The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian the voice of the Jewish community of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Running title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Physical Description:
4 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 8, no. 41 (Dec. 24, 1982)-v. 11, no. 26 (Aug. 30, 1985).
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44606415
lccn - sn 00229548
ocm44606415
System ID:
AA00014310:00004

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
THE VOICE OP
THE JEWISH
COMMUNITY OP
PALM BEACH
COUNTY
Jewish floridian
VOLUME9NUMBER 1
PALM BEACH. FLORIOA
FRIDAY, JANUARY 7.1983
PRICE 35 CENTS
rogress Reported at Talks Between Israel, Lebanon
By DAVID LANDAU
K1RYAT SHMONA
l(JTA) Israeli, Lebanese and
American negotiators sat
[down at this border town for
the second round of talks aim-
ed at defining Israel's future
relations with Lebanon.
The actual working session
kas brief. A communique is-
sued later said progress had
been made and "some differ-
ences were resolved and others
WTC narrowed." The talks
biovc back to Khalde in Leb-
anon this week.
Much of the time was oc-
cupied with ceremonials. The
Israeli, stressed, particularly
lor the benefit of the Lebanese
kwa media here in force.
in y at Shmona's powerful
rmbolic value in the context
I peace talks. David kimche,
lead of the Israeli delegation.
said it was "no accident" that
this border town was selected
as the Israeli site for the talks.
"This town and its brave
people symbolized for us the
threat of the terrorist presence
in Lebanon, the repeated
shellings and Katyusha rocket
bombardments and the neces-
sity to remove that threat," he
said.
The Israeli, Lebanese and
American delegations were
welcomed to Kiryat Shmona
with the traditional brcad-and-
salt ceremony. They thanked
Mayor Keuven Robert and the
town council for their
hospitality. The chief of the
Lebanese delegation, Antoine
I atale, appeared genuinely
moved and responded warmly
to the greetings.
But the talks themselves did
not appear to accelerate. An
Home For Aged Annual Meeting
to Introduce Executive
Director to the Community
jThe first Annual Meeting of
|e Jewish Home for the Aged
Palm Beach County, now
Ider construction and near-
|g completion, will serve as
k occasion to welcome and
[troduce recently appointed
kecutive Director, E. Drew
ickenheimer, to the com-
munity. Scheduled for Sun-
}y, Jan. 16 from 4-6 p.m. in
cmple Israel Schwartzbcrg
|all, the meeting will mark a
int step in the planning
iocess to provide the Jewish
immunity with the much
feded 120-bed skilled long-
rm nursing care facility for
|e elderly.
Mr. Gackenheimer has been
isociated with the Hebrew
Rehabilitation Center for the
kged in Boston from 1969 to
le present, during which time
le rose to the position of
Executive Vice President of
lat 725-bed geriatric com-
plex. Responsible for the ad-
ministration and supervision
HI all departments and activi-
ies of the facility, during his
:nure he planned and coor-
linated the development and
Opening of a 250-bed addition,
graduate of the George
ashington University
iraduate School of Business
administration, he majored in
leaith Care Administration
knd has published several pro-
fessional papers related to the
tare of the aged in nursing
|omes and alternate care serv-
Ces. Mr. Gackenheimer is a
professional member of the
National Association of Jew-
lh Homes for the Aged Ad-
linistrators. Last year he was
lected as president of the
leaith Care Management
I: .Si'
agenda remains to be agreed
on by both parties and Israeli
sources said they did not ex-
pect this to be accomplished
immediately.
THE JOINT communique
on behalf of the three dele-
gations was read by Israeli
Foreign Ministry spokesman
Avi Pazner. It said: "Negotia-
tions between Israel and Leb-
anon, with the participation of
the United States, continued
with the review of the posi-
E. Drew Gackenheimer
Association of Massachusetts.
The Annual Meeting will
also highlight a progress re-
port by President Erwin H.
Blonder and an announcement
of plans for the dedication and
opening of the Home on or
about June 1.
The following slate of of-
ficers and Board of Trustees
members will be voted upon
and installed: Erwin H.
Blonder, president; Bennett
Herman, vice president; Alec
Engelstein, vice president;
Heinz Eppler, vice president;
Stanley Brenner, treasurer;
Charles Jacobson, assistant
treasurer; Marilyn Lampert,
secretary; Sylvia Berman, as-
sistant secretary.
Nominated for three-year
terms as members of the
Board of Trustees are: Herbert
A. Girard, Arthur Gladstone,
Continued on Page 6
lions of Lebanon and Israel.
We continued our discussions
about setting up an agenda for
the talks. Further progress was
made. Some differences were
resolved and others were nar-
rowed. The discussions will
continue at our next meeting
in Khalde."
Pazncr stressed that the
atmosphere was "friendly and
cordial" but refused to say on
what precise points progress
was made. The Israeli dele-
gation is under instructions
from the Cabinet to stand firm
on Israel's demand that
normalization of relations
with Lebanon be the key item.
But Israel will not insist that
the term "normalization"
must be used.
The Lebanese priority is the
withdrawal of Israeli forces
from Lebanon. They have
agreed to consider termination
of the state of war and security
arrangements for Israel.
Yehuda Blum
Israels Basic Position
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS
(JTA) Israel's basic interests
and position at the United Na-
tions did not change during
the 37th session of the General
Assembly, Ambassador
Yehuda Blum of Israel told re-
porters here at a briefing.
Blum said, however, that it
is expected that next year the
Arabs will attempt again to
suspend Israel from the As-
sembly. He added that the
composition of the Security
Council will be "worse" next
year because Pakistan wil re-
place Japan, Nicaragua will
replace Panama and Malta
will replace Ireland as part of
the rotation of seats.
The envoy noted that the
Assembly, which concluded
after being in session for three
months, opened a few days
after the massacre of Palestin-
ian civilians in Beirut and
marked the first time Israel
had participated in an interna-
tional forum since the "Peace
for Galilee" operation was
launched June 6.
"The timing was not in Is-
rael's favor," Blum said, ref-
erring to the proximity of the
events in Lebanon and the
opening of the Assembly ses-
sion. "But at the end there was
not a great deal of change as
far as Israel is concerend. We
knew that there would be a
series of anti-Israel resolutions
(in the Assembly), as in previ-
ous years, but all in all Israel,
at the conclusion of the As-
sembly, is more at ease than
when the Assembly opened."
A 'Failure' For the Arabs
Blum claimed that the As-
sembly session could be
viewed as a "failure" for the
Arabs. He noted that when the
session began it seemed that
(he Arabs were going to try to
use their diplomatic muscles to
make up for the military
defeat in Lebanon and the lack
of concerted Arab reaction to
the Israeli operation. But the
Arab delegations did not suc-
ceed, Blum said.
"The Arabs at the UN have
realized that the Palestine Lib-
eration Organization was
crushed military and political-
ly in Lebanon," the Israeli
envoy said. As a result, he ob-
served, the Arabs, in order to
sweeten the bitter pill of defeat
the PLO had to swallow, sup-
ported even more extreme res-
olutions in the Assembly
dealing with Palestinian rights
than they did in the past.
But, behind the scenes, it
was clear that the PLO had
lost ground with the Arab del-
egations, Blum said. "This be-
came particularly clear in rela-
tions between Jordan and the
PLO," he said. He noted that
the division of interests be-
came evident "with the strug-
gle and sharp exchanges" be-
tween the two sides.
Disappointed With Europeans
Blum expressed disappoint-
ment about the attitude of the
European countries toward
the Mideast conflict. He said
that while the European coun-
tries voted against the extreme
pro-Palestinian resolutions
last year, they preferred to ab-
stain this year. This was clear-
ly demonstrated last week
when the European countries
abstained on a resolution
calling for the establishment
of a Palestinian state under the
leadership of the PLO, Blum
said. He also expressed "dis-
appointment" that a number
of Latin American countries
supported this year the anti-Is-
raeli resolution on the Mid-
Continued on Page 3
Challenge and Response
The Case for the 1983 Jewish Federation
United Jewish Appeal Campaign
CHALLENGE
What can your campaign dollars buy in our local Palm Beach Jewish com-
munity?
RESPONSE
For a gift of $52 [$1 a week], one hour of professional counseling at the
Jewish Family and Children's Service for a distressed teenager, newly divorced
parent or an elderly person with no family can be provided.
For $100 ($2 a week], one month of hot lunches for a senior citizen at the
Comprehensive Senior Service Center of the JCC can be provided.
For $365 ($1 a day], one week of skilled nursing care for an elderly person at
the soon to be completed Jewish Home for the Aged or more hours of transpor-
tation service to bring seniors to doctors' appointments, grocery shopping, or
the JCC can be provided.
For $500 ($10 a week], six weeks of day care programs for a pre-school child
from a single parent family or a partial scholarship to a Jewish camp or a
summer program in Israel can be provided.
For $1000 ($20 a week],a scholarship for a Jewish student at the Jewish Com-
munity Day School can be provided.


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, January 7,1983
Jewish community day school
___ -------------- Thf Rrniamin B. Hornstein
The Benjamin S. Hornstein
Elementary School of the Jew-
ish Community Day School
activities are in full swing at
the campus at Parker Avenue.
Mordecai Levow, the Head-
master of the school and Mrs.
Shirley Dellerson, President,
extend a cordial invitation to
all of the members of the
community to visit the new
campus, to share in the ex-
citing school activities and to
see for themselves the progress
on the Main Hall, which will
house th; new Sanctuary,
Auditorium, Kitchen, etc.
One of the recent successful
activities in the school was iu
exciting Book Fai
Hannuka catalog
project.
and
ordering
The Knesset has been in
volved in many special activj.
ties for students, including fa
recent toy sale at the Day
School Flea Market and fa
very successful Hannuka
skating party. Pictured below
are some of the many active
things going on at the Day
School and the Day School
Icadershi
Members of the Hornstein-Jewish Commun-
ity Day School choir are shown saying the
blessing over the giant "Chanukah
Menorah" that was lit each night on the
balcony of the Manor House of the new
campus.
The Knesset Service Committee which assists the school clean-
up and other activities are shown with Jack Rosenbium,
Knesset Advisor. Members of the committee are: MichiH
Eisenberg, Brian Ray, Heather Lewis, Roaai Greenfield and
Edward Steinhoff.
Members of the Hornstein-Jewish Community Day School
Choir are shown with Mrs. Rosalind Pomerance, the choir
director. The newly formed choir performed at several area
nursing homes and is preparing a number of other appearances.
The Religious Committee assists with the planning of Kabbalat
Shabbal and other service activities. The members of the
Religious Committee pictured above are [left to right] Jillian
Rosenbach, Tricia Slomowitz, Paul Tochner and Matthew
Kuril.
Third grade students looking through the
exciting collection of Judaica and secular
books at the PTA sponsored Fourth Annual
Book Fair at the Hornstein-Jewish Commui
ity Day School. Andrew Tarlowe, brings hit
handful of books for check-out.
2
x
2
The Knesset Social Committee was responsible for special socia1
activities at the school including the recent Chanukah skatiag
parly. Sjiown [left to right] Merrie Burman, Elizabeth Lerner.
Deborah Pevsner and Louis Shapiro.
The Finance Committee who directs the various financial activi-
ties. Pictured [left to right] Eric Weiss, Mark Leibovit, Matthew
Sullon and Nikki Ravitz.
Mrs. Susan Allbuch, one of the PTA mothers who helped with
Ihe Book Fair is shown collecting for a purchase made by
Geoffrey Mullen.
The Knesset Sports Committee which is
planning various intra mural like sports ac-
tivities. The members of this committee are:
|b row) Zev Pomerance, Robert Fraakel
and Joshua Weingard. [front row] Jnred


Super Sunday '83 Spotlight
On Scott Wilson
Friday, January 7.1983 / The Jewish Floridian of.Palm Beach County Pag* 3
One would expect only
adults to assume responsible
positions such as Vice
[chairmen for Super Sunday.
