The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian the voice of the Jewish community of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Running title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Physical Description:
4 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 8, no. 41 (Dec. 24, 1982)-v. 11, no. 26 (Aug. 30, 1985).
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44606415
lccn - sn 00229548
ocm44606415
System ID:
AA00014310:00025

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
THE VOICE OF fllf*
tut irwiSH *I1W
THE JEWISH
COMMUNITY OF
PALM BEACH
COUNTY
Jewish floridian
VOLUME 9-NUMBER 22
PALM BEACH, FLORIDA
FRIDAY, JUNE 24,1963
PRICE 35 CENTS
'Constructive Achievement'
Jackson Praises Lebanon Agreement
By HELEN SILVER
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Sen. Henry Jackson (D.,
Wash.) has praised the Israeli-
Lebanese agreement "as a
courageous, constructive
hopeful achievement. It it is to
be followed by a wise and
tough diplomacy, it could be-
come another historic turning
point in reaching stability and
peace in that region."
Jackson spoke to some 800
persons at a dinner of Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith, marking the start of the
ADL's 70th anniversary
meeting held here.
"It begins to look as though
the Reagan Administration
has finally grasped a basic
truth about the Middle East
that a strong, unwavering
United States-Israel relation-
ship must be the core of
American policy in the area,"
Jackson said. "1 salute the
President for his release of the
75 F-16 fighter planes to Isra-
el, also in the decision to pro-
ceed with the delayed transfer
Sen. Henry Jackson
of the technology needed for
the production of the Lavic
fighter."
JACKSON added that "ef-
forts to implement the Israeli-
Lebanese agreement arc
turning into quite a lesson for
the Administration on what
friends and allies are and
what they are not. The con-
trast with Israel is obvious
when compared to Syria, to
mention only one."
Jackson contrasted the
standard of living and political
stability in Israel with the
poverty, illiteracy, tyrannical
governments and political in-
stability of the Arab states
which he said continues to
make the area "fertile ground
for Soviet infiltration and ex-
ploitation by oligarchic elites
and terrorist leaders in that
area."
He said that the lesson to be
drawn is that "military ap-
proaches alone are not enough
to achieve stability and securi-
ty in this troubled world.
Arms alone will not do the
job. The underlying economic,
Continued on Page 6
Federation Holds 21 st Annual Meeting
Jeanne Levy Installed To 3rd Term As President
Iwcnty-one years of service
lite local community, over-
fcas and Israel were high-
glued during the Jewish
federation of Palm Beach
(ounty's annual meeting held
Jiic 5 ai the Hyatt Palm
fcaches. Marlene Burns,
airman of the event, wel-
omed ihose who had come to
far how Federation had met
now challenges this year, to
stall iis new slate of officers
nd io bestow honors upon
pany dedicated volunteers.
Bums slated, "The Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County has 'come of age'.
We have grown from a small
community of 1,000 Jews to
an intermediate one exceeding
40,000 Jews. This year saw
three of our beneficiary agen-
cies, the Jewish Family and
Children's Service, the Jewish
Community Day School and
the Joseph L. Morse Geriatric
Center establish new and per-
manent homes. The Jewish
Community Center, our
fourth beneficiary agency, has
completed its feasibility study
which will pave the way for a
new facility."
This year. Burns related, the
format of the annual meeting
was changed. In lieu of verbal
committee reports, the 1983
Annual Report supplement to
the June 10 issue of The Jew-
ish Floridian was distributed
which contained a written re-
view of the past year.
Myron J. Nickman, general
chairman of the 1983 Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
Continued on Page 2
Tdfi^il M
i^^^^^^Br *'^! kvliH
r 1
Wjt/k ^W 'r "J PmWl
^fl r I i
M ''w
Jeanne Levy, president of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County.
Oil and OPEC Re-Evaluated In ADL Report
WASHINGTON, D.C.
The improved oil situation and
radical shifts in the alignment
of the Middle East power
structure "offer the United
States an opportunity for a
new look" at its Mideast
policy, according to a research
report just issued by the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith.
The ADL report "Oil,
OPEC and Arab Power: U.S.
Gains, U.S. Problems"
said that with "little likeli-
hood" of a second Arab oil
embargo and the reduction of
Arab petrodollar income, the
United States is now in a far
stronger economic and diplo-
matic position in relation to
the Arab world than it was five
years ago.
In making the report public
at a session of the League's
70th Anniversary National
Commission meeting at the
Washington Marriott Hotel,
Abraham H. Foxman, asso-
ciate national director, urged
that the reappraisal be
initiated promptly and called
for an end to "appeasement"
of Saudi Arabia.
"Instead of catering to the
Arabs as in the past," Mr.
Foxman stated, "the U.S. can
now pursue its own strategic
interests in the Middle East
based on a realistic assessment
of which states are dependable
friends and reliable allies, free
of the confusion created in the
past by oil and petrodollars."
He went on to quote the
ADL report:
"Some Arab regimes
Syria, Libya, Iraq and South
Yemen, for example are in
the Soviet camp. Most
'moderate' Arab regimes
Saudi Arabia, Kuwait and
Jordan are too frightened
of radical forces in the Arab
world to be dependable allies
and too weak to be reliable
friends. The PLO, its military
power smashed in Lebanon
and its military options against
Israel seriously reduced, if not
eliminated, is losing its
political influence and Arafat
has confronted rebellion
within his own Fatah ranks."
According to the ADL re-
port, the timing is right for a
Middle East revaluation be-
cause "barring unforeseen po-
litical upheavals," the condi-
tions and actions which caused
the reversal in Arab oil and
political influence are expected
to persist for some time to
come.
The study pointed out that
most of the substantial drop in
U.S. oil consumption
almost 20 percent when com-
pared to the 1977-79 period
resulted from "structural"
changes in the economy
brought about by conservation
measures, more efficient
utilization of energy and the
switch to alternate energy
sources.
Nevertheless, the League
report cautioned, "the oil and
energy problem has not been
solved."
It pointed out that falling
prices have undercut a prime
motive to drill for domestic
oil, undermined the Synfuels
Program's attempt to meet the
country's long range energy
needs and weakened consumer
incentive to conserve.


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/ Friday, June 24,1983
Federation Holds 21 st
Continued from Page
can-
Over 250 people attended the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach County's 21st
Annual meeting
Beaches.
held
Hyatt
HmMmmml
Marlene Burns, chairperson of
the 21st Annual meeting of the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County, welcomes
guests.
County-United Jewish An.*.
and Israel Special FunJ S!
paigns, recognized 3
"hard-working" Voli.2! ?
He stated, "This !"
banner year tor Federal
and the campaign. We rJ
$5,000,000, more money th
ever before "He paid sJ5
tribute to Women's DiS
who raised over 20 percent
the funds for the 1983
paign.
Jeanne Levy, president of 1
the Federation, recognized fc
achievements of Myron Nict
man by presenting him
award for his "dedicati*
commitment and effort
behalf of the campaign td
by so doing, improving flj
quality of life for Jews of |
Palm Beach County *j[
around the world."
Presentation of
Service Awards
Levy presented the Georpl
B. Golden Community Servbl
Award to Harriet "Buddie!
Brenner and Alec Engelstea|
Brenner served as chairman!
the steering committee fori
lu
Zelig CMniti
Appeal-Jerusa
K fderation s 2
director general of United Israel
it-m. uest speaker at the Jewish
1st Annual meeting.
Jeanne Levy, president of the Jewish Federation,
presents an Award of Appreciation to Myron J.
Nickman, 1983 General Campaign chairman for his
commitment and dedication in behalf of the Jewish
people.

1
> *
I
Myron J. Nickman, 1983 General Campaign
chairman, presents an award to Marva Perrin, 1983
Women's Division Campaign vice president of the
Jewish Federation, in appreciation for her dedicated
leadership in the Women's Division campaign.
Jeanne Levy (right], president of the Jti|
Federation of Palm Beach Count), presents I
George B. Golden (ommunm Service Awgrdsl
Alec Kngelstein (left) and Harriet "Buddie"!
[center].
H. Irwin Levy [left], chairman of the Project
Renewal Committee of the Jewish Federation of |__
Palm Beach County, accepts an award from Zelig ^ ... .. ...,,. iwiid
Chinit*. given by the people of Hod H.sharon, "l \ .^"v ? LSST **
Federation's twi.ned neighborhood in Israel. tSSL^TSS F-UfftS- -*
recognition for their work as co-chairntM m
Sunday. Mr. Lampert received an award lor*
on the Campaign Cabinet.
^ration
Rabbi Joel Chazin, spiritual leader of Temple ^^^^^T^iH ,
m .^riQ\lu the Campaign, from Myron J. Nickman. serving on the Campaign in"
County for wnm. Nickman.


Annual Meeting
Friday, June 24,1983/The Jewiah Floridianof Palm Beach County Page 3
Jewish Community Center
Activities Study. In comment-
inB on Brenner's achievement,
Levy said, "Buddie devoted
her full time to the study and
| did a fantastic job."
Engelstein received recogni-
tion for his chairmanship of
Ithe construction committee of
Ithe Joseph L. Morse Geriatric
Center. Levy said about
Engelstein, "He always re-
ponded with a *yes* over and
ueyond the call of duty and
devoted countless hours in ex-
cess of what the job called
for."
Election of Officers
The slate of officers and
oard members for 1983-84
as presented by Marva
errin, chairman of the
ominating committee, and
as unanimously accepted.
abbi Joel Chazin of Temple
;Emanu-El installed the newly
lected sltae. Those serving as
fficers for the 1983-84 year
lare: Jeanne Levy, President;
eter Cummings, Vice Presi-
ent; Alec Engelstein, Vice
resident; Arnold Lampert,
ice President; Myron J.
ickman, Vice President;
arbara Tanen, Vice Presi-
ent; Dr. Elizabeth S. Freilich,
ecretary; Alvin Wilensky,
reasurer. The newly elected
oard members are: Leonard
rank el, Milton Gold, Lionel
reenbaum, Arnold Hoff-
an, Marilyn Lampert,
obert S. Levy, Robert E.
ist, Joseph Molat, Larry
Ochstein, Bernard Plisskin,
Samuel Robinson, Dr.
Richard G. Shugarman, Leah
Siskin, Michael Zimmerman,
Harvey Goldberg, Dr. Peter
Wunsh, Cynnie List and Max
Tochner.
In accepting the presidency
for her third term, Levy said,
"It has been an honor to be
president for the past two
years and an added honor to
be chosen for one more year.
The president is only as good
as the people around her and
the officers and board mem-
bers have done an outstanding
job. I would also like to ex-
press my appreciation to the
professional and clerical staff
of the Jewish Federation for
their commitment and excel-
lent work."
Twenty-one years of serv-
ice Federation comes of
age" was the subject of a
video presentation that high-
lighted the significant events
which had taken place in the
Palm Beach County Jewish
community.
In conclusion, Zelig
Chmitz, deputy director of the
United Israel Appeal in Jeru-
salem, presented an award of
appreciation to the people of
Palm Beach County from the
Mayor of Giora and Gil
Amal's neighborhood councils
in Hod Hasharon, Israel for
this community's help in
Project Renewal. Accepting
the award was H. Irwin Levy,
chairman of the Project Re-
newal Committee of the Jew-
ish Federation of Palm Beach
County.
Alan L. Shulman [right] receives an award from
Myron J. Nickman. for serving on the 1983 Cam-
paign Cabinet of the Jewish Federation.
1


lyron J. Nickman [left], presents an award to
lorlimer Weiss for serving on the Campaign
tabinet.
JEWISH
FEDERATION
OF PALM BEACH
COUNTY
VKUJ
V
VI
'nation
Harry Sher [right] receives an award from Myron J.
Nickman for serving in the Campaign.
Myron J. Nickman [left] gives an award to Sanford
Burns for serving on the Campaign Cabinet.
Myron J. Nickman [left] presents an award to
Nathan Tanen for serving on the Campaign Cabinet.
Jerry Hartman [right] receives an award from Myron
J. Nickman, for serving on the Campaign Cabinet.
lyron J. Nickman [left], presents an award to Al
loskowiu for serving in the campaign.
i
Receiving an award from Myron J. Nickman [left], is
H. Irwin Levy, a member of the 1983 Campaign
Cabinet.
bert Perrin [right] accepts an award from Myron
"ickman, for serving^ on the Campaign Cabinet.
The following individuals received awards from
Myron J. Nickman [center], General Campaign
chairman, for serving on the 1983 Campaign
Cabinet. [Left to right] Michael Zimmerman, Larry
Ochstein, Erwln Blonder. Not pictured: Barry Berg,
Peter Cummings, Philip Wm. Fisher, Arthur
Gladstone, Rabbi Howard J. Hirsch, Nathan
Kosowski, Shepard Lesser, Barbara Shulman, Dr.
Richard G. Shugarman.
Irving Siegel [right] receives an award froi
Nickman, for serving in the campaign.
i Myron J.


