The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian the voice of the Jewish community of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Running title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Physical Description:
4 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 8, no. 41 (Dec. 24, 1982)-v. 11, no. 26 (Aug. 30, 1985).
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44606415
lccn - sn 00229548
ocm44606415
System ID:
AA00014310:00027

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
\t VOICE OF
E JEWISH
Immunity of
ilm blach
HINTY
the
ewish floridian
VOLUME 9Number 24
PALM BEACH, FLORIDA
FRIDAY, JULY 22,1963
PRICE 35 CENTS
loseph L. Morse Geriatric Center Admits First Residents
Inlecr Dave Silverman presents a bouquet of flowers to
Rijjer who had the distinction of being the first resident
titled i" (he Joseph L. Morse Geriatric Center on July 7. The
fers were sent by Bennett Berman, Vice President of the
nl (if Trustees of the Joseph L. Morse Geriatric Center, to
tome the first resident and mark this milestone in the
|munil\.
The first 15 residents of the
Joseph L. Morse Geriatric
Center, the area's newest not-
for-profit long term skilled
nursing care facility for the
elderly, were admitted on July
7. According to Erwin H.
Blonder, President of the
Board of Trustees, the
opening of the Morse Geriatric
Center is a milestone in this
community. "This is one of
the finest homes in the
country, both in the physical
structure and the staff em-
ployed," stated Blonder.
Rose Riger, 87, the first
person to be admitted, agrees.
She fell in love with the facility
when her children took her to
see it as it was being com-
pleted. "So far, it is beauti-
ful," declared Rose.
Both Rose and her husband,
Nathan, 89, lived in Century
Village until it became too
difficult for them to take care
of themselves. Nathan will
live on another floor as he
needs special care. Although
they will be apart for the first
time in 68 years, they will be
able to visit each other daily.
Their son and daughter-in-
law, Joe and Sally Riger,
enthusiastically stated, "We
are elated to have our parents
in the Morse Geriatric Center.
They will get more care here
than we can give them."
Sadye Gerzog, 83, a resident
who was admitted on the
second day, was a very active
woman before her stroke
several years ago. Her doctor
said that she would never
walk, but Sadye proved him
wrong. She is not only excited
about the physical activities
that the Center will have
available, but about the intel-
lectual stimulation that will be
provided also. "I want to
learn something new every
day," Sadye asserts. "I also
am looking forward to this
Begin-Reagan Meeting Still
Scheduled in Washington for July 27
By DAVID LANDAU
IISALT M (JTA)Premier Menachem Begin's visit to
tinglon at the end of this month is on, despite rumors to the
ar\ here and in Washington. Officials close to Begin said
ircek that the July 27 meeting with President Reagan at the
h House will take place as scheduled.
i\ ^aid Begin's visit was likely to comprise mainly political
and lew if any public appearances before Jewish or other
s I he> said the visit would last four daysthe extent of
11 sciaJ sojourn in Washington.
I'Ok | s KROM Washington at the end of last week, citing
[lean sources, said Begin wanted to defer the trip for health
>">. I his was denied by sources close to the Premier here.
lome ol the sources do not hide Begin's lack of enthusiasm
|>iic visit at the present time.
|y indicate that the Premier feels the visit may not contri-
ipositively to the relationship between the two countries if
required to enter into a direct argument with Reagan over
Israel's planto which the U.S. objectsfor a partial redeploy-
ment of the Israel Defense Forces in Lebanon.
Despite the insistence by sources close to Begin that his physi-
cal condition is not a problem in connection with the imminent
trip, observers cannot help noting that unlike on previous oc-
casions, Begin this time apparently plans to forego public ap-
pearances before Jewish groups.
IF THIS TURNS out to be the case, it will dovetail into the
pattern of few and brief public appearances that the Premier has
established here at home over the past several months. The con-
ventional wisdom among political and media pundits to explain
this behavior is that Begin is still depressed by the death of his
wife, Aliza, last Nov. and depressed, too, by the complicated
and unsatisfactory outcome of the Lebanon war.
At a long-deferred meeting of the Herut Central Committee
that finally convened in Tel Aviv last Thursday night, Begin
made one of the briefest addresses he has ever made to his party.
This inevitably added to the speculation that he is not at the
peak of his form at this time.
Jewish environment and being
able to attend services."
Admissions will be stag-
gered over several weeks until
the full capacity of 120 resi-
dents will be reached by
September I. One hundred
and thirty staff members will
see to the care of the residents.
According to C. Drew
Gackenheimer, executive
director of the Morse Geriatric
Center, Health and Reha-
bilitative Services which had to
approve the Center before it
opened, was most impressed
by the quality and the high
ratio of the staff to the resi-
dents.
The Center will have 50 per-
cent of the residents on
Medicaid. "We are one of the
few facilities in this area to
make a commitment to this
high percentage," stated
Gackenheimer.
Medical services include a
full-time medical director;
dental and podiatry care; and
occupational, physical and
speech therapy. Recreational
programs will be profes-
sionally directed towards
keeping the residents physical-
ly, socially and mentally
active.
Among the special features
are a chapel, auditorium,
solaria, roof garden, library,
beauty-barber shop, gift shop
and spacious gardens with
walk and shady rest areas.
Though admission is open to
all elderly who qualify and
need its services, the Center
will serve kosher food and
accent Judaic cultural and
religious observances. Located
at 4847 Fred Galdstone Drive
(off Haverhill), the Center is a
beneficiary agency of the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County and was plan-
ned and constructed with
Continued on Page 3
legations Visit Palm Beach County's Project Renewal Neighborhood
Two delegations from the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County recently visited
Hod Hasharon, Palm Beach
County's and South Bro-
ward's adopted Project
Renewal community in Israel.
Project Renewal is a five year
commitment on the part of the
government of Israel, the
people of Israel and com-
munities in the Diaspora to
solve the physical and social
"Us in over 80 lower socio-
economic neighborhoods
including Giora and Gil Amal
on the outskirts of Hod
Hasharon.
In Israel to attend the
Jewish Agency Assembly in
Jerusalem were Julie and Peter
Jammings, Sheila and Alex
tnnelstein. Elizabeth S. Frei-
lich. Rabbi Howard and Eva
Hirsch, Marilyn and Arnold
1 am pert, Jeanne and Irwin
Levy, Eileen and Myron Nick-
man, Leah and Phil Siskin and
Alan Shulman along with
Normal Schimelman, Exe-
cutive Director of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County. One full day out of
the four was set aside for
discussions and decisions on
Project Renewal.
Gideon Witkon, newly
appointed National Director
of the program and Bernie
Waldman, new U.S. National
Chairman for Project
Renewal, led the discussions.
The problems that still remain
to be solved in Hod Hasharon
came up for careful examina-
tion. "Growing awareness on
the part of leadership and the
people in Palm Beach County
is beginning to result in greater
involvement, interest and
commitment," stated Irwin
Levy, chairman of the Project
Renewal Committee for the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County.
The day after the Assembly
closed, the delegation visited
Hod Hasharon and observed
the deteriorating Day Care
Center on the outskirts of
Giora. The dilapidated facility
is overcrowded with 45 chil-
dren attending and an addi-
tional 35 waiting to be ad-
mitted.
The second delegation
participated in the Project
Renewal Chairman's Mission
that was held during the last
week of June in Israel. Rep-
resentatives from this area
included Michael Burrows;
Rabbi Howard Hirsch; Marva
Perrin, Women's Division
Campaign Vice President;
Norman Schimelman, and
Douglas Kleiner, Assistant
Executive Director of the Jew-
ish Federation of Palm Beach
County.
The mission included visits
to three different typical Pro-
ject Renewal neighborhoods
one reaching the phasing
out process, a second two
years in the program, and a
third just about to be inte-
grated into the program. Each
area presented its own set of
Continued on Page 5