IBut Scott Wilson, a high
Ischool senior, is the exception
[in his role as Super Sunday
[Youth Vice Chairman. Having
exhibited his capabilities as a
leader while working on the
committee last year, he was
asked by Marilyn and Arnold
.ampert, Super Sunday Co-
Lhairmen, to undertake the
Chairmanship this year.
A native of South Florida,
Scott is. dually enrolled at
orth Shore High School and
palm Beach Junior College.
le is active in his senior class,
nid is also a hard working
Member of the Jewish Com-
munity Youth Council and of
lemple Beth EL USY. Re-
leeiing on his experience with
Super Sunday last year, he
said, "I was impressed with
the organization of the
phonathon. All the teen-agers
were so enthusiastic and
expressed their desire to
continue their involvement
this year."
Scott is in charge of recruit-
ing and organizing volunteers
from this area's Jewish youth
groups. On Super Sunday, the
young adults will work in the
mailroom,inscribe and deliver
balloons to the phone
solicitors when goals are
reached, collect pledge cards
and deliver them to the mail-
room and assist whenever and
wherever needed.
Marilyn and Arnold
Lampert are impressed with
Scott's abilities. "Scott's
youthful enthusiasm in in-
fectious. He is doing a
superior job of organizing the
youth in our community to
assist us in reaching the 1983
goal and we are thankful to
have Scoti as a member of our
Super Sunday '83 winning
team." Super Sunday will be
held on Feb. 6 at the Hyatt
Palm Beaches and is the com-
munity-wide phonathon to
raise funds for the 1983 Jewish
I ederation-United Jewish
Appeal campaign. For more
inlormation call the Feder-
ation office.
Rabbi Alan Sherman, director of the Community Relations
Council of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County, reads
the prayer while Steve Levitt, director of the Jewish Family and
Children's Service, gets ready to affix the mezuzah to the
doorpost of the Jewish Family and Children's Service's new
quarters. The community was invited to the recently held Open
House to tour the facilities and witness the ceremony.
r*g**g**JA
The Campaign Cabinet
of the
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
cordially invites you to a
GALA COMMUNITY DINNER CELEBRATION
on behalf of the
1983 Jewish Federation-United Jewish Appeal Campaign
Tuesday evening, January 18,1983
at quarter past seven
The Breakers, Palm Beach
Guest Speaker
The Honorable Moshe Arena
Israel's Ambassador to the United States
Michael Burrows
Co-Chairmen
Minimum commitment $1,000
To the Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County-UJA Campaign
Irving Kaufman
For information
and reservations call
832-2120
Rabbi Howard Shapiro of Temple Israel lights the Chanukah
candles during the recently held Open House at the Jewish
Family and Children's Service's new quarters at 2250 Palm
Beach Lakes Blvd., Suite 104, West Palm Beach.
Israel's Basic Position
Continued from Page 1-
east.
Blum said that Israel was
successful in thwarting the
Arab move to suspend Israel
from the Assembly. He said
that this was possible because
the United States took a very
firm position against the Arab
plan.
As for the role of Egypt in
this year's Assembly, Blum
said that the Egyptians used
the occasion as part of their
campaign to return to the
Arab fold. As a result, Blum
said, the Egyptian rhetoric at
the UN was very unpleasant to
Israeli ears. "It began in
April, when Israel completed
its withdrawal from the Sinai.
The Egyptians suddenly
started sharpening their
rhetoric" against Israel, Blum
said, noting that the Egyptian
speeches at the UN during the
Lebanon war were among the
sharpest attacking Israel.
Tune in to
MOSAIC
Sponsored by
The Jewish Federation
of Palm Beach County
Sunday aioraing over WFTV Chasnet 5, at S a.a*.
rOtrafi
__ *, Jaaearjr*
Tie Mtb Aasrversary ef Temple bract
TUNEIN1TO
L'CHAYIM
' The Jewish Listener's Digest
An Exciting New Radio Magazine
Sunday.. 10:30 am
1340AMWPBR


Page 4
The Jewish W^^^mS^SSS&^JSflSSSt 7'l93
I&ruel As Siamese Twin
In its pre-natal existence, Zionism
swam the waters of the womb indifferent to
the enormous possibilities of its Turkish
host. Later, it was born to the horror of life
as a Siamese twin of the ugliness of British
rule. With the coming of independence in
1948, modern Zionism still found itself
attached, this time to the ugliness of
American rule.
That rule has never been uglier than
today. Nor has Israel's independence ever
seemed a greater travesty, its Siamese
status by now utterly inseparable from the
stupidity and self-interest of an obtuse
President and a State Department mired in
the mythology of Arab virtue.
The visit of Jordan's King Hussein
last week showed Secretary of State Shultz
and Mr. Reagan at their worst. A perfect
schizoid, the King had come in the cause of
a new Palestinian state at the head of which
would stand Yasir Arafat; little more than
a decade ago, Hussein blasted the PLO out
of its Jordanian fortress and sent it
scurrying for its life into Lebanon.
In the interim, the King stood aloof of
the Yom Kippur War, fearful that he would
lose even more ground than he did on the
West Bank in the Six-Day War of 1967.
Since then, he has rigorously abjured the
Camp David accord to which Mr. Reagan
is, by his own campaign promise, com-
mitted and which he has tried to get
Hussein to join since his incumbency.
Last week, both Shultz and Reagan
rewarded the Jordanian monarch's
recalcitrance by promising him all sorts of
goodies if only he would plead the cause of
the so-called Reagan peace initiative of
Sept. 1 with his Arab brethren a plan
designed to establish a Palestinian entity
on the West Bank in confederation with
Jordan which would, of course and in short
order, become the new Palestinian state
Yasir Arafat has been struggling for just as
a starter in his war of liquidation against
Israel.
The trouble with the President's
initiative is that it is a flagrant violation of
the very Camp David process he has at-
tempted to interest Hussein in; needless to
say, that is why the King is modestly
enthusiastic. Furthermore, nowhere in all
of this feverish activity has a single
American official yet come to his senses to
recognize both the weakness and the
danger inherent in the Reagan plan, whose
ultimate end will be little different from
Secretary of State William Rogers' plan in
the early days of the Nixon
Administration: complete amputation of
Israel back to its 1948 condition.
Nor has anybody distanced himself
sufficiently from the media to recognize the
original purpose and remarkable
achievement of Israel in Lebanon the
possibility of peace under independent
Lebanese rule. On the contrary, punish-
ment of Israel is the main objective of the
Reagan Administration for having dared to
set up new and hopeful possibilities in the
Middle East without meddlesome and,
needless to say, bungling interference on
the part of Mr. Reagan and all of his
Bechtoil men.
Jewish f lor idian
Endowment Fund Planning
Estimated Taxes
B LEONARD H.CARTKR.
CPA.JI)
The penalty lor under-
estimation of income tax for
the year 1982 is 20 percent.
The penalty is non-deductible
and thus constitutes an entire
loss. Generally, estimated
taxes are required to be paid
where income includes more
than $500 from sources other
than wages, but none need be
paid if the estimated lax for
1982 is less than $200 and for
1983 less than $300.
The amount of the under
payment is the excess ol the
amount of installment which
would have been required to
be paid if the estimated tax
had been 80 percent of the tax
due shown on the return for
the taxable year, over the
amount of the installment paid
on or before the due date. The
installment dates are April 15,
June 15, Sept. 15 and Jan. 15
ol the succeeding year.
There are four exceptions by
which the penalty may be
avoided: a different method
may be used for each install-
ment.
1. This exception applies if
the estimated tax equals the
ia\ on the prior year's return.
2. This exception applies if
NOTE: This column is written as a service to provigV
general information to the public about the Endowment
Program of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
Information contained herein is not designated as legal or
tax ads ice. You should take up such matters with your re-
spective attorneys and accountants. Should you want addi-
tional information about charitable giving, and the various
methods which may be utilized through the Federation's
I ndowment Program, please contact Stanley Hyman, En-
dowment Director of the Jewish Federation at 832-2120
^
the installment is based upon a to a bank accompanied by a
tax computed upon the prior card with the taxpayers socu;
but using cur- security number. A mailec
payment must be postmarked
two days before the due date
year s income
rent iax rates.
3. This exception applies if
the installment payment for
each quarter is based upon the
annuali/ed income for each
period.
4. This exception applies if
ihe installment payment
equals 90 percent of the tax
determined on the basis of
actual income for each de-
claration period.
For the year 1983. the penalty
rate is a non-deductible 16
percent. Withholding on in-
k-rest, dividends or pensions
should be taken into con-
sideration in paying estimated
taxes.
The year 1983 will also herald
a new method of paying
estimated taxes. No form need
be filled. Ihe payment is made
Leonard H. Carter, CPA
JD, is a certified public ac-
countant of the States of
Honda and New York, andt
member of the New York
Slate Bar. He was formerly the
managing partner of L. H.
Carter and Company, certified
public accountants, and
formerly a partner and tax
director of Israeloff Trattner
and Company, certified public
accountants with offices m
Florida and New York. He has
been a director of public
corporations and presently is i
member of the Legal and Tax
Subcommittee of the Endow-
ment Lund Committee of the
Jewish Led era lion of Palm
Beach County.
i
Is The Klan a Growing Menace
Meeting to Explore KKK
B> Ml RRAY J.KK.RN
On Jog Road, in Lake
\Votth, white robed men and
women distribute literature
about the Ku Klux Klan; a
West Palm Beach businessmen
is handed a card informing
him that he is being patroni/ed
by a member of the Klan; the
Palm Beach I'osi is picketed
bv Klan members in white
robes for unfairness to the
Klan and the picketing story is
shown on Channel Five's Si\
O'clock News; a KKK rally at
Loxahatchee Road teatures a
horse show and giant 25 loot
cross-burning; young Klan
groups exert peer pressure in
the public schools.
Is the Klan a growing
menace in the Southeast and
Palm Beach County? The
Klan says its membership has
doubled in the past three (3)
years. Among leaders of the
community there is a wide
difference of opinion on the
vitality of the Klan and
problems it poses.
ol Palm Beach Count,
tomMntng Outvote* and FrtwationMtporMr- ( ^^
FREDKSMOCHET SUZANNE SMOCMET ii!ti^H'ZL,.
Editor and Publisher Eecutie Editor RONNi TARTAKOW EPSTEIN
Publish.*MostlyOctobsr through Mid Ap.,i------in bsi^c.0( JT" T "-'
Second Clsss Poslsoe Paid si Bocs Rston. Fia USPS OMOjn
PALM BEACH BOCA RATON OFFICE
N Fodaral Mwy Suits 206. Bocs Raton. Fla 13432 Phono 366-2001
.... .T. IC**PI"" ,MNE Wh St Miami. Fla 33101 F^onelV^AOA
Portateatar Raton, torn. M7t to Jewish Floriated. P.O. Bo. 01 267J. Miami. Fla 11101
Advertising 04recirx Had Leaser Phon* saaviaA2
Combined Jewish Appe.,j.,1h Feder.hon ol Palm Beach Couni/inc Officer, Pr.a.d.nl
Lamport. Dr Richsrd G Shugarman. Secretary. Or Eluabsih S Freilich. Treasurer Ai.in wll*n*k.
S^RIPTIO^^^
Committee (AJC) and Com-
muniiy Relations ( ouncil of
the Jewish federation ol Palm
Beach County, is open to the
entire community at no
charge.
Dan (. allowav. Community
Relations Officei Irom the
Office ol ihe Sheriff, has
noted some Klan recruiting in
the schools. He reports in-
cidents between blacks and
Klan children. Officer
C allow ay criticizes community
leaders lor failure to speak out
against ihe Klan for fear of
reprisal at the polls. He also
sees deteriorating economic
conditions giving rise to ex-
tremist black groups with the
possibility of violence in retal-
iation to KKK activities.
1 here arc a number of Klan
factions with different
methods of operation.
Although their targets arc the
same; blacks. Jews and
Catholics; their methods
diller. Florida Grand Dragon
John Paul Rogers is quoted.
"We are not against blacks or
anv minorities, but arc pro-
white." On the other hand.
Wilkinson. Grand Wizard of
The Invisible Empire, is pre-
paring for violence and
permits combat training.
Richard Ford. Kleagle for
Invisible Empire.
A meeting on Sunday
evening. Jan. 9 at 7:30 p.m. at
Temple Israel; 1901 North
Hagler Drive. West Palm
Beach; will explore the subject
in depth and answer questions
about the Klan operations
than many, especially from the ""I. ",'""": empire, is
Northeast. Find bewildering T^?. Thc Palm Bcath
The Guest Speaker will be ll i2**2P
having a 25 year old prostitute
work off probation by work-
ing for the Ku Klux Klan.
The success that the Klai
claims for itself is attributed
by its detractors to the fact
that it allies itsell with popular
causes: i.e.. The Iran Hostage
situation in 1980; the General
Platform on the Conserve
Movement Against Inflation,
stronger defense; reduced
federal spending and wham
refer to as "family values."
Thc KKK strength at one
tune, five (5) million, hasbeei
up and down since its incep-
tion soon after the Civil Wat.
It flourishes during times ol
social and economic stress. Its
prime target for supporters b
thc teenage population, which
represents 15 percent of iu
membership; 65 percent of us
members arc between the age
of 20 and 35. In the past, the
KKK has been allied with nee-
Nazi organizations and engage
in para-military training w"11
them.
Rabbi Alan R. Sherman
docs not see the situation'
the Southeast as a crisis, w
he feels the Meeting is
important vehicle to
available to the community""
extent of the threat ol I
trcmist movements, as
*ellas
Friday, January 7.1983
Volume 9
22TEVETH5743
Number 1
vestigat.ve Reporter and
Author Jerry Thompson of
the Nashville Tenncsscan. His
book. "My Life in the Klan "
exposes Klan objectives and
ac,,v!,'es Jhe meeting, spon-
sored by the American Jewish
(public
tying to swing it
opinion) around so
that we're considered a
Political group." There is
evidence that this is the
direction thc Klan is moving in
ihe County, h iS contributing
lunds in support of political
candidates and succeeded in
what is being done about m
and future directions.
Belie Gilbert. rcpresenuM
thc American Jewish Comni"
tee, sees the Meeting
"means for the coming
to see how deep the ^
problem is and to be
that it exists."



Friday, January 7,1983 / The Jewigh'rioriciian of Palm Beach County Page 5
How Riverside made its name.
It takes years to build a name that is
second to none.
It takes nearly 70 years of experience
and commitment to Jewish tradition.
It began with Riverside's founder,
Charles Rosenthal. He believed that being a
Jewish funeral director was more than just a
business. It was a very special calling that
demanded absolute integrity, genuine
compassion, true charity and a dedication and
deep involvement in Jewish life.
Today, Charles Rosenthal's beliefs are
Riverside's policies. People like Carl Grossberg,
Alfred Golden, Leo Hack, Andrew Fier and a
new generation of Jewish management are
seeing to it.
At Riverside, we've always tried hard
to be the best. And to us that means no let-up of
effort. No compromising of standards. And no
cutting of service.
That's how Riverside got its name.
That's how we intend to keep it
4714 Okeechobee Boulevard,
West Palm Beach
683-8676
RIVERSIDE
Memorial Chapel. !k Fun.nl Director*
The most respected name in Jewish funeral
service in the world.
pon.or.na The Guardian Plan* Prearr.ncea Funeral <..mr.fi,
lllMI .


,*.
rEelewSKl ioridianof Palm Reach County Friday. January 7. 1983
Home for Aged Annual Meeting
Continued from Pane 1
Robert Li. List, Alan L. Shul-
man and Mortimer Weiss.
Nominated lor a one-year
term as members of the Board
of Trustees arc: Rev. Martin
Adolf, Abe Bisgaier, fcvelyn
Blum. Marlenc Burns, Shirley
Fleishman, Phillip Wm.
Fisher, Richard Calvin, Alex
Gruber, Norma Grabler, Eva
Hirsch, Anne Marie Kaufman,
Dorothy Kohl, Joseph Molat,
Bernard Plisskin and Ben
Roisman.
Hie following Board of
Trustees members are not up
foi re-election: Detra Kay,
Murray Kern. Dr. Elliot Klor-
feitl, Saul Kramer. Robert S.
Levy, Berenice Rogers, Rabbi
Dr. William H. Shapiro.
Michael Stein and Dr. Ernest
M. Weiner.
Chairing the Annual Meet
ing committee is Sylvia Her-
man. Assisting in planning the
meeting arc Charles Jacobson
Murray Kern, Marilyn Lam
pen and Joseph Molat.
To enable the committee to
plan for attendance, members
of the community Interested in Home's office b> calling Mr.
attending the Annual Meeting Adlcr or Kcgina Sussman at
are requested to advise the 832-2120.
Announcement to the Community
The President, Officers and Board of Trustees
cordially invite you
to the
FIRST ANNUAL MEETING
of the
JEWISH HOME FOR THE AGED
OF PALM BEACH COUNTY, INC.
Sunday, January 16
4:00 to 6:00 p.m.
TEMPLE ISRAEL SOCIAL HALL
J90J N. Flagler Drwe West Palm Beach
Members of the community interested in
actending are requested to inform the
Home's office by calling Regina Sussman
at 832-2120.
Maxwell House Coffee
Is Hospitality.
Lox n bagels 'n cream cheese is al-
most as much a pan of a traditional
Jewish household as the Mezuzah on
the door And the most natural ac-
companiment to this American
gastronomical innovation is Maxwell
House* Coffee.
The full-pleasant aroma and great-
tasting, satisfying
good flavor of
Maxwell House*
has been delighting lovers of good
food for half a century. And why not ?
Who would ever think of serving
first-rate food without great coffee'
So, no matter what your preference-
instant or goundwhen you pour
Maxwdl House? you pour flavor At
its most satisfyingtonsistently cup
after cup after cup
K (Yrlifird Ku-hrr
^/t living tradition in Jewish homes for over half a century
Arnold Hoffman to
Speak At Century Village
Arnold J. Hoffman. Esq..
noted Counsellor and Tax
Expert, will speak on behalf ot
the American Tcchnion
Society for the Israel Institute
of Technology. Haifa. Israel,
on Wednesday. Jan. 12, at
10 a.m. at the Century Village
Auditorium.
The program is being
presented by Cen-Tech, the
newest arm of Technion in
Palm Beach County, to ac-
quaint people with some of the
quiet, brilliant work of the
Institute.
Aside from Us Engineering
School where the Medit-
icranean-Dcad Sea Canal
plans originated, and its
Aeronautical Engineering
School which outsmarted the
Soviet Union's most
dangerous war weaponry, the
Institute has a prestigious
Medical Science School.
A film called "Frontiers of
Healing" will be shown, de-
tailing advances being made in
medical science thru its com-
bination with technology, as
Arnold J. Hoffman
taught, researched and devel-
oped in its unique Medical
School one of very few uni-
versities in the world
making available computer
medicine and its techniques to
physicians for exact diagnose
and treatment.
For more information, call
CEN-TECH president Jos.
Dorf or Roslyn Ram.
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Friday, January 7,1983 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 7
WE OWE YOU
CREDIT FOR YOUR AGE
Announcing the
20% Senior Discount
For years, we've given you
special vacation rates, weekend
specials, dinner discounts and
lots of other good reasons
to stay with us. But
beginning October 1st
we're really going to
spoil you.
You Only Have to Be 55 to
Get 20% Off Your Hotel Bill.
Prom October 1st through
January 31st*-a great time to
see Florida-Howard Johnson's
JBrticipating lodges will offer
I senior citizens a 20% room
discount And thafs not all.
You'll Even Get a 10% Discount on Your Dinner.
Not just a 20% discount on your room, but
10% off your dinner, too. For participating lodges
and more information on the way we treat senior
citizens, call toll free 1-800-654-2000, and
ask for the Senior Double Discount offer, or
bring this ad to a participating Howard
Johnson's Motor Lodge.
At Howard Johnson's, we give
you credit for the things
that count most
HOWARDjonnsoriS
All rooms subject to availability. Offer not valid December 20 through
January 2, or in conjunction with any other Howard Johnson's offer.
C Howard Johnson Co. 1982


Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, January 7,1983
Organizations in the News
PIONEER WOMEN
The Golda Meir Club of
Pioneer Women-Na'Amat
have the following events
scheduled: Wednesday, Jan.
19, opening meeting.
Shoshana Flexer will be the
guest. Tuesday, Jan. 25, board
meeting. Thursday, Jan. 27
"An Israel Afternoon"
luncheon. Israeli singing and
dancing at the Ramada Inn,
12 noon.
The Theodore Heril Club of
Pioneer Women will have a
live hour boat ride on Feb. 17,
aboard the "Patriot" from the
Sea Mist Marina, Boynton
Beach to Pals Captains table
lor Lunch. Fee $20 per person.
Call Hannah Schwartz.
The Pioneer Women
Na'Amat, Cypress Lakes
Chapter is proud to announce
a Vienese Game Night at 7:30
p.m. at the American Bank,
Jan. 12, at Okeechobee Blvd.
and West Road. Donation,
S2.50. Also the regular
meeting on Tuesday at 12:30
p.m. at the American Bank
will feature Ned Goldberg
from the Jewish Family
Services who will speak on the
topic Adjusting to Aging and
Retirement, Jan. 18. On Jan.
25, there will be a membership
tea for all prospective new
members and slides will be
shown on the works of the
Pioneer Women for women
and children in Israel. Tillie
Sakren may be contacted
regarding the above. All are
invited.
MIZRACHI WOMEN
American Mizrachi Wo-
men. Rishona Chapter will
hold its regular meeting fol-
lowed by Estelle Bauman, an
interesting, stimulating per-
former. Refreshments, lun-
cheon and card party Sunday,
Jan. 30 at 11 a.m.
DEBORAH
HOSPITAL FOUNDATION
Scheduled events: Jan. 17
through 19, Deborah Mobile
Health van will be stationed at
Cross County Mall. Free heart
and lung testing. Public in-
vited. Jan. 22, matinee dinner
and show at Oakland West
Dinner Theater "Kiss Me
Kate."
BRANDEIS
UNIVERSITY WOMEN
Brandeis University
Women, Boynton Beach will
have the "Professors" lun-
cheon on Monday, Jan. 17 at
Bernards. The speaker will be
Joyce Antler, Sociology
Professor, whose topic will be
"Significance of the new
Right." The cost will be $12.
Eve Scwall, chairman and Kay
Warren, co-chairman.
WOMEN'S
AMERICAN ORT
Century Chapter Women's
American ORT will hold its
next meeting on Thursday
Jan. 13, 12:30 at Congregation
Anshei Sholom. Albert Elazer,
lormer United States resident,
now residing in Jerusalem,
and spending his winters in
Florida, will tell us about
Israel since the Lebanese War.
Come and be informed. All
are welcome. Jan. 21-23, Cape
Canaveral weekend and Bun
Reynolds Dinner Theatre.
The Lake Worth West
Chapter of W omen's
American ORT will hold their
monthly meeting on Monday,
Jan. 10, at 1 p.m. at the Senior
Citizen's Center, 201 North
Dixie Highway and 2nd Avc
North in Lake Worth. The
guest speaker will be Oscar
Goldstein, well known en-
tertainer and lecturer, who is
affiliated with B'nai B'rith in a
public relations capacity. He is
a world traveler, much of
whose experience in the field
of humor stems from his
travels abroad.