Plt*4 The Jewwb Flortdkoof Palm Beach County/ Friday, June 2*. 19B3
UJA Florida Region Women's Division Holds Leadership Conference
UJA Women's Division
leadership and professionals
from around the state met
recently at the Hyatt Palm
Beaches for a regional confer-
ence. Over 75 women attended
the two-day meeting which
provided a chance for them to
meet together and exchange
ideas on the upcoming
campaign and to hear about
the current situation in Israel.
Jeanne Levy, president of
the Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County and the 1983
UJA Women's Division
Florida Regional chairwoman,
and Delia Rosenberg, con-
ference chairwoman,'
welcomed the community
leaders and recognized the
workers who made the con-
ference possible. Among these
were Nancy Lipoff of Miami,
programs; Mikki Futernick of
Miami, training; Debbie
Abramowitz of Orlando,
recruitment; and Carol Green-
baum of Palm Beach,
arrangements.
Joyce Newman of Holly-
wood showed a film entitled,
Life Behind the Lifeline, to the
general session. Produced by
the South Broward Federa-
tion, it illustrated Federation's
role in the continuity of Jewish
life. "With this vehicle, others
will begin to understand what
we do and where our dollars
go," stated Newman.
Harriet Zimmerman, UJA
National Women's Division
chairwoman, gave the women
a synopsis of the most critical
needs that Israel will face in
1984. She informed them that
budget cuts, due to Operation
Peace for Galilee in Lebanon,
were most heavily felt in
programs involving human
services. Dollars must be
raised overseas to aid Israel's
efforts in the areas of absorp-
tion, immigration, settlements
and service for young people.
Zimmerman further ex-
plained that Project Renewal,
a partnership with the people
of Israel, the Israeli govern-
ment and communities in the
Diaspora to upgrade over 80
Sephardic neighborhoods in
Israel, was put on the back
burner because of the war in
Lebanon. "Unless we fulfill
the promise to Project Renew-
al communities, we are en-
couraging a festering sore to
develop. Campaign '84 is
about meeting our obligation
and responsibility to the
people of Israel," stated
Zimmerman.
Women's Division leaders
heard scholar-in-residence Dr.
Haim Shaked, professor of
Middle Eastern Studies at the
University of Miami, give a
geo-political overview of the
Middle East. In another major
talk, Annette Dulzin, Israeli
journalist and wife of Leon
Dulzin, chairman of the
World Zionist Organization
and the Jewish Agency, up-
dated the current political
Top leadership and professionals of Women's Divisions from
all over Florida met recently for a United Jewish Appeal
Conference. Pictured above are [left to right] Nancy Lipoff of
Miami, UJA Women's Division Florida Region program
chairman; Marsha Sherman of Tampa, UJA Women's Division
Florida Region chairman; Annette Dolzin, Israeli journalist and
guest speaker at the event; Jeanne Levy, immediate past UJA
Women's Division Florida Region chairman; and Delia
Rosenberg, conference chairman.
situation in Israel. The role of
Jewish women as volunteers
was addressed by Dr. Rela
Geffen Monson, associate
professor of sociology at
Gratz College in Philadelphia.
Rounding out the conference
were various workshops on
fundraising and management
skills.
Jeanne Levy, outgoing
regional chairwoman, was
honored with a special award
for her dedication and com-
mitment during the past year.
Incoming chairwoman is
Marcia Sherman of Tampa.
The Women's Division of
the Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County hosted a
"Welcome to Palm Beach"
cocktail party on the first day.
During registration, "Simply
Delicious," a cookbook
compiled by the Jewish Com-
munity Day School's Parent
Teacher Organization, was
given to each conference
attendee by the Palm Beach
Women's Division.
Watt Speaks To
Community Leaders
Secretary of the Interior,
James G. Watt, declared
recently at a community
forum held at Temple Israel,
"The Reagan administration
is seeking a balance between
protecting the environment
and moving ahead to explore
all energy sources." The area
leaders heard Watt speak
about making this country
energy independent through
the use of alternative sources
of energy.
, In energy exploration and
development, the secretary
feels that national interests
must override local interests.
Watt believes that coal
mining, which has been shut
down for 11 years, must be
resumed if we are to become
energy independent. He said
that his home state of
Wyoming is the "energy
basket of the world for coal."
Watt feels that this source of
energy will be taken for
America how and when are
the only two questions. He
disagrees with people who
advocate waiting for techno-
logy to be developed for the
safe use of coal before begin-
ning to mine the commodity.
"Technology will be
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developed as the mining
proceeds," stated Watt. "I am
afraid that the area will be
exploited without an orderly
development if we wait for a
crisis to spur us on."
Stressing that "energy is the
Achilles heel of this country,"
Watt declared that the govern-
ment's aim is to reduce its oil
dependency on Arab and for-
eign countries. He urges that
"the Jewish community con-
tact their Congressmen and
Senators to let them know that
I we need to move on coal and
j nuclear power."
Watt is looking toward the
21st century when he makes
decisions. "They will have an
impact on future generations
more than on the present,"
declared Watt. He believes
that solar energy and synthetic
fuels should be developed by
the private sector.
A delegation from Women's Division of the Jewish Fedtmu
of Palm Beach County attended the UJA Women's mE
Florida Region Leadership Conference at the Hyatt Pii
Beaches. Shown above are Lynae F.hrtkh, Women's nivu
Director; Sheila Engelstein, Women's Division pSS,0.1
Marilyn I urn pert; Adele Simon, vice president EdicatZ'
Jeanne Levy, immediate past UJA Women's Division Florid'
Region chairman; Susan Wolf-Schwartz; Carol Green dm.'
and Barbara Perry, assistant director of Women's Division n I
pictured: Marva Perrin, Debbie Brass, Carole Klein .2
Barbara Shulman. "' m
Questions and Answers Regarding
the Israel-Lebanon Agreement
21 JO Out Ol Town Upon ftaouMt
Friday, June 24,1983
/olume8
13TAIIUZ6743
Number 22>
The informational meeting
was held under the auspices of
the Community Relations
; Council of the Jewish Federa-
i tion of Palm Beach County.
I Elsie Leviton, chairman,
served as moderator and
Colld Page 15-
What is the assessment of
the United States of this situa-
tion?
The United States govern-
ment is extremely concerned
with the situation. Speaking to
the American Jewish Com-
mittee, Secretary of Defense
Caspar W. Weinberger said
the Soviet involvement in the
Middle East ranging from
"provocative statements,
disparaging U.S.-Israeli-
Lebanese efforts to bring
peace and stability to Leba-
non" to the presence of Soviet
troops "heightens the dan-
ger of direct conflict between
Syria and Israel."
Then, after saying he was
choosing his words carefully,
the secretary added: "I want
to say that the Soviet Union is
making a profound and
dangerous mistake if it thinks
that by resorting to belligerent
words and provocative ac-
tions, by the obstruction of the
Lebanese peace process, it can
pressure the United States into
a retreat from its commitment
to the security of Israel."
In a question and answer
session, he added, "I want to
make it very clear to the So-
viets and any proxies they may
have in Syria that any aggres-
sion by them will be met by a
retaliatory force that would
make the aggression totally
unworthwhile, totally lacking
in any hope of gain to the
aggressors."
(Subsequently, a Defense
Department spokesman said:
"The secretary was referring
to Israel when he spoke of the
retaliatory force.")
Mr. Weinberger also said,
Leaving all sentiment aside,
looking only at our own na-
tional interests, it is clear that
we in the United States have a
very, very important stake in
Israel's security."
He added, "The United
States cannot afford to have
any of our friends in the
region, including the moderate
Arabs, conclude that we in the
United States are unreliable;
they surely would if at any
time we were seen to abandon
Israel."
What is the Israeli asses-
sment about the possibUity of
Israel has made it clear in
recent days through public and
private actions and com-
munications that she does not
want war. No country abhors
war more, or understands the
pain of war better. But Israel
has also made it clear that she
will defend herself if necessary
and defend the interests which
are critical to her survival if
called upon to do so. As an Is-
raeli spokesman stated, "We
will do everything we can to
prevent a military confronta-
tion with the Syrians." But,
expressing concern about a
possible Syrian miscalcula-
tion, he said, "This whole
exercise on their part could be
dangerous."
Whether Syria or the
Russians intend it, there is fear
that a series of escalating
clashes in Lebanon directed by
Syrian forces could lead to the
outbreak of major hostilities.
Conceivably, it could even
lead to Soviet casualties such
as did occur in 1970 in the
Sinai during the War of Attri-
tion. Israeli and American
intelligence report a subs-
tantial expansion of Syrian
forces in Lebanon during the
last several weeks growing to
50,000 troops now in Leba-
non, 15,000 more than those
present only two months ago.
In addition there are 1,400
tanks now in Lebanese terri-
tory in contrast to 1,100 two
months ago. In recent weeks
the Syrians have permitted the
PLO and the PL A, which is
under direct control of the
Syrians, to move through their
lines in broad daylight back
into Lebanon in direct
violation of the Beirut with-
drawal agreement. They have
used these forces and their
Druze allies to shell and mine
not only areas presently
patrolled by Israeli soldiers
but also those patrolled by sol-
diers of the multinational
force.
What's the postnre of 4
other Arab states?
President Hosni Mubarak"!
a speech to the Egypu
Parliament urged AraD <*
tions to support the W"
Lebanese accord. ReiWg
Mubarak, the editor .ofj
Egyptian newspaper AM"
Yom. Ibrahim Saada, wtjj
"They (Syria) must now m
draw because the LeMJ*
people and *%*
declared their wish of
Pap IS