Page 2 The Jewish Florklian of Palm Beach County / Friday, July 22.1983
Soviet Emigrant Urges
Help For 'Refuseniks'
The Soviet Jewry Task
Force of the Community Rela-
tions Council of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County was host recently to
Lev Utefsky, a chemist who
emigrated from the Soviet
Union in 1980 and now lives in
Israel. He was traveling to
several cities in the United
States to relate the truth about
the newly formed Soviet Anti-
Zionist Committee from his
own personal experiences.
Utefsky hopes to draw
public attention to the plight
of the "Refuseniks" those
who want to leave the Soviet
Union and have not been
allowed in order to put
pressure on the Soviet govern-
ment for their release. He said
that the announcement of the
Anti-Zionist Committee that
very few Jews want to leave
the Soviet Union is a lie. "I
know personally some of the
10,000 'Refusnicks' who
would like to leave."
Utefsky's 26 year old
daughter Evgenia and 7 year
old grandson, are two of those
who remain behind. When
they applied for exit visas,
they were refused which led to
the loss of Evgenia's job as a
chemical engineer. She now
works as a cleaning woman to
support her family and to be
considered gainfully employed
a requirement for an exit
visa.
The outburst of anti-Semi-
tism is so tremendous in the
Soviet Union, according to
Utefsky, that normal life
could not be granted. "The
real struggle is against the
Jewish soul, not Zionism."
The study of Hebrew, Bible
and religion are considered
anti-Soviet activity and have
been formally declared anti-
ethical to Soviet law.
Articles that appeared in the
Leningrad newspapers
recently were displayed by
Utefsky. He cited the virulent
anti-Semitic propaganda to
illustrate his fear that the Jews
of the USSR might be in
physical danger. "After the
articles were published, a
Jewish cemetery in Leningrad
was desecrated," Utefsky
emphasized. "There could be
well organized danger."
Utefsky sees the efforts of
the U .S. government crucial to
the release of more "Refuse-
niks." "Three hundred Jews
left the USSR this year be-
cause of the efforts of the U.S.
government," stated Utefsky.
But the U.S. government
could do more. "Lots of
things must be known to them.
They are not super informed.
My experience tells me this."
Utefsky, who now is an
associate professor of
chemistry at Ben Gurion
University of the Negev, was
asked why he undertook this
mission. He gave what he
called an Israeli answer. "I
have no choice." Noting that
his activism could be danger-
ous for his family, he said,
"1-rom the first day I crossed
the border, 1 represented those
left behind. I must act." He
was permitted to leave the
Soviet Union a few months
after he applied for his exit
visa. "It was a time of getting
rid of intellectuals," he said.
Lev Utefsky, an emigrant from the Soviet Union di
copies of two Leningrad newspapers that contain uti-Sh
articles. He expressed a fear for the safety of the II
"Refuseniks" remaining in the Soviet Union since the
formed Anti-Zionist Committee of the Soviet Public dei
that Jews no longer wish to leave because "family reunifies
has essentially been completed" and Jews have cta*7
"succumb to Zionist lures."
Scout Brings A little Bit Of Israel To Camp Shalom
By LOUISE ROSS
Assistant News Coordinator
Every year the Israel Scouts
Federation sends a delegation
of nearly 50 Israeli Scouts to
the United States to work with
various Jewish sponsored
summer camps. The Jewish
Community Center's Camp
Shalom is host this summer to
Merav Michaeli, a 16'/: year
old Scout from Pet&h Tikvah,
Israel, who helps promote a
positive, caring feeling
towards Israel among the
campers.
While Merav serves as a
specialist at the camp teaching
Israeli games, songs, dances
and holding discussion about
Israel, she has also had an op-
portunity to obeserve Ameri-
can culture first-hand. She
lives with different families for
two weeks ai a time and has
learned a great deal about
America in a short period.
"kids my age here are im-
mature," Merav relates.
"They are so spoiled it's hard
getting used to." She finds it
difficult '.o realize that dish-
washers, dryers and other ap-
pliances are the norm here.
When she stayed in a home
with no dishwasher, she had
fun washing dishes. "I also
made Israeli brownies and
they couldn't believe that I
made them with flour not a
mix," recounted Merav.
Merav finds idle conversa-
tion acceptable at first but
cannot understand why it sel-
An Open Letter to the Lucky American Girl
Who Received a Letter From Mr. Andropov
Dear friend,
My name is Avi Goldstein. I
am about your age, was born
in December 1973. I live in
Tbilist, USSR. My parents ap-
plied for exit visas to Israel
two years before I was born
and got refused their right to
emigrate. So I have experi-
enced a lot: imprisonment of
my uncle in 1978, searches of
our apartment, etc. The goal
of my letter is not to make you
pity me, not at all. I just want
you to forward my letters to
Mr. Andropov because he
never answered my letters sent
directly to him. He is nice
enough to invite you to the
prisoner camps at the Black
Sea Shore in the USSR, but he
denies my right to travel to Is-
rael. Double standard ap-
o
Radio/TV Highlights pk-
MOSAIC Sunday, July 24, 8 a.m. WPTV
Channel 5 with host Phyllis Shever Girard Joel
Gross, author of "The Book of Rachel" and the newly
published "This Year in Jerusalem" July 31 Nathan
Permutter, Executive Director of Anti-Defamation League
of B'nai B'rith and author of "The New Anti-Semitism."
L'CHAYIM Sunday, July 24 and 31, 10:30 a.ni -
WPBR 1340-AM with host Rabbi Mark S. Golub
The Jewish Listener's Digest, a radio magazine.
JEWISH MUSIC AND CULTURE HOUR Sunday
July 24 and 31, 10 p.m. WHRS-FM Stereo 91 with
host Dr. Simon Silverman.
SHALOM Sunday, July 24 and 31, lOa.m WPEC
Channel 12 (8:30 a.m. ON TV Channel 51) with host
Richard Peritz.
* Sponsored by the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County
proach to the various prob-
lems. I wouldn't like to think
so. Let us imagine that Mr.
Andropov has not received
any of my letters and if he did
he would order to let our
family go, at least me and my
mother, or me and my grand-
mother.
All of these combinations
has been tried with no success.
Once again -I ask you, my
American friend, to make this
letter known to Mr. Andro-
pov. Having a precedent al-
ready, you are to expect an as-
swer this time also. The an-
swer could be exit visas to my
family. If so, you won a vic-
tory in the human rights fight.
If not, you know more about
human hypocrisy.
Hoping to hear from you
soon.
Sincerely,
AVI GOLDSTEIN
P.S. My parents helped me to
compose this letter in English.
Union of Council for Soviet
Jewry President Lynn Singer
arranged to have this letter
sent to Smantha Smith. She is
the little girl from Maine who
wrote to Yuri Andropov about
U.S.-Soviet problems and
upon his reply, accepted an in-
vitation to visit the USSR this
summer. Samantha has not
answered this letter.
dom leads to more serious dis-
cussions. "In Israel, when we
get together and gossip, we al-
ways get on to problems of the
country like the emigration of
Israelis to the U.S., the Leba-
non crisis, economic prob-
lems, etc. We get into heated
arguments," related Merav.
"People here are not political-
ly aware."
Merav sat on the floor
cross-legged throughout the
interview and spoke in excel-
lent English. Asked what im-
pressed her most about the
States, she said, "There is
nothing like the Waterslide,
swimming pools in every
home, the variety of erasers,
and the comfortable way of
life. Yesterday, I received my
first newspaper from Israel
containing in-depth news cov-
erage and 1 realized that there
is no pressure here like there is
at home."
Merav describes her politics
as being very much on the left.
She does not agree with Be-
gin's policies at all and felt
that the recent doctor's strike
was handled poorly by the
government. "It is a great dis-
grace. The doctors are perfect-
ly right and it shouldn't have
gotten to this state. The|
ernment was insensitive^
them," offered Merav.
Before being chosen focf
Scout program, Merav
through a battery of orali
written tests, seminars and!
terviews. "I took a re.
bility on myself to comelof]
U.S. and when I return it
continue (hat by workingi
new immigrants," Ma
relates. She is also the I
for an elementary age!
group lor the second
planning and running
twice weekly meetings.
Alter camp is over k\
gust, Merav will traveli,
the other Scouts to NewYtj
Philadelphia, Washing
D.C. and Niagara Falk.]
will return home vvith"*^
experiences while the
here gained much from tk
interaction with her. Hi
Bcrtisch, Camp Shalom Din
tor, sees Merav as a fascia
ing and intelligent girl. "If
fun being with her. Her i"
scrvations are interesting!
it helps us see things frosj
different angle," Ben
said. "The children
related to her very well."
Israeli Scout, Merav Mkraaeli, [left] leads a i*^
campers at Camp Shalom in aa Israeli song coBtpW"""
motions. The children learn about Israel aad pick P
Hebrew also from the musical rhyme.


Friday, July 22,1983 / The Jewish Floridian of Plam Beach County Page 3
Kosowski Re-Elected
President Of JF&CS
"V
I Bertram Gerzog helps his mother, Sayde, into her new room
lie Joseph L. Morse Geriatric Center. A rose [on dresser] was
\n to each new resident as they were admitted.
i
*
* '"
K *'
* \t

Morse Geriatric Center resident, Nathan Riger, visits his
|, Rose, in her room at the Center. After not having been
jrated for 68 years of their married life, they are happy to be
I to see each other as often as they like.
Morse Geriatric Center
Admits First Residents
Nathan Kosowski was re-
elected President of the Jewish
Family and Children's Service
of Palm Beach County, Inc.,
at the agency's final meeting
of the Board of Directors,
June 20. Kosowski, a resident
of North Palm Beach has been
involved with a variety of local
Jewish services, including the
Federation's Midrasha; he is a
member of the Federation
Board of Directors, as well.
During the preceding year,
theJFA CS moved into the
area of provision of Home
Health Aide services, through
scholarships, to needy indivi-
duals located primarily in our
elderly Jewish population. The
agency completed its two year
study concerning the need for
vocational testing and career
guidance services for area resi-
dents, and entered the pilot
study phase where these serv-
ices will be provided, begin-
miiinued from Page 1
is raised by the Jewish
lie lor the Aged of Palm
I'll County, Inc.
Jans are underway to
fide a day-care program
meals to elderly who are
not residents of the Center.
The staff will also cooperate
with other social service agen-
cies in providing supportive
services to enable many of the
elderly to remain in the com-
munity.
ning in September.
Also elected officers at the
meeting were: First Vice Presi-
dent, David R. Schwartz; Sec-
ond Vice President, Lynette
Feldman; Secretary, Suzanne
Smith, and Treasurer, Harry
Lerner.
Re-elected Board members
were: Ruth Kirshner, Ann
Blicher, Murray Kern, Charles
Green, Dr. Norman Silver-
smith and Suzanne Smith.
Other members of the Board
are Evelyn Blum, Gene
Devore, Lynette Feldman,
Osna Goodfriend, Ruth
Horen, Linda Kalnitsky,
Harry Lerner, Mildred Moss,
Dr. Thomas Ross, Adele Say-
les. Rose Schwartz, and
Lenora Walkover.
The Jewish Family and
Children's Service is a consti-
tuent agency of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County and the United Way.
Its offices are located at 2250
Nathan Kosowski
Palm Beach Lakes Blvd., Suite
104, in West Palm Beach. Ap-
pointments with professional
staff counselors may be made
Monday through Friday at
844-1991.
Knesset Votes Approval
Of Women in Cabinet
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
The Knesset voted 62-50 to
approve the appointment to
the Cabinet of Liberal-Likud
MK Sarah Doron as a Minis-
ter-Without-Portfolio. There
was one abstention.
Doron will be the first wom-
an in the all male Cabinets
presided over by Premier
Menachcm Begin since Likud
was first elected to office in
1977. There had been consid-
erable opposition to her, not
necessarily on the basis of sex.
The Orthodox Aguda Israel
party objected strenuously to
Doron's liberal positions on
abortion and on the relation-
ship of the State to the reli-
gious establishment.
BUT THAT opposition
seemed to abate as her
nomination was brought to a
vote, leading Labor opposi-
tion MKs to suggest that a
"deal" had been made with
the Aguda on the controversial
"Who is a Jew" amendment
which Likud's Liberal Party
wing vigorously opposed. The
defeat of that amendment
which would make invalid
conversions to Judaism by
non-Orthodox rabbis, was at-
tributed to the Liberal MKs. It
was rejected by a 58-50 vote
when submitted to the Knesset
last March.
According to unconfirmed
reports. Begin has recently
written to the Aguda leaders
that he is "committed to make
every effort" to secure a Knes-
set majority for the amend-
ment.
He had made similar
pledges to the Aguda in the
past to "do his best" for the
amendment but without refer-
ence to a "commitment."
Some opposition MKs suspect
that Begin intends to exert
pressure on the Liberals not to
oppose the amendment when
it is next raised in the Knesset,
probably after the summer
recess.
THE OPPOSITION also
noted that Doron would be the
21st minister in a government
which also includes eight
deputy ministers. They ob-
served that this was hardly the
"compact and streamlined
government" Begin had pro-
mised in his election cam-
paigning.
Doron will be replacing for-
mer Energy Minister Yitzhak
Berman who resigned from the
government last September
following the Sabra and
Shatila refugee camps mas-
sacre. The death last month of
Deputy Premier and Agricul-
ture Minister Simcha Ehrlich
left vacant another Liberal
Party Cabinet seat. The agri-
culture portfolio is now ex-
pected to go to Pessah Gruper
who is presently Deputy Min-
ister of Agriculture.
r. Bensimon Appointed Medical
(rector At Morse Geriatric Center
r*in H. Blonder, Presi-
of the Joseph L. Morse
latnc Center, has an-
nced the appointment of
I Jaimy H. Bensimon as
fical Director of the newly
1>ed 120 bed long term
*? nursing care facility.
Fill direct and supervise all
peal services and medically
?ed activities available to
residents at the Center.
I graduate of the University
Ijrasbourg (France) Faculty
Medicine and the University
Montreal (Canada) Faculty
[Medicine, Dr. Bensimon
Fd his residency in internal
Dr. Jaimy H. Bensimon
medicine at Notre Dame
Hospital, Montreal, and
completed a fellowship in
cardiology at the Montreal
Heart Institute. A Fellow of
the Royal College of Physi-
cians and Surgeons of Canada
with certifications in internal
medicine and cardiology, his
professional associations
include memberships in the
American Medical Association
and the American College of
Physicians.
Dr. and Mrs. Bensimon and
their two children reside in
West Palm Beach.
$15,000 REWARD
FOR PROVEN WHEREABOUTS ONLY
ANN GOTLIB,
White Female, 12 Years Old
DATE OF BIRTH: May 5, 1971
HEIGHT: 4-10" to 5'
WEIGHT: 80 Pounds
HAIR: Red/Auburn, Curly
Shoulder Length
EYES: Grey
COMPLEXION: Fair/Freckled
BUILD: Small
OTHER: Pierced Ears
This missing female, Ann Gotlib, disappeared from the Bashford
Manor Mall, Louisville, Kentucky, while traveling to her home on
June 1,1983 between 5:30 and 6:00 P.M. Ann's bicycle, on which
she had been riding, was found leaning against a brick support
pillar at the southeast corner of the shopping mall. Ann speaks
fluent English and Russian. Foul play is suspected.
If you have seen Ann or know where she is, call:
Jefferson County Police
Homicide Unit (502) 588-2105
Louisville, Kentucky
Federal Bureau of Investigation
(502) 583-3941
Louisville, Kentucky
or
Local FBI Office


Page 4 The Jewish Florkiian of Palm Beach County Friday. July 22,1983
Jewish f lor id ia n
ol Plin B**ch Count*
Combining "Our Vote*' ami 'Fr>ftion Raportw"
tEDKSHOCMET SUZANNE SHOCMET RONNI EPSTEIN
toitor ano Pubiitftar Exacutiva Editor | Nawa Coordinator
Pubtialtad tMaakty Oetobar throuoti Mid-April. B>-Waahiy oalanca ot yaar
Sacond Claaa Poataga Paid at Boca Raton. Fla USPS 0NO30
PALM BEACH BOCA RATON OFFICE
2200 ^Lf*,wl ""* 2M Boc **"" F* 33431 Pt>on* 32001
Main Offtca a Plant 1N E 8tn St.. Miami. Fl 33101 Pnonal-37>ae05
PniMialai.Ralan(am KM 10 Jawtan Flartdlan. P.O. ton 01-an, Miami. Fla. M101
____ -- ihw1Htnn Otnetor. Had Laaaar, PhowaMa-HM
~!?" i**1*1 *0oaal-Jawiah Fadaraiion ol Palm Baacti County. Inc Ofticara: Praaldant. Joanna
Lavy Viea PreJanta. Patar Cummii.ja. Alac Engautain. Arnold Lampart. Myron J Niekman. BarOarr
Tanan. Sacratary. Or Eiuaoatn S Frallic> Traaaurar. Alvin Wiiansky Submit malarial to RonrW
Epatain. Diraetor ot Public RHationa. 501 b.'vith Flaglor Or. West Palm Baach. FL 33*01
c,. Jaian Fiondian doaa not guar.vitaa Kaanrutn ot Marcnandiaa Advartiaad
SUBSCRIPTION RATES Local Araa U Annual 1? Year Minimum 7 50). or by mamberviip Jawish
^rS??"0". 'P,lm B#*ch County. M1 5 Fiagiar >. W.| Palm Baacn. Fla 33401 Phon832
2120 Out Ot Town Upon Raouaat
Harsher Measures Demanded
Against Arabs in Hebron
By DAVID LANDAU
And GIL SEDAN
Friday, July 22,1983
Volume 9
12 AB 5743
Number 24
Negotiation American-Style
What is worse, as a principle negotiator
for peace in the Middle East between Israel
and its Arab neighbors, time and again the
Reagan Administration and the U.S. State
Department have managed to create new
sets of facts when they were either in dis-
pute before, or else did not exist at all.
The Reagan Administration's repeated
violation of the stipulations in the Camp
David agreements having to do with the
West Bank and Gaza (Judea and Samaria,
if you will), despite the President's brave
assertions to the contrary during his run
for office in 1980, is a perfect example of
creating a new set of facts involving an
issue previously in dispute.
The State Department's drawing of a
new map of the Middle East is a perfect ex-
ample of creating a new set of facts in-
volving an issue that did not exist before at
all.
In what sense then are the President and
all of his men negotiators in the cause of
peace in the Middle East today? What do
they leave open to negotiate as they go
along arbitrarily changing the rules, the
conditions and the realities of the dispute
among the parties involved?
This is neither negotiation nor arbi-
tration. This is high-handed ordination
instead. Furthermore, it is a terribly
dangerous game which the Administration
is playing. It shows the Arabs increasingly
that the U.S. isn't worth a hill of beans in
honesty or integrity so far as its Israeli ally
is concerned, and Israel is constantly being
assured the U.S. is an ally, is it not?
Under these circumstances, given the
dim-witted attitudes of the Administration,
can there be even among its policy-makers
any doubt that the United States is not
staunching the flames of further fighting in
the Middle East, but fanning them?
A Sense of Foreboding
As of now, at any rate, the date between
them is still on. Menachem Begin will be
meeting with Ronald Reagan in
Washington on July 27. But there is no
jubilation in Jerusalem about this. And. we
suspect, there is little more at the White
House.
What both parties fear is a Begin ex-
plosion, with Begins propensity for
Biblical peroration. There is some reason
for this: Begins emotional state of mind
since the death of his beloved wife, Aliza.
And on top of this, the death of his
longtime friend and political ally the other
week, Deputy Prime Minister Simcha
Ehrlkh.
Heightened by the tensions in Hebron
and the growing anti-Lebanon campaign
sentiment in Israel itself, Mr. Begins
depressed but smouldering state of mind
these days may result in what nobody
wants. Not even the careless, callous
Reagan Administration.
J
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Jewish settlers are pressing
their demands on the govern-
ment for harsher measures
against Arab trouble-makers
on the West Bank in the after-
math of the murder of 19-
year-old Aharon Gross near
the Hebron marketplace last
Thursday.
Representatives of the
Council of Jewish Settlements
in Judaea and Samaria met
with Premier Menachem Begin
Sunday morning, shortly
before the weekly Cabinet
meeting. They insisted that the
government crack down
harder on Arabs and that it
expand the Jewish presence in
the center of Hebron. Begin
promised to raise their de-
mands at the Cabinet session.
GROSS, an American-born
yeshiva student whose parents
settled in Israel in 1974, was
buried at midnight funeral
services in Jerusalem Thurs-
day. He had been fatally
stabbed late that afternoon
while waiting for a ride to his
home in Kiryat Arba, the Or-
thodox township adjacent to
Hebron.
Israeli authorities clamped a
curfew on downtown Hebron
and later removed Mayor
Mustapha Abdul Natshe from
office for alleged "indirect"
incitement to violence against
Jews. But despite the curfew,
infuriated Kiryat Arba Jews
roamed the deserted market-
place Thursday night, setting
fire to Arab stalls.
On Friday, Israeli border
police used tear gas and clubs
and fired into the air to dis-
perse some 200 stone-throwing
Arabs demonstrating on the
Temple Mount in the Old City
of Jerusalem against the Heb-
ron curfew. One policeman
and six Arabs were reported
injured and about 40 Arabs
were arrested. The police also
detained a number of suspects
in the Hebron stabbing and
the market place arson but no
further details were released.
IN WASHINGTON Friday,
the Reagan Administration
condemned the violence in
Hebron but suggested that the
only way to end such incidents
was to resolve the issues of the
West Bank.
State Department deputy
spokesman Alan Romberg
said, "We deplore the murder
(of Gross) and those responsi-
ble for it. We also condemn
the burning of parts of the
Hebron market. Indeed, we
are greatly concerned by any
development which increases
the likelihood of confronta-
tion and violence on the West
Bank. Yesterday's (Thurs-
day s) events underscore the
need to find a way to address
in a constructive way, the un-
derlying causes of unrest in
that area," Romberg said.
In New York, the Herut
Zionists of America said in a
statement Friday that it "con-
demns the cowardly murder in
Hebron of yet another inno-
"nl Je* Rabbi Dov
Aharoni-Fisch. executive di-
rector, declared: "We believe
that Jews throughout the
world should respond bv in-
creasing their support for Is-
raeli government efforts to
settle the width and breadth of
Judaea and Samaria."
THE EVENTS in Hebron
confront Begin's government
with a dilemma that has been
developing for some time. The
West Bank settlers, particular-
ly those in Kiryat Arba, a
Gush Emunim stronghold,
had been calling for tougher
measures against Hebron
Arabs, and for the ouster of
Mayor Natshe long before the
stabbing of Gross last Thurs-
day.
They have since seized upon
the murder as proof that they
were right all along and have
berated the army for alleged
"softness" in dealing with
Arabs w ho disturb the peace.
At an emergency meeting
Friday morning, settler leaders
contended that restrictions im-
posed on soldiers in the use of
their weapons to quell stone-
throwing and other Arab acts
of violence against Jews only
encouraged such acts. The set-
tlers and their supporters
within the political commu-
nity, notably Science Minister
Yuval Neeman of the ultra-na-
tionalist Tehiya party, are de-
manding an end to the restric-
tions.
SOME SETTLERS are
asking life imprisonment as
punishment for stone-throw-
ers and deportation for local
Arab politicians, not just
removal from office. But
Shlomo Uya, head of the West
Bank civil administration,
flatly rejected settler demands
for the creation of Jewish
vigilante units on the West
Bank. He declared at a Jerusa-
lem press conference Friday
that the army and only the
army would continue to be re-
sponsible for the security of all
inhabitants of the territory.
The settlers responded by
threatening to turn in the
weapons provided them by the
army for self-defense, thereby
challenging the army to
protect them and their families
at all times.
The settlers are a politically
potent and highly vocal part of
Begin's constituency. But the
government, fearful that
harsher measures will only en-
gender worse violence, is
anxious to keep the West Bank
as quiet as possible, particu-
larly in the next few weeks be-
fore Begin goes to Washington
to meet with President Reag-
an. The general mood in the
Cabinet therefore is to take no
further measures at this time
besides the ouster of Natshe.
AT THE same time, the
government is anxious to re-
store the main municipalities
to Arab hands. At present,
Nablus, Ramallah and El
Birch, three of the largest
est Bank towns, are run by
Israeli army officers. Their
mayors were deposed some
time ago and the Israeli ad-
ministration has been unable
to find Arabs willing to re-
place them. The same problem
has now arisen in u,
where Natshe is th.H"
mayor ousted by tn J
m recent years. "
Uya explained to the
that the situation i ji
hould not be used to J
the entire West Bank 13
the case of Natshe was
cial one, due to his coi
opposition to both they
administration and to J
tiers. There would havek
no choice but to dinmu
eventually, Ilva said *
The settlers, of course i
him deported as was hisl
decessor, Mayor fj
Kawasme three years agorf
an ambush attack that k]
seven yeshiva students inn
ron. But llya noted that 1
she, unlike Kawasme
other deposed West
mayors, was not regarded!
serious political leader
rather a puppet manipub
by his city council membi
all ol whom are consid
"hostile" elements.
NATSHE IS regarded L
some quarters, however, b|
Palestinian moderate. Hci
quick to condemn the i_
of Gross and to urge cat]
a radio interview after hisi
missal, he remarked bill
that the Kiryat Arba ...
have now gotten what
wanted ail along and will
be able to do as they pk
Hebron.
According to Natshe, I
and his councilmen opp
violence. He blamed _
steadily increasing presentrf
Hebron of Jewish miliu
from Kiryat Arba for pro
ing violent acts. The
have angrily denied this.
The stabbing of Grossl
particularly tragic alter
Some Jewish settlers
plained that his fellow ye
students left him bleedhy
the street while they eng
in a running gun battle
his assailants who fled in ac
His body lay near the scene!
the stabbing for some ir
apparently mistaken for
Arab who, according to I
unconfirmed radio report I
Thursday, had been ouo
by armed Jewish settlers.
THE BODY was takaj
the Hebron hospital by
Arabs where Gross was [
nounced dead, still under
mistaken impression than
was an Arab. Kiryat Arbaj
tiers who claimed the bo
much later, insisted that r
was still alive but had beenl
lowed to lose too muchrJ
to be saved.
The Hebron hospital diiH
tor, Abdul Halim Naoji
hotly denied this. He saiduT
when the youth was brougm
he had no pulse, no
pressure and was not Dreai
ing. He was, in short, cliw
ly dead.
YOUR OPINION COUNTS
Tell us What you Think!!
Send letters to:
The Editor, Jewish Floridian
501 South Flagler Dr. #305
W. Pslm Beech, FL 33401


Around stau lesser
thelbwn
Blossom Cohen recently returned from Fall River, Mass.
where she was visiting family. While in Fall River
Blossom's nephew, Morton Dean, received the Arts
Unlimited's Annual award for outstanding achievement in
the field of communications. At the award ceremony,
dubbed "Prime Time" and held at government center, the
CBS newscaster entertained well wishers with stories of life
as an anchorman and a globe trotting journalist. Aunt
Blossom was thrilled to be part of the event.
Rabbi Alan and Wally Sherman are so pleased to have
family move to town. Hailing from Cleveland, Dr.
Howard and Edie Schneider are residing in West Palm
Beach. Howard, Wally's brother, recently completed his
residency in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology at
Shands Teaching Hospital in Gainesville. Edie and
Howard are expecting their first child. Welcome to the
Palm Beaches.
Congratulations to Arianne Khrich, daughter of Bonnie
and Marc Enrich and granddaughter of Bel and Simmy
Schepps and Sara and Sam Rose of West Palm Beach.
Arianne received the United States Achievement Academy
award in History and Government.
Jeffrey A. Perry-Marx, son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert E.
Marx ol Koyal Palm Beach, was ordained on May 29 at
lemple Emanu-El in New York City. Rabbi Perry-Marx
uiiendcd Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of
Religion. He will be serving at Temple Israel in Brookline,
Mass.
loronto bound David M. Rishkind, D.M.D. has been
awarded the prestigious Academy of General Dentistry
(A.CD.) Fellowship by the National Council of Con-
tinuing Dental Education. He will receive the honor in
formal academic ceremony in July, at the Annual Meeting
in Toronto. As a Fellow, Dr. Roshkind becomes a par-
ticipant in ihe Academy's Mastership Program.
Martha and Ellis Nadelman are cruising off with eleven
boats from the Palm Beach Power Squadron. The two
week trip will be to Key West with many stops on the way.
I hey also plan a side trip to the Dry Tortugas.
As soon as they return, they plan to repack and head
north to New England to visit children and grandchildren.
Sounds like a great summer.
Friday, July 22,1983 / The Jewish Ftoridian of Palm Beach County Page 5
Delegations Visit Palm Beach
County's Project Renewal
Continutd from Page 1
problems and challenges.
During the visit to Hod
Hasharon, the delegates saw
the Senior Citizen's building in
Gil Amal, the Day Care
Center, the newly completed
Sports Hall and Enrichment
Center. The trip continued
across town to Giora. (One of
the great difficulties lacing
these two Project Renewal
communities is their distance
from the center of town and
their even greater distance
from each other Gil Amal is
about 2 miles to the East of
Hod Hasharon and Giora
about 3 miles to the West.)
In Giora, the group visited
the newly refurbished com-
munity hall and the individual
classrooms for after-school
tutoring and club activities.
After dinner at the Senior
Citizen's Center, entertain-
ment was provided by the
quartet of young women from
Giora who sang in the West
Palm Beach area two years
ago. These four young women
are about to enter their last
year of high school and then
the Army. Ronit, one of the
quartet, said, "This voice
training we've received be-
cause of Project Renewal has
given me a great chance to get
into the entertainment unit in the
Army. II this happens, maybe
I'll be able to make a career of
singing."
lrwin Levy related that the
implications of this are clear.
"Project Renewal can make a
big difference in many
people's lives. Our involve-
ment is helping make that
happen," stated Levy.
On a recent mission lo Israel and Hod Hasharon, Palm Beach
County's Project Renewal neighborhood, Myron J. Nickman,
general chairman of the 1984 I .1A-Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County campaign, and his wife Eileen are delighted with the
opportunity to meet youngsters from the early childhood develop
ment center in Giora.
r. ^V:.
JEST .iriil
JrT~\J^BdV T > 1* ^**f gl
r
Through assistance from the Palm Beach County Jewish
Federation and the South Broward Federation and the
government of Israel, the people of Giora on the outskirts of
Hod Hasharon have been able to open and operate successfully
an early childhood development center. Marilyn Lampert, a
member of the Board of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County, observes the pre-school program in progress.
>vernment-
[mployed Doctors
lay Arbitration
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
^ cm ment-em ployed
Ktors have signed an
reement with the govern-
pit for a binding arbitration
adjudicate the doctors'
lands for higher salaries
I shorter working hours.
A NEUTRAL arbitra-
must be selected by both
within 48 hours of
signing. The arbitrator
nave 40 days to make a
Permination in the dispute.
t decision to seek -ar-
fation, originally opposed
line government, brought to
I ,,ne four-month long
piors' strike and a two week
nger strike by doctors which
made it impossible for
PPiials to continue to
PUon,
Points in dispute between
. government-employed
S|tians and doctors em-
y** by Kupat Holim, the
lladrut sick fund, were
['led by an exchange of
ys between the two parties.
' sick fund doctors had
fed in the general strike but
f returning to normal
ies before the arbitration
fsion.
FOR THE FINEST IN
SECULAR AND JEWISH
EDUCATION ENROLL
YOUR CHILDREN NOW
TtairrriffSD'--
owraowHM
TMHomMi*
School plot 10(5 OR
MWCfNO pfoo/ont 0*
n**r* ana :ok
SMmncO'.incten
** o up >
>ClHOt P-iflwm ncudng
an >. pxywei
JEWBH
jogaiiwtJfclll
MM IRS
QCfcrlflM IW
9m
mrouoh pill on
itw wptnoi
cumculumiugfHin
Oft WOW^. OHd

OUtKtf NOM
' > V.
Bmw on***- '
im wv km** **
nnonmtK K c..<
out mono
otd-iouimm
Mucomn TnotocM*
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Stance luUMHOft/.
ua*ni" on*
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IY SCHOOL
Ml* NC COUNIf
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MiawMolwffyitt* Mioncn nt nokoi
com ml on*. McMy oi M on.
v> ma mm taw iMos 585-2227 nm
A UNf riCIARV 'GINCY Of TMI JIWISM UN*
JuOonm
TOM Or AIM ItACM COUNTY
The Law Finn Of
Howard J. Wiener.; P.A.
Ia Pleased To Announce
The Expansion And Relocation
Of Ita Office. To
Suite 204 260 Royal Palm Way
Poat Office Box 3066
Palm Beach, Florida 39480
(306)833-4001
Practico limited To All Matters Involving Fadaral and Stete Taxation,
I ncluding Penaion And Profit Sharing Planning And Dooifm,
Tax Planning For Corporation., Profatonal AaoocUtioaa.
Individual., Eateteo 4 TruaU,
Foreign Taxation aad Tax Litigation
/. R. WEINRAUB & Co., Inc.
Insurance Agents
& Consultants
Insurance Exchange of the America's
245 Southeast First Street, Suite 319
Miami, Florida 33131 (305) 381-9677
N.J. (201)66&4900N.Y. (212)5640070
Telex 642184
Riverside
Riverside Memorial Chapel,Inc. Funeral Directors
The most respected name in Jewish funeral service
in the world.
Miami Beach/Miami/North Miami Beach
Dade County Phone No. 531 -1151
Hollywood/Ft. Lauderdale (Tamarac)
Broward County Phone No. 523-5801
West Palm Beach: 683-8676
Alfred Golden, Executive Vice President
Leo Hack, V.P., Religious Advisor
Keith Kronish, Vice President, F.D.
William F. Saulson, Family Consultant
Carl Grossberg
Sponsoring the Guardian Plan Pre-Arranged Funeral
Tradition, ltk what makes usJews.


Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, July 22,1983
Organizations in the News
HADASSAH
The Lee Vassil Group of the
Lake Worth Chapter of Had-
assail will open next season
with a new slate of officers:
President, Helen Turbowitz;
Vice President of Education,
Helen Toder; Vice President
of Fund Raising, Henriette
Kalfin; Vice President of
Membership, Ruth Sommers;
Vice President of Program-
ming, Rose Marcus; Record-
ing Secretary, Charlotte Res-
nick; Corresponding Secre-
tary, Rose Klein; Treasurer,
Ruth Atran; Financial Secre-
tary, Anna Cox; and Social
Secretary, Lillian Manz.
Please note that our Meet-
ing Date has been changed to
the last Tuesday of the month
but our Board meetings still
remain the second Tuesday ol
the month.
May all our members and
their family have a healthy
summer and look forward to
our first meeting Tuesday,
Sept. 27 at Temple Beth
Shalom, 315 N. "A" St.. Lake
Worth.
Z'Hava Hadassah of
Golden Lakes Village A bus
trip to Fort Pierce Jai-Alai will
take place on Wednesday,
Aug. 3. Cost of ticket includes
bus fare and program. For
tickets and detailed informa-
tion, contact Florence Najar.
Shalom West Palm Beach
Hadassah holds the following
theatre parties at the Burt
Reynolds Theatre:
Aug. 7, Sunday matinee,
"Geo. M"; champagne, hors
d'ouvres, sit-down lunch,
transportation.
Sept. 28, Wednesday
matinee, "Prisoner of Second
Ave.," sit-down lunch, trans-
portation.
Call Esther Tochner, Lil
Schack.MaePodwol.
Tnrnrr^ntn.
A-AAboT Answfr(0nf
A Division of
'ARINQ-A DING" ANSWERING SERVICE
Computerized Switchboard Live Operator.
WE ANSWER FAST!
43*0700
213 No. Dixie Highway, Lake Worth, FL 33460
.nimitiimimiiHim......' fl H i ijjujW
Militants Vow Action
Mary and Floyd Bachrach
Invite their friends to join in celebrating
the future marriage of
Michael Bachrach and Sherry Joseph
at a
AUF RUF
Temple Beth El
Weat Palm Beach
July 30th at fc30 A.M.
Kiddush to follow service
By GIL SEDAN
JfcRUSALEM (JTA)
Militant Jewish settlers
threatened to take matters into
their own hands if the army
did not crack down harder on
Arabs in Hebron who they
claimed were jeopardizing the
security of Jews.
A small group of Jews who
have established themselves in
Hebron, led by Rabbi Moshe
Levinger. a Gush Emunin
hardliner from adjacent Kiryat
Arba, objected when the army
lifted an order thai had closed
all shops and buildings on
Hebron's main street for the
past five days. The closure was
imposed alter an explosive was
thrown at an Israeli military
vehicle on the main street last
week.
According to Levinger,
"The -.county situation along
the roads is unstable. A man
leaves his home and doesn't
know what is going to happen
to him." The settlers are
demanding that the army take
more effective measures
against the Arab population
Wedding
PEARMAN-ELLENBOGEN
Mr. and Mrs. Stanley K.
Ellenbogen of Lake Clarke
Shores announce the marriage
of their son, Mark, to Wendy
Pearman on May 29. Wendy is
the daughter of Mrs. Maxine
Pearman of Hollywood,
Florida and the iate John
Pearman. Rabbi Howard
Shapiro of Temple Israel offi-
ciated.
The couple will reside in
Gainesville, Florida where
they are both students at Santa
Fe Community College.
Engagement
SAKOWITZDAVIS
Mr. and Mrs. Philip
Sakowitz of Lake Worth an-
nounce the engagement of
their daughter Susan to
Michael Davis, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Theodore Davis of Boca
Raton. A December wedding
a planned.
and special action against
Hebron Mayor Mustapha
Abdul Natshe who they
alleged is a "PLO agent."
Natshe complained to the
Israeli authorities that the
recent unrest in Hebron is the
result of Jewish provocations.
He pointed out that the West
Bank city has been quiet for
many years. Security sources
said the tension only served
the interests of the PLO to
prove that Jews and Arabs
could not coexist in peace.
The settlers insist that there
is no solution but drastic-
action. They said that in the
past month alone, 14 Jews
were injured in more than SO
rock-throwing incidents. The
settlers have already retal-
iated. Two Arab buses were
set on fire recently and five
electric utility poles erected by
the Hebron municipality were
lorn down.
Local police have appointed
a special investigating team to
track down both Jewish and
Arab attackers, but so far
without results.
4/SThe recipe for
Gulden's Mustard
has been in my
family for years.
Aad these recipes
will be in your
family
for years, too! 99
Fillet of Sole
': cup Gulden sSpto
Broon Muslim
*J cup Itghl cream
1 cup dn bread crumbs
I teaspoon ueano
I teaspoon tin me
I teaspoon basil
1*1 pounds sole filkts
CHARLIE Gl'LDEN
1 table spoons butter w
margarine, melted
tuice from on* kmon
': cup fish broth
2 Ub*spoons hf*-.
CRM
l4 cup while wine
Ma mustard and cream In separate boo! combine bread
crumbs oregano Hume, basil Lightly coil listi ith muward
itu'c bread with crumb rr.utufe Saute fish in bullrr
" trtmned about 5 minutes each sick Puke I <'
or se n iitg puif and keep wtm Then pour lemon and lisr,
broth into skillet bnn| to boil remote
fish bits Bwnd in cream and nine
Spoon sauce wer fish Mr*eM
lemon and ptisie\ garr.i -
A
Apple Salad
2 tablespoons kmo* pact
l7 cap water
4 applet (CortlMd.
Macs w Defcbou or
mature) peeled,
cored aad dtced
1 cup chopped walnut-
h cap sliced celer>
< cup iMtomuae
' cup Gulden sSpm
Brown Mustard
I teaspoon sugar
Bled lemon face a*] safer Md applet
and let sUad M minutes. drain VK
walnuts and celery and toss Blend
nanMMue. Bastard aad sugar toss
wiCh apples Ser.es <
Gulden s adds just the right flavor.
ruise The
Fun Ships
Every Saturday and Sunday the fbbulous'"Fun Ships".
CoinK/ale. Festival. Mardi GfasandTropkxjIe depart
wornJWami and Los Angeles tor exorte ports... VWualry
everything s included tor the low prioe of younenjise:
5ican feasr elant meals <*** macks a day...
C5?,!^e ^ <*** h a ** OambMng caslna..
JJW spectoculor live entertainment nightly...
aance M the wee hours of the mornlnQ to three
we dance bands or In an authentic dlsco-
rheque and more!
9>tps at Panamanian and Liberton


Friday, July 22,1983 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 7
Local Resident Wins UJA
Student Essay Contest
L cight winners of the
led Jewish Appeal Univer-
jSsay Contest, funded by
iMorris J. Kaplan Foun-
\n were announced by
fert E. Loup, UJA Na-
Chairman. Among the
^-winning authors of
h on the theme "Jewish
Irience as a Source of
|val Strategies" is Barry
Mann of Harvard
lersity, age 23. Barry and
arents, Mr. and Mrs. Jay
n, live in Wellington.
|his contest," Loup said,
vides an opportunity for
Jius to join the main-
.. of Jewish life, and at
Bme time generates truly
fve thinking on the future
fcwish life and the chal-
[it presents to each of us.
Ing from the seriousness
[depth of Jewish corn-
cm that the entrants
knstrated, our future is in
lie hands."
try Mann was valdic-
ol Twin Lakes High
t>l where he was a Florida
champion in extem-
[cous speaking for four
He also took two
Barry Paul Mann
national titles in his senior
year. Mann attended Harvard
University where he was
awarded an honorary scholar-
ship upon entering. During the
course of his college studies,
he took a year off and traveled
throughout Europe, North
Africa and Israel. After
graduating Harvard this
year with a degree in English
Literature, he received a
fellowship from that institu-
tion to study in Europe this
summer. He will be visiting
concentration camp sites as re-
search for his study.
Mann was accepted at the
Neighborhood Playhouse in
New York and will be studying
there this fall. He is an actor
and playwright who has on
first place in a Harvard lay
writing competition. He Iso
was a first prize award winner
in a Wichita State essay
contest.
Each UJA essay contest
winner will receive a guided
visit to Israel this summer with
an additional $300 com-
mendation stipend provided
through grants from the
Morris J. Kaplun Foundation.
"The essays submitted by
talented and imaginative
students from 66 universities,
were a source of profound
inspiration to me and to my
colleagues," Zvi Levavy,
Dutch Review Withdrawal Of UNIFIL
By DAVID LANDAU
JLRUSALLM (JTA)
Dutch Foreign Minister Hans
\i4*
^GETTING THE CHILDREN
TO EAT A DELICIOUS
HOT MEAL IS EASY AS
ti
7>M
ABC's &123s
from
Chef Boy-ar-dee
ABC's &123's
from Chef
Boy-ar-dee*
are tasty
pasta alphabet
letters and
numbers covered
with a rich tomato sauce. The
children will absolutely love it as
a delicious hot lunch and as a
tasty dinner side-dish. And so
will the adults! Either way you
I serve it, getting the children to
eat is as easy as Aleph Bez!
abor Day-Rosh Hashanna
Van der Broek said here that
his government might be
willing to reconsider its
decision to withdraw its troops
from the United Nations
Interim Force in Lebanon by
Oct. 19 if by then a new and
useful role was available for
the troops and if the Lebanese
situation was improved.
Van der Broek was
responding to Israeli Foreign
Minister Yitzhak Shamir's
suggestion that UNIFIL
contingents might be able to
play a role, alongside multina-
tional force units, in aiding the
Lebanese army to take over
and control areas of the coun-
try that Israeli and Syrian
forces vacate.
The two Foreign Ministers
met for four hours. Van der
Broek met later with Premier
Menachem Begin. Israeli offi-
cials stressed the warm and
friendly atmosphere at the
talks despite differences that
surfaced especially over the
Palestinian issue and Israeli
West Bank settlements. The
officials said both ministers
had felt the talks went "excel-
lently."
President of the M.J. Kaplun
Foundation said. "We believe
that this program will help
those on the periphery of
Jewish life to join the main-
stream and help the already
committed to strengthen their
dedication to Jewish precepts
of life and thoughts."
The other winners of the
United Jewish Appeal Univer-
sity Essay Contest are Samuel
Fleischacker, of Yale Univer-
sity, age 22; Diane Faith Stein-
berg of the University of
Southern California, age 24;
Bonnie Morris of American
University, age 22; Harman
M. Grossman, age 24, from
Harvard Law School and
Ellen Resnick, age 19, also
from Harvard University;
Michael Seth Berger, age 21,
of Princeton University, and
Steven Schnipper of the
Medical College of Penn-
sylvania, age 23.
Oops
We would like to correct two errors that were made in
the last issue of The Jewish Floridian.
Dr. Richard G. Shugarman's name was inadvertently
left out as one of the past recipients of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach County's Young Leadership
Award in the article announcing the winners for this year.
The correct name for the B'nai B'rith Women's region
that includes Palm Beach County is the South Coastal
Region.
Open all year
25th & COLLINS
MIAMI BEACH.
GALA SHOW
THE FAMILY JACOBS' KOSHER

ALL Rooms Waterview
Colour TV Air Conditioned
Refrig Strictly Dietary Laws
Music Entertainment
Social Programmes
Pool Free Chaises
Individual Diet Catering
Strict Rabbinical supervision
Complimentary ice cream served daily poolside
HIGH HOLY DAYS
11 Nights and Twelve Days
$340.SEPT.7to18th
Par Person Double Occupancy
6 Nights $199.00 P.P.D.O. (Split Stay)
2 Meals Daily, 3 Meals Shabbas/Holidays
LABOR DAY WEEKEND, SEPT. 2-5
4 days 3 nights S7ft 00
Call Collect (305) 538-5721
SPECIAL
!280
pays-9 nights
Bpt.2-11
| of 250 rooms
Reserve Now For The
IGH HOLY DAYS & SUCC0TH
r_vlces Will be Conducted by Cantor Herman Klein
PLUS TAX &
GRATUITIES
* INCLUDING
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occ
MJTIFUL
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ICCAH
u ni* Faci|rt Sauna Handball VoUayoall
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TO INSURE MAXIMUM COMFORT
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844-4343
1101 54th Street. West Palm Beach
A Planned Social & Therapeutic Program For A Full Life
in Beautiful Surroundings


Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, July 22,1983
National Council of Jewish Women
Celebrating Nine Decades of Achievement
National Council of Jewish
Women, the oldest Jewish wo-
men's organization in the
United States, is celebrating its
90th year ot devotion to
education, community service
and social action. It was
established in 1893 by Hannah
Greenbaum Solomon during
the Parliament of Religions in
Chicago alter the men present
refused to allow the women an
active role in program plan-
ning and execution. Rather
than being content with only
pouring lea. Mrs. Solomon
united the women 10 do some-
thing worthwhile and in the
process lounded the National
Council of Jewish Women.
Among the Council's many
milestones are the establish-
ment of a permanent Immi-
grant Aid Station on Ellis
Island in 1904; the acceptance
of a NCJW probation officer
for delinquent children in the
municipal courts in 1906;
providing funds to help
establish the School of Edu-
cation at The Hebrew Univer-
sity in 1947; being the first
national Jewish women's
organization to sponsor Meals
on Wheels in 1957; launching
the Senior Service Corps pilot
program, later to become
\ para-professional from the community [left)
works with mother and toddler in HATAF. a
head-start home education project for disad-
1 antaged families. HATAF is a project of the
NCJW Research Institute.
Retired Senior Volunteer Sections. The national
Program (RSVP) in 1963 and organization is committed to
playing a leading role in the social action, legislative af-
lirst National White House
Conference on Families in
1980.
NCJW's 100,000 members
nationwide are organized in
200 chartered affiliates, called
Come fiddle
around.
ITS COUNTRY/WESTERN CRUISE TIME ON
ms C AW BE-1. SEPTEMBER 17, FROM MIAMI.
Join in on oil the tun as our
newest Happy Ship msConbe-l
sets sal on o hond-cloppin foor
srompm. good ole time
weve lassoed some of
Country, westerns rop rolenr
Tompoil ond the Gtaser Brothers
along wirh Angie Abel os on
odded arrrocnon They II be
ploying ond singing oil rhetr hits
You II cruise ro three exonc
Conbbeon pom enjoy oil our
shipboord ooivines finedming
plush casino ond olwoys cour-
teous service
So come fiddle oround
You II even get o reol cowboy
hot to wear proudly bock home
Toke odvonroge of our spe-
cial Tnougurol Season" offer.
From only 1599 for on inside
cabin upper ond lower beds.
S629 for on inside cobin with
rwo lower beds, or S679 for on
outside cabin with rwo lower
beds. No restrictions.
"CariUI
A HoppyShip
s
from
599
PERKASON
Tbmpall G The Gtaser ttorhen
DouMeoccuooncy Suantmo Ron
Ponomo
%
^
>
See Your
Trove! Agent
r-m
Storting October 1st. our original "Happy Ship: ms Dohemewill
begin weekty cruises from Mtami to the Western Conbbeon visiting
Port-ou-Prince Port Antonio Grand Coymon ond Cozumel.
An Israeli child who comes from .
vantaged family is being helped to d.
educational gap through proems ,
National Council of Jewish Women's rI
Institute for Innovation in Education.
lairs, education, quality of
Jewish life, assistance to the
poor, programs in Israel, serv-
ices to youth and the aging,
svomen's issues, community
service and consitutional
rights.
Two Sections of NCJW are
active in the Palm Beach
County area north of Delray
Beach. Each group is auto-
nomous and pursues its own
projects and fundraising
events. The Palm Beach
Section was founded eight
years ago by Doris Singer,
Leila Siedler and Barbara
Mandel who presently serves
as National President. Doris
Singer became the first
president of the new Section
and has been a moving force in
the organization ever since.
Palm Beach Section's 350
members continue to be in-
volved in a variety of com-
munity activities. Council
women pride themselves in
finding a need in the com-
munity, fulfilling it and then
turning the project over to a
proper agency for continued
implementation. One of the
first projects of the Palm
Beach Section was Kosher
Meals on Wheels which has
just been turned over to the
Jewish Community Center to
implement.
Thirty women from the
Section participate in the
Picture Lady program. They
go into the schools and show
the fourth grades famous
paintings and discuss art with
them. This program has
become so successful that
more women are being re-
cruited to help out in more
schools.
The library at the Joseph L.
Morse Geriatric Center is
being set up by the women.
They are also becoming in-
volved in the Domestic Assault
Shelter and will be handling
the hotline for them.
One of the programs that
ne bection participates in in
Israel is the Research Institute
for Innovation in Education,
which is part of the Hebrew
University's School of
Education. The Institute's
research, demonstration and
action programs are designed
to bring the socially and
educationally disadvantaged
segments of the population
into the mainstream of Israeli
life.
The Okeechobee Section of
the NCJW was also founded
eight years ago and now has
150 members. One of their
biggest projects as well as the
Palm Beach Section's is the
Ship-A-Box program. Since
1948, NCJW has sent
thousands of packages of edu-
cational materials and toys to
Israel. They are used
by social workers and teachers
in kindergartens and in
schools and institutions for
children with special needs.
The women of the
Okeechobee Section parti-
cipate in community service
work at the Domestic Assault
Shelter and the Community
Mental Health Center. They,
too, were instrumental i
initiating the Kosher MeaH
Wheels with the Palm B<
Section. Their big fundraa
a luncheon and card
which raises money for L
through the Annual Narj
Support.
The Palm Beach ,
Okeechobee Sections are
of Area 18 extending
Miami to Palm Beach.
Southern states inch
Florida comprise the Soutl
District. For more
formation contact Dorisl
President of the Palm
Section, at 683-7525 or I
Salkind, President of
Okeechobee Section, ail
3374.
Waldman
HOTEL
Miami Beach's Finest Glatt Kosher CuisineS
Your Hottt Sam and Morris WakJman, Gary Shar. Dartd DUmort
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3 meals Sat. and holidays
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7 Days 6 Nights
(Sept. 7-11 and Sept. 16-18) ^_ ,'
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SMmp at adjoining Atlantic Town Hot*; mam* at WaUmm
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r.I 4*'Vtwa\ I

lesecration Penalty
Extended in New York State
Friday, July 22,1983 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 9
By BEN GALLOB
NEW YORK (JTA) A
jate law approved in 1982 to
[crease the penalty for acts of
kecration against syna-
gogues and churches has been
extended by new legislation to
include damage to educational
and residential premises, As-
semblyman Sheldon Silver
Menorah Golf Tourney Raises
$4,000 For N'nai B'rith Youth
Oscar Goldstein, public re-
itions director of Menorah
Chapels in Sunrise, Deerfield
[kach, North Miami Beach,
largatc, and West Palm
ieach, has announced a con-
ribution by Menorah Chapels
bf more than $4,000 to B'nai
S'rith Youth Services.
The funds were raised
|hrough a third annual
knorah Chapels B'nai B'rith
eniors Golf Tournament,
Leld for the second consecu-
ive season at Palm-Aire
Country Club. More than 325
jolfers, aged 55 and older,
lere attracted to the tourna-
ncnt during two days of play.
Tournament winners were
[ed Garson of Delray Beach,
lnh a low gross score of 80;
|co Taus of Lauderdale
|akes, low gross, 74; Dorothy
chwab of Sunrise, low gross
bitten, with 101; and Fran
Jiller of Deerfield Beach, low
et women, with a 75.
Ted Garson poses with a tro-
phy and camera he received as
low gross winner of Third An-
nual Menorah Chapels B'nai
B'rith Seniors Golf Tourn-
ament at Palm-Aire Country
Club.
COME UP TO THE
GOODLIFE AT BROWNS
In The Comfort Of The Cats*
ALL INCLUSIVE
TWO-WEEK VACATION
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par pert. dtri. occ
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3 WEEKS
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WEEKLY RATES from *286 to M26
Terface. Princess & Palace accommodations slightly higtver
Special discounts he longer stays
EVERYTHING INCLUDED IN OUR
CARE-FREE VACATION PACKAGE!
VB^Qoar^HandlifHjAndUrnoTransportatwi
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Qx9mVomtimm*am_________
(D., Manhattan) reported this
week.
Two bills sponsored by
Silver to address the problem
were approved by the Assem-
bly, and similar measures, in-
troduced in the State Senate by
Sen. Norman Levy (R.-C,
Nassau) were approved over-
whelmingly in each house and
are now on Governor Mario
Cuomo's desk for his expected
signature.
ONE MEASURE amends
the state penal law to expand
the crime of aggravated har-
assment in the first degree to
include damages to institu-
tions maintained for the pur-
poses of religious instruction.
The 1981 measures also were
sponsored by Assemblyman
Silver and Sen. Levy.
Citing recent shooting inci-
dents directed against Yeshiva
University in upper Manhat-
tan and the nearby Jewish Me-
morial Hospital, Silver said
"desecration of religious edu-
cational institutions is no less
harmful than damages to
places of religious worship."
The other measure requires
insurance firms to report all
claims in excess of $250 for
casualty losses resulting from
desecration, vandalism and
theft of religious articles suf-
fered by houses of worship to
the New York State Division
of Criminal Justice Service
(DCJS).
SILVER SAID that the
DCJS, after establishing a
central registry of such acts,
will promulgate rules and reg-
ulations to detail the contents
of such reports. In addition,
local law enforcement agencies
will be required to file similar
reports with the DCJS so that
overall patterns of desecra-
tion, vandalism and theft in
New York state might be ef-
fectively determined.
Silver said that, from this
information, the DCJS "will
be able to see whether these in-
cidents continue to rise in the
state and thus make a compre-
hensive report to the Governor
on or before July 1, 1984, and
annually thereafter with
respect to its findings and rec-
ommendations."
He said it might be possible,
after such "wanton acts" were
recorded and evaluated "by
the central registry," to see
whether such acts showed
common characteristics which
might "provide clues as to the
identity and motives" of the
perpetrators.
Wharton School
Slates Seminar
NEW YORK JWB and
the Wharton School of Busi-
ness of the University of
Pennsylvania will conduct a
three-day Summer Institute on
Financial Management for ex-
ecutive directors of Jewish
Community Centers and YM-
YWHAs.
The institute, designed to
provide specific training appli-
cable to the JCC field, will
take place Aug. 7 to 10 at the
Wharton Entrepreneurial
Center in Philadelphia.
Executives will review bud-
geting practices and
procedures for not-for-profit
organizations, variable fee-
setting principles and applica-
tions, and factors in managing
budgeted and non-budgeted
deficits.
r
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West Palm Beach, Florida 33409
JEWISH FAMILY AND CHILDREN'S SERVICE
An outstanding professional and counseling agency serving the
Jewish community of Palm Beach County. Professional and
confidential help Is available for
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Consultation and
evaluation serylces
Marital counseling
Parent-child conflicts
Personal problems
684-1991
Moderate fee* are charged In family and Individual counting to
thOM who can pay |Fhi arc based on Income and family size)
The Jewish Family and Children's Services Is a beneficiary agency of
the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County.
IN THE COOL & SCENIC BLUE RIDGE MOUNTAINS
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A Welcome Cocktail for 2 in our Gangplank Lounge
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s
Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, July 22,1983
Synagogue News
Both the Social Action
Committee and the Temple's
Board of Governors agreed
that a special award be pre-
sented to Herbert for his out-
standing work as a volun
m the program, in C
because of Herbert's unJ\
Juvenile Alternative ?}
Program will continue
[unction at Temple Israel
Candle Lighting Time Friday, July 22,7:54pm
Beth David Holds Joint Installation
Dr. Richard G. Shugarman, [left] past President of Temple
Israel and Herbert Smith
Temple Israel Custodian Receives
Award For Supervising JASP
By RABBI
EDWARD L.COHN
To his surprise during the
Annual Congregational Meet-
ing at Temple Israel, Mr.
Herbert Smith was called to
the dais for a very special
award.
Herbert Smith is the young,
chief custodian of Temple Is-
rael. For the past three years
he has been responsible for the
care and maintenance of the
sanctuary building, religious
school classrooms, the library,
social hall and offices in the
large complex of buildings
that comprisethephysical plant
of the Temple on North Flag-
ler Drive.
This past October, Herbert
volunteered to add a new as-
signment to his workload.
When he became aware that
the Temple's Social Action
Committee was interested in
the Juvenile Alternative Serv-
ice Program, Herbert insisted
they allow him to supervise the
program! "Done!" said Mari-
lyn Cohen, chairperson of the
committee. She arranged for
juvenile offenders to be sent to
the Temple at Herbert's
request.
From October until June
there were nine youngsters
under Herbert's supervision.
These juveniles, boys and girls
of different races and from
different economic back-
grounds, were sent one by one.
"Each juvenile," according to
Herbert, "had no understand-
ing of the law. All of them had
committed small misdemean-
ors. Some didn't know they
had done wrong." -
Depending upon the age of
the child and the particular in-
cident, the juvenile may be
diverted from the criminal jus-
tice system. The judge may put
them into the Juvenile Alter-
native Service Program. In
this program, the individual
has to work for a non-profit
organization or institution.
Their working hours become a
service benefitting the com-
munity. Statistically, JASP
has proved helpful to 40-60
percent of the young people
who have participated in the
program.
Herbert explained that his
job was not only to supervise
the hours of work the young-
sters did at the Temple, but to
get to understand them as
human beings as well.
"They're not here just for the
work, but to open up. I try to
be their friend," he said.
Children under Herbert's
charge ranged in ages from 10
to 16. They cleaned windows,
mopped floors, and painted
classrooms. The girls worked
in the sanctuary and in the li-
brary. "I gave them jobs that
they could do. First, I set the
example and showed them
how, then 1 just let them use
their own judgment from there
on," said Herbert.
When asked where he got
his expertise in working with
youngsters, Herbert who
doesn't look much older than
his oldest charges just
grinned and replied "Don't
forget I have two kids of my
own!"
In a very special way, Her-
bert Smith would work, talk
and joke with the juveniles
who were under his care.
Quietly and sincerely he would
counsel with .hem one on one
with a free exchange of opin-
ions and ideas about them-
selves and their lives. In his
gentle manner and with his
winning smile Herbert won
their trust and their respect.
Temple Beth David of
Northern Palm Beach County
recently held its annual joint
installation of Temple, Sister-
hood and Men's Club officers
and board members at the
Colonnades Beach Hotel.
After a brunch reception.
Rabbi William Marder, spirit-
ual leader of the congregation,
installed the newly elected
leaders.
Leonard Gilman was in-
stalled as the temple's presi-
dent. Serving with him will be
Phyllis Stein, Executive Vice
President; Jodi Farber, Sec-
ond Vice President; Linda
Llias, Financial Secretary; Joe
Spitz, Treasurer; DaveStoller,
Corresponding Secretary;
Anne Sloop, Recording Secre-
tary; Linda and Russell Stoch,
Membership; Lou Mark,
Ways and Means; Barry Nel-
son, Education; Shirley Licht-
stein, Adult Education; Bob
Brody, House; Linda Manko,
Ritual; Margot Brozbst, Pub-
licity; David Falk, Communi-
cations; Naomi Rothstein,
Youth; Merry Kaplan, Social;
Steve Stolzer, Building Con-
struction; Barry Present,
Building Financial Planning;
Marty Goldberg, Building
Fund Raising; Fred Cohen,
Len Karmelin, Jack Kaplan,