The Palm Beach Chapter of
Women's American ORT will
meet on Monday, Jan. 10, at 1
p.m. at the Community Cen-
ter, 110 Southern Blvd., West
Palm Beach (adjacent to St.
Catherine's Greek Orthodox
Church).
Every Saturday ana Sundaytrie fabu-
lous "fun Ships'- Corruvaie. festivaie.
Marat Gras and Trooicaie deport from
Mtarrv and Los Anaetes for exotic ports. Vir-
tually everything s included for one low
once of your cruse eight meats and snacks
a day a fun gomoiina casino live enter-
tanroenT nightly aonce bands., parties
ana dozens of srvtpocara activities Vou get
voiue no land vocation can match'
fries of Ftanomanon ana uOenar ."Jegst-,
The program w ill be a Town
Hall meeting on the subject of
how the American Jew faces
his responsibility to combat
anti-Semitism. Reba Mayer
will preside. This is an oppor-
tunity for everyone attending
to express his opinion and
thinking. Members of the
committee are Mildred
Tunick. Beatrice Goldstein.
Jeanne Siff and Reba Mayer.
It should prove exciting and
provocative.
Refreshments will be served.
Bring your friends.
ORT schools throughout
the world offer cultural,
recreational benefits, health
care and a fine technical
education to students for
developing them into well
rounded persons, able to meet
life's challenges.
West Palm Beach Chapter
of Women's American OR!
will hold u meeting on Tues-
day, Jan. 11 at Anshei Sholom
Synagogue, at 12:30. Speaker
of the day will be Mrs. Jean
Greenfield. Director of
Health, Rehabilitation Ser-
vices of the State of Florida.
All members and friends are
invited.
Friday. Jan. 14: Chapter
Flea Market at Miller's Super
Market Lot, on Southern
Blvd. and Military Trail. Sale
starts at 7:30 a.m. until 4 p.m.
We ask that you please drop
off some of the items you
contribute, it you can. If you
have any large or heavy items,
please call Libby Blum for
pick up.
Wednesday, Jan. 26: ORT
Mother to Another Luncheon
at the Musicana. Get voui
luncheon ticket from Harriet
Schwartz.
Friday, Jan. 28: ORT
Sabbath at 8 p.m. at Anshei
Sholom. All members and
husbands, friends are invited,
and neighbors, so that thev
too. can see what ORT does.
The Haverhill Chapter of
the women's American ORT
takes great pride in presenting
the noted book reviewer.
Helen Nussbaum, doing a
review on Disraeli at its next
regular meeting. Members and
their guests are invited to
attend the meeting on Thurs-
day. Jan. 13, 12 noon, at the
Sunrise Savings and Loan
Bank, Gun Club Road and
Military Trail, West Palm
Beach.
NATIONAL JEWISH
CIVIL SERVICE
EMPLOYEES. INC
A chicken or fish luncheon
complete with all the trim-
mings, dessert, coffee or tea is
the menu for the Second
Anniversary Luncheon and
Card Party of the South
Florida Jewish Civil Service
Employees, Inc., a welfare,
fraternal and philanthropic
organization dedicated to
foster the elimination of pre-
judices and discrimination
both on and off the job; is
being held on Sunday, Jan. 9
at 12 noon, at the Sons of Italy
Lodge Hall. 1000 Lake
Avenue. Lake Worth.
Members, friends and guests
are invited to attend. Reserva-
tions must be in by Thursday.
Jan 6. For information and
reservations please call
JeanctteS. Levine.
The next General Meeting
will be held on Sunday, reb. 6,
at 2 p.m. at the Weight
Watchers Auditorium in the
Gun Club Shopping Center on
Military Trail and Gun Club
Road (between Summit and
Southern Blvd.), West Palm
Beach. Marcy Fine, RN. of the
American Heari Association,
will show a film and demons-
trail cardio pulmonary
resucitanon (CPR).
Members. friends ..,
guests are invited to attend*
vital program on cpr Lhls
further information on Z
Luncheon and Card pariv f
the Chapter, please 2 f
S1dLevr.Wes5,PaSfrnCBS
or Jack Weiner. BovS
Beach or write to Sid lS
President. 2557 Emory Dr
West-Villa x.' West pu
Beach. Fla. 33406. Um
HADASSAH
The Tamar Groan of
Hadassahwill hold the Anna,
Youth Aliyah Luncheon "
M-nndKay,J?J- 3l' am I
will be held at the Flaak
Museum in Palm Beach where
you will be treated to a tour
followed by a catered lunch
and professional enter-
tainment. A donation of $23
or more, will reserve a place
for you at this affair. Call Roz
Lefkowitz or Mary Friedwald
for reservations.
Cypress Lakes Hadassik
will hold their regular meeting
on Monday, Jan. 10 at
American Savings Bank at 12
noon. Slides of Israel will be
presented along with an in-
doctrination on Hadassah.
Everyone is invited.
Golda Meir-Bointon Beach
Chapter of Hadassah w ill have
their annual Chai Luncheon
for the benefit of Youth
Aliyah on Thursday, Jan. 13
at the Ramada Inn, W est Palm
Beach. For reservations, call
Estelle Schwartz or Martha
Sapir.
The regular meeting will be
held on W edncsday, Jan. 19,
12:30 p.m. at Temple Beth
Sholom. 315 "A" Street, Lake
Worth. Helen Nussbaum will
present a book review.
The Chapter is participating in
the Education Day meeting to
be held in the new auditorium
of Florida Atlantic University,
Boca Raton on Thursdav, Jan.
SUPER SAVER
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Call Clara Lang for
irticulars.
YIDDISH CULTURE
|On Jan. 11 the Yiddish
illure Group of Century
fillage will present Mark Olf,
fine singer who will ac-
)mpan> himself on the
Stir.
The Musical Friends
insisting of Lillian Kessler,
lger and pianist; Jacky
jrber, Phil Herman and Sam
Inkenthal on violins will
itertain.
[The Jan. 18 program of
Iddish Culture will present
>ra Dacher on the Hawaiian
liiur, with Joe Levine on
njo and Ethel Philips on
ino.
jOur venerable 95-year-old
lm Schutser will read for us.
Friday, January 7,1983 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 9
We also feature this
morning. The Bert Weiss Trio
with Beatrice Kahn playing the
cello, Mildred Birnbaum on
piano and Bert Weiss on
violin.
On Jan. 25 Yiddish Culture
presents Rose Levinson,
concert pianist, playing varied
selections.
Jesse Fuchs, whose
monologues and factual
readings are always
enlightening and informative
will do a piece called "Inside
Israel."
Ann March, singer and Jack
Zuckerman, baritone, a most
pleasant combination, with
Ruth Hyde at the piano will
sing for us.
For more information contact
Sam Finkenthal, 684-1654.
ommunity Calendar
January 8
Brandeis University major committee meeting Brandeis
University Women Boynton Beach theatre noon
January 9
[Congregation Aitz Chaim Sisterhood 10 a.m. Temple
Beth El Men's Club breakfast meeting Golden Lakes
Temple Sisterhood 10 a.m. B'nai B'rith Women Mitz-
vah Council 9:30 a.m. Congregation Anshei Sholom
[Men's Club 10 a.m.
I January 10
Ijlwish federation executive committee -
18 p.m. Women's American ORT Palm Beach board -
19:45 a.m. B'nai B'rith Haifa board 2 p.m. Golden
Lakes Temple Sisterhood Koach luncheon Hadassah -
IC > press Lakes noon
[January II
ladassah Lee Vassil board -10 a.m. Women's Ameri-
can ORT West Palm Beach 12:30 p.m. Hadassah -
icnrictia Szold board 1 p.m. Temple Beth David -
hecutive board 7:30 p.m. B'nai B'rith Women -
>lcnorah 12 noon Brandeis University Women Lake
> orih luncheon vuih speaker noon Hadassah West
loynion Beach board 10 a.m. Pioneer Women -
.>press Lakes Discussion (day card parly (evening)
]l \S ISH FEDERATION EDUCATORS' COUNCIL -
loon
lunuar\ 12
[L\\ ISH FEDERATION WOMEN'S DIVISION LION
It JLDAH LUNCHEON Pioneer Women Ezrat -
larionette Show 7 p.m. Temple Beth-El Sisterhood
.ard Parly.
lanuarv 12
Congregation Anshei Sholom board 1 p.m. B'nai
f'ruh No 3046 8 p.m. Temple Beth David Sisterhood -
>ard 8 p.m. Temple Emanu-EI Rabbi Howard Kush-
jci 7:30 p.m. JEWISH FEDERATION WOMEN'S
ll\ 1SION EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 6 p.m. JEW-
>H I LDLRATION WOMEN'S DIVISION BOARD OF
(IRECTORS-Sp.m.
lanuary 13
Vnai B'rith Olam "Gift of Love" luncheon B'nai
frith Women Ohav 9:30 a.m. Temple Beth Sholom -
>ard 9:30 a.m. Hadassah Yovel board 9:30 a.m.
kmerican Jewish Congress board noon Women's
|mierican ORT Haverhill 12:30 p.m. Temple Judea
>terhood-7:30 p.m. -Temple Judea Men's Club
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NATIONAL COUNCIL
OF JEWISH WOMEN
National Council of Jewish
Women Travel Slide Show.
Date: Monday, Jan. 17 at 7:30
p.m.
Come and take a "trip" to
China, Africa, and Israel,
when Valerie Hoffman,
NCJW National Tour Admin-
istrator, who has been just
about everywhere in the
world, will visit Palm Beach
section to show slides of
exciting trips and answer
questions. Featured in 1983
are trips for singles, travel to
China, Japan, Alaska, Israel
trips that tie-in with European
ones, and private car trips to
Israel.
The Tour Meeting will take
place at the home of Sonia
Koff. RSVP Arlcne Kurtis or
Doris King. There is no
obligation of any kind. Come,
have fun, see the wonderful
world of travel NCJW offers.
Refreshments.
B'NAI B'RITH
On Sunday, Jan. 9 at 9:30
a.m., B'nai B'rith Lucerne
Lakes Lodge 3132 of Lake
Worth will hold their mem-
bership breakfast at the Senior
Center in Lake Worth.
Eli Topel, past president of
District No. 1 and Member-
ship Cabinet Chairman of
District No. 5 and the Florida
State Association, will be the
guest speaker. Mr. Topel is
also the creator and national
chairman of the Century Club
program of B'nai B'rith.
Members and wives are
cordially invited to bring
friends and enjoy this
meaningful occasion.
For further information
contact Membership
Chairman, Len Greenberg.
B'nai B'rith Century Lodge
will feature a double-header of
seriousness and laughter at its
Israel Bond Night on Tuesday,
Jan. ||, at 7:30 p.m. at
Temple Anshei Sholom in
West Palm Beach. Thomas F.
Hennessey, Chief Executive
Officer of St. Mary's Hospital
will address the group and will
be followed by Mr. Emil
Cohen, top humorist and
reconteur of the entertainment
world. The public is cordially
invited.
WANTED TO BUY *
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Private Collector
Royal Palm Beach to Honor
Danny and Rhea Jatlow
Danny and Rhea Jatlow,
leaders in the Royal Palm
Beach community, have been
named the Recipient-Elect of
the Israel Bond City of Peace
award by the Royal Palm
Beach Israel Bond Committee.
The Jatlows will be present-
ed with their award during
ceremonies at the annual
Royal Palm Beach Bond func-
tion on Jan. 16, 8 p.m., at the
RPB City Hall; according to
Mel Hershenson, Chairman of
the event.
According to Hershenson,
the Jatlows are being honored
for their dedication and lead-
ership within the community,
and in the Palm Beach County
Israel Bond campaign.
Mr. Jatlow has been instru-
mental in the success of the
annual Bond golf tournament,
and is also on the Board of the
3rd and 4th Graders
Enjoy New Group
Wednesdays from 7-8 p.m.
is Friendship Group time for
third and fourth graders at the
Jewish Community Center,
2415 Okeechobee Blvd., West
Palm Beach or at different
homes in V\ ellingon for those
children who reside in the
western pan of the county.
Children in other areas are
encouraged to get together and
form a group.
All groups will enjoy a
variety of activities and events.
Future happenings include an
overnight.
Call Terrie Lubin at the
Center, 689-7700, lor infor-
mation regarding these
groups.
Danny and Rhea Jatlow
RPB B'nai B'rith, RPB Jewish
Federation, and he is active in
ZOA, Hadassah, and serves
on the Mid-East Task Force.
Mrs. Jatlow is the Chairman
of the RPB Israel Bond
Women's Division, and ac-
cording to her husband "is
active in all Jewish causes."
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Cramer 848-0611.
For additional information for the following offices: Lake Worth, Downtown,
Wellington, Pahokee, Boca Raton, Belle Glad* and Boynton Beach, call
Sandy Lynch 582-3322
l'i Billion Mbar FDIC


Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, January 7,19B3
A Student's View On Israel
BY GARY ROSENBERG
When 1 first arrived in Israel
(his past July, the war against
the Palestine Liberation Or-
ganization (PLO) in Lebanon
was in progress. Everywhere
people crowded around televi-
sion sets and radios to learn
the latest developments. The
streets were teeming with sol-
diers who waited for rides to
take them to their units. In the
sky, convoys of helicopters
flew overhead, and occa-
sionally I could hear the sonic
booms of jets flying toward
Lebanon.
People tried to carry on with
their everyday affairs. How-
ever, it was difficult for
families and businesses be-
cause every Israeli male serves
in the army reserves up to age
55, and many of these men
were called to active duty.
Students who planned to enter
college would miss the fall
term and possibly the entire
year. Doctors and other pro-
fessionals had to abandon
their practices and serve in the
IDF (Israeli Defense Force). I
heard no complaints.
From conversations 1 had
with the Israelis, 1 felt that all
citizens would fight if neces-
sary. The general consensus
was that something had to be
done about the PLO who have
conducted 1,500 terrorist at-
tacks inside Israel during the
past 10 years. Casualties in-
clude the 100 elementary
school children who were held
hostage inside their school, the
II Israeli Olympic athletes who
were slaughtered at the 1972
Olympic Games in Munich,
and the 33 people killed when
a Tel Aviv bus was sabotaged.
My family and 1 met with a
cabinet minister at the Knesset
(Israeli Parliament) who said,
"The Israelis are determined
to stand up to international
terrorism; and Israel will no
longer permit the northern
third of its nation to be ex-
posed to shelling and other
acts of terrorism." He also
said that "Lebanon is a hos-
tage nation under the control
of the PLO. They are head-
quartered in Beirut and have
as their declared aim the des-
truction of the State of Israel.
Therefore, a military incursion
was the only possible way to
deal with the PLO terrorists."
The media has reported that
there were 10,000 civilian
casualties and 600,000 new
refugees in southern Lebanon
during the Israeli campaign. I
talked to several doctors I met
at Hadassah Hospital in Jeru-
salem who had just returned
from a field hospital that was
set up exclusively to treat
civilians in Tyre and Sidon
(sites of early heavy fighting in
southern Lebanon). 1 expected
to hear tales of countless
thousands of deaths, as had
been reported. The doctors
were outraged at this misin-
formation. They reported
treating only minimal civilian
casualties. In fact, they said
that they were bored most of
the time for lack of work to
do. The press has since revised
its estimate to 47 civilian
casualties in Tyre, and 250
civilian casualties in Sidon,
and these numbers would have
been far fewer had the PLO
not chosen to set up its mili-
tary strongholds among
civilian populations.
The entire population of
southern Lebanon is approx-
imately 600,000, and it defies
logic that this entire popula-
tion was left homeless as had
been reported in the press. The
fact is that many of the refu-
gees that the press observed
were actually Lebanese Chris-
tians returning trom the north
where they had lived for the
past seven years. Their villages
were safe now that the PLO
was gone.
The night before going into
Lebanon, we spent the evening
on a kibbutz. We arranged for
someone to explain to us
about life on a kibbutz. The
man who met with us was
Gadi Kuritski. Gadi was 30
years old, a veteran runner of
over 30 marathons, and a
scholarship student who had
graduated from Amherst. He
had just returned from Leba-
non.
As the conversation turned
to Lebanon, we learned that
Gadi was a specially trained
commando in the elite Golani
Brigade. Because of his unit's
superior training, it was ac-
tivated first to participate in
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the initial invasion of southern
Lebanon. His unit was pre-
ceded by twelve tanks and fol-
lowed by twelve tanks. He told
us that as his unit made its way
a few miles into Lebanon,
several children ran into the
paths of the tanks and laid
down in the road. The unit
came to a halt and the com-
mander shouted for the chil-
dren to move. Suddenly PLO
Russian-made lire grenades
were launched into the unit,
killing seven men including the
commander and wounding
several others. The children
were decoys for the PLO; and
because the Israelis stopped to
give warning, seven men died.
On the second day of the war,
Gadi's unit captured the Beau-
fort Castle, the PLO strong-
hold in southern Lebanon.
The next morning, as we
made our way closer to the
border, we passed through Is-
raeli northern towns and vil-
lages, and 1 noticed that each
home had a bomb shelter. I
learned that families fled to
their shelters whenever the
PLO shelled their towns. Now
these people no longer fear
random rocket attacks.
Finally we arrived at the
border. We visited the "Good
Fence" where Lebanese citi-
zens are permitted to freely
cross the border into Israel.
The Lebanese receive badly
needed free food, water and
medical attention. The fence
has existed for five years and
stands as a symbol of goodwill
between Israel and Lebanon.
We gradually made our way
into Lebanon, driving approx-
imately 20 miles to former
PLO strongholds and the
Beaufort Castle. As we
crossed the Litani River, I got
my first view of the castle. It is
an 800 year old crusader for-
tress strategically located at
the top of the highest and
steepest mountain in the
vicinity. Whoever controlled
the castle, controlled all of the
surrounding regions including
northern Israel. It was from
the top of this imposing
mountain that the PLO
launched their Russian-Made
Katyusha rockets into Israel.
One has to climb to the
castle to appreciate its stra-
tegic value. On three sides
there are sheer cliffs, and on
its access side there is a narrow
road lined with PLO trenches.
As I climbed to the top of the
castle, it took concentration
and agility to keep from slip-
ping. The thoughts of Israeli
soldiers climbing this incredi-
ble structure at night with their
bulky, heavy backpacks and
weapons, while under direct
enemy fire, left me in a state of
awe. The vulnerability of
northern Israel when the PLO
was in command of Beaufort
Castle way very apparent from
atop.
After leaving the castle, we
visited some of the neighbor-
ing Lebanese villages. I ex-
pected to see whole towns and
villages razed. I did see some
destroyed buildings but I saw
many more standing and un-
touched. I saw former PLO
headquarters within the Arab
villages which had painted on
the outside walls the Russian
hammer and sickle, and por-
traits of the Ayatollah Kho-
meini. I studied copies of cap-
tured PLO documents which
were released to the public that
listed the locations of future
target sites within Israel. All of
them were civilian locations.
The documents also revealed
that the PLO leaders were
trained in communist coun-
tries; but their armaments
came mostly from Russia; and
that many of the terrorists
were not even Palestinians but
came from Syria, Iran, Iraq,
Jordan, Libya, Yemen, Italy,
France and Germany.
Many things have happened
since 1 returned home from Is-
rael; the Israeli seige of Beirut,
the departure of the PLO ter-
rorists, the assassination of
president elect Gemayel, the
massacre of hundreds of
Palestinians in their refugee
camps by right wing Christian
militiamen, and the reintro-
duction of a multinational
force in Beirut. The tragedy of
Lebanon has affected
Moslems, Christians, and
Jews alike.
These tragedies should not
cloud the fundamental issues
that still exist in the Middle
East, namely the need for all
nations to strive for peace,
mutual recognition, and inter- -
changes of people, cultures,
and commerce. David Hart-
man, senior lecturer in
philosophy at the Hebrew
University of Jerusalem com-
ments "Israelis and Pales-
tinians need not live as his-
torical fatalists who believe
that the conflict between them
is eternal. Periodic wars need
not be our destiny. Let both
our peoples show resolve to
grasp the opportunity of re-
placing the tragedy of the past
with the hope of the future."
Gary Rosenberg is a 19-year-
old student at St. Andrews, in
Boca Raton.
Jewish Family & Children's
Service Offering Training Course
For the third year in a row
Jewish Family and Children's
Service of Palm Beach
County, Inc., is offering a
training course for individuals
who would like to become vol-
unteer friendly visitors. Jewish
Family and 4Children's
Service utilizes friendly
visitors as assistants to the
professional caseworker staff.
Volunteer Friendly Visitors
are responsible for making
once-a-week home visits to
socially isolated shut-ins.
Friendly Visitors are not
required to have a car as most
assignments are very close to
the volunteer's home.
Training sessions will be
held on Tuesday and Thursday
mornings from 10 a.m.-12
p.m. for three consecutive
weeks. The first session
begins on Tuesday, Jan. 11, at
10a.m.
All training sessions will be
held at the new J.F. and C.S.
offices at 22S0 Palm Beach
Lakes Boulevard, Suite 104.
II you are interested in at-
tending the training course, or
know of someone else who is-
interested, call Ned Goldberg,
caseworker and instructor.
"LET'S DANCE"
Sunday, January 23rd, 8:00 P.M.
The Breakers
833-8421
Flaglei;
National
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Your Locally Owned and Operated
Independent Bank
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:niM I i ..'* 4
Friday, January 7,1983 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 11
date
(TOBY F.WILK
lappy Birthday
a happy Arthur
(in reflected that he
Israel and everything
," and that it made
>roud to be a Jew."
en Laureates attended
Dinner for the Weiz-
[ institute, at which
tein was honored. His
an irreplaceable loss.
Arab States (Algeria,
Jordan, Kuwait, Libya,
nubia and Syria) have
lined air force of 1,912
t. In contrast, Israel has
1634. Israel is out-
fred in the air by a 3:1
Yet, the Reagan
list ration intends to sell
r-bombers to Jordan,
|lgh King Hussein still
ind refuses to negotiate
Israel. Offering Hussein
without demanding he
Israel in peace talks, only
fds Hussein's stubborn-
and contributes to the
tate the U.S. has pledged
:iui. hoi Jordan, the
inistration prefers the
kt but for Israel, it
Crs the stick.
kshiva University, in its
1 year, is America's oldest
largest University under
ish auspices. Many under-
rates there combine
at the University with a
of study in Israel.
[Kirk Douglas Honored
irk Douglas, who plays a
>caust survivor in the
t-TV movie "Remem-
^ce of Love," was honored
i the prestigious Weizmann
lallion "for service to
ice, Israel and the Jewish
He."
)uth Africa's first Conser-
ve Jewish Congregation
been established in a
krb of Johannesburg with
Initial membership of 60
lies.
[illiam Bolger, the Post-
ler General, has
)rized a stamp soon to be
libuied nationwide, com-
|orating the 500th bir-
of Martin Luther and
king Luther for his views
pligious freedom. Luther's
on freedom of religion
expressed in his writings
ein he advocated setting
the Synagogues and
rls of Jews; that their
be forbidden to teach
kin of loss of life and
that Jews be forbidden,
lin of death, to pray, to
God, or utter God's
Luther was born on
mber 10. On November
| his German disciples
down and destroyed
?nagogucs, hundreds of
I and shops, and arrested
3().()(io Jews, killing and
ng countless others.
the Postmaster General
}\\ him what you think of
rious concept of freedom
{ion.
fENNIS, ANYONE?