Midrasha-Judaica
High School Holds Graduation
^^^^l^/Tb^Jvm^Wkih^m^M^^BmACmmtiy P*je6
June 5 was a busy day for
the Jewish community of
Palm Beach County. In ad-
dition to the Jewish
Federation's annual meeting
held in the evening, the
Midrasha-Judaica High
School held its graduation
ceremonies in the morning at
Temple Beth El. Seven young
ladies received their diplomas
after completing four years of
study the first class to
graduate after finishing the
full four years. They were Lisa
Burman, Robin David, Toby
Kosowski, Joyce Lampert,
Ellen Perry, Susan Tenzer and
Judith Wolfson.
In her keynote address, Dr.
Elizabeth Sterenberg Freilich,
co-chairman of the Education
Committee of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County, encouraged the
graduates to become Jews of
initiative, to make the world a
better place in which to live,
and to teach Judaism's ethical
code. Sterenberg said, "You
are among the world's best
educated Jews and are in a
much better position to be
Jews of initiative. You must
embrace the task with a
passion as we Jews bring to the
world the vehicle for
enhancing life."
Dr. Paul Klein, chairman of
the Midrasha Committee of
the Jewish Federation, and
Ann Lynn Lipton, Jewish
Education Director of the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County, presented
Report From
The Field
JDC's emergency relief
activities in South Lebanon
are drawing to a close. Since
December a total of 1,550 tons
of cement have been delivered
to the refugee camps at Ein
Hilwe, Rashidiye, Burj Al-
Shimali and El-Basse for re-
construction and repair of
2,000 homes. This is in addi-
non to 2,500 heating stoves
that were delivered previously
by JDC in conjunction with
UNWRA. JDC also received
donations of farm tools
through the good offices of
the Brother's Brother Founda-
tion in Pittsburgh. The tools
were distributed to schools
ihroughout South Lebanon.
The total value of JDC's
emergency relief activities in
south Lebanon is about $2
million: of which about
M0O.OOO was received in cash
donations while $100,000
came from JDC's 1982
operating budget. An esti-
mated $1,500,000 of donated
goods and materials was re-
ceived. Much of the donated
material was turned over to
JDC in Israel bylsraelisand by
voluntary agencies for distri-
bution in Lebanon.
The 1981 report just issued
by the United States Agency of
International Development
shows that JDC was the third
largest out of 132 agencies re-
porting private contributions,
following the United Israel
Appeal and the Christian
Children's Fund.
The fact that UIA and JDC
we m the one and three posi-
l|ons is a tribute to the
generosity of the American
Jewish Community and its
support of the UJA-Federa-
on campaigns.
awards to community leaders,
the graduates and other Mid-
rasha students. Dr. Haviva
Langenauer was announced as
the first recipient of the
Midrasha Educator's Award.
Commented Lipton, "Dr.
Langenauer gave of her time
and effort to help Midrasha
develop."
Dr. Elizabeth Sterenberg
Freilich was recognized for her
contribution to Jewish
education.
The following honors were
awarded for excellence in
various subject areas. Hebrew,
Toby Kosowski; Beginning
Hebrew, Karen List;
Advanced Hebrew, Sharon
Slomowitz; Chanting from
our Holy Books, Sharon
Slomowitz; Judaica, Judy
Wolfson; Bible, Barry Grant;
History of the Holocaust,
Mitchell Levy; Jewish Ameri-
can Literature, Rachel
Pomerance; Study of Cults,
Heidi Newmark; Comparative
Religions, Rachel Pomerance;
Jewish Issues Award, Robin
David and Fine Arts, Melanie
Schonberg. Esther Zaretsky
was honored for her four years
of dedicated service as a tea-
cher in Midrasha.
Midrasha scholarships were
awarded to three students who
will be attending programs in
Israel this summer: Karen
Kosowski, Sharon Slomowitz
and Wendy Wagner.
A Prayer for Families was
read by Marilyn Lampert,
senior class parent, and was
followed by poems presented
by the seniors. Diplomas were
granted by Ann Lynn Lipton
and Nathan Kosowski, co-
chairman of the Education
Committee of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County.
Participating in the
ceremony were Rabbi William
Marder of Temple Beth
David, Rabbi Steven Westman
of Temple Beth Torah and
Cantor Elaine Shapiro of
Temple Beth El.
_ Midrasha-Judaica High
School is a community project
sponsored by the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County in cooperation with
the Jewish Community Day
School and local synagogues.
Midrasha-Judaica High School recently held graduation
ceremonies at Temple Beth El. Pictured above [left to right] are:
Joyce Lampert, Lisa Burman, Anne Lynn Lipton, Jewish
Education Director of the Jewish Federation of Palm Reach.
County; Robin David, Dr. Elizabeth Sterenberg Freilich,
keynote speaker; Ellen Perry, Nathan Kosowski, co-chairman
of the Jewish Federation's Education Committee; Judith
Wolfson, Dr. Paul Klein, chairman of the Midrasha Committee
of the Jewish Federation; Susan Tenier and Toby Kosowski.
Share Your School Days
The Jewish Floridian is planning a Back to School
supplement. We would like to include you! If you are
college bound, please send your photograph, name of
school you are or will be attending, and course of study.
Please include your address and phone number and mail
it along with your photograph to The Jewish Floridian,
SLS0?* Fla8ler Drive- Suite 305 West Palm Beach, FL
33401 by July 29. All material received will be used ac-
cording to space available.
K Certified Koaher
Fleischmann's Margarine is proud to offer you
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Enjoy special savings on Fleischmann's
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Page6
Synagogue News
TEMPLE JUDEA
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, June 24,1983
made arrangements to offer!
the breakfast and lunch each
at five dollars per person all
inclusive and the dessert at
three dollars per person. Send
checks payable to Temple
Judea to Mrs. Candy Fischer,
529 Muirfield Drive, Atlantis,
33463. Advance reservations
required due to limited
Rabbi Joel Levine will de-
liver a behind the scenes report
on Israel at Temple Judea
Sabbath Services, Friday,
June 24, 8 p.m. in the Cultural
Center of St. Catherine's
Greek Orthodox Church,
corner of Southern Boulevard
and Flagler Drive.
Rabbi Levine returned June
23 from his sixth trip to Israel
where he spent a month inter-
acting with Israelis from all
walks of life. Rabbi Levine
and his wife, Susan, met with
Rabbi Moshe Zemer, a key
leader of the Reform move-
ment in Israel; Zeev Chafets,
on leave from his position as
Director of Israel's Govern-
ment Press Office; and Lee
Diamond, Dean of the High
School in Israel. They also
tourned Hod Hasharon, Palm
Beach County's sister city in
Israel.
In honor of America's Inde-
pendence Day, Rabbi Levine
will speak on "Judaism and
the American Heritage" on
Friday, July 1 at 8 p.m. He
will relate Judaism's debt to
America's heritage of free-
dom and will select appropri-
ate liturgical readings to high-
light how our religion and
America's abiding values have
complimented each other.
The Junior oneg will be held
for children during the rabbi's
sermon. Following services the
oneg shabbat, sponsored by
Sisterhood, will welcome un-
affiliated families who wish to
learn more about Temple
Judea. For move information
leave your name and telephone
number with the Temple of-
fice. _____.
Membership
Candy Fischer has been re-
cently appointed by Dr. Jef-
frey Faivus, president of Tem-
ple Judea, as the new chair-
person of membership. The
Temple's fiscal year began on
June 1 with extensive plans al-
ready in progress for an inno-
vative program of introducing
the unaffiliated to the congre-
gation.
An integral part of the new
program is a series of summer
events at the new Royce Hotel,
the corner of Australian and
Belvedere. Rabbi Joel Levine
will kick off this program with
a Rabbi's Breakfast, Tuesday,
July 12, from 8 a.m. to 9 a.m.
at the hotel. This will be an ed-
ucational and social program
for members and their guests.
Congregational leaders will be
present to socialize and answer
informal questions. Rabbi Le-
Jackson
Continued from Page 1
instalibility and violence must |
be dealt with, and dealt with
effectively."
THE ADL honored J. Wil-
lard Marriott, chairman of the
board of the Marriot Hotel
Corp., with its Americanism
Award, presented to "indivi-
duals whose contribution to
democracy has been outstand-
ing in the private and public
sector of American life."
ADL's International
Award, the Joseph Prize for
Human Rights, was awarded
jointly to Violinist Isaac Stern
and conductor Zubin Merita,
musical director of the New
York Philharmonic and
musical director for life of the
Israel Philharmonic. Stern ac-
cepted the award for Mehta,
who could not attend. The
award recognized the contri-
butions of the two musicians
"to the improvement of hu-
man relations and the growth
of human rights."
vine will conduct a program
on a contemporary problem
confronting Jewish life. Addi-
tional programs following this
format include the Rabbi's
Lunch, Wednesday, July 20
from Noon to 1 p.m. and the
Rabbi's Dessert, Monday,
July 25 from 3 p.m. to 4:30
p.m.
Bill Meyer, First Vice Presi-
dent of the congregation, has
are
space. For more information
leave your name and telephone
number with the Temple of-
fice.
For more Synagogue News,
see page 15.
o
Radio/TV Highlights J*'
# MOSAIC -Sunday, June 26, 8 a.m. WPTV
Channel 5 with host Phyllis Shever Girard A1PAC
with its Executive Director Tom Dine and Senator Rudy
Boschwitz.
July 3 Ruth Gruber, author and lecturer.
L'CHAYIM Sunday, June 26 and July 3, 10:30
a.m. WPBR 1340-AM with host Rabbi Mark S.
Golub The Jewish Listener's Digest, a radio magazine.
JEWISH MUSIC AND CULTURE HOUR Sunday,
June 26 and July 3, 10 p.m. WHRS-FM Stereo 91
with host Dr. Simon Silverman
SHALOM Sunday, June 26, 10 a.m. WPEC
Channel 12 (8:30 a.m. ON TV Channel 51), with host
Richard Peritz General Natan Nir of the Israeli Army.
July 3-
ISRAELI DIARY Thursday, June 30, 10 p.m.
WPBT Channel 2 Stanley Rosenblatt returns to
Israel to discuss the Lebanon crisis and the future of
Israeli-Arab relations in the Middle East with key Israeli
leaders.
Community Calendar
JUNE 24-30
June 26
Congregation Aitz Chaim -10 a.m.
June 27
Women's American ORT Mid Palm 1 p.m. u-i- -
- Cypress Lakes board 9:30 a.m. uass"1
June 28
Temple Beth El executive committee 8 p.m. Pionew
Women Golda Meir board 9:30 a.m. Women"!
American ORT Golden Lakes -1 p.m. Temple Beth E
Men's Club board 8 p.m. Congregation Aiuh,
Sholom 1 p.m. JEWISH FEDERATION YOUNr
LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT CABINET 8 p.m.
GETTING THE CHILDREN
TO EAT A DELICIOUS
HOT MEAL IS EASY AS
ABC's & 123s
from
Chef Boy-ar-de
* Sponsored
County.
by the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
ABC's & 123s
from Chef
Boy-ar-dee*
\Z^s-^-^ are tas,y
r vMV 5a P3813 alphabet
\&JM*^ letters and
v/v"^ numbers covered
with a rich tomato sauce. The
children will absolutely love it as
a delicious hot lunch and as a
tasty dinner side-dish. And so
will the adults! Either way you
serve it, getting the children to
eat is as easy as Aleph Bez!
pour on the $ork>* Brand
Dooofcinatod Cafct-
;gy\^ t..^lllll!l^^fih!!!ff
gfau. ^M oraM water. Add io and
^a^ondw* you want.
maleoCM *a*97%**i few. And Kadw;
too. S thtnwtof your jmmer*outd only baw
rrfrwhinQ!
KCortffiodKoAor


Because Someone Cared
Friday, June 24,1983 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 7
T
~T7-
21.7 percent of all Hispanic,
and 8.1 percent of all Jewish
and 7.8 percent of all white
non-Jewish clients were ad-
versely affected by cuts in
benefits.
Households surveyed in
New York City's working class
and middle-class neighbor-
By STEPHEN LEVITT,
ACSW
A personal view from the
Executive Director of the Jew-
ish Family and Children's
Service.
(All case names mentioned
in these articles are fictitious;
client information at Jewish
Family and Children's Service
is held in the strictest of con-
| fidence.j
People aften ask me, "We
hear so much about 'Reagan-
omics'. but does this really
affect the Jewish com-
munity?" I believe 1 have an
answer to that question.
Falling through the Safely
Set: A Study of the Impact of
Human Service Cuts on Un-
employed in New York City
Families in 1982, has recently
been published by the Jewish
Board of Family and Chil-
dren's Services in New York.
Since there are many New
Yorkers residing in our local
community, and because we
all live in the United States
anyway, 1 thought it might be
interesting to present a few
facts highlighted by this study:
The Jewish Board con-
ducted a one week's survey of
all clients seen in its network
ol 12 mental health clinics lo-
cated throughout the five
boroughs of New York City.
A total of 1,645 households
were surveyed.
One third of all house-
holds receiving public benefits
lost all or part of those bene-
fits.
Twelve percent of all
households experienced a job
loss or reduction in work
hours.
The community with the
highest rate of unemployment
*as the Borough Park section
ol Brooklyn, which is
predominately an Orthodox
community.
19.6 percent of all black,
^>>
Cool North Carolina
Mountain Vacation
siilMr Mountain in .1 his
uriiui.K furmslit'd \ ,li .in.mi
villa. \nii-mill 1Mv In,I.
' ll, I I'nnis, Indoor m mi-
niinjj, s inn.1 .111,1 >!>.!
I "i n-ntal Krm hurt- ,mJ in-
f>rm......11 .ill or u rid
/UGPR HIGH
lOD>,. I k .....:.
r 11 Box
lVuni, r I Ik. S.l >< .
toll free number
I-KO0-4J8-4555
hoods are being severely af-
fected by cuts in benefits.
* Food Stamps were the
public benefit most often
eliminated.
The Jewish Board of Family
& Children's Services is the
largest voluntary agency of its
kind in the country. They
employ more than 500 social
service professionals who each
year serve more than 40,000
clients in a wide variety of
programs. Therefore, the Jew-
ish Board of Family & Chil-
dren's Services can provide a
microcosm of what is happen-
ing, both in other agencies
throughout the city and to
New Yorkers as a whole.
Since human service budget
reductions have gone into
effect, JBFCS staff members
have reported an increasing
evidence of frustration, worry,
familv disintegration and in-
dividual breakdown among
their caseloads as the impact
of public benefit losses and
unemployment began to be
Continued on Page 10
If Sam Breakstone hadn't been so
sour cream
and cottage cneese in 1882, they wouldn't
taste so good today.
100 years ago, Sam Breakstone had a reputation for being a demanding man.
A very demanding man.
Good wasn't good enough for Sam. His sour cream and cottage cheese had to
be as fresh, as natural, and as delicious as they could possibly be.
And because Sam was so demanding then, his sour cream and cottage cheese
tastes so delicious now.
Right now, you can demand 10< off both Breakstone's tour cream and cottage
cheese by redeeming these coupons.
IhQiaa OOEhT
Mr. Grocer: Kraft. Inc. will reim-
burse you for the fece value of this
coupon plus 7 c handling allowance
provided you redeemed it on your
retail sales of the named product(s)
and that upon request you agree to
furnish proof of purchase of suffi-
cient product to cover all redemp-
tions. Coupon is void in Wisconsin
SAVE lOe ON ANY SIZE
BREAKSTONE'S COTTAGE CHEESE.
IOC
,1
or where taxed, prohibited, or
restricted by law, and may not be
assigned or transferred by you.
Cash value 1/20*. Customer must
pay applicable sales tax. For
redemption, mail to Kraft, Inc.
Dairy Group, P.O. Box 1799, Clin-
ton. Iowa 52734.
143Q0 SSbOm
5S1V2S OOEhT
Mr. Grocer: Kraft, Inc. will reim-
burse you for the face value of this
coupon plus 7 c handling allowance
provided you redeemed it on your
retail sales of the named product(s)
and that upon request you agree to
furnish proof of purchase of suffi-
cient product to cover all redemp-
tions. Coupon is void in Wisconsin
SAVE 10* ON ANY SIZE
BREAKSTONE'S SOUR CREAM.
O Kraft". 1~1963
KK
or where taxed, prohibited, or
restricted by law, and may not be
assigned or transferred by you.
Cash value 1720(. Customer must
pay applicable sales tax. For
redemption, mail to Kraft, Inc.
Dairy Group. P.O. Box 1799. Clin-
ton. Iowa 52734.
ExptTM 11/3M3
143DD ESflbZS


FogeS The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, June 24,1983
B'nai B'rith
Eddie Jacobson, van tk.
Reaching Out to Others
B'nai B'rith International,
the largest Jewish service
organization in the world, was
the first international service
organization founded in the
United States before the
B'nai B'rith was founded on
October 13, 1843, in New
York City at Sinsheimer Cafe
[the three-story building
shown here].
B'nai B'rith International
headquarters is located today
in Washington, D.C.
Under The Supervision
Of Rabbinical Council
Of The PalmBearhea
"THE NEW IMAGE"
Century
Opanft-7
Mon-Thurs
MM
KOSHER Ay* MARKET 8-4 Sun.
v 3 v i Closed Sat.
4774 OKEECHOBEE BLVD., WEST PALM BEACH
Between Military Trail & Haverhill In the Mini-Mall
The Most Modem & Complete Kosher Supermarket
tfxtt*:*:*:*:*:-:^
l
FOR THE FINEST III
SECULAR AND JEWISH
EDUCATION ENROLL
YOUR CHILDREN NOW
QUIfMMia
lot HWW
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raTT-r-nfrin-'-^
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Skuioi PfOgfOn including
on mac pfiyiKoi
oucoton and
WVnOHJOK
0CTvl0r
M Kmdaiojoflan
Vough poor taam
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OUt MOM:
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Connw anvtn*..
* iwi wovid* "V
':'<*on nKMtan,
fwnonmtm c g>t
ou' cntKktn o
ducakon TnlocMy
icmon ipocious
ciosuoomj c iifror,
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DRV
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Commmyiy Oo
Scnoaioamn
Hud**) oi *.*> iau
coW> and
rkano> ond annc
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coum. and
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Mov* ofmt Mr ana
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JudanV
* MMftcuar JULY 4th WEEK-END CELEBRATION
5 days A 4 nights
July 1 to July 5
4 diys A 3 nights
July I to July 4
juiy i n juiy a r-u July I to J
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plus Ui A gritultlts
INCLUDING MEALS
Reserve Now For The
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Services Wi'l be Cnnducled by P'ominent Canior
SPACIOUS OCEANFRONT SYNAGOGUE
PrlwitiBtKh OlynpicPsel PteUiot Theupeulic
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Parties 25 to 500

GROUP
i the Ocean
r Waaarvattona 1
ILefttowMtJ
Salvation Army (1865), before
the Daughters of the American
Revolution (1890) and before
Kiwanis (1915). B'nai B'rith
began in 1843 in New York
City and had as its purpose
"the mission of uniting
persons of the Jewish faith in
the work of promoting their
highest interest and those of
humanity..."
During the Civil War, B'nai
B'rith members founded what
is now the Albert Einstein
Medical Center.because Jews
serving in the Union Army
were not permitted in army or
other hospitals in Philadel-
phia. The first Jewish chaplain
of the U.S. Army, Rabbi
Bernhard Gotthelf of Louis-
ville, was appointed during the
Civil War as the result of a
successful B'nai B'rith
campaign.
Since 1899, the National
Jewish Hospital in Denver has
pioneered in the treatment and
research of tuberculosis and
respiratory diseases. Since
1914, the Leo N. Levi Hospital
in Hot Springs, Arkansas, has
specialized in the treatment of
(arthritis and related diseases.
Both were founded by B'nai
B'rith.
Another highlight of B'nai
B'rith history occurred when
U.S. recognition of the State
of Israel was in jeopardy in
1948. At the request of B'nai
B'rith's top leadership, Ben
B'rith Edward "Eddie"
Jacobson, a friend of Presi-
dent Harry S. Truman,
arranged for the President to
meet with Chaim Weizmann.
Truman subsequently con-
firmed U.S. support for Pales-
tine's partition and formally
recognized Israel's establish-
ment on May 14, 1948. B'nai
B'rith's president and execu-
tive vice president, as well as
Throughout the years n> ,
B'rith has created"*$*
and institutions to coSTS
the everyday and txSZX*
ry issues Jews and oK08"
The Anti-DefamatbnT*
is a "watchdog" f0r thf7Ut
ish people and "$**
advocate of human riSR
was founded in 1913 asarl
of an incident in AtE
Georgta tnvolving ggj
B'nai B'rith lodge members in Maryland host an annual Pus.
over Seder for Jewish patients of mental health hospitals.
mi/H JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER yu,.,
Tffi OF THE PALM BEACHES. INC. W
2415 Okeechobee Blvd, West Palm Beach, FL
689-7700
CAMP SHORCSH
^
0
.c^n Summer y
Camps
1983
KTOft-rox
s
v
COUNSIIORS-IN-TRAININC
\
rh. rh V ******* river C,vde in the bonny town of Glasgow,
2m^Ve$i!!T,Iibut !*"Jewb5h center. And here a
22 te^s^P"t^byitsproLdmembm.Youmightbc
anmJSS!^^
wh^ A ^ fe ?*' "* A wee sip of fine scotch
toStoZSZ^?* aU 5*5 kind,V to "* nation and made
s^lvS ^tch the1one preferred above all others, for so delicate and
whv^tlrn5 S f" ]tb^ "*that wh^' And that is
ep^adn^scc^wn^y, m n, p,,^ ^^^ N
J&B. It whispers.


crchant who was accused of
mini and murdering a young
jfi. There was no evidence
i'inst him but he was
ivicied and hung by a lynch
jb. It was incidents and acts
:e this that spurred B'nai
frith to form the ADL.
iince 1923 Hillel Founda-
is have reached out to and
,ed hundreds of thousands
Jews on college campuses,
mically, they were founded
response to the urgings of a
fotestant minister at the
liversity of Illinois who was
ching a class on religion.
I discovered that the Jewish
[iith had no organization on
pus and held talks with the
J community stressing the
essity for a "Jewish ad-
:ss" on campus. Thus,
llel was born.
i addition, B'nai B'rith
rn are involved in the Com-
munity Volunteer Services
Program, Adult Jewish Edu-
cation, BBYO (B'nai B'rith
Youth Organization), Senior
Citizens Housing, programs in
Israel and more. Locally, as
part of the Community Vol-
unteer Services Program,
various lodges sponsor essay
contests during Brotherhood
Week, help police and fire
departments during Christmas
in non-critical work enabling
personnel to spend more time
with their families, collect
books and magazines to
donate to hospitals and
nursing homes, perform
services for shut-ins and help
raise money for community
endeavors.
Palm Beach Lodge No. 1146
was the first B'nai B'rith
group to form locally, begin-
ning its service to the com-
munity in the early 1920's.
Friday, June 24, 1963 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 9
Since then, the Palm Beach
Council, composed of Palm
Beach, Martin and St. Lucie
counties has grown to include
18 lodges and one unit (men
and women). Up until 1981,
the Palm Beach Council was
part of the North Broward
Council. In that year it became
large enough to split and thus,
the Palm Beach Council was
formed with 2800 members
initially. Two years later,
membership has grown to
4,200. B'nai B'rith District V
(from Maryland to Florida)
currently is the fastest growing
district in the world. It now is
the second largest and is
expected to surpass District I
(New York) in the next couple
of years.
Ken Farber, Regional
Director of B'nai B'rith, attri-
butes the growth of the region
in part to a successful active
membership campaign. "Two-
thirds of our new members in
this area have not been B'nai
B'rith members before. We
ask people to join and they
respond positively," stated
Farber.
LOCAL LODGES
Boca Teeca Lodge No. 3119
Boca Raton, Jack Paull,
president, 994-1520. Boca
West Lodge No. 3137 Boca
Raton, Albert Greenberg,
president, 483-7146. Century
Lodge No. 2939 West Palm
Beach, Iz Greenberg, presi-
dent, 689-5443. Delray Lodge
No. 2965 Delray Beach, Er-
win Mann, president, 499-
1403. Leonard A. Friedman
Lodge No. 3046 Royal
Palm Beach, Nathan Super,
president, 793-1306. Golden
Lakes Lodge No. 3113
West Palm Beach, David Sil-
verman, president, 686-7356.
Haifa Lodge No. 2969
Boynton Beach, Morris
Friedman, president, 737-
3247. Lake Worth Lodge No.
3016 Lake Worth, Sid Ber-
ger, president, .964-0343.
Lucerne Lakes Lodge No.
3132 Lake Worth, Sid
Klein, president, 968-8587. Lt.
Col. Netanyahu Lodge No.
3041 Palm Beach, William
Barth, president, 586-4471.
Noah Lodge No. 3084 Boca
Raton, Jon Klasfeld, presi-
dent, 368-5500 off. North
Lodge No. 3115 Palm
Beach Gardens, Stan Cohen,
president, 689-0483.
Olympic XI No. 2947
Boca Raton, Dick Fishman,
president, 482-7143. Palm
Continued on Page 11
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Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, June 24,1983
Organizations in the News
B'NAIB'RITH
The newly formed B'nai
B'rith Lodge Oasis in West
Boynton Beach has arranged
to sponsor trips to the Miami
Seaquarium. On July 6, ex-
ceptional children and their
counselors from the Royal
Palm School and on July 20,
underprivileged children from
the Hispanic Human Relations
Day Care Center, will partici-
pate in the trips. This is the
fifth year that B'nai B'rith has
sponsored these outings for
the retarded and underprivi-
leged children ot Palm Beach
County.
PIONEER WOMEN
NA'AMAT
Theodore Herzl Club of
Pioneer Women Na'Amat will
hold a Dessert Card Party
June 30, at 12:30 p.m. at Lake
Worth Shuffleboard Courts.
1121 Lucerne Ave. There will
be door prizes. S2.50 per per-
son. Bring a sandwich. For
tickets, please call Hannah
Schwartz.
WOMEN'S AMERICAN
ORT
The Haverhill Chapter of
the Women's American ORT
takes pride in its newest com-
munity service. The organiza-
tion recently presented a col-
lection of lap robes to the new
Joseph L. Morse Geriatric
Center on Haverhill Road. It
is the heartfelt wish of the
membership of this ORT
Chapter that these robes,
made by the women, will add
to the comfort of the aged res-
idents in this new facility.
Century Chapter of Wom-
en's American ORT will hold
a Sunday matinee, June 26 at
the Lake Worth Playhouse.
"By Jupiter" by Rogers and
Hart. Lunch at the Oriental
Express.
Because Someone Cared
Continued from Page 7
lelt. For this writer one oi tne
most devastating facts I en-
countered in the report is the
tact that public benefit losses
now seem to be working their
way into the marginal families
IN THE COOL & SCENIC BLUE RIDGE MOUNTAINS
Altitude 2200 lt
.b*s
x^Jsceofc* oL^ahe v^7#
Irom f- \J daily
per person dbl occ
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Lunch and Dinner
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ONLY $1998!!
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Deluxe Accomodations
Evening Entertainer*
Boat ride on Sea of Galilee
)0 A"taxes *tips &
TRAVEL AGENCY. INC.
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IT PALM ACM. FLORIDA 1140*
Many Extras
For Reservations & Information
Call: 686-8900
The Jewish War Veterans participated in the May 24 nam, u
tion ceremony at the Federal Courthouse. Shown above rTiSi
to right] Sam Mindel, Florida State Commander JWv1
Steinberg, past National Commander JWV; Doris Gni?
president Ladies Auxiliary Post 408; Judge Patricia SS
presiding U.S. Magistrate; Rose Weinberg, past Drftu.:
Ladies Auxiliary Post 408; Lillian Weintraub, AmericS
chairman Ladies Auxiliary JWV Department of Floridr Fit
Randal. Patriotic instructor Ladies Aixiliary Post m u*
Rabbi Alan Sherman, Chaplain Jewish Federation of'
Beach County. Rabbi Sherman gave the invocation.
f*
o*
FREE copy of Holiday Inns* large booklet containing dozens ot
exciting ideas for your condo group, club or organization.
Dinner Theaters* Supper Ctube*Crulsee< Epcot Town
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Mall this coupon or call person-to-person collect to the
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The Information You Want Will Be Mailed To You
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Your: Name___________________.___________
Address.
Phone,
Club Name.
Call or Mail To: Holiday Inn, 100 Datura Street at
Flagler Dr., W. Palm Beach, Fla. 33401 (305) 655-8800.
CALL OR WRITE DO NOT DELAY
SUPPLYS LIMITED-
and the "new poor" that had
middle-to-lower income
families who were, in the past,
managing to survive with a lit-
tle assistance but who are now
falling behind more each day.
Consider this: fully 8.1 percent
Oi all Jewish client families
during this study period have
lost their job; 2.9 percent had
their hours reduced, for a total
job elimation or reduction
representing 11.1 percent of
Jewish households. When one
considers the size of New
York's Jewish population,
these are really staggering
facts.
Although statistics are only
one way of looking at prob-
lems, one would do well to
consider the preceding facts
before dismissing the notion
that recession and Federal
policies do not affect the Jew-
ish community.
(The Jewish Family & Chil-
dren 's Service of Palm Beach
Courtly, Inc., is a non-profit
agency designed to meet the
social, emotional and counsel-
ing needs of the Jewish com-
munity of Palm Beach
County. Our office is located
at 2250 Palm Beach Lakes
Blvd., Suite 104. Our tele-
phone number is 684-1991.
The Jewish Family and Chil-
dren 's Service is a beneficiary
agency of the Jewish Federa-
tion of Palm Beach County).
irvin Steinberg, past National Commander of the Jewish Wu
Veterans, gave the keynote address at a recent naturalization
ceremony held at the Federal Courthouse. Members of the
Jewish War Veterans witnessed the event as 56 people took lie
oath of allegiance to the United States.
Wald
man hotel
Miami Beach's Finest GLatt Kosher Cuisine
Your Hosts Ssm and Morris Waldman, Gary Sher, David Diamond
HIGH HOLIDAY SPECIALS
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Phone Sam Waldman 538-5731 or 5344751
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Around staci lesser
theTown
1
MORE SCHOOL NEWS .
Jonathan Scott Klorfein, son of Fruema and Dr. Elliot
Klorfein, recently graduated from Tulane University Col-
lege of Arts and Science. He was the Captain of the Tennis
Team. Jonathan is spending two months in Europe this
summer.
Sister Tamarais attending George Washington Univer-
sity where she is working toward her Master of Business
Administration.
Brother Stephenis a tax attorney in Atlanta.
Anne and Paul Gilbert and Bette and Mort Gilbert are
very proud of their grandson and nephew James Lowell
Frankel. James received his PHD in Applied Mathematics
and Computers from Harvard University. He also received
a Professorship where he teaches classes one day a week
He is connected with the Digital Equipment Corporation
in Boston in the capacity of Research Engineer.
Wendy Tuerkneimer, granddaughter of Eleanor and
Jack Grossman, graduated from The American Heritage
Middle School in Plantation. Twelve year old Wendy is the
Class Valedictorian and received seven honors for the
highest grade in each of her classes. She was a vocalist at
the graduation exercises. This summer Wendy will be a
member of the Talent Identification Program at Duke
University.
Donald Gross, son of Arlene and Edward Gross,recent-
ly graduated from Forest Hill High School. Donnie was a
member of Dimension 20 Advanced Chorus which won
superior ratings at State Contest. He won the Harry M.
Johanson Award for being the Most Dedicated Senior Boy
and the award for being Most Outstanding in Dimension
Donnie was on the Senior Board and a member of Na-
tional Honor Society. He will attend the University of
Honda.
On Wednesday, April 27, about 60 people gathered at
Bodo s Restaurant to honor Mollie and Sidney Falik for
their untiring efforts and devotion to Israel and Labor
Zionism. Mollie and Sid were presented with a olaque in
appreciation tor their dedication. MazolTov!
hwn above is the 1983 Graduating Class of the Hornstein-
J"i C ommunily Day School. Pictured [left to right]: Mini
PMM, train Sapenoff, Edward Sleinhoff, Stephanie Phillips,
V* I erner, Shoshana Chazin, Paul Tochner, Eric Weiss, Zev
fmcrance, Rina Gillard and Robert Frankel. Not pictured:
P*n (Jlick and Merrie Burman.
BB Local Lodges
Continued from Page 9
hens Lodge No. 3144
Bray Beach, Bernard Weiss,
Tsident, 498-1622. North
No. 3157 Delray
i Bertram Stern, presi-
. 272-2378. Shomer Lodge
3122 Boca Raton, Hy
pnkin, president. Tel Aviv
"W No. 3015, West Palm
acn, Sam Perkis, president.
?Mure Coast Lodge No.
w, Ft. Piercet Vero Beach,
St. Lucie, Morris
v"z, president, 335-
Yachad Unit No. 5231
Boynton Beach, Sol Her-
f*< President, 737-3798.
'naj B'rith Palm Beach
fncil Ken Farber Re-
pnal Director 1776 Lake
fth Road Suite 205,
Lake Worth, FL 33460 582-
7656.
Friday, June 24, 1983/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 11
Camp Shalom Opens Its 21 st Season
Camp Shalom opened its
21st season June 20th with 285
campers enrolled in numerous
recreational activities includ-
ing a newly opened archery
course and minature golf
course. The first session runs
from June 20 to July 15. A
second session is being offered
beginning July 18 for four
weeks.
This year Teen Travel II,
under the direction of Terry
Frost, has been added to the
overall program. It is for
youngsters in grades 8-10 and
consists of several extended
travel excursions. One week
trips to Miami and the Keys,
Tampa and Orlando are
scheduled for the first session
and an extended trip to New
York will be the highlight of
the second session.
Teen Travel I for 6th and
7th graders will begin its
second year with two day trips
to Miami and Tampa being
planned. A four day trip to
Orlando rounds out the pro-
gram run by Terrie Lubin.
Sports Camp also will be
entering its second year of
operation. This is a separate
unit with the major emphasis
on sports. In addition to the
regular camp program, the
youngsters leave Camp
Shalom most every day to
participate in sports activities
around the community includ-
ing bowling, swimming, ten-
nis, skating and others. Sally
Masters is in charge of this
unit.
Pre-school children partici-
pate in their own camp activi-
ties under the direction of Gail
Kressal. They have their own
wading pool and playground
and activities are geared to
their interests and abilities.
An Israeli Scout is on the
premises who assists in all
activities and talks to the
campers about Israel.
The Shabbat program is
held weekly and consists of the
traditional blessings and
material geared to that week's
Torah portion.
An integral part of Camp
Shalom is the CIT (Counselor
in Training) program. This
year nine teen-agers assist
various groups under the
supervision of the senior
counselors. They learn to
work with people and are
being prepared for serving as
counselors next year.
Camp Shalom is constantly
being upgraded. Last year two
large awnings were set up to
provide shade for quiet out-
door activities. This year 20
new tables and benches are in
use and the pavillion is. being
refurbished. An old bus has
been converted to serve as a
staff office.
Camp Shalom is operated
by the Jewish Community
Center under the direction of
BNAI BRITH to. DADE COUNTY PRESENTS:
ISRAEL
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MISSION
15 DAYS DELUXE A
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Camp Shalom holds a Balloon Launch during a previous year.
This year, the camp will offer recreational activities to 285
campers.
Hareen Bertisch. According to
Bertisch, Camp Shalom is able
to offer something that other
camps cannot a beautiful
Judaic enrichment program.
She also feels that teaching
children how to form relation-
ships with other children and
how to work in groups is a
primary objective of the sum-
mer camp experience.
For more information con-
tact the Jewish Community
Center office.
Kutsher's Playaway Plan
Gives You The Stars!
BEN VEREEN *LOLA FALANA
July 3 July 9
ROBERT KLEIN SUSAN ANTON
July 16 July 23
BILLY CRYSTAL
July 30
Impressed? That's just Julywait till you see our
August galaxy! All in addition to our private lake. 18-hole
golf course, tennis, racquet ball, indoor ice skating, ex-
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make you feel like the most important star of all!
-AUG. _____
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T*eJewiahFVdhw of P*n Beach County/ Friday, Jam 24,1968
Senior News
FROM THE JEWISH COMMUNfTY CENTER
Have you been to the JCC
Kosher Dining Center? Kosher
lunches are served daily,
through Title III of the Older
Americans Act, distributed
through Gulfstream areawide
Council on Aging. Kosher
meals are also delivered to
those who are at home who are
unable to come to the Center.
People over 60 should call 686-
1661 for information or reser-
vations. Ask for Bonnie Sil-
ver stein.
After just a few months, se-
niors are enjoying connecting
with each other, connecting
with new ideas, services and
ways of life. We have to ex-
pand the program due to the
demand!! On Fridays we will
use another room so that more
people can participate in the
JCC Senior Oneg Shabbat
Program and Hot Kosher
Lunch. Our federal grant
"partially" funds the pro-
gram. The meals cost the JCC
$2.50 and persons may pay the
full amount or contribute
whatever they want. Call for a
reservation today.
DAILY PROGRAM AT
THE "HOT LUNCH
CONNECTION"
June 24 Sing-a-Long
Kurlands
June 27- Arts and Crafts
June28 Israeli Scout
June 29 Fire Prevention
Film
June 30 "Cataracts" Dr.
Spector
Jill) 5 Insects and You in
Florida Palm Beach Exter-
minating
July 7 Sex" Dr. Robert
Berger
We are also serving persons
living in Boynton Beach, Del-
ray Beach or Boca Raton. For
information in these areas call
495-0806. Telephone calls in
both North and South County
areas should be made from 9
a.m. to 12 noon.
NEEDED
Volunteers We Need Yon
The JCC is proud of the
many volunteers that help us
in various phases of our pro-
gram. They enable us to bring
services to many more people
and help us to enrich and en-
hance the lives of persons of
all ages from our youngest
pre-scoolers up to our oldest
senior adult. We are always
ready to expand our volunteer
staff. Marcie Frisch, newest
staff person, is working with
our volunteers. She has a list
of the many jobs we need to
have fulfilled. We need recep-
:ionists, record keepers,
drivers to deliver our hot ko-
her lunches, outreach
workers, telephone communi-
cators, program leaders (if you
are just "dying" to tell the
world about your hobby, trip,
favorite interest) call Marcie
and she will help you share
your knowledge and talent
vsith others. We could go on
and on. Join the prestigious
group of JCC Volunteers to-
da\. Call Marcie Frisch for an
appointment 689-7700.
Pepper Addresses JWV Confab
"Israel wants to be free of ag-
gression and can achieve this
with an independent Lebanon
as a neighbor," asserted Pep-
per.
Stating that he was "partial
towards old folks I'm 82
and in that class," he advo-
cated the right of the older
person to keep on working.
"There should be no dis-
crimination on the part of
age." Pepper practices what
he preaches. "The great re-
ward of age is not sitting
down. There is the challenge
of the future at whatever age
one is," affirmed Pepper.
U.S. Congressman Claude
Pepper spoke at the Jewish
War Veterans Department of
Florida 37th Annnal Conven-
tion, in conjunction with the
I idies Auxilian 31st Conven-
tion.
The Honorable Clauae Pep-
per, U.S. Congressman from
Florida, addressed the joint
opening session of the Depart-
ment of Florida, Jewish Wax
Veterans of the United States
37th Annual Convention, in
conjunction with the Ladies
Auxiliary 31st Convention,
held recently at the Hyatt
Palm Beaches. Pepper, con-
sidered the spokesman for
older Americans, said he was
heartened by Congress begin-
ning to restore many cuts in
the budget that had been
made.
Pepper is a strong advocate
of the nuclear arms freeze. "I
pleaded a long time ago to
stop the nuclear arms race,"
he said. Pepper anticipated the
Russians catching up with the
United States. "Now," he re-
lated, "I'm worried about
Castro getting nuclear
weapons. Even with a few, he
could do much damage.' *
On the subject of the Middle
East, the congressman believes
that the offensive into Leba-
non by Israel was justified.
. '-'. -
III--
Morse Geriatric Center
pting Applications

a i
Persons interested in applying for admission to the Morse Geriatric Center
may now pick up admission applications at the Center or request them by mail.
Screening of the completed applications will begin shortly, therefore anyone
interested should request these forms as soon as possible.
The 120 bed skilled nursing care facility will provide three levels of long term
care for those 65 years and older who may need the services and programs
provided It will be operated in accordance with Jewish traditions and will offer
Kosher meals and daily and holiday religious services. A highly trained staff will
be available to provide all necessary medical and therapeutic treatment.
Moreover, activity and social service programs will enable the residents to live
an enriched and meaningful life in a warm, hospitable environment.
Once again, potential applicants are urged to submit completed applications
as soon as possible. Inquiries should be directed to: Morse Geriatric Center,
4*47 Fred Gladstone Drive. West Palm Beach, Florida 33407; Telephone (305)
471-5111. The Morse Geriatric Center is a beneficiary agency of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach County.____________________
Israel and Lebanon Agreement
Continued from Page 4
the Syrians out. What then are
the Syrians waiting for?"
The United States continues
to hope that the Saudis might
be forthcoming in trying to
gain acceptance of the Accord
and to encourage Syria to
withdraw but there is no
evidence that the Saudis are
playing such a role. Saudi
Arabia has been characterized
as a "marshmallow" it can
be squeezed and it will react to
the pressure, but it can't press
back. So in situations of this
type, the Saudis follow their
pattern, and take cover.
What role should the United
States play?
In the face of the war-like
actions ot Syria and the Soviet
Union the United States must
demonstrate through public
pronouncements, symbolic
gestures and concrete actions
that it stands firmly in alliance
with Israel. To the extent that
the United States plays such a
role the danger of war in the
Middle East will be reduced
and the prospects for peace
enhanced.
To affirm its long-term
commitment to the alliance
with Israel, the United States
can take two steps imme-
diately. The first is to an-
nounce the immediate release
of the 75 F-16's that were
earlier suspended by the Presi-
dent. That suspension en-
couraged Syria and the Soviet
Union in their be'licose
posture.
The long-term commitment
also would be demonstrated in
an agreement that would allow
the licensing and co-
production of certain central
components required for the
Israeli Lavi figter plane. Israel
originally understood that it
was to have both licensing and
co-production rights of those
critical components. That
rights were given and tha
apparently taken away. Suck
an action would be consists
with the basic policies of the
United States to assist its albs
in becoming self-sufficient I1
their own defense.


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JCC News
Mother-Toddler Special Summer
The Jewish Community Center of the Palm Beaches is
continuing their popular Mother-Toddler Program for
toddlers 10 months through 3 years of age as part of the
JCC Summer Programs at the Center, 2415 Okeechobee
Blvd.
Toddlers and mothers will do special play, exercises, art
work and enjoy learning new things about each other and
the world around them. Call Gail at 689-7700 for a
complete listing of programs.
Singles Join Together
Singles Young, Career, Single Parents and Prime
Time are invited for a special evening at the Jewish
Community Center, 2415 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm
Beach on Wednesday evening, June 29, at 7:30 p.m.
Meet Dr. Paul Klein, president of the JCC. Join other
singles for wine and cheese as you learn about the Center.
Meet new friends, greet old friends. There is no admission
fee. Call Joan at 689-7700 for additional information.
Flea Market Collectables
The Jewish Community Center is now accepting
[clothing, bric-a-brac, appliances, all items in good con-
dition, to be sold at their up-coming Flea Market to be held
Sunday, August 21 at the Center, 2415 Okeechobee Blvd.,
West Palm Beach. Please call Sam Rubin at 689-7703 to
arrange pick-up. All contributions are tax deductible.
tmt^mitrM ^faJtiMLItmiftMrtitfl n&u
I iii

The Law Firm Of
Howard J. Wiener, P.A.
Is Pleased To Announce
The Expansion And Relocation
Of Ha Offices To
Suite 204-250 Royal Palm Way
Post Office Box 3066
Palm Bench, Florida 33480
(305)833-4001
Pf^WLiniiUdToAUMtUrInvolvtasFderldSUUTitioo,
tacMtag FsaslM Aad Pram snaring Itaafcf Awl pests*
T Planning Far Corporations, Profaaakwal AaeocUtfeae,
Individual., Eatatea Truata,
Foreign Taxation and Tax Litigation
Jewish History
Course Offered
Rabbi Merle E. Singer of
Temple Beth-El, Boca Raton,
will teach a two-semester
course, "The Roots of the
Jewish Historical Experi-
ence," at the Florida Atlantic
University Boca Raton cam-
pus beginning this fall.
The history department is
offering the course under a
resident lectureship estab-
lished for the 1983-84
academic year by the Jewish
Chautauqua Society. The first
four-credit segment of the
course will be offered during
the fall semester.
Using a thematic approach,
Rabbi Singer will present a
synthesis of the 5,000-year his-
tory, thought, culture and
civilization of the Jewish peo-
ple.
"Jewish history involves not
only the political, economic
and social forces, but the re-
ligious ideas, observances and
institutions that are reflected
in contemporary Jewish cul-
ture," Rabbi Singer explained.
The Jewish Chautauqua
Society is the education
project of the National
Federation of Temple
Brotherhoods and sponsors
courses at universities
throughout the United States
to promote a better under-
standing of Judaism.
This course is one of 136
resident lectureships to be of-
fered throughout the country
by the Jewish ChautaUqua
Society and one of eight of-
fered in the state of Florida.
Registration for the fall
semester will be held at FAU
August 24 through 26.
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stop eating
long enough
to have
some fun..."
$350d$365
Per week, per person (dbl.occ.)
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For reservations and
information phone
When you escape the Florida heat
this Summer, escape to something
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Mid-day snacks? Magnificent Pool
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So come to the Brickman. Where the
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South Fallsburg, NY 12779
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Overlooking a great
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m
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:______________
WANTED
Mashgeach to supervise Kashruth policies of local
community Contact Rabbi Joseph Speiser, chairman,
jutnrutn Committee, Palm Beach County Board of
Rabbis 689-9430 or 684-7750.
Tfaer
Arts-CraitWeweiry \>I JDlOirVlf
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Frl. 10 AM-5 PM, Sun. 12-5 PM
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A Welcome Cocktail for 2 in our Gangplank Lounge
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I NAME
I