Rabbi William Marder [kfii
installs Leonard Gilmw is
President of Temple Beth M
Lynn Klinger, Barbara Oar I
Joe Schil f.and Nat KosowskL
Board Members.
Sisterhood will be led this 1
year by President Laura Nd-I
son. Assisting her will J
Susan Mark, Executive Vial
President; Marci Scheret.l
Program Vice President; Pattil
Wieseneck and Judy Cold-I
man, lund Raising Vice Prtsij
dents; Karen Wanuck and j
C arol Gay, Membership Vice|
Presidents; Shirley Lichistfa,]
CONSERVATIVE
B'noi Torah Congregation
1401 N.W. 4th Avenue, Boco Raton, 33432. Phone 392-8566.
Rabbi Theodore Feldman. Sabbath Services, Friday 8:15 p.m.,
Saturday 9:30 a.m.
Congregation Anshei Sholom
5348 Grove Street, West Polm Beach 33409. Phone 684-3212.
Rabbi Harry Z. Schectman. Cantor Mordecai Spektor. Daily: 8:30
a.m. and 7:30 p.m. Friday: 8:30 a.m., 5 p.m. and a late service
at 8:15 p.m., Saturday: 8:30 a.m., 7:30 p.m., Mincha.
Congregation Beth Kodesh of Boynton Beach
at Congregational Church, 115 No. Federal Highway, Boynton
Beach. Phone 737-5756. Rabbi Avrom I. Drazin, Sabbath ser-
vices, Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.
Golden Lakes Temple
1470 Golden Lakes Blvd., West Palm Beoch 33411 Phone 689-
9430. Rabbi Joseph Speiser Daily Services 8:15 a.m. cjnd 5:30
p.m. Sabbath services Friday 8:15 p.m. Saturday 9a.m., 5 p.m.,
Mincha followed by Sholosh Suedos.
Temple Beth David
at Westminster Presbyterian Church, 10410 N. Military Trail,
Palm Beach Gardens 33410 Office 321 Northlake Blvd !
North Palm Beach. Phone 845-1134. Rabbi William Marder]
Cantor Earl J. Rackoff. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m., Saturday
10a.m.
Temple Beth El
2815 No. Flogler Dr.. West Palm Beach 33407. Phone 833-0339.
Rabbi Howard J. Hirsch, Cantor Elaine Shapiro. Sabbath services
Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 930 a.m. Daily Minyan 8:15 a.m.,
Sunday and legal Holidays 9am
Temple Beth Sholom
224 N.W. Avenue "G". Belle Glade 33430. Sabbath services
Friday 8:30 p.m.
Temple Beth Sholom
315 N. "A" Street, Lake Worth 33460. Phone 585-5020. Rabbi
Emanuel Eisenberg, Cantor Jacob Elman. Services Monday and
Thursday 8:15 am. Friday 8 1 5 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.
Temple Beth Zion
Lions Club. 700 Cornelia Dr., Royal Palm Beach, Sabbath Ser-
vices Friday 8 p.m.. Saturday 9 a.m. Rabbi Nathan Zelizer
Cantor ^Choim Baltuck. Phone 793-9122.
Temple B'noi Jacob
2177 So. Congress Ave., West Palm Beach 33406. Phone 433-
5957. Rabbi Dr. Morns Silberman. Sabbath services, Friday 8
p.m., Saturday 9a.m., Monday through Thursday 9 a.m.
Temple IMi
190 North County Road. Polm Beach 33480. Phone 832-0804
ra^6' i*J Cna*,n- Con,' Dav.d Dardashti. Sobabth services
Friday 8:30 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.
Temple Emeth
^ ^"u^'i0""' Avenue- Delfy Beach 33446. Phone 498-
J536. Robb. Bernard Silver, Cantor Seymour Zisook. Sobbath
n*7CM' P T. c"d 8 P m Sa,or*>y <">d holiday, 8:45 a.m.
Daily Minyon, 8:45a.m.ond5p.m.
Religious directory
The Treasure Coast Jewish Center
(Martin County) 3257 S.E. Salerno Road (opposite Winn-Dinie),
Stuart, FL 33490. President Lief Grazi: 1-287-7732. Friday service
8p.m.
CONSERVATIVE LIBERAL
Temple Eternal Light
Boca West Community UMC, 8900 Boca West, Glades Rood (I
mile west of Boca Turnpike). The free Synagogue, P.O. Box3,
Boca Roton 33432. Phone: 368-1600, 391-1111. Rabbi Beniomin |
Rosayn. Sabbath services, Friday 8:15 p.m.
ORTHODOX
Aitz Chaim Congregation
Century Village, West Palm Beach. Phone 689-4675. Sabboth
services 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. Daily services 8:15 a.m. and 630
p.m.
Congregation Anshei Emwna
551 Brittany L. Kings Point, Delray Beach 33446. Phone 499-7407
or 499-9229. Harry Silver, President. Daily services 8 a.m. and5.
p.m. Saturdaysand Holidays 9 a.m.
REFORM
The Reform Temple of Jupiter Tequeifa
at St. Jude Church (Parrish Hall), 204 U.S. Highway One South. j
Tequesta 33458 Phone 747-4235. President Jeanne Tarsches.
Services the second and fourth Friday of every month, 8 p.m.
Temple Beth El of Boca Raton
333 S.W. Fourth Avenue, Boca Roton 33432. Phone 391 -8900-
Rabbi Merle E. Singer, Cantor Martin Rosen. Sabbath services
Friday 8:15 p.m. Torah Study with Rabbi Singer, Saturday 9:15
a.m. Sabbath morning services 10:30 a.m.
Temple Beth Shalom
St. Helen's Parish Hall, 20th Avenue and Victory Blvd., Vero
Beach 32960, mailing address: P.O. Box 2113, Vero Bead" K
32960. Rabbi Stephen Adams. Phone 1-569-0180.
Temple Bath Torah
at St. David's in the Pines Episcopal Retreat, Forest Hill Blvd. onj j
Wellington Trace, West Palm Beoch. Mailing address: BO I
Lantern Tree Lone, West Palm Beach 33411. Friday "rv*eV ,
p.m. Rabbi Steven R. Weslman, Cantor Nicholas Fenakel. wn
793 2700.
Temple Israel
1901 No. Flagler Dr., West Palm Beach 33407. Phone833-BjCJ-
Robbi Howard Shapiro, Cantorial Soloist Susan Weiss. Soboo
services, Friday 8 p.m.
ot St. Catherine's Greek Orthodox Church Social Hall.
Washington Rd., at Southern Boulevard. Rabbi Joel I l
Cantor Rita Shore. Mailing address 1407 14th lone,
Worth 33463. Phone 965-7778.
~
at Cason-United Methodist Chutch, corner of lake \6a Rj^
Sw.nton Ave., Delray. Phone 276-6161. Moiling a*""5,,,,,,
NW. 9th Street. Delray Beach 33444. Rabbi Samuel
Friday services 8:15 p.m.