Reagan Administration
i $4.2 billion "Crisis
Ition Plan" for you,
'imily and friends, to
the devastation of a
lr war. All that is
Cd for the plan to work
the enemy allow us at
days' notice so Ameri-
m be evacuated and get
carry food, water and
lions for three weeks.
Jibly. the U.S. Postal
- has prepared a plan for
continuing mail delivery to
nuclear survivors. "Change of
Address" forms are already
stocked in post offices across
the country for evacuees to fill
out on their way to "reloca-
tion." One Congressional
member observed: "There
won't be many people left to
read or write those letters."
"But, those that arc," replied
a post office official, "will get
their mail." So, after a nuclear
attack, gather your ashes to-
gether and head for the nearest
post office to fill out a
"Change of Address" card.
You might want to state on
same: "Special Delivery
Pearly Gates or Hell's
Hinges."
Ruth Gruber's 15th book
called "Haven" is a true story
of Jewish refugees saved in
World War II. Today, these
rescued refugees are doctors
and engineers. One is the
greatest radiologist in the
world; another is the father of
the Polaris missile.
Lane Kirkiand, President of
the AFL-CTO, pledged Ameri-
can Labor's support of Israel.
Kirkiand stated: "To those
who would punish Israel by
withholding economic or
military assistance, we say:
save the talk for the military
leader of Poland and his So-
viet masters. Such threats ill
behoove an Administration
that refuses to halt the flow of
credit to the Eastern Bloc, and
begs the Soviet Union to buy
more grain from us."
Douglas Fraser, President
of the UAW, urged Americans
to judge Israel by its
democratic values and not on
the basis of false propaganda
stories spread by Israel's
enemies. He also pledged that
he and his million member
Union would continue its link
with Israel's cause.
ARAB WARFARE
IN THE
UNITED STATES
A massive and malicious
propaganda campaign is being
developed in this country by
Arab oil governments and
some American firms dealing
with these governments, for
the purpose of influencing
Congress to vote against
American aid to Israel. Adver-
tisements in newspapers are
being designed to incite
Americans against such aid.
The avertisements will not
mention that Arab countries
are also receiving substantial
financial aid from the U.S.
Nor will the ads mention that
the PLO is financed by Saudi
Arabia to the tune of $1
million a day and that the
Soviet government is
allocating about $200 million
annually for "National
Liberation Movements"
abroad most of which goes
to the PLO for terrorist acti-
vities. We should know it is in
America's interest to maintain
a strong Israel militarily
and economically as the
only democracy in the mid-
Last upon whom we can
depend to thwart Moscow's
ambition to control (hat vital
area. The Kremlin already has
gained influence in Syria and
Iraq.
Oh That Aching Back!
Research by Dr. Gilad of
Technion in Israel, indicates
that through proper workplace
design taking into account the
configuration of the human
back and its limitations, the
productivity of the average
worker can be increased by up
to 50 percent.
A major way Jews have
assured continuity is through
the communal structures they
have built. The Council of
Jewish Federations began in
1932 with 13 Federations.
Today, there is a network of
200 Federations working for
the welfare of the Jewish
people and for the disad-
vantaged. Unrealized dreams
lie ahead .
Josephthal&Co.
FOUNDED 1910
MEMBERS NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE, INC.
AMERICAN STOCK EXCHANGE, INC.
AND OTHER LEADING EXCHANGES
GINNY MAE'S
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RESIDENT MANAGER PALM BEACH 659-7900
Howard J. Wiener, J.D., LL.M Taxation,
Wills, Trusts, i and Estate Planning
Law Offices
Howard J. Wiener, P.A.
250 Royal Palm Way'Suite 306
Palm Beach, Florida 33480
Telephone (305)833-4001
Perfect &i/te ^usation*
THE RECOMMENDED P VC. MANUFACTURERS"
Ultimate QtiaHty and
WorkmaiMhip at Competitive
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MON-SAT Ife904:30 Mr7 S. Military Trail
EVE A SUN BY APPOINTMENT LAKE WORTH. Fl. 33461
TEL 3> Mrs. Harriett "Buddie" Brenner [second from left] a long lime
resident of the Palm Beaches recently received the Sylvan Cole
Human Relations Award at the Annual Award Dinner of the
Palm Beach County Chapter of the American Jewish Commit-
tee. She is pictured above with members of her family [left to
right) Cathie Brenner Malin, Stanley Brenner and Rick Brenner.
Pictured above at the recent American Jewish Committee
Annual Award Dinner are (left to right | Arnold J. Hoffman,
Palm Beach Chapter President; Hyman Bookbinder, noted
Washington representative for the American Jewish Committee;
and Ann Leibovit, Co-Chairman of the Dinner.
"Yachad"
VI imc to Stand together
Young Leadership
Mission to Israel
April IO-20L19B3
For information, rail
Jewish Federation
of Palm Beach County
(305)832-2120
THEO TOBIASSE
Noted Israeli artist
featured at Patricia Judith Gallery
Now you can view the original oils, goacnes ana
limitea editions of noted lyaeii artist Iheo Tobiasse
at our magnificent gallery His art is founa m
important museums m the United States Europe
Canada ana lyael Iheo Tobiasse will also be present
for a special showing at the Patricia Judith Gallery
March 20-Apnl 3 1983
MTRICIk JUDHH
/IRT GALLERY krj
?K taw Poim#no Pa* Booa Boca Uaion 360 3316
Gallery open Monday through Saturday 10 am 6 pm
Thursdays 10 am 9 pm or by appointment
=1
c
5


Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/ Friday, January 7,1983
Senior News
FROM THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
The JCC-CSSC is funded in
part by Title III of the Older
Americans Act awarded by
Cm 11 st ream Areawide Agency
on Aging, Florida Department
of HRS, the Department of
I ransportation, Jewish Feder-
ation and client contribution,
enabling us to provide a
variety of services for the older
;idult. Our service through the
litlc III of the Older Ameri-
cans Act is available for transit
disadvantaged persons 55 and
over, who do not drive and
cannot use the public transit
system. We take people to
doctors' appointments, to
treatment centers, to hospi-
tals, nursing homes to visit
spouses, to social service
agencies and for food shop-
ping. Please call Helen or Beth
in Senior Transportation Of-
Iice for information about our
scheduling. I here is no fee for
this service but client contri-
butions are encouraged so that
we can continue 10 serve more
and more people.
We offei anothei service to
the community as a result of
vehicles awarded to us through
the Urban Mass Tran-
sportation Act by the
Department of Transportation
and the support of the Jewish
federation of Palm Beach
County. At this time we will be
serving groups of persons who
have specific transportation
needs. Under this funding we
are able to take people to a
variety of places, both day or
night. Groups and
organizations can call the JCC
to arrange to go to luncheons,
theatre, shopping, exhibits,
trips, etc. A moderate group
fee for each event is charged to
cover our vehicle and driver
expense. Our lift van is
available for handicapped
persons within limited areas.
Call Rhonda Cohen for infor-
mation for these services, 689-
7700.
CLASSES
A variety of education and
recreation programs are of-
fered at the JCC from Adult
Community Education, New
Dimensions, retired and prac-
ticing professors, community
agencies, etc. I hese activities
are provided with no fee to the
participant, but client contri-
butions are encouraged at all
times, so that we can continue
to expand our programs. The
Senior Center enjoys partici-
pating in a variety of special
family activities and events
with the rest of the JCC.
Everyone is invited to attend
all of our activities. Call the
JCC for information, 689-
7700.
Palm Beach County
School Board
I he School Board ol Palm
Beach County Adult Commu-
nity Education piovidcs out-
standing instructors and
classes at the Jewish Commu-
nity Center throughout the
vcar. Wintei session begins
Ian. 17. I he following classes
will be offered weekly at the
JCC. Everyone is invited to
attend. No ice.
Grandparenting Mon-
day, I p.m. A special class to
help you understand and enjoy
your children and grandchil-
dren, by exploring today's
lifestyles. Instructor, Lois
Marcello. Begins Monday,
Jan.17.
Know Your Car Wednes-
day, 9 a.m. A classic course
designed to increase the
driver's knowledge on the va-
rious parts of your car, wir.
"Medicare Is
Not Enough:'
Edward and Selma Kaplan
You Probably
Need B'nai B'rith's
Senior Security
Supplement, loo.
It Now Pays Up
lb $250,000.
Form MOD AS-1307 7
Tor many medical
charges, it pays the
difference between
the actual fee and
what Medicare pays.
It includes private
duty nursing in the
hospii.il
It includes doctors
office and hospital
visits beyond what
Medicare pays.
Hospital deductibles
covered.
Acceptance is
guaranteed."
"for member-, age 65 and
over. Pre-emting conditions
not covered for the firs! 6
mont h. of cove rage
For B naib nth members only.
Wt enroll nev members
B'nai B'rith's
Group Insurance .-
Underwritten b> 1
MONY
Mutual I.ile Insurance
C ompam ol lev. VorV
^
Plea** contact me by phone or mail. I'm
interested in full details of B'nai B'rith's
Senior Security Supplement.
"fall to: National Prafarrad Risks
900 North Federal Hwy.
Suit* 300
Boca Raton. Florida 33432
O05)36i,M00 1-000-432 507 (Florid* Only)'
I
I
I
!
I
I
I
I
L
Mame__
Address.
City/State/Zip
Age-----
Home Phone.
Work Phone
I
I
I
I
I
.J
Paul Oblas, Instructor. Begins
Jan.19.
Yoga in Your Chair for Men
and Women Wednesday, 1
p.m. Learn to relax by breath-
ing and exercise, while sitting
in your chair, with Bea Bunze,
Instructor. Begins Jan. 19.
I.ip Reading Wednesday,
4 p.m. This on-going course is
especially designed for those
with hearing impairment.
Anyone with any hearing
problem should attend. In-
structor, Darlcne Kohuth.
Writers Workshop
Friday, 9:30 a.m. Begins Jan.
14.
Institute of
New Dimensions
This is a Palm Beach
Junior College sponsored
program with a staff of retired
volunteers with tremendous
expertise in ihe sciences.
professions and arts. A variety
ol afternoon lectures will be
held at ihe JCC.
I hursday, Jan. 13,
12:45 p.m.
" I he Life Of an Inventor"
Norman Forrest
ON GOING PROGRAMS
Creative Crafts and Con-
versation this class meets
Mondays at 10 a.m. Join a
real group and enjoy learning
to make a variety ol creative
items. Everyone invited. Lee
Blumenthal and Evelyn Katz,
group leaders.
Learning to Kxpress Your
Feelings Begins Wednes-
day, Ian. 12. 10 a.m. to 12
Noon and 1 to 3 p.m. a
small women's support group
will begin to meet each
Wednesday morning, to
enable participants to discuss
their problems of every day
living. Group leader, Dayre
Horton, JCC Resident Intern
Social Worker. Number of
persons limited. Call Rose
Lord or Libby Robbins at 689-
7703.
Beginners Conversational
Spanish Ann Blicher, an
active member of our commu-
nity and resident of Palm
Beach County for over 35
years, has started a Beginners
Conversational Spanish at the
Center on Fridays at 1 p.m.
Call Rose Lord or Libby Rob-
bins at 689-7703 to register.
Round Table Talk for Men
Timely Topics for Thinking
Women (fantastic current
events discussion groups)
these groups will meet jointly
on the following Tuesdays at I
p.m. on the following dates:
Jan. 18, and 25.
On Stage a JCC drama
workshop designed for per-
sons interested in all phases of
drama; Director, Dick Sand-
ers; Group Co-ordinator, Syl-
via Skolnik. Meets every Tues-
day in January at 10 a.m. The
Fall program will concentrate
on One Act Plays.
Speakers Club Meets
Thursdays at 10 a.m., Morris
Shuken, president. All who
are interested in improving
speaking are encouraged to
join this group.
Health Insurance Assistance
Edie Reiter, Health Insur-
ance Co-ordinator, will assist
persons with health insurance
forms, answer questions, etc.,
Thursday Jan 20 at 2 p.m.
Joy through Movement
Thursday 9:15-11 a.m. A
great JCC extension course
with dance therapist. Ceil
Golden, is again meeting at
Poinciana Place in Lake
Worth in the Social Hall,
courtesy of the Challenger
Country Club. Course in-
cludes exercises for hands, feet
and body. Basic ballet to make
you feel free to move grace-
fully. Jazz dancing put fun
in your dancing and creative
Important! I!
WANTED: Names and telephone numbers of any
person who was a part of Ike Warsaw ghetto uprising
experience. Preferably living in Florida. Please call Jewish
Federation office 832-2120. Holocaust Commemoration
Commission, Community Relations Council.
dancing to help you express
your own unique self and
dance out your feelings. Talks
during the half session break
of 10 minutes on subjects of
interest io students in the
class. Fee $8 for eight lessons.
All proceeds go to the JCC of
the I'alm Beaches.
Hospice Volunteer Training
A weekly six week training
class will meet every Tuesday
at 9 a.m. at the Jewish Com-
munity Center. 2415 Okeecho-
bee Blvd., West Palm Beach.
Training will prepare volun-
teers to handle home support
for families coping with ter-
minal illness and bereavement.
I he program is co-sponsored
by Hospice of Palm Beach
County and the Jewish Com-
munity Center. Enrollment
limited. 1 or information and
registration, call Andrea Wald
586-6766.
SECONDTUESDAY CLUB
I he Second Iticsdav ol the
Month Activity will have a
luncheon and lecture courlesv
of the American Savings and
1 nan Bank, Michcle Garclick,
Managei on Tuesday, Jan. II
at 12 Noon. Attendance by
reservation only. Please call
Sam Rubin for information,
689-7700.
Second Tuesday Club Semi
Annual Luncheon and Card
Party to be held Thursday,
Jan. 27 at the Sweden House,
12 Noon to 4 p.m. Donation
S6.50 plus SI if you need
transportation. Call Sam
Rubin at 689-7703 for your
reservation.
TRIPS
Lido Spa, Miami Beach
Sunday, April 17, 1983 to
Wednesday, April 20, 1983.
Members per person
single occupancy SI60; double
occupancy $145.
Non-members per person
single occupancy $167;
double occupancy $152.
Limited reservations. Call
Sam Rubin for information.
Artist of the Month
monthly exhibits by Senior
Artists take place in the CSSC.
Seniors are invited to call the
Center if they wish to exhibit
their art. Artists price their in-
dividual work giv ing people an
opportunity to purchase any-
thing they wish. We cordially
invited Seniors who wish to
exhibit to call the Center 689-
7703 for further information.
Artist for the Month of Jan-
uary Oscar Colchimiro
Oscar Colchimiro, an ex-
tremely versatile painter who
uses all media, will display at
Jewish ( otnmumtv Center in
the Senior Center, only on
Monday, ruesday, Thursday
and I ridav during this month.
He has an extensive back-
ground with an MA degree in
Fine Arts liom Columbia Uni-
versity. Mr. Colchimiro has
copied and sold masters at the
Metropolitan Museum of Art.
He is presently doing rooftop
scenes of the New York sky-
line. Everyone is invited to
come to see his work. For
further information call Rose
or Libby at 689-7700.
Prime Time Singles An
active group of single senior
citizens 55 plus. This group
has been growing rapidly and
meets for a wide variety of ac-
tivities each month. Rita Ad-
ler, president, invites everyone
to visit and participate. For
further questions call Rita at
689-0247.
NEW ADDRESS!!!
2250 Palm Beach Lakes Boulevard Sufto 104
West Palm Batch, Florida 33400
JfWISf MM* r AMD CNRDtf r S UMVKi
An outstanding professional and counseling agency serving the
Jewish community of Palm Beech County. Prolessionel and con-
fidential help la available tor
Problems ol the aging
Consultation and evaluation services
Marital counseling
Parent child conflicts
Personal problems
684-1991.
I Moderate IBM am charged" lamtty and individual couneeUng to
|>OMwhocanpay(Faaaaraba*lonnconaardlamMyalza)
|The Jewteh FamMy and ChNdrens Service, la a beneficiary agency*
I the Jewish Federation of Palm teach Countv.


Friday, January 7,1983 / The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Pf 13
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Page 14 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Friday, January 7, 1983
The Rabbinical Corner
DEVOTED TO DISCUSSION OF THEMES AND ISSUES RELEVANT TO JEWISH UFE. PAST AND PRESENT
Jewish Chapel at West Point
B\ RABBI
SAMUEL M. SILVER
Reform Hebrew Congregation
of Delray
A new synagogue is being
built.
When it is finished it will
probably be the most visited
Jewish institution ol" its kind in
the U.S.
The new structure is the
future Jewish Chapel at West
Point.
Its completion will mark the
culmination of years of cam-
paigning by one (1) of the
most illustrious group of Jews
on this continent.
The campaigners are headed
by Ldgai Bronfman, whose
Canada-based family have
been most generous to many
causes. Mr. Bronfman is cur-
rently the President of the
World Jewish Congress.
The rabbinical sparkplug in
the effort to create a "shul" in
Rabbi Samuel M. Silver
West Point is Rabbi Avraham
Soltes, a gifted and eloquent
Jewish leader who has served
as spiritual leader in New
Jersey and who has written a
number of fascinating books.
Dr. Soltes is the rabbi of the
Jewish congregation in West
Bar Mitzvah
JEFFREY MAYFR
Jeffrey Mayer, son of Howard and Carole Mayer of Palm
Beach Gardens, will become Bar Mitzvah Friday evening, Jan. 7
and Saturday morning, Jan. 8, at Temple Beth David, Palm
Beach Gardens. Rabbi William Marder and Cantor Earl J.
Rackoff will officiate.
Point, which has conducted
services in multi-use buildings
but which now looks forward
'to a synagogue of its own.
Jews and West Point have
enjoyed mutuality ever since
the first graduating class from
the institution in 1802. There
were two (2) graduates in that
class; one of them was Simon
Magruder Levy. The first
quartermaster of West Point
was another Jewish soldier,
Isaac Franks,
Since that time hundreds of
Jewish cadets have emerged
from the "Point," and main
of them have had distinquish-
ed careers. I he West Point
Jewish choir has thrilled
audiences throughout the U.S.
I he new chapel is the brain-
child of Max Abramowitz, the
eminent architect who helped
design the I \, Lincoln Center
and Brandeis University.
If you want more data
about the Chapel or if you
want to make a tax-deductible
gilt 10 this glorious enterprise;
write, Jewish Chapel Fund,
132 West 31 Street. Suite 200.
New York, New York 10001.
Hyman Krakower and H. Ben Pulda will be honored a
Century Village-Congregation Anshei Sholom Israel Bo h
reception on Jan. 16 2 p.m. in the Temple Sanctuary. Both"1
being honored for their work in the community, the temnlc a*'!
for the State of Israel. "nd
Announcements
Announcements such as engagements, weddings and Bar-
Bat Mitzvahs are published as a free service by The Jewish
FloridkH. Information should be sent To: 501 S Flasler
Drive, Suite 305, W. Palm Beach, FL 33401. If desired
attach a clear black and white photograph.
W JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER m,
OF THE PALM BEACHES, INC. \flf
2415 Okeechobee Blvd.. West Palm Beach, FL
689-7700
/Hitzvah Day/
198)
JfISM COMMJUIfV l -( OUC 11
-
-*4r thm MvlMBMM |
i" team o '-i
' if*
tD(i**io* :< .- Nmta
in i --'. tvir th \mm,
a #*r*/-. Hitinf aiiUnM,
I ,
-
-
If, TMa
' as* to aUii
acre** tha
- *ra<*R th*
a *-<
M aay.
-
ak--ut taia
1 anr*
**" M ft*H-TTOO.
Synagogues In Palm Beach County-

conservative
B'nai Torah Congregation
I40l N.W 4th Avenue. Boca Raton 33432. Phone 392-8566. Rabbi Theodore
Feldman. Sabbath services, Friday 8:15 p.m. Saturday 9:30 a.m.
Congregation Anshei Sholom
5348 Grove Street, West Palm Beach 33409. Phone 684-3212. Office hours 9
a.m. to 1 p.m Rabbi Harry Z. Schectman. Cantor Mordecai Spektor. Daily
8:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m Friday, 8:30 a.m.. 5 p.m. late serviced 8:15 p m
SholoshSuJdos"*8 ay> 8:3 5 Pm- Minch* followed bV
Congregation Beth Kodesh of Bovnton Beach
5i?Sn|j8arhha,anal C?U^h' ,15 c J[ederal Hwy Bynton Beach- Phone 737-
4622. Rabbi Avrom L. Drazin. Sabbath services, Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9
Golden Lakes Temple
1470 Golden Lakes Blvd., W. Palm Beach. Fl 33411 Hahhi in,.K c
Phone 689-9430. President. Samuel Eisenfeld. P Spd,W'
Temple Beth David
?r sSr, Ksrcam<"Ea" *,; asaaMe in
Temple Beth El
2815 North Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach 33407. Phone 833-0339 Rabbi
n ^ in Th lfi!S' Camcr ELaine Shapiro- Sabbatn Eving Service af 8 15
p.m. in The Sanctuary Saturday morning at 9:30 a.m. Daily M.nvan at l\\
a.m., Sunday and Legal Holidays at 9 a.m. ^inyan at 8.15
Temple Beth Sholom
224 N.W Avenue G,' BeUe Glade 33430. Cantor Jack Stateman services, Friday at 8:30 p.m. aiaieman. Sabbath
Tempi* BclbSkolom
315 N. *A' Street, Lake Worth 33460 Phone w w>n b.kk- c
Eisenber, Cantor Jacob E.man. Sarv, Mond.y and Thursday" at'g iSTm"
Friday at 8:15 p.m., Saturday at 9a.m. my ai B.15 a.m..
Tempi* Bath Zioa
Beach, FL 33411, Phone 793-0643. Cantor Albert Koslow *' **' Palm
Temple B'nai Jacob
at Faith United Presbyterian Church, 275 Alemeida Drive Palm l_w. -*.
Temple B'nai Jacob. President JacobTram. PfSatSiZus^SSV^1-
Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday a,9a.m. Mondays and Th^ysat^a^i *"""'
Temple Emaaa-EI
190 North County Road, Palm Beach 33480. Phone 832-0804 R-hhi 1 .
SSya.Dav,d Dardash,L Sabba'h **%!%$"* W?*pSf
Temple Kmelh
5780 West Atlantic Avenue. Delray Beach 33446. Phone 498-3536. Rabbi
Bernard Silver. Cantor Seymour Zisook. Sabbath services. Friday at 5 p.m. and
8 p.m.. Saturday and Holidays 8:45 a.m. Daily Minyan at 8:45 and 5 p m
Conservative-Liberal
Temple Eternal Light
Boca^TumniL??^^i,V c MC' 89 Z WeSt GUdes Road < *
llIfrtffliiPmJ&ty*"!*tf'0' Box 3' Boca Ron 33432. Phone:
36^-1600, 391-1111. Rabbi Benjamin Rosayn. Sabbath services, Friday at 8:15
Orthodox
w d 1 b A,tI Chaim Congregalloa Ceatury VBrage
i*2S:!SrS. ^woTm675 s*"""h x"Ktt' *""5 "'Dti*
R Coagregatioa Aashei Emu
Hi5r,s1i;;^p^i0faD.,^ Beach0446. Phone 499-7407 or 499-9229.
Holidays9am Da',y Serv,ce$ 8 *"< 5 p.m. Saturdays and
Reform
333 S w c l TeP,BthElofBocaRalcHi
^rcSSitSf^SpSlSSS '"' phone 391-8900. Rabbi Merle b.
a.m. Torah Study w rSS Sinaer"tElS? Fri^ *A5 P-"- Sa,U'day *"
' aD0' am- Sabbath morning services 10:30 a.m.
ai David' h TP*s Balk Torah
Trace, Welt ii\J^^SS^n,tM- Fores B,vd- nd Wellington
3341.. cwS?S!&fcjSE 12Jack Pine St'We$t Pa,m Beach
8 renakel, President Ronnie Kramer (793-2700).
Shugarman, President CaS t 5ben' Rabbl Emeriius, Dr. Richard C.
*^*R*m^r^%!!^ Educator. CantoriaJ Soloist Susm
Rabbi Joel L Lamm* r-. T,"lt *
Lane. Lake Worth FlI SrtRft2?S Barbar Cb"*. President. 1407 14th
P.m. Meeting at St (A!?9 9*5-7778. Services Friday evenings alj
Washington Rd. at SouthirnBlvV n*"* Church Social Hall 4000
gejity. PhoM^SSJSlf 2H*. Comer of Lake Ida Rd. and Swinton Ave..
33444. Rabbi Samue S Ivjj 'pS. J,d,e** 2005 NW- Street. Delray Beach
P m. UCI ailver. President, Bernard Etish. Friday services at 8:15


Friday, January 7,1983 / The Jewiab Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 16
Syn
iii
e News
TEMPLE JUDEA
There will be a special per-
formance of "Fiddler on the
Roof" for the benefit of Tem-
ple Judea on Sunday, Jan. 16
at 7 p.m. at The Stage Com-
pany, 201 Clematis Street,
West Palm Beach. Donation
$12.50 per ticket. For reserva-
tions call Mel Brandt.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID
Receives Major Contribution
Mr. Leonard Gilman, vice-
president Buildng Fund
Raising Chairman of Tem-
ple Beth David, Northern
Palm Beach County, an-
nounced at a recent Board of
Directors meeting the receipt
of a generous donation from
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Rapa-
port of Palm Beach. The
donation was earmarked for
construction of the new Sanc-
tuary. Rapaport's feeling con-
cerning the donation was evi-
denced by his statement
"The Synagogue is the corner-
stone of Jewish life, and my
gift will hopefully assure the
continuity of Jewish tradition
and education in Northern
Palm Beach County."
Temple Beth David, a mod-
ern conservative Temple with
a membership of over ISO
families, is currently con-
structing a new Synagogue on
Hood Rd., in Palm Beach
Gardens. The expected com-
pletion date of the new facility
which will include the main
Sanctuary, a library, youth
center, kitchen facilities, of-
fices and a separate structure
for both the Hebrew and Nur-
sery schools will be spring of
1983. Rabbi William Marder is
the Spiritual Leader accom-
panied by Cantor Earl J.
Rackoff. Until completion,
the congregation currently
meets at the Westminster
Presbyterian Church in Palm
Beach Gardens.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
Milton Freedman if Mourned
Temple Beth Sholom of
Lake Worth is grieved to re-
port the passing of one of its
outstanding leaders, Milton
Freedman on Dec. 13.
We deeply mourn this loss
of one who not only personi-
fied Judaism and Yiddishkite
but whose devotion and sensi-
tivity to the well-being of the
Temple will be greatly missed.
Milton Freedman served as
President, Vice President, Di-
rector, Gabai, Chaired many
Committees and was Temple
honoree for the State of Israel
bonds. He also served as the
first President of the Temple's
Men's Club.
Temple Israel Plans Gala to
Celebrate 60th Anniversary
Temple Israel, the oldest
Jewish institution in the Palm
Beaches, will celebrate its 60th
anniversary at a Gala Celebra-
tion to be held on Sunday
evening, Jan. 23, 8 p.m. at the
Breakers, Palm Beach.
The theme of the program
will be "Club Diamond Opens
for One Night Only," and will
be a recreation of a night club
during the big band era. The
evening, which will include a
champaign dinner, will be
highlighted by the big band
sound of Billy Row), well
known orchestra leader. The
event is being created by Bruce
Sutka, internationally known
party planner.
Ann Leibovit, chairman of
the event, stated "We are
making this a community-wide
event and we would like to
invite everyone to attend what
promises to be the most excit-
ing and entertaining event of
the year. We will dance the
lindy, have conga lines and
even have a jitterbug contest.
For all those who loved the
sounds of the big band era
and those who wish to ex-
perience it for the first time,
(his is an evening not to be
missed."
For more information and
reservations contact Temple
Israel's office.
From the Jewish Task Force of Community Relations Council
Of The Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
A VITAL SCHARA ASA Y
Jerusalem
[Dear Friend,
1 last saw my husband,
I Anatoly Scharansky, eight
years ago. He was young and
| strong, 27 years old. Since
1978 he has lived on a prison
Idiet, averaging about 1005
calories a day.
His only crimes are his love
[lor freedom and his love for
his faith the Soviets call
these "espionage" and "anti-
ISoviet agitation."
In January, Anatoly's
|mother and brother were al-
lowed to visit him. it was the
first word we had of his or-
I deal.
In December 1980, in a So-
viet prison camp, Anatoly ob-
served Hanukkah. He dried
bread from his daily ration,
hardened it and carved out
' eight small indentations. For
days, he scraped and collected
oil from machinery and
vehicles. He tore his own
clothing to make wicks.
Bread, crankcase oil, and
cloth these were his Han-
nukah lights. The guards were
infuriated.
He was sentenced to the
special "punishment cell" for
15 davs.
In the special punishment
cell, prisoners are fed once
every two days. Warm cloth-
ing is forbidden. Anatoly suf-
fered from nutritional
deprivation. Even on the verge
of collapse, he could hardly
speak to the prisoner in the
next cell to ask him to call the
guard.
By the time the guard came,
Anatoly was unconscious.
But, since it was not a food
day, they gave him only an in-
jection to restore him to con-
sciousness. He recuperated in
the hospital for 33 days. And
when he was better, they look
him directly back to the
punishment cell.
Following his isolation, they
put him on trial. The trial
lasted five minutes. He was
accused of not confessing to
espionage, and of being a
"bad influence" on other
camp prisoners.
Anatoly admitted that he
had not confessed. After all,
he said, he had nothing to
confess. And how could he
have been a bad influence
when, most of the time, he had
been in isolation?
The judge sentenced him to
three more years in the
Chistopol prison among
Russia's most hardened
criminals. Upon his arrival
there, he was sentenced to two
months of extremely severe
conditions, as punishment. .
For what? For having been
sent to prison!
After all this, my husband
wrote to Brezhnev. He de-
manded the return of his
prayer book. The letter was
confiscated.
Anatoly wrote to the Mos-
cow synagogue, requesting a
Bible. He got word that his re-
quest was being granted, but
never received the Bible.
Today, Anatoly's health is
seriously impaired. He suffers
from an acute optic disease.
He has lost weight beyond
recognition. We have written
time and again, requesting
medical care for him. But our
requests go unanswered. Since
last January, no one has seen
or heard from him.
Now we hear that Anatoly
has been placed in solitary
confinement again, for failing
to meet his work quota of
making eight potato sacks a
day. But how can he weave
when he can barely see?
I will tell you what is in my
heart:
My husband's life or death
depends on the whim of the
government. They like all
the morally bankrupt con-
stantly look over their
shoulders to see if they are be-
ing watched as they commit
their crimes.
Anatoly is but one of the
Prisoners of Conscience in the
Soviet Union one of many
whose only crime is a passion
for freedom to live as a Jew.
You must help them.
Keep the pressure on the
real criminals: the Soviet
government. Please help us
force them to keep Anatoly
alive by sending a Postcard to
Secretarv of State, George
Shultz at the address below,
along with the message below.
Very truly yours,
AVITAL SCHARANSKY
Please send your Postcard
today to: The Honorable
George Shultz; Secretary of
State; Department of State;
Washington, D.C. 20520 with
the following message:
We remember Anatoly
Scharansky and all the
Prisoners of Conscience that
languish in Soviet prisons and
labor camps. Those of us liv-
ing in freedom implore you:
Make every effort to open the
gates of emigration so that
those who wish to leave the
Soviet Union will be enabled
to do so. Raise your voice with
ours.
Your Signature
Sonny Levitt Elected President of
Jewif h Funeral Directors of America
Sonny Levitt, Vice Presi-
dent of Levitt-Weinstein
Memorial Chapels, has been
elected President of the Jewish
Funeral Directors of America
during a recent meeting in
Calsbad, California. Mr.
Levitt, a prominent Florida
luneral director for many
years, has continuously con-
tributed unselfishly io his pro-
fession and his community.
''The JFDA is the national
forum in which Jewish funeral
directors meet to discuss
lamily life in America, and the
importance of the Jewish
culture, religion, and tradi-
| tions as they affect the funeral
industry. Being actively,
involved in associations like
these allows the Levitt-
Weinstein organization to
maintain its sensitivity to the
needs of the Jewish com-
munity," Levitt stated.
Levitt-Weinstein is associ-
ated with Weinstein Brothers
Memorial Chapels in Chicago
and Wilmette, Illinois.
Norman Cutler, of Weinstein
Brothers, was also elected an
officer of the JFDA.
Levitt-Weinstein Memorial
Chapels are family owned and
operated, and are located in
Hollywood, North Miami
Beach, West Palm Beach and
Pompano Beach.
Tjbey who go feel not
Be pain of parting, it is
those who stay behind
that suffer"
J^jngfelkxo.
The Menoroh
Pre-NeedPkm.
a Service* according to your individual withes
Fraa preantationi & consultations
Interest free payments (up to 5 year*)
a Paymanti art put into trutt and
lOONretundeble
a Fraa camatary counieling and arrangements
throughout the country
a Worldwide (hipping available
Chapels in Fort Lauderdale, Margate.
Daerf laid Beech. W. Palm Beach, N. Miami Beech
Broward 742-6000
Dade 945-3939
Palm Beach 627-2277
South Palm Beach 427-4700
-Please lend ma fraa pamphlet on Menorah's
Pre Need Plan.
Pteaie call me to iet up a fraa presentation.
r*eme___________,____________
Address.
City.
State
Zip.
I
I
I
i Menorah Chapels
i 6800 West Oakland Park Boulevard
i Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33313


Page 14 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Rearh Conatv WMmm in..r.. n iqoq
Page 16 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County / Friday, January 7.1983
January 18,1983
The Date of a Very Significant Event
In the Life of the Jewish Community
In Palm Beach County
The Gala Community Dinner
Given on Behalf of the
1983 Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County-
United Jewish Appeal
And Israel Special Fund Campaigns
Guest Speaker:
The Honorable Moshe Arens
Israel's Ambassador
To The United States
You Are Urged to Join in Support of the Most
Crucial Campaign in Our History
Gala Community Dinner
Tuesday Evening, January 18,1983,7:15 p.m.
The Breakers, Palm Beach
Minimum $1000 Gift To The
1983 Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County-
United Jewish Appeal and Israel Special Fund Campaigns
. .Fl l'?M,v,,lon*"< InlofmationContact
The Jewish Federation Of Palm Beach Countv
501 South Flagler Dr., Suite 305, West Palm Beach, Florida 33401, ,305) 832-2120
fa


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