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The Jewish Floridian ( August 30, 1985 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian the voice of the Jewish community of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Running title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Physical Description:
4 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
August 30, 1985

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 8, no. 41 (Dec. 24, 1982)-v. 11, no. 26 (Aug. 30, 1985).
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44606415
lccn - sn 00229548
ocm44606415
System ID:
AA00014310:00001

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian the voice of the Jewish community of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Running title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Physical Description:
4 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
August 30, 1985

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 8, no. 41 (Dec. 24, 1982)-v. 11, no. 26 (Aug. 30, 1985).
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44606415
lccn - sn 00229548
ocm44606415
System ID:
AA00014310:00001

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)

Full Text
THE VOICE Or
THE JEWISH
COMMUNITY OF
PALM BEACH
COUNTY
ewish florid ian
VOLUME 11-NUMBER 26
PALM BEACH, FLORIDA FRIDAY, AUGUST 30,1985
PRICE 36 CENTS
Israeli MIA
Reports Say He May Be Alive and Held by Terrorists in Damascus
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) A glimmer of
hope emerged that an Israeli soldier missing
in action from the war in Lebanon is alive in
Damascus where he is being held prisoner
by the Democratic Front for the Liberation
of Palestine, an extremist group led by
Nayef Hawatmeh. The whereabouts of
Zecharia Baumel was reported last week by
Jordan TV, but no other details were given.
PREMIER SHIMON PERES im
mediately initiated diplomatic action in an
effort to obtain Baumel's release and his
return home. He asked U.S. Ambassador
Thomas Pickering to contact Richard Mur-
phy, Assistant Secretary of State for Near
Eastern and South Asian Affairs, who was
in Jordan, to try to get more information on
Baumel's fate. Upon his arrival at Ben
Gurion Airport, Murphy said he had no fur-
ther information.
Baumel is one of four soldiers still missing.
He, Zvi Feldman and Yehuda Katz were
Continued on Page 13
Separation 'Subversion9
Bennett, Meese Hit
For School Politics
RABBI MEIR KAHANE
U.S. Jews
Denounce Kahane's
'Alien' Judaism
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Twelve major national
Jewish organizations have
joined in vehemently de-
nouncing Rabbi Meir
Kahane, the leader of the
Kach Party in Israel, calling
his policies "racism,"
demagoguery," and "a
perversion of Jewish
religious, ethical, and tradi-
tional values and practices."
The joint statement was issued
hours More Kahane was schedul-
ed to arrive here from Israel for a
month-long visit to the United
states. The Kach Party advocates
ousting all Arabs from Israel and
m used violent tactics to express
its views.
The statement, which strongly
decries the tactics, views and
goals of Kahane, declares that he
"is not representative of
American Jewry, (and) more fun-
damentally, his words and actions
are alien to Judaism."
THE NATIONAL organiza-
tions that signed the statement
were the American Jewish Com-
mittee, American Jewish Con-
gress, B'nai B'rith, Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith, Hadassah, Jewish Labor
Committee, Jewish War Veterans
Continued on Page 11-
By KEVIN FREEMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Education Secretary
William Bennett was urged
last week to abandon "ef-
forts to subvert" the separa-
tion of church and state in
American education, and to
cease attempts to inject
religious values into public
schools that "will convert
our schools and com-
munities into religious
battlegrounds."
The American Jewish Con-
gress, in a statement issued here,
said that only when strict neutrali-
ty, in constitutional terms, is en-
forced "can religious schools en-
joy the necessary independence to
fulfill their religious mission. And
only with neutrality can public in-
stitutions provide an atmosphere
.. free of subtle coercion and
feeling of religious isolation."
THE AJC was responding to
remarks by Bennett and Attorney
General Edwin Meese in separate
speeches in Washington to the
Supreme Council of the Knights of
Columbus, a Roman Catholic
society for men.
Both Meese and Bennett assail-
ed recent Supreme Court deci-
sions involving the separation of
church and state. Bennett focused
specifically on the July 1 Supreme
Court decision invalidating public
school programs that sent public
school teachers into parochial
schools and yeshivas to pro-
vide remedial instructions.
The court ruled, in its decision
striking down a program in the
New York City school system and
another similar program in Grand
Rapids, Michigan, that such pro-
grams forge "a symbolic union of
government and religion" that is
forbidden by the Constitution.
THE LOSS of the federally
financed program in New York
was described as devastating to
Jewish schools, and the court's
decision was assailed by Orthodox
groups. However, the AJC filed
At Hadassah Confab
Specter: U.S. Aid To Israel Needs Boost
friend of the court briefs in the
case urging the court to rule the
programs unconstitutional.
Bennett, in his remarks, said
the Supreme Court's decision last
July and others in the past years
seeking to separate church from
state had been "misguided at-
tempts to apply neutrality to
religion." He said the court failed
to "reflect sufficiently on the rela-
tionship between our faith and our
political order."
That relationship, he added, is
"our values as a free people and
the central value of the Judaeo-
Christian tradition are flesh of the
flesh and blood of the blood." Ac-
cording to the Education
Secretary, in other remarks,
religious intolerance had now
given way to a "new aversion to
religion" manifested "in the guise
of Constitutional interpretation."
Bennett declared: "The same
Constitution that had protected
the rights of religious parents,
and under whose aegis a host of
religions had found happy accom-
modation, now became, in the
hands of aggressive plaintiffs and
Continued on Page 10-
Inside
Arab-Israeli Conflict:
here's the Solution?
page2
JJorse Geriatric
pnter Residents
interviewed... page 3
Update/Opinion...
Page 6
By MARLENE GOLDMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) A
Washington legislator said
here that in order for Israel
to exist, it is "vital that the
assistance of the U.S. be in-
creased for the next fiscal
year." Sen. Arlen Specter
(R., Pa.), addressing some
3,000 delegates attending
the 721st annual national
convention of Hadassah,
which is also marking its
73rd anniversary, stated
that the U.S. plans to raise
its aid to Israel from last
year's $2.6 billion to $4.5
billion.
"As long as we possess a good
set of lungs, sturdy legs, and the
capacity to fight," the U:S. will
make sure that Israel is secure.
SEN. SPECTER
Specter said. At the same time, he
stated, it is "vital the U.S. not sell
arms to Arab nations."
Specter, a member of the
Foreign Operations Appropria-
tions Subcommittee, said that
Israel's allies in Congress will at-
tempt to block further sales of
U.S. arms to Israel's Arab
neighbors, and added that Arab
nations hostile to Israel must ac-
cept the ties between that nation
and the U.S. as a prerequisite to
establishing better relations with
the United States.
"PEACE WILL never be
achieved at the expense of
Israel," Specter said, and he add-
ed that "in the pursuit of peace
the United States and Israel are
inextricably bound." The Senator
declared that there is "no dif-
ference between supporting U.S.
interests and Israeli interests,"
Continued on Page 13


-o
!
Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, August 30, 1985
The Arab-Israel Conflict:
Where's the Solution?
(First of a two-part series)
By LLOYD RESNICK
To both the casual observer
and the expert in international
relations, the present Arab-
Israel conflict constitutes a
complex problem for which no
simple solution exists.
Recent media treatment has
convinced some Americans
that Israel is solely responsible
for the current stalemate in
the peace process. However, a
closer examination of history
and of the theology of the
Arab-Moslem component in
the conflict will help keep the
issue in perspective and help to
explain why a solution con-
tinues to evade us.
Historical And Theological
Barriers To Peace
In the introduction to his
monograph "The Role of Arab
Political Culture and .History
in the Conflict-with Israel
Sublished by the Center for
(ear East Policy Research,
Arnold M. Soloway reminds us
of a fundamental religious doc-
trine of Islam: All Moslems are
one people distinct from the
rest of mankind.
The unity of the Moslem
world was, in fact, a reality for
centuries, from the time of
Mohammed essentially until
the demise of the Ottoman em-
pire. Ironically, during the
Dark Ages in Europe, when
Western culture was at its ebb,
the Moslem society was
flourishing to the extent that
many ,htorians .believe .that,
the Renaissance in Europe
would not have occurred had it
not been for the Arab
civilization.
This nostalgic vision of Arab
supremacy leads to the doc-
trine that the Moslem people
should all live together again
in one empire under one ruler.
Despite their contemporary in-
ability to achieve this goal of
Islamic unity, Moslems con-
tinue to cherish the ideal.
Empirically, however,
loyalties in today's Moslem
world tend to be directed
towards one's village, tribe, ci-
ty or particular religious
order. Moreover, recently
developed nation-state iden-
tities in the Arab world are
tenuous and volatile, and
Soloway notes that this results
in "essentially authoritarian
military dictatorships .
largely dominated by military
establishments that are
notoriously exploitative, op-
pressive and unstable."
This domestic instability, as
well as the anti-West senti-
ment expressed by most Arab
countries, may be attributed to
the fact that the nation-state
concept was imposed upon the
Arab people following World
War I when the British and the
French divided what was left
of the Ottoman empire ar-
bitrarily amongst themselves,
installing their favorites as
leaders. These puppet heads-
of-state were eventually over-
thrown during a spate of na-
tionalistic "liberations" over
the last few decades, resulting
in a region full of Arab states
struggling for national identi-
ty and internal tranquility.
Theologically, Moslem
dogma divides the world into
two parts, dar al Islam (all
areas governed by the laws of
Islam), and dar al Harb (ter-
ritories of warfare where the
laws of the "infidels" rule).
For the- fundamentalist
believer in Islam, a permanent
state of war (jihad) exists bet-
ween these two regions.
Soloway states that Islamic-
Arab dogma considers Chirs-
tians and Jews to be a subject
people who, when they live in
larger, Moslem societies,
should be ruled over by Arab
"overlords." Non-Moslems
cannot attain equality in the
Islamic world as a result of this
theological concept called
dhimmi.
Literally, dhimmi means
"protege' or "protected per-
son," but Jaques Ellul, in a
preface to Bat Ye'or's book
The Dhimmi, claims that the_
term implies latent hostility.*'
Although Ellul admits that
some of the dhimmi have been
treated well at certain points
in history, he observes that the
concept entails the notion of
rights being conceded by
Moslems to the dhimmi and
negates the democratic idea of
automatically endowed human
rights. Ellul compares this ine-
quality to the medieval Euro-
pean serf's position with
regard to his feudal lord.
Ellul says further that the
immutable dhimmi concept ex-
plains why "the idea of solving
the Middle East conflicts by
the creation of a federation in-
cluding Israel within a group
of Moslem peoples or states, or
in a 'Judeo-Islamic,' state, is a
fantasy."
All this Islamic theological
dogma constitutes what
Soloway calls "a virulent form
of Islamic-Arab nationalism,"
which helps explain the Arab
rejection of any Jewish na-
tional claims in the Middle
East.
Intra-Arab Domestic
Turmoil
Further complicating mat-
ters are the numerous political
and religious rivalries within
today's Arab nations which
create severe internal ten-
sions. Syria, Iraq, Saudi
Arabia, and, of course,
Lebanon are just a few ex-
amples of internally
fragmented countries.
Soloway observes that
"Arab national leaders tend
not to be representative of the
majority of the people they
control accentuating the
cleavages within the country
and promoting long-standing
and bitter rivalries between
the state and the group it
controls."
Historically, the Arab
revolutionaries who overthrew
the Western puppet regimes
after World War I did not
represent the majority of the
population. Consequently, in
Syria an 11.7 percent Alawi
Moslem minority, led today by
President Hafez Assad, rules
over and dominates a 60-70
percent Sunni Moslem
majority.
Even in Saudi Arabia,
perceived by the West to be a
unified Arab state, there is a
resurgence of a 200-year-old
conflict between the
puritanical Wahhabi branch of
Islam, which is allied with the
ruling Sajid family, apd the
Shiites,. wjjo .lutw : j>uWicljr -.
demonstrate their loyalty to
Iran's Ayatollah Khomeni.
These destabilizing domestic
conflicts, unrelated directly to
the politics of the Arab-Israel
conflict, nevertheless exert a
significant influence on Arab
policy-making, creating a web
of turmoil with which the
Arabs must deal before con-
structive dialogue with Israel
can begin.
In a lecture delivered at a
seminar of Jewish and Arab
writers in April, 1985,
Yehoshofat Harkabi noted the
paradox that "the inability of
Arab governments to solve the
problems of their countries im-
pairs their capacity to
govern." He went on to
observe that "the (Arab-Israel)
The lines on the map indicate serious inter-Arab conflict*
resolutions of which are necessary before a tine Arab-Isrwi
settlement can be achieved. (Reprinted from "The Role of
Arab Political Culture and History in the Conflict with
Israel.")
conflict is not the Arabs' cen-
tral and most acute problem,
and their efforts should be
directed elsewhere to remedy
ills of their societies."
So it seems as if two pre-
conditions for peace between
the Arab countries and Israel,
stable political climates within
Arab nations and a theological
tolerance amongst Moslems
for other forms of belief, are
lacking in the Middle East to-
day. Surely, something more
that simple diplomacy will be
necessary before the two
adversaries will be able to
negotiate constructively.
Next Issue: The myth of
pan-Arab unity and why
diplomatic attempts to solve the
Arab-Israel conflict have
failed.
ft :'*
Israelis Deny They Supply
Anns; TrauMjR^>to Contras
TEL AVIV (WNS) The Foreign Ministry has
denied charges that Israel has supplied arms directly to the
United States-backed rebel forces fighting the Sandinista
government in Nicaragua.
The Ministry's statement was issued after Nicaraguan
President Daniel Ortega asserted that Israel is training and
arming the rebel Contra forces. It said, too, that Israel has
been making persistent efforts to restore diplomatic rela-
tions with Nicaragua broