDOFF
Richard, 88, of 148 Lake Gloria Drive,
West Palm Beach. Levltt-Welnsteln
Memorial, West Palm Beach.
NACHMAN
Jeffrey, 84, of 4676 Davis Road, Lake
Worth. Levltt-Welnsteln Memorial
Chapel. West Palm Beach.
PINE
Sadie, 84. of Wellington O-806. Century
Village. West Palm Beach. Riverside
Memorial Chapel. West Palm Beach.
TAFFBRT
Shirley, 78, of Windsor 81, Century
Village. Levitt-Welnsteui Memorial,
West Palm Beach.
JOEL E. COHEN, M.D.
IS PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE THE OPENING
OF HIS OFFICE FOR THE PRACTICE OF
ORTHOPAEDIC AND RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY
SPORTS MEDICINE
ARTHROSCOPY
901 N FLAGLER DRIVE
WEST PALM BEACH, FL 33401
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210 JUPITER LAKES BLVD.
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(305) 747-7690
When selecting a profewionaJ,
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At Levitt-Weinstein,
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North Miami fetch
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Beach
load Sever
'4SM


Page 16-A The Jewiah Floridian of Palm Beth County / Friday, Auguat 19,1983
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Off to College
Class of'87
BACK TO SCHOOL

E

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>
a
!
E
i
5
Midrasha-Judaica
High School
Jewish Community
Day School
"Train a child in the way he should go; and when
he is old he will not depart pom it"
Book of Proveifcs 22:6
Supplement to the Jewish Floridian of Pelm Beach County Section B


Page 2-B The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Friday. August 19 19P
Jewish Community Day School Enters New E
______________________ ------------ activities with the students in1 will include a nn..f
Bv MORDECAI LEVOV
Headmaster
The Jewish Community Day
School will begin its second
decade in the Fall of 1983 on
its new campus with a sub-
stantially expanded program
that will include, for the first
time, a junior high school
division. During the past two
years, the campus has under-
gone major refurbishing
including the construction of a
new six classroom building,
the new "Merkaz" which
houses the sanctuary lunch
room auditorium, and the
expanded playground and
athletic facilities. The seven
acre site offers opportunities
for further expansion as the
school continues to grow.
The Day School reached a
milestone in 1982, when it
became the first Jewish day
school to become accredited
by the prestigious Florida
Council of Independent
Schools. As a result of a move
to the new campus, the school
underwent re-evaluation this
past spring and was further
accredited with the comment
by the evaluators, that the new
facility would assure the
continued fine educational
program that originally led to
the school's accreditation.
Through the generosity of
Mr. and Mrs. Robert D.
Rapaport, the JCDS will reach
a further milestone this Fall
with the creation of the Rapa-
port Junior High School as a
separate department.
The School will begin the
Fall term on Aug. 24 with the
Benjamin S. Hornstein
Elementary School, encom-
passing the kindergarten
through sixth grade and a
separate, carefully planned
Junior High School program
that will include the seventh,
eighth and ninth grades.
The basic philosophy of the
school, which begins its fall
term on August 24, is to
combine an outstanding
program of secular education
with an understanding of the
social, cultural and religious
heritage of the Jewish people.
In order to achieve these
objectives, the school has an
outstanding faculty of secular
and Judaic teachers who are
committed to excellence in
education and the importance
of insuring that each indivi-
dual student achieves his or
her greatest potential. The
teaching faculty can count on
a wide range of support to
achieve these goals from the
school's headmaster, Morde-
cai Levow, the newly appoint-
ed secular studies coordinator,
Mrs. Selma Barnett, the
Judaic Studies programming
and curriculum assistant, Jack
Rosenbaum, Mr. Ron Her-
manski, the new science co-
ordinator, and Mrs. Sarah
Allinson, the school psycholo-
gist.
Education, in order to be
successful and effective,
should be challenging and fun.
Therefore, the school's
program not only includes
rigorous classroom and indivi-
dual studies but also a whole
range of special formal and
informal programs.
For the past two years, the
school has had an outstanding
computer education program,
at the Science Museum and
Planetarium, lor the students
in the sixth, seventh and eighth
grades. This fall the program
will be expanded to include the
fourth through ninth grades
and to utilize "in-house"
computers for special enrich-
ment and reinforcement
The Day School, in a special program with the Science Museum,
provides computer instruction for upper grade students.
jtllllllllHIIHIIIttl...........Ml
activities with the students in' wiu include a n
kindergarten through fourth outstanding private JL'
grades. Recognizing the the area. Plans call fn
importance of the science and school games in tne V
math components, our Soccer, Basketball
science coordinator is
developing a completely
revised science curriculum
which will include an outdoor
Science Laboratory as well as
expanded Science Room lab
facilities. The Math program,
too, under the guidance of
Mrs. Barnett, who was the
Math Teacher of the Year in
1980 in Nassau County in New
York, is being revised and
expanded.
The Music, Art and
Physical Education programs parents are invited ln !fl
of the school will be expanded school for enrollm
and strengthened and a new
Drama program is being
added. The J.C.D.S. took the
lead in establishing a "small
school" athletic league which
Soccer,
etc. for studems'in i
through sixth gr [tt
seventh through nimhg,
.A.fedral'y assisted kl
hot lunch program is pr
for all students
sportation can be am
from various areas
Palm Beaches, ifi.'
ance is available f0r 2
requiring it.
Class sizes are u
However, space is avail
grades. |n
invited
,vr --'
formation.
The school is a Bentfi
Agency of the Jewish F
tion of Palm Beach Cou
Bonnie Sheryl Grant
KIDS KI9SLT
Infants and Children's Clothing
0-14 Boys & Girls
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All Back to School Needs
Two Convenient locations.
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I JUUUULMJ Bill Ulj M.LLIUU.IJUJU.M 11 UAUiUM
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James A. Collins, Resident Manager
MEMBERS OF THE NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE


Friday, August 19.1983 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page3-B
[idrasha Judaica High School
Learning and Growing Together
1ANNLYNN LIPTON
lish Education Director
IjeMish Federation of
1 palm Beach County
Le is a \crv special group
leenaecrs who meet on
EdJy evenings. They g
Ihcr in order .to share
(hines their tr.end-
their experiences and
Idesire to learn about their
ton and their people. This
|al group has a good time
line together and growing
[her. They are waiting for
f to join them!
[jdrasha is a school for
|es 9 to 12 that meets
lnesday evenings from 7 to
.p.m. at the Jewish Com-
Ijiv Dav School. The
[cms come from every high
lol in Palm Beach County.
I represent all of the Jew-
linstitutions in our com-
litv and the school is open
fi'liated and non-affiliated
le courses are taught by
Landing faculty members
I are specialists in their
|s- be it Hebrew, Jewish
or Bible. The courses
Ir something of interest for
lybody and a sampling of
>sc titles include: Hebrew,
I Bible Comes Alive, Jew-
Drama, Newspaper and
[rent Events, Cults in
jerica, Literature of the
ocaust and many others.
idrasha students have one
^r special opportunity. If
attend the program for
: years of high school
Ishman, Sophomore and
Junior), they are eligible for a
scholarship up to $500 to be
ipplied to any approved pro-
gram of study and travel in Is-
rael. This program has en-
couraged many young people
to spend a quinmester or
summer in Israel in such pro-
grams as High School in Is-
rael, United Synagogue Youth
Pilgrimage, Hadassah
Pilgrimage, National Federa-
tion of Temple Youth and
others.
The Fall semester will begin
with a special event and regis-
tration on September 14, and
classes will start October 5. If
vou would like to receive more
information and a catalogue,
'ontact Ann Lynn Lipton,
Jewish Education Director of
the Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County at 832-2120.
You too can be a member of
this elite group of committed
Jewish teenagers!
Teacher Roz Pomerance [left] asks a student in the Midrasba
Judaica High School to show the location of an area they are
studying on the map of Israel.
Hillel: Home Away From Home
What do the Jewish students
at Florida State University
have in common with those at
Palm Beach Junior College?
Hillel Jewish Student Centers.
Hillel is the college division
of B'nai B'rith, the oldest and
largest Jewish service organi-
zation in the world. Founded
in 1923, Hillel has been serving
as the Jewish address on
campus for over sixty years.
In Florida, there are Hillel
staff workers serving the cam-
puses of the University of
Florida, Florida State Univer-
sity, Miami Dade Community
College, University of Miami,
University of South Florida,
Broward Community College,
Florida International Univer-
sity and Florida Atlantic Uni-
versity.
Outreach workers, profes-
sionals and volunteers, serve
at more than a dozen other
campuses throughout the
state.
All these people have one
thing in common they are
dedicated to making it easier
to be Jewish, when being
Jewish isn't easy.
Rabbis, social workers and
educators, the Hillel profes-
sional staff is helping to en-
hance the quality of Jewish life
on the campus and in the com-
munity. Hillel is making the
difference on campus
throughout the United States.
Serving as a lifeline to the
future Jewish community by
working with all Jewish col-
lege youth, regardless of deno-
minational or socio-economic
factors, Hillel professionals
are devoted to a stronger
Jewish tomorrow.
On the campus, Hillel is the
place where Jewish students go
for worship, for study, for
counsel, for friends, for fun.
Offering authentic Jewish
experiences, making sure that
every holiday is celebrated in
ways that are meaningful and
enjoyable. Hillel serves as a
home-away-from-home for
thousands of students each
year.
Hillel is Israel culture fairs,
pool parties, Shabbat services
and dinners, coffeehouses and
socials. It's speakers, films
and Holocaust commemora-
tion, Soviet Jewry programs
and Israeli dance groups.
The Hillel student is also in-
volved in United Jewish Ap-
peal campaigns. Last year
alone, over $20,000 was raised
on campuses throughout Flor-
ida.
Hillel is the place where stu-
dents can work and socialize
with other Jewish students,
find a Rabbi or social worker
in times of trouble, and a place
to call home on campus. This
is Hillel Jewish Student
Centers throughout Florida
and throughout the country.
Hillel is funded by local fed-
erations and B'nai B'rith and
by donations from parents and
friends of Hillel. All Jewish
students and faculty are mem-
bers of Hillel and welcome at
all its activities.
Hillel is a beneficiary agency
of the Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County and
scores of other federations
across the United States, and
is. an affiliate of B'nai B'rith
International.
Flagler
National 11
Bank"!
Member FDIC
Helping to build
Palm Beach County.
Locally owned
and operated.
WE'RE
PROUD
TO BE
INDEPENDENT.
LAKE WORTH BANKING CENTER 659-2265
6530 Lake Worth Rd, Lake Worth, FL. 33463
P.G.A. BANKING CENTER 659-2265
2570 PGA. Blvd., Palm Beach Gardens, FL. 33410
DELRAY BANKING CENTER 498-4600
4920 Delray West Rd., Delray, FL. 33446
IUPITER BANKING CENTER 659-2265
620 W. Indiantown Rd., Jupiter, FL. 33458
FLAGLER CENTER 659-2265
501 S. Flagler Dr., W.P.B., FL. 33401
FOREST HILL BANKING CENTER 659-2265
1870 Forest Hill Blvd. West Palm Beach, FL. 33406
PALM BEACH LAKES BANKING CENTER 659-2265
2380 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd., West Palm Beach, FL. 33409
NORTHLAKE BANKING CENTER 659-2265
2863 Northlake Blvd., Lake Park, FL. 33410
mm


Page4-B The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, August 19,1983
Maintaining Jew
Temple Beth David
OF NORTHERN PALM BEACH COUNTY
A Conservative Congregation
Serving the Needs of All Ages
Rabbi William Marder
Cantor Earl Rackoff
* Conservative Congregation
* Affiliate of the United Synagogue of America
* Complete Sabbath and Festival Service Schedule
* High Holiday Services
* Religious School, K-7, Bar/Bat Mitzvah
Starting Sunday, Sept. 11
* Confirmation
* Youth Programs
* Adult Education
* Sisterhood
Men's Club
* Social Programs
Be A Part Of Our Exciting Congregation Community In
Our New Home On Hood Road in Palm Beach Gardens.
For Membership and Religious School Information
Call Temple Office
845-1134
By RABBI
WILLIAM MARDER
Temple Beth David
With this year's high school
graduates preparing to begin
their college careers, and with
many young people from our
area returning to their cam-
puses, the subject of Jewish
identity on campus becomes
timely and relevant.
There was a time, two or
three generations ago, when
the campus in general was an
unfriendly place for Jews:
there were sometimes ex-
tremely small enrollments of
Jewish students; it was fash-
ionable for Jewish professors
to hide their Jewish identity or
at least to assert an indiffer-
ence to their Jewish origins;
few courses of Jewish content
or interest were offered; and
there was a low profile among
the Jewish student body on
campus.
.By and laro.,i.. l
?!""* has c S
very many cam!?01'!
ffyingas Jews 3
"lembers in nJS
the students, in'fa
campus Jewish CJ2
w,th sharJ *9
ties, and pro,2?
sgn.ficantly/T"
are offered at a <
and for credit
challenge and a uniw
funity. Campus is Ti
>ng atmosphere
beliefs arc questiooe'
discussed and analn
values held up to critia
A further challengl
college is most oft5|
sons first experieoccl
Tom a home-ani1
"Move to apW
.w
.*.* i
j


Friday, August 19,1983 / Th Jwiriah Floridkn of Palm Beach County Pagfc5-B
lentity On Campus
ickeround which lent him its
In Jewish identity. Now, for
I first time, the young Jew is
f his own. He has to decide
, himself how to live as a
and, on the most basic
lei, how much his Jewish
Entity means to him.
The greatness of the campus
eerience is the opportunity it
lords. It can be a time for
bening the experience of
Lsh observance, through
Lanukah celebrations, the
jder on Passover, Shabbat at
EL or services in a college
ting run by faculty members
Id students. It can be the
Lse of needing to get in-
lived in campus demonstra-
te on behalf of Israel, in so-
jarity with Soviet Jews, on
her issues of Jewish concern.
lean be a time for reflecting
\ Judaism's abiding value by
iming into contact with those
to not only question and
Iticize Judaism, but who
actively seek to win adherents
to a variety of causes or be-
liefs. It can be a rewarding
time of strengthening of
Jewish identity, a critical time
in the transition from Jewish
youngster to adult Jew.
The overwhelming need is
for Jewish students to return
to campus with a realization
that this period is pivotal in
their lives as Jews, and to seek
out actively Jewish life on
campus. The Jew in isolation,
without the ingredient of
Jewish community, is a Jew in
danger, vulnerable to all kinds
of pressures and tactics. But
the student who is involved in
campus Jewish life, taking ad-
vantage of the unique oppor-
tunities afforded him, meeting
the challenges and growing, is
fulfilled through Jewish
identity. That is the kind of
Jewish experience to look for
on campus.
>wish Youth Organizations and Activities
Some of the following organizations and activities
nay be available on the campus you will be attending.
Information can be obtained through B'nai B'rith Hillel
Foundation on campus or by writing to B'nai B'rith Hillel
Foundation of Florida, 1100 Stanford Drive, Coral
iables.FL 33146.
Jewish Student Union
American Zionist Youth Foundation Israel
Committee representative
Reform Movement representative
Kosher Food Plan
Judaic Studies Program
Student Struggle for Soviet Jewry
Religious Services
Jewish Sororities and Fraternities
Publication
Jewish Life on Campus a directory of B'nai B'rith
lillel Foundations and other Jewish campus agencies with
"formation on Jewish enrollment.
*
&
m is learning;
M learning
\vetoyou."
Nhersf3il3
Our concerned ond dynomic Pobbi
HOWARD SHAPIRO
Our creorive and coring Principal
CECEIL TISHMAN
Our experienced ond Dedicored Teachers
invite you to enroll you children in
TEMPLE ISRAEL'S RELIGIOUS SCHOOL
so that they may be educated
TO SEE THE WORLD THROUGH JEWISH EYES'
Pre-K thru 3rd. Grade open to norvmembers.
Coll Mrs. Trshmon 603-6421
for more inforrnorion
1901 N RoglerDr.
West Polm Beach
633-6422
ISRAEL


Pa*e 6-B The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Friday. August 19. 1963
^
Ss
'4
First High Holiday
Away From Home
B> STEVEN KAPNER
Traditionally, when one
thinks of the High Hobdays
one thinks of the formal
rituals of Judaism. Rosh
Hashanah and Yom Kippur
conjure image* of dignified
family worship, Jong struc-
tured services, ana somber
moments ol prayer But most
important!). it is the
"sameness"' of the hobdays
from vear 10 vear that we
acknowledge. For me.
a wO.iege ireshman-to-be. this
"sameness will be shattered.
M> experiences during the
High Holidays *i!i be any-
thing bui mundane, and 1
expeci that ihis holiday will
greatly contribute to my
continuing Jewish experience.
For my first High Hobdays
away from home. 1 expect to
have two separate, and \ery
unique experiences: Rosh
Hashanah will occur while I'm
backpacking in the mountains
of New Hampshire on a Har-
vard informal orientation
experience and Yom Kippur
will occur during my Fresh-
man Oriental ion and Regis-
tration week.
While reading the letter
Harvard sent me confirming
my piace on the trip. 1 realized
that 1 was going to have a very
intimate religious experience. 1
would not be encumbered by
the "ritual" of the holidav.
GLORY TO THOSE WHO HOPE, FOR THE FUTURE
IS THEIRS- c_
Celebrate the world's beginning *s
we welcome 5744 with prayer and
song. Join our Temple Family and
Rabbi Howard Shapiro as the
Shoiar proclaims our hopes for a
year of blessing and peace, health
and prosperity.
Membership and ticket information 833-8422
TMPU ISHAU
F90l Nom rwgef Dm* *m pjr, Beat*
A tudnon o> eacettrnce
m etaim ucvarv-i
1923
ISRAEL
*ACfTttC< i/K^ ol
VnefiCJT iMOcw Coogi*g4 i Service* '-J*y* frOOpm
This Rosh Hashanah it will
be just God and Me. l"m
sure that if 1 begin a prayer.
God will know what
I'm talking about. So as far a<.
my expectations for this
holida>. 1 expect a beautiful
sxpenence. It's not that the
ritual itself is bad. it"s just that
sometimes we may tr\ too
hard or go too far to get
"dose" to God. and hence we
actually mo\e further away
from Him.
For Yom Kippur, my ex-
perience will be almost the
opposite. During Freshman
Ueek, along with placement
tests and tours of Boston,
Harvard has scheduled Yom
Kippur services.
At these services 1 expect to
be somewhat overwhelmed.
Harvard has a large Jewish
percentage, and I'm sure most
will be at these services.
Therefore. I'll be attending
these \er> somber and \er>
long services in which I'll
know virtually no one in the
congregation at a time when
m> mind will be inundated
with the activities and deci-
sions of Freshman Week.
Presently, l am somewhat
apprehensive about Yom
Kippur, for J know that 1 will
feel at least slightly alienated
from the service and hence the
holiday itself.
However, despite this
seemingly total alienation
from traditional methods of
holiday worship, 1 will not be
completely removed from the
family element inherent within
Judaism. The National
Federation of Temple Broth-
erhoods will attempt to
provide a home away from
home by inviting students into
Brotherhood members' homes
for holidays. Sabbaths, or just
for friendly evening rap ses-
sions. My alonencss at the
I niversity sponsored worship
and the togetherness of a
family should combine to
make my Jewish experience an
experience to remember and
cherish.