responding Secretary;
una Gordon, Recording
Iretary; Marge Schimelman,
lancial Secretary and Linda
as. Treasurer.
Installed as President of
|n's Club was Howard Gor-
TJ His slate includes Leon-
,'karmelin, Vice President;
Sillen, Treasurer; Alan
Ick, Secretary; Robert
fan, Program; Toby Lewis,
id Raising; Hank Gilbert,
Idush; Marc Ehrich, Pub-
ly; Ray Jacobowitz, Mem-
U'ip and Andy Leventhal,
fshine.
Outgoing President Nathan
kowski presented special
Lds to Phyllis and Mark
In and Steve Stolzer in rec-
lition of outstanding con-
ditions made to the temple
ling the previous year.
Cantor Earl Rackoff, ac-
hpanied by his wife Lillian,
Rented a musical interlude.
event was chaired by
an Present.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID
To Host Summer
Open Houses
Temple Beth David of
(turn Palm Beach County,
Conservative congregation
an affiliate of the United
lagogue of America, will
|i two Open Houses this
Jiniei to acquaint those in-
jstcd in affiliating with the
ngrcgation. The Open
Ms will be held on Sun-
|, Aug. 14 from 2-5 p.m.;
! Sunday, Aug. 21' from 2-5
\. at the new home of Tem-
llk'th David on Hood Road
falni Beach Gardens.
Membership Chairpeople
Russell and Linda Stoch
Kicd families, singles and
pics to these get-togethers,
kieshments will be served.
[lie Synagogue's Spiritual
|der i- kabbi William Mar-
Cantor Larl Rackoff will
Itinuc serving the Congre-
lon. I he Congregation has
wnplete Sabbath and Festi-
I Service Schedule, High
|idu\ Services, a profes-
sionally staffed and directed
Religious School K-7, Bar-
Bat Mitzvah, Youth Pro-
grams, Adult Education, Sis-
terhood, Men's Club, and So-
cial Programs. For informa-
tion on membership, and
Religious School, call the
Temple.
TEMPLE JUDEA
Father John Mangrum will
be the guest speaker at Temple
Judea Sabbath Services, Fri-
day, July 22 at 8 p.m. in the
Cultural Center of St. Cathe-
rine's Greek Orthodox
Church, the corner of South-
ern Blvd. and Flagler Drive.
Rabbi Joel Levine has in-
vited Father Mangrum to ad-
dress the congregation in rec-
ognition of his continuing
friendship w'th the Jewish
people and his outstanding
contributions throughout his
lifetime towards interfaith un-
derstanding. Father Man-
grum was selected by our local
Jewish-Federation to partici-
pate in a special mission to Is-
rael. He has also served as
scholar-in-residence together
with Rabbi Levine for the re-
gional Hadassah conference
which was held here in the
Palm Beaches two years ago.
Father Mangrum is spiritual
leader of Saint David's In
The-Pines Episcopal Mission
in Wellington and in this posi-
tion has worked closely to
provide a home for Temple
Beth Torah in his church fa-
cility. His efforts have been
recognized by the Jewish com-
munity of Wellington and the
Western communities.
During Father Mangrum's
address, Temple Judea's regu-
lar junior oneg for children
will be held.
Friday, July 22,1983 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 11
I
Membership Teas
Temple Judea's member-
ship committee chaired by
Candy Fischer is sponsoring
special events throughout the
summer to familiarize
members of the Jewish com-
munity wjth the congregation.
Rosh Hashana begins early
this year on Sept. 7. Although
Temple Judea sells High Holy
Day tickets to the community,
membership with the syna-
gogue, any sunagogue, is one
of the most powerful ways to
sustain and enhance Jewish
life.
Candy and her husband.
Dr. Lee Fischer will host a tea
at their home on Tuesday eve-
ning, July 26 at 7:30 p.m. at
529 Muirfield Drive, Atlantic.
Merril and Mirnia Fox will
host a tea at their home on
Wednesday evening, Aug. 3 at
7:30 p.m. at 1161 Chorus
Way, Royal Palm Beach. Dr.
Jeffrey Faivus, Temple presi-
dent and members of the con-
gregation are present at each
tea to answer questions about
Temple Judea. Rabbi Joel Le-
vine delivers an informal talk
about the programs for the
current year as well as a de-
scription of the congregation
extensive pastoral program of
visitations and counseling.
In order to encourage large
numbers of people to learn
more about the congregation,
the membership committee
has scheduled a special Wine
and Cheese Party at the new
Royce Hotel, Sunday, Aug. 7
at 7:30 p.m. The Royce is
located at the corner of Aus-
tralian and Belvedere. Tickets
are $6.50 per person. At all
membership events, progress
reports will be delivered about
Temple Judea's sanctuary,
banquet hall, chapel, and
school, which will be con-
structed as an integral unit on
chillingwoth Drive, near Con-
gress Avenue, facing 1-95.
For more information about
Temple Judea, leave your
name and telephone number at
the Temple office.
Report on Soviet Jewry
Rabbi Richard Agler will
deliver an on the scene report
on Soviet Jewry at Temple
Judea's opening "Rabbi's
Lunch," Wednesday, Aug. 3
from noon to 1:30 p.m. at the
New Royce Hotel, the corner
of Australian and Belvedere.
Rabbi Agler is currently Assis-
tant Rabbi of Temple Beth El
lice, 79, of Andover 0-161 Century
Ige, Weal Palm Beach. Rlvenlde
portal Chapel. West Palm Beach.
UoviNwuilam. 72. of 2068 Dudley
p E Weil Palm Beach. Riverside
portal Chapel, Weat Palm Beach.
BIN
cca, 96, of 1717 Lucerne Ave.. Lake
In Riveraide Memorial Chapel.
1 Palm Beach.
Area Deaths
COHEN
Rose T.. 77, of Somerset L-217. Century
Village, Weat Palm Beach. Riverside
Memorial Chapel. West Palm Beach.
OORFMAN
Annette. 88, of 1740 N.W. 19th Terrace.
Del ray Beach. Riverside Memorial
Chapel, West Palm Beach.
FINKELSTEIN
Max. 77 of 711 Lorl Drive. Palm Springs,
Cantor
AsMsor

When selecting a professional,
you often have to choose between
quality ami price.
At levitt-Weinstein,
you can have both.
A*k *bout our CuAraMttxl SecuHly PUn***.
C*8 today lor an appointment.
of Boca Raton. He recently
returned from a special
mission to the Soviet Union.
Rabbi Agler's trip was spon-
sored by the South Florida
Conference on Soviet Jewry.
A contribution from Rabbi
Joel Levine's Discretionary
Fund helped finance this
program. His appearance at
Temple Judea will be his only
report to the Jewish commu-
nity of the Palm Beaches.
Rabbi Agler met with some
75 refuseniks and he was able
to obtain information nor-
mally unavailable if one were
on a programmed Intourist
excursion.
This special program is lim-
ited to 50 participants. Send
check, $5 per person, payable
to Temple Judea to Mrs.
Candy Fischer, 529 Muirfield
Drive, Atlantis, FL 33463.
Members and non-members
are invited
TEMPLE BETH ZION
Royal Palm Beach
Temple Beth Zion, of The
Western Communities, an-
nounces the inauguration of a
Hebrew School for the year
term commencing Sept. 1983
to June 1984.
Mrs. Rosalind Pomeranz,
principal and a teacher of the
school, has revealed that Beth
Zion will receive guidance in
the development of the
school's curriculum from Ann
Memorial Chapels
Hollywood
Wt Pembroke M.
North Miami leach
** West Dili* MsfJnMy
305/949-S31S
S*tlOk*ec*ob*w|W. MN.tti*iutfton
3OW*M700 30V7-4SOO
Levitt-Welnsteln Memorial Chapel.
FINKELSTEIN
Samuel. 78, of Coventry E No. 110, West
Palm Beach. Levvlt-Welnsteln
Memorial Chapel, West Palm Beach.
FRINER
Irving. 78, of 800 N.E. 26th Ave.,
Boynton Beach. Riverside Memorial
Chapel. West Palm Beach.
MM
David. 82, of Bedford H-189, Century
Village, West Palm Beach. Levitt-
Welnsteln Memorial Chapel, West Palm
Beach.
KAMINSKY
Etta. 78, of Sheffield C-67, Century
Village. West Palm Beach. Riverside
Memorial Chapel. West Palm Beach.
KATZ
Lillian, of Canterbury MM, Century
Village, West Palm Beach. Levitt-
Welnsteln Memorial Chapel.
KBIT
Beatrice, 75, of 8780 Femney Drive E.,
West Palm Beach. Riverside Memorial
Chapel. West Palm Beach.
KUTLIR
Edith. 71, of Kent E-78, Century Village.
Levttt-Welnsteln Memorial Chapel.
West Palm Beach.
LBVI
Prank D., 82, of 1801 8. Flagler Drive,
West Palm Beach. Riverside Memorial
Chapel, West Palm Beach.
MARCUS
Milton, 72, of Covered Bridge. Lake
Worth. Riverside Memorial Chapel,
West Palm Beach.
ROUFF
Abraham. 74, of Bedford A-B, Century
Village, West Palm Beach. Levitt
Welnsteln Memorial Chapel, West Palm
Beach.
SAMUELS
Shirley K.. 88, of 1801 South Flagler
Drive, West Palm Beach. Riverside
Memorial Chapel, West Palm Beach.
SCHWARTZ
Robert, of ST9-A, Cape Cod Circle. Lake
Worth. Riverside Memorial Chapel.
West Palm Beach.
Rabbi Richard Agler
Lynn Linton, Director of
Jewish Education for the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County. Ms. Lipton,
with many degrees in Jewish
Education, has just been
awarded a Fellowship in
Jewish Educational Leader-
ship at the New York Univer-
sity Graduate School of Edu-
cation, Department of Hebrew
Culture. As a result of this
guidance, the young students
of Beth Zion's school will re-
ceive a .deep grounding in
Jewish history, tradition and
culture. Classes are to be held
Tuesdays, Thursdays and
Sundays at the Crestwood
Middle School in Royal Palm
Beach. For information con-
tact Henry Brown or Helen
Schwartz.
Share Your School Days
The Jewish Floridian is planning a Back to School
supplement. We would like to include you! If you are
college bound, please send your photograph, name of
school you are or will be attending, and course of study.
Please include your address and phone number and mail
it along with your photograph to The Jewish Floridian,
501 South Flagler Drive, Suite 305, West Palm Beach, FL
33401 by July 29. All material received will be used ac-
cording to space available.
HOWARD A. SCHNEIDER, M.D.
Announces the opening of his office
for the practice of
Internal Medicine and Rheumatology
At
Courtyard Gardens
Suite 104
2560 RCA Blvd.
Office Hours P'lm Beach Gardens, R. ^^
ByAppt *"19 694-2223
THE JOSEPH L MORSE GERIATRIC CENTER
ANNOUNCES
Receiving applications for admission to the 120-bed
long term care skilled nursing facility
THE NEW CENTER FEATURES
Modtwly dulonid a aj*jaj
imablllt,
IwuMfn-iiM^iaum
*t ojyaid pnliulonili
ciwpiiiiwiamiiwiiii
McluiHlij
Pantolan
-PhyitttJ Thorepy
Ooowprttoml mmm
OMIMlop
atartaaw
Waal top pwl
lapaotaiMOMMI
.-.
itin
I
'SocM S*n " FwM program of Rtcr* at tonal
AotMUaa
*ym|HMMB "OojOOfvanoa ot tMMMtn
nd HoUdayi oonducMd
by Rabbi Ala "
C*aa4alncy I
laNfeii
* KaahardMary Ism
For Information Write or Calk
The Joseph L. Morse Geriatric Center
4847 Fred Gladstone Drive
West Palm Beach, Florida 33407
Attn: Social Service Department
(305)471-5111
A Facility of the Jewish Home for the Aged, inc
and
A Beneficiary Agency of Ths Jewish Federation or
Palm Beach County, Inc.
.

=


I
Page 12 TheJewiah Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, July 22,19&i
NORTON
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