Page 14 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, June 24,1983
b There Jewish Life After Bar/Bat MitzvahT
Bar/Bat Mitzvahs
One year ago Temple Israel
was invited as an experimental
Congregation to introduce the
new curriculum "To See The
World Through Jewish Eyes."
It was a course designed for
Kindergarten. So successful
was the venture for the Union
Of American Hebrew Congre-
gations and Temple Israel
that a second segment for
pre teens is being introduced
this year.
Principal of Temple Israel
Religious School, Ceceil Tish-
man, was one of three lay
leaders from South Florida
Congregations invited to at-
tend an intense three day
seminar at the Educational
Office of the Union Of Ameri-
can Hebrew Congregations in
New York City. There with
other lay leaders from across
the nation, Mrs. Tishman des-
cribed her experience. "I at-
tended classes from 8:30 a.m.
to 9 p.m. The classes ranged
from reading and research of
selected material to role play-
ing. Hours were devoted to
learning new methods and ac-
cepting new and novel ways to
make our children into Jews
who affirm their Jewish iden-
tity and bind themselves in-
separably to their people by
word and deed."
According to Mrs. Tish-
man, "Post Bar Mitzvah Syn-
drome" is not fatal, but it is
progressive. It leaves a
vacuum during early and late
teenage years when peer pres-
sure and the pressures of cults
and born again Christians are
at its strongest. Parental pas-
sivity lets the child make his
own decision whether to stay
in school after Bar-Bat Mitz-
vah or leave. We delude our-
selves into thinking that allow-
ing our child to arrive at the
decision makes him or her feel
grown up. We certainly would
wnmrarrmrrm wrrrro mi iwn mum nrrrnq
A-AAborr AnswerFoni
A Division of
ARING-A-DING" ANSWERING SERVICE
Computerized Switchboard Live Operators
WE ANSWER FAST!
439-0700
213 No. Dixie Highway, Lake Worth, FL 33460
not allow our child to decide
his secular future while still in
grade school. Surely this must
be a decision made by parents
and is not negotiable. Bar-Bat
Mitzvah at age 13 cannot, in
this modern age, constitute the
entirety of Jewish education
and experience.
Aware of this acute problem
nationwide, the UAHC was
prompted to produce a second
segment of their successful
course "To See The World
Through Jewish Eyes." This
new segment is for pre-teens
prior to entering Midrasha. It
will be introduced at Temple
Israel when Religious School
resumes in the fall. "For want
of a more apt description of
this course," the principal
said, "We've chosen the
course title, 'Is There Jewish
Life After Bar Mitzvah?' "
"Approximately 20 lucky
pre-teens will have a self-con-
tained total Jewish learning
enviornment. Emphasis will be
on thinking and doing. The
new curriculum has no books
other than those used for re-
search. Holidays and heroes
will be studied for their contri-
butions to Jewish and Ameri-
can secular life. The Jewish
experience in America with its
rich and varied history will be
used to help study particular
goals and objectives."
Over the Summer months
classes will be conducted at
Temple Israel to instruct and
prepare the teachers for this
special new course. Addi-
tionally there will be an orien-
tation class for parents prior
to the opening of school.
HOLLY KATZ
Holly Katz, daughter of
Melvin and Myra Katz, Coun-
terpoint Estates, West Palm
Beach, was Bat Mitzvah on
Saturday, June 18 at Temple
Beth Zion in Royal Palm
Beach. Holly is the grand-
daughter of Allen and Evelyn
Katz and Meyer and Faye
Kraut.
LAURENCE GORDON
Laurence Allen Gordon,
son of Howard and Deena
Gordon of Palm Beach Gar-
dens will be called to the torah
Friday evening, June 24 and
Saturday morning, June 25 at
Temple Beth David. Rabbi
William Marder and Cantor
Earl Rackoff will officiate.
Through the Bar-Bat Mitzvah
twinning program sponsored
by the Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County, Larry
will share his joyous occa^
with German Abramov iff
bent, USSR in a SS^Jj
pression of solidarity wiK
brothers and sistenT2
duress. Larry is the aranH
of Albert and EvdyfflS*
of Lake Worth andKft
Frieda Gordon of HJJg
He is an eighth grade ,,h
jj^Howc, waK'si-
Births
Mr. and Mrs. Jon Stoll nf
West Palm Beach annou*
the birth of their daughter
Lauren Elizabeth, on April2?'
Mrs. Stoll is the daughter of
Mrs. Betty Sedlock of inde-
pendence. Oh. and the late
Mr. Victor Sedlock. Mr. Stoll
is the son of Mr. and Mrs
Lawrence Stoll of Palm
Beach.
Religious directory-
2250 Palm Beach Lakes Boulevard Suite 104
West Palm Beach, Florida 33409
JEWISH FAMILY AND CHILDREN'S SERVICE
An outstanding professional and counseling agency serving iht
Jewish community of Palm Beach County. Professional ana
confidential help Is available tor
Problems of the aging
Consultation and
evaluation services
Marital counseling
Parent-child contllclt
Personal problem*
684-1991
Moderate Ihs are charged In family and individual counseling to
thoie who can pay (Fees are based on Income and family sot)
The Jewish Family and Children's Services la a benefklary agency ol
the Jewish Federation of Pslm Beach County.
Conservative
B'nai Torah Congregation
1401 N.W 4th Avenue, Boca Raton, 33432. Phone 392-8566. Rabbi
Theodore Feldman. Sabbath Services, Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9:30
BtIMIt
Congregation Anshei Sholom
5348 Grove Street, W. Palm Beach 33409. Phone 684-3212. Rabbi Harry
Z. Selectman. Cantor Mordecai Spektor. Daily: 8:30 a.m. and 7:30 p.m.
Frida.: 8:30 a.m., 5 p.m. and a late service at 8:15 p.m., Saturday: 830
a.m., 7:30 p.m., Mincha.
Congregation Beth kodrsh of Boynton Beach
at Congregational Church, 115 No. Federal Highway, Boynton Beach.
Phono 737-5756. Rabbi Avrom L. Drazin. Sabbath services, Friday 8:15
p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.
Golden Lakes Temple
1470 iolden Lakes Blvd., W. Palm Beach 33411. Phone 689-9430. Rabbi
Joser i Speiser. Daily Services 8:15 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. Sabbath services
Frida 8:15 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m., 5 p.m., Mincha followed by Sholosh
Suede s.
Temple Beth David
at Westminster Presbyterian Church, 10410 N. Military Trail, Palm Beach
Gard ns33410. Offic?- 321 Northlake Blvd., No. Palm Beach Phone
845-1 34. Rabbi William Marder, Cantor Earl J. Rackoff. Sabbath ser-
vices. Friday 8 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m.
Temple Beth El
2815 No. Flagler Dr., W. Palm Beach 33407. Phone 833-0339. Rabbi
Howard J. Hirsch, Cantor Elaine Shapiro. Sabbath services Friday 8:15
p.m., Saturday 9:30 a.m. Daijv Minyan 8:15 a.m., Sunday and Legal
Holidays 9 a.m. Temp|e Be||, Sholom
224 NW Avenue "G", BeUe Glade 33430. Sabbath services Friday 8:30
p.m.
Temple Beth Sholom
315 N. "A" Street, Lake Worth 33460. Phone 585-5020. Rabbi Emanuel
Eisenberg, Cantor Jacob Elman. Services Monday and Thursday 815 am
Fridav 8:15 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m. "^iJa.m.
Temple Beth Zion
Lions Club, 700 Camelia Dr., Royal Palm Beach. Sabbath Services Fridav
8 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m. Rabbi Nathan Zelizer; Cantor Chaim Baltuck
Phone 793-9122. < _
Temple B'nai Jacob
2177 So. Congress Ave., West Palm Beach 33406. Phone 433-5957 Rokk;
Dr. Morns Silberman. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.^! Saturday US?
Monday through Thursday 9 a.m. ,,M" am-
Temple Emanu-EI
190 North County Road, Pabn Beach 33480. Phone 832-0804. Rabbi Joel
Chazin, Cantor David Dardashti. Sabbath services, Friday 8 30 n m
Saturday 9 a.m. Temple Emeth P '
5780 West Atlantic Avenue, Delray Beach 33446. Phone 498-3536. Rabbi
Bernard Silver, Cantor Seymour Zisook. Sabbath services, 5pm and 8
p.m., Saturday and holidays, 8:45 a.m. Daily Minyan, 8:45 a.m. and 5
p.m.
The Treasure Coast Jewish Center
(Martin County) 3257 S.E. Salerno Road (opposite Winn-Dixie), Stuart,
FL 33490. President Lief Grazi: 1-287-7732. Friday service 8 p.m.
Conservative-Liberal
Temple Eternal Light
Boca West Community UMC, 8900 Boca West, Glades Road (1 mile west
Si ,Tor!?e); Jhe Free Synagogue, P.O. Box 3, Boca Raton 33432.
Phone: 368-1600, 391-1111. Rabbi Benjamin Rosayn. Sabbath services,
Friday 8:15 p.m.
Orthodox
Aitz Chaim Congregation
Century Village, W. Palm Beach. Phone 689-4675. Sabbath services 9 a.m.
and 5 p.m. Daily services 8:15 a.m. and 6:30 p.m.
Congregation Anshei Emuna
551 Brittany L. Kings Point, Delray Beach 33446. Phone 499-7407 or 499-
9229 Harry Silver, President. Daily services 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Saturdays
and Holidays 9 a.m.
Reform
The Reform Temple of Jupiler-Tequesta
H? Jundu Church (parrish Hall), 204 U.S. Highway One South, Tequesta
33458. Phone 747-4235. President Jeanne Tarsches. Services the second
and lourth Friday of every month, 8 p.m.
Temple Beth El of Boca Raton
IP ,S^V.Fourth Avenue, Boca Raton 33432. Phone 391-8900. Rabbi
Merle B. Singer, Cantor Martin Rosen. Sabbath services Friday 8:15 p.m-
rorah Study with Rabbi Singer, Saturday 9:15 a.m. Sabbath monng
services 10:30 a.m.
. Temple Beth Shalom
32960 mailinPo?ahH HaVth Avenue >nd Victory Blvd., Vero Beach
^&1fe^%2113'Vero Bh-FL 3296-Rabbi
WemnoanV Tri If *fr"J^*!SU Forest Hill Blvd. and
Lane W pI.aCen W?1 Palm ". Mailing address: 825 Lantern Tr
Westml HE KKS 5341-1' Fridy wrvices 8:15 p.m. Rabbi Steven R.
Westman, Cantor Nicholas Fenakel. Phone 793-2700
Temple Israel
!Xi?rf%i5a*ler J?r- V' PaUn Beach 33407- phone 833-8421. Rabbi
Howard Shapiro, Cantonal Soloist Susan Weiss. Sabbath services, Friday
J'^'r k TempleJudea
Rd.TSSS2L! Sre MaVu^-H^her?.S,oulevard- Rab>i Joel L. Levine. Cantor Rita Shore.
Mailing address 1407 14th Lane, Lake Worth 33463. Phone 965-7778.
Temple Sinai
AveaSDe"lVanv"ephMeth^f Church corner of Lake Ida Rd. and Swinton
Delray BeS^VLt^61- Mailin addrc" 2005 N.W. 9th Street,
ueiray Beach, 33444. Rabbi Samuel Silver. Friday services 8:15 p.m.


Fnday, June 24,1983 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
IH '
Page 15
Synagogue News
Candle Lighting Time Friday. June 24,7:55pm
TEMPLE
BETH TORAH
Holds Anniversary
Dinner
Saturday, May 21 marked
Temple Beth Torah's Fifth
Anniversary Celebration. The
gala event was held at the
Indian Trails Country Club.
Wendy Eastman, chaired
the Ad Journal Committee
and offered the welcoming
remarks. Her efforts were re-
sponsible for the most success-
ful fund raising effort of the
year.
Officers for the 1983-84
year were installed by Rabbi
Steven Westman, spiritual
leader of Beth Torah. Saul
Goldman will serve as PrcM-
Jcnt for the coming year. He
accepted the presidency with
an inspirational message
pointed tow arc a unified and
siiung Jewish community His
view of the future includes a
growing membership and a
Temple Building ... a wish
shared by all members and
fI lends. Following the instal-
lation of officers, Cantor
Nicholas Fenakel led the
group in song and a closing
prayer was offered by Rabbi
Westman.
for information about
Temple Beth Torah, contact
Lenny Friedman or Saul
Goldman. For Y outh group
iniormalion contact Sharon
Watt
Continued from Page 4
Jeanne Levy, president ol the
'.wish federation, introduced
5 icretary Wan.
In conclusion, Elsie Leviton
responded to a question from
the audience about reports
thai insufficient oil is being
stored ior strategic purposes.
She said, "The reason less oil
is being stored is because we
do not have enough storage
facilities. We must encourage
our Congressmen and
Senators to appropriate
money lor additional storage
facilities."
Edelman and Hebrew School
information contact Bonnie
Harris.
TEMPLE BETH ZION
Registration
The religious school of
Temple Beth Zion, the conser-
vative synagogue of the
western communities of Palm
Beach County, announced
that registration will continue
throughout the summer. The
school will have classes for
children from kindergarten
through eighth grade. A broad
range of studies will cover all
areas of Jewish culture and the
programs will be interesting
and exciting. Rosalind Pomer-
ance is the schorl d!:ctor.
She teacher at the Jewish
Community Day I chool, Mid-
rash? Judaica High School,
anH harttiig-j at Temple Beth
El.
For information contact El-
len Brown or Helen Schwartz.
Parents planning to have their
children attend the school in
the fall are urged to register
them early in order to make
appropriate preparation.
CONGREGATION
BETH ZION
At a special meeting on June
6, Congregation Beth Zion
and the Executive Board en-
gaged Rabbi Nathan Zelizer
and Cantor Chaim Balluck for
the forthcoming High Holi-
days in September and for re-
ligious services the balance of
the -ear.
Rabbi Zelizer is a graduate
of the Jewish Theological
Seminary and has a Doctor of
Divinity from that institution.
He served as Rabbi of Congre-
gation Tifereth Israel, Colum-
bus, Oh.'for many years. He
was also extremely active in
the community as Chaplain
with the Veterans Administra-
tion Hospital, Jewish Welfare
Bpard, ZOA, Jewish War Vet-
erans and the American
Legion. During World War II
he served as Chaplain for the
Army in the Pacific and
Japan. He is the author of
"The History of Higher Jew-
ish Education in America."
Area Deaths
ABRAMSON
Manvllle R. ee. of 273 Tradewlnd Drive.
Pelm Beach. Rlveralde Memorial
Chapel, Weit Palm Beach.
BROWN
Ruth, 78 of Century village, Weit Palm
Beach. Menorah Garden, and Funeral
Chapels, West Palm Beach.
CANTOR
Anna, 79, of 2548 Dudley Drive E.. Weet
Palm Beach. Riverside Memorial
Chapel. West Palm Beach.
DEITCH
jMk. M, of S3S-A1 Knotty Pine Circle.
West Palm Beach. Rlveralde Memorial
Chapel. Weat Palm Beach.
DONENFBLD
Sylvia, 88, of 821 Lake Dora Drive. Weat
Palm Beach. Levltt-Welnateln
Memorial Chapel. Waat Palm Beach.
FA8BBBO
Estelle, 88, of TT70 Tahtti Lane, Lake
worth Rlveralde Memorial Chapel.
West Palm Beach.
QRABBR
{*rry J 7a, 0f Mansfield M-819, Boca
won. Rlveralde Memorial Chapel.
West Palm Beach
KLBDtAN
-*". 1% of Cambrldfe MM, Weat
raim Beach. Levltt-Welnateln
Memorial Chapel. Weat Palm Beach.
KODNER
Roes, 81, of Century village. Weet Palm
"each. Menorah Gardens ft funeral
>*P1. Weet Palm Beach.
LCVOfB
JTorence K.. 70. of 44 Cocoanut Row, No.
J*. Palm Beach. Rlveralde Memorial
Chapel. Weet Palm Beach.
LBVT
B*tty> TO. J0 Bradley Place. Palm
I em pit- Israel held Confirmation ceremonies this Shavuoth.
Pictured above (standing, left to right] David Shapiro. Scott
Classman. Paul Shapiro, Rabbi Howard Shapiro. (Seated, left
to ri-hi' Nanci Chertoff, Kimberly Kapner. Robin Kandel. Beth
Chert off.
Beach. Rlveralde Memorial Chapel.
Weat Palm Beach.
Sidney A., of Kent J-160. Century VU-
lage, Weet Palm Beach. Rlveralde
. Memorial Chapel. Weat Palm Beach.
ME8KIN
Sophia. 72 of 7807 Ace Road N.. Lake
Worth. Levltt-Welnetein Memorial
Chapel, Weet Palm Beach.
Ruth, 78, of 22 Cape Cod Circle, Lake
Worth. Levltt-Welnateln Memorial
Chapel, Weet Palm Beach.
RANDALL
Jack M.. 70. of Flanders J 488. Delray
Beach. Levltt-Wemetetn Memorial
Chapel. Weet Palm Beach.
K1GER
Mary, t. of 2778 Dudley Drive W.. Weat
Palm Beach. Levltt-Welnetein
Memorial Chapel. Weet Palm Beach.
ROSEN
Jordan (Edward). 1 Leke Meryl
Drive, Weet Palm Beach. Rlveralde
Memorial Chapel. Weat Palm Beach.
ROflENOARTEN
Sadie, M of Normandy E-204, Kings
Point, Delray Beach. Levltt-Welnateln
Memorial Chapel. Weet Palm Beach.
SEITZES
Rhode, 78. of Oreenbrler C-40B. Weet
Palm Beach. Levltt-Welnetein
Memorial Chapel, Weet Palm Beach.
BN EIDER
David, 72. of JO0 N.E. Flret Court,
Boynton Beach. Levltt-Welnetein
Memorial Chapel. Weat Palm Beach.
WALDEN
Kathryn E.. TS. of Lake Worth. Menorah
Gardens ft runeral Chapela. Weet Palm
Beach.
Cantor Baltuck served as Can-
tor for the Rego Park Jewish
Center in Queens, N.Y. before
moving to Florida. He gradu-
ated Hcrzliah Cantorial
School in New York City and
has sung and studied with
Yussele Rosenblatt David
Kutzivitsky.
TFMPFi kbah 'he Rahhinical Assembly, Southeast Region, held their Spring
a.t, ^ Kt,lah recfn,,y ,he cen Bre* Inn Siner Utand. Thi
Affiliate Organizations Kalian is held annuaUy for a combination of Torah study and
At recent meetings of the practical matters relating to the rabbinate. Schoiar-in-Residence
affiliate organizations of Dr- Avraham Holtz, professor of Hebrew Literature at the
Temple Israel, elections were Jewish Theological Seminary, spoke about the larger issues of
held and the respective officers worship and prayer as they applied to poetry in religion. The
and boards were elected for Kallah was coordinated by Rabbi William Marder of Temple
the 1983-1984 year. For Sister- Beth David and Rabbi Theodore Feldman of B'nai Torah
hood the following were Congregation in Boca Raton. Pictured above is [left to right]
elected: Rabbi William Marder. Rabbi Joel Chazin of Temple Emanu-EI
President, Wallis Sherman; tS^^SSSSlJSSmSJSF* Avr,h*m Ho,te
Vice Presidents, Adele Gold- (8,an berg, Gail Leeds, Edith Grant,
Fay Kapetansky; Treasurer,
Tema Adler; Recording Secre-
tary, Joan Diamond; Corre-
sponding Secretary, Diane
Steiner; and Parliamentarian,
Evelyn Guttag.
President, Wally Sherman,
explained that her board will
be meeting during the Summer
months to plan for the year
ahead. She is certain that Sis-
terhood will repeat its excel-
lent fund raising programs:
Donor. Great Escape Auction,
Super Sunday Dinner. Specific
projects will be presented to
supply the Temple with some
refurbishing, while other com-
mittees will be working on
existing, informative and in-
structive programming for the
Sisterhood year.
For Brotherhood the fol-
lowing were elected:
President, Stephen J. Gold-
stein; Vice Presidents, Henry
Blum, Howard Vogei, Murray
Nash, Jonathan Fuss; Corre-
sponding Secretary, Mike
Wiseman; Recording Secre-
tary, Raymond Goldmuntz;
Treasurer, Merton B. Levin-
son, Board of Directors: Larry
Kramer, Frank Thrasher, Al-
bert Metzker, Bernard
Kramer, and Morton W. Gil-
bert.
Stephen J. Goldstein has
been elected to head the slate
for the new officers and Board
of Temple Israel's Brother-
hood, in his plans for the
coming year, President, Steve
Goldstein, stressed that the
accent will be on fresh and at-
tractive new programming. He
hinted at some special social
events with a strong possibility
of a jointly sponsored social
with the Temple Israel Sister-
hood. Brotherhood will un-
dertake a Community project
this year. "With more young
fellows volunteering their sup-
port for the Temple Israel
Brotherhood, the promise of
exciting good times is inevita-
ble for the year ahead," Gold-
stein said.
At a most successful meet-
ing and Beach Party, the Tem-
ple Israel Youth Group held its
election of officers. Elected as
President, was Robin Kandel.
David Shapiro was elected
Vice President with Eric Slepp
to serve as Treasurer. Twin
sisters, Beth and Nanci Cher-
toff, were elected respectively
to the position of Secretary
and Senior Board Member.
Miss Kandel assured the
membership that the group
will be as active next year as
the past year. Temple Israel
was well represented at
SEFTY functions regionally
and nationally this past year.
, Sir- Speedy
We Make You
Look Good!
1
Complmtm printing, copying a bindmry smrviem )
Fr pick-up A dmlivmryoi your ordmr '
586-6220 g
107 South Dixie Hwy. Lake Worth. Ft. 33460 < |
"Conservative Synagogue seeking Bal Koreh who will
also attend Daily Minyan and supervise Kashrut on
premises. Apartment near synagogue provided, plus
salary. Ideal for retiree...We are also seeking a part-
time afternoon Hebrew School teacher and Youth
Director. Smd inquiries to: Cong. B'nal Israel of St.
Petersburg, 301 59th St., North St. Petersburg, FL
33710, ATT: Personal.
^e^tna^t 42, 6 ft, slim, blond, university education, good
housewife, interests: travel, sailing, siding, walking, ten-
nis, music, theater, painting, literature, antiquities,
seeks
a dynamic gentleman of strong character, with sense of
humor, living in excellent financial situation. Object:
matrimony.
Write:
Marianne Pilz
Saseler Chaussee 96a
2000 Hamburg 65
Weat Germany


Pge 16 The Jewish Floridkn of Pahn Beach County /Friday, June 24,1983
*

NORTON
-SINCE 1921-
TIRE CO.
SAJITY
ami
OUR NEW CORPORATE HEADQUARTERS, WAREHOUSES AND
TRUCK SERVICE CENTER AT 2525 N.W. 82nd AVENUE
YYOKOHAMA
QUALITY VALUE PERFORMANCE
P155/80R13
39.84
P-METRIC
TUBELESS
V WHITEWALL P^5/80R13144.70
PBICE
P185/80R13'58.16
40,000 MILE
LIMITED
WARRANTY
IS
< i
LOW COST. HIGH
MILEAGE. OUT-
STANDING VALUE
BUCK RADIAL
1 90
P185/75R14'59.55|2 00
P195/75R1462.53I2 13
P205/75R14 70.73 2 34
P215/75R14-73.66
P205/75R15 71.95
2 49
2 44
P215/75R15I74.98 259
P225/75R15(77.48 12-74
P235/75R15 89.42
2 96
XZX TUBELESS
BLACKWALLS
SIZE
145x13
155x13
165x13
175x14
185x14
165x15
165/70-13
175/70-13
185/70-13
185/70-14
PRICE F.E.T.
36.26 163
41.39H2
46.451155
53.182 08
57.35215
51.36 172
44.761155
49.93! 166
55.24
58.94
1.78
1.99
THI NEW GENERATION RADIAL
BLACKWALLS
SIZE
PRICE
RET
165/ 70-365 77.08 I 172
180/65-390' 90.30 1 94
190/65-390
220/55-390
WHITE
99.91 2 09
102.39|2 26
MICHELIN
XCA UGHT TRUCK
TUBELESS BLACK
SIZE
700x15
6p'y
PRICE
'FET
73.81 2 97
750x16
___*h____
87.914.i5
mo*,16-5 90.653 79
I TUBELESS BLACK
195/70-14 205/70-14
81.85
F.E.T. 2.27
FET 2.40
875.Xl6.5l 98.104 55
950.^16-5|111.95495
10x16.5
116.66
SIZE
PRICE
FET
155SR12 39.50
1 19
145SR13J 34.85
Y865 STEEL BELTED RAMA^
FOR FOREIGW A MOST DOMESTIC
SMALL INTERMEMATE CARS
SIZE 155SR12 PflK?E 31.18 F.E.T. 1 36
145SR13 31.94 1 23
155SR13 33.97 1 48
165SR13 36.13 1 60
175SR14 41.98 1.84
185SR14 44.29 1 98
165SR15 41.30 1 79

185/70SR13
185/70SR14
44.62
47,25
195/70SRl4|5iX
1 781
91
SMAYi5L TRUC^%^L|i0577^^
41?f
209
Y45
STEEL RAOIAL
BLACKWALL
57.
iFE T
1 15
155SR13> 41.24
1 24
165SR13' 44.73
1 53
175SR14
185SR14
165SR15
51.12
n 81
54.02
1211
52.28
1 7:
P3/70
BEST SELLING RADIAL
DUAL STEEL BELTS
SIZE
PRICE FET.
165/70SR13
175/70SR13
43.8^
1 26
49.49
1 32
185/ 70SR13153.99
ILFGoodrich
SIZE
PRICE
P155/80B13 | 31 .97
P165/80B13 I 33.81
P175/80B13 35.75
P185/80B13
P175/75B14
P185/75B14
37.93
38.79
P195/75B14
P205/75B14
P215/75B14
P225/75B14
P155/80B15
P165/80B15
39.88
41.82
42.92
44.25
46.57
35.75
37.44
P205/75B15
1 57
185/70SR14|57.
195/70SR14
1 65
1 88
IIRELLI
WIDE
RADIALS
4 76
-4TLT
EMfALLS
|*A78x13
C78a13
I-C78x14
E78x14
F78*14
G78x14
H78x14
078x15
Hhci
25.01
27.91
28.53
29.73
31.16
32.85
34.39
32.93
H78'15
3441
L78x15
36.56
1 59
1 80
188
2.01
2 12
226
249
235
254
2.79
I AMMMM m 2 Ply only
IMPORT TRUCKS
MICHELIN 185*,46P'y
XCT
"BE
HIGHWAY RADIAL
WHITEWALLS
P165/80R13
P175/80R13
P185/80R13
P185/75R14
P195/75R14
P205/75R14
P215/75R14
P2'5/75R15
P225/75R15
P235/75R15
3E
35.62
38.39
40.09
4125
42.62
43.90
45.89
46.28
48.77
53.61
ZH
1 67
1 64
1 78
1 93
206
231
247
2 49
2 70
289
P215/75B15
P225/75B15
P235/75B15
44.14
45.60
47.78
FET
BELTED CLM
, 44 P-METRIC. POLYESTER
CORD. FIBERGLASS BELTl
1.50
1.63
1.69
1.70
1.79
1.9S|
WHITEWALLS
'7 // f *m
^55/80872
3749,
U9 Fe
2 201
2.351
1.68
1.83
id
2.15

2.34
2.46
265
50.10
Goodrich
LIFESAVER XLM
STEEL BELTED RADIAL
WHITEWALLS
D"7"7 REVOLUTIONARY
/ /ALL SEASON RADIAI
HIGH PERFORMANCE
SPEED RATED
THE ONLY DUAL TREAD
DESIGN, DUAL COM-
POUND TIRE
STEEL BELT IN SIDEWALL
FOR ADDED STRENGTH
_SJffi_
195/70HR14 86.1
205/70HR14 96.
""ice
OTHER StZ6 AVAM.BLE
WE ALSO CARRY
P5.P6.P7 and P8
SIZES TO FTT MOST
AMERICAN 4 IMPORT CARS|
AT MOST STORES
SIZE SALE PRICE FET
P165/80R13 46.86 1.69
P175/80R13 48.57 1.71
P185/80R13 49.85 1.92
P195/70R13 50.82 1 98
P205/70R14 56.92 2.23
P175/75R14 47.50 1.13
P185/75R14 52.32 2.04
P195/75R14 56.92 2.11
P205/75R14 59.37 2.34
P2T5/75R14 60.45 2.41
P225/75R14 64.62 2.M
P195/75R15 59.70 2.33
P205/75R15 61.73 2.47
P215/75R15 64.09 2 59
P225/75R15 66.44 2.71
P235/75R15 71. 3.01
TELEPHONE- .
CLOCKRADtO *
Push-button telephone
and hands-lree 2-way
speaker plus a full *H
leatured AM/FM dock .*,,
radio m one compact unit
otter expires July 2
WITH THE PURCHASE Or ANY FOl/fl
.HIGH TEC
I RADIALS
T/Jk'!
AT/^P^H
Riaii value
5 89')'.
WE HONOR
HOMfSTtAlT
30100 S leot'j.H., w ?
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40?MI.M'M ?''
NAPLM
iXli 'imumlr 774-4443
WE SERVICE NATIONAL ACCOUNTS


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