MiclrttlBakst
" HlODERN OPTICAL
v\ SERVICE
\ A Complete Collection of Distinctive
^ Contempory Eyewear
'I ft SENIOR ADULT COURTESY
l\ LAB ON PREMISIS
^_ ., ARTIFICIAL EYES
r -^ "WE FILL ALL PRESCRIPTIONS'
I
?* -L Bruca 0. Princa Toni Bogi*
REG OPTICIANS
111 So Oliva Weat Pal* 8#'ch
832-0122 832-3098


Friday, August 19,1983 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 7-B
illege Years -
Time To Beware of Cults
By SANDY ANDRON
I Let us begin with the
Wise that our Jewish youth
Round in the many cults
,ich plag^ our country
div in far disproportionate
unbers to our actual popula-
n The figure is alarming.
wording to the lowest
Late, Jews constitute 12-15
"cent of the cult population;
' such groups as the Uniii-
ion Church and the Divine
Ut Mission the figure is
Eh times higher. The flight
, the cults represents a stag-
ering loss of our teens to
.ovements which may soon
ival intermarriage and
isimilation as threats to
idaism.
From all the studies which
ive been done, we find that
,e cults focus on the gifted
nd creative almost every-
where we look. The most
ighly sought-after age group
the 18-26 bracket and we are
iell aware of the extreme
essure that peers can exert at
iis particular level. The lone-
ly, the unhappy, the confused,
the anxious, the youth in
transition all turn to their
peers for acceptance, tor
support, for solutions, for
guidance and counsel, and for
social moorings. The highly
trained, supportive, "at-
peacc-with-himself" cult
missionary is there like the
proverbial spider with his web
to ensnare the unsuspecting,
hungry, searching teen-age
"fly."
A look at the recruitment
times and techniques is also
revealing. They strike the first
week on campus (a period of
insecurity), during final exams
(a time of anxiety), at gra-
duation time (when there is
concern for the future), the
week after Thanksgiving
recess (when homesickness sets
in), at vacation spots (out of
the flow of routine), where
teens are on bikes or carrying
guitars (both symbols of
rootlessness) and at many,
many other periods of transi-
tion.
An approach to a solution is
^
=LC%
-
Glenn Davis
Daily municipal
bond reports
Current market quotes
New-issue announcements
Latest research
Portfolio Evaluations
lYou can now systematically accumulate gold and silver
P small dollar amounts at prices normally available only
fo high volume dealers.
ma* about Shearson's new flexible PRECIOUS
fcTALS ACCUMULATION PROGRAM.
Call Lee Kleinman, V.P.
655-7850
ShearsowAmerican Express, Inc.

249 Royal Palm Way
Plaza Center East-6th Floor
Palm Beach, FL 33480
both simplistic and complex at
the same time. On the simple
side it is obvious that we can't
have our religious education
focusing on areas of study
which exclude ethics and
personal commitment to
Judaism. It is further obvious
that anti-culture flourishes in a
vacuum and that if we fill the
vacuum there will be no neces-
sity for a teen to search else-
where for answers. This is the
key. One teenager who left the
cults was quoted as saying that
the religion she grew up with
might be compared to reading
the label on a can of food,
while the cult offered her the
nourishment of the product.
If the cults are offering love
Continued on Page 8
Temple Beth David
OF NORTHERN PALM BEACH COUNTY
A Conservative Congregation Serving the Needs of All Ages
RABBI WILLIAM MARDER CANTOR EARL BACKOFF
Come Worship With Us At
HIGH HOLY DAY SERVICES
Held At Colonnades Beach Hotel, Singer Island
Junior Congregation Services
Youth Group Program
For Tickets, Membership and Religious School Information
Call Temple Office:
845-1134
AN AFFILIATE OF UNITED SYNAGOGUE OF AMERICA
.
DIAMONDS
At Unbelievably Low Price:
FANTASTIC SAVINGS
ON DIAMONDS FROM
V* CARAT TO
1.00 CARAT & UP
*
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YOU SELECT YOUR DIAMOND
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HOURS) 930 a.m.-6i00 p.m.
Mwnbtr ANA & Chanter of Commerce
SI


Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, August 19,1963
A Time To Beware of Cults
Continued from Page 7
in the absence of self, then we
must provide love with the ful-
fillment of the self. If they
offer a life of childhood free
of all obligation, then we must
counter with a life of maturity
and acceptance of responsi-
bility. If they offer acceptance
thru the generation of fear,
then we must reply by
providing security through
reverence for the individual
and the divine.
When buttressed by solid
Jewish experiences in home
and at school, we will be on
the right road toward neutral-
izing the destructive effects of
the cults.
Dr. Andron is Youth
Programming Director,
Central Agency for Jewish
Education, Miami.
Belvedere
Construction Co.
P.O. Box 15107
2115 Belvedere Road
West Palm Beach, Florida 33416
Ph. 683-5344
IF YOU CARE...
about
Membership in a Conservative Congregation
Worshipping in one of America's most inspiring Sanctuaries
on Shabbat and Holy Days
A pulpit that challenges and stimulates
Family Shabbat Services and dinners
Superlative education for your children in the only fully
accredited United Synagogue Religious School in Palm Beach
County.
An award winning U.S.Y. program for Jewish Youth
Jewish self-expression through Men's Club, Sisterhood, Young
Couples and singles.
The finest "Cultural Festival" in greater West Palm
Beach with internationally known celebrities
and speakers.
Comprehensive classes in Adult Education, Hebrew language
and Jewish liturgy.
IF YOU TRULY CARE....bout
The Survival of the Jewish People
Personal Identification as a Jew
A Jewish Legacy for Your Children
MEET US AT
TEMPLE BETH EL
2815 North Flagler Drive
West Palm Beach, Florida
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday Morning, August 28th
10:00 A.M.-12:00 noon
8334)338
RABBI HOWARD J. HIRSCH
Elaine Shapiro, Cantor
Rath Levow, Director of Education
Samuel Wadler, President
WE CARE!
Printers anS Engravers ,WithaTuchof
Back to School Supplies and
Personalized Accessories
A complete line of Wedding and
Bar Mitzvah invitations,
announcements and
Bridal Consultants Addressing & Calligraphy
Fast Service on Party invitations and stationery
in our own print shop.
Business Cards Office Supplies
Letterheads Desk Accessories
Announcements Address Books
Rubber Stamps Party Supplies
License Plates Greeting Cards
For your convenience our salesman
will visit your office
Member of W.P.B.
and Palm Beach
Chamber of Commerce
655-6103
296 South County Road, Palm Beach
(same block as Hamburger Heaven)
You are at a crossroads. Behind you lies tl
foundation upon which you are building tl
rest of your working life. Before you a)
choices, opportunities and challenge
stretching out in a multiple of directions]
ACHIEVE THE LIMIT.
A member of the Sears Financial Netwol
DEAN WITTE
Ronald D. Katz
Vice President & Branch manager
Florida Region
501 South Flagler Drive, Suite 104
West Palm Beach, FL 33401
(305) 655-3371
Congregation Beth Kodesh
of
Boy n ton Beach
Proudly Announces
The opening of our new home
at
501 N.E. 26th Ave
Boynton Beach
Rabbi Avrom Drazin
Cantor IrviafB*
Beth Kodesh will be open for
HIGH HOLIDAY SERVICES
High Holiday Stating Available
Call:
Irving Koch, Prea.
George Paaternack, Paat Prea.
Leo Groasbard, Paat Prea.
David Kornetaky, Vice Prea.
737-57561
7374622
732-2555
737-6538
aiaaaiaa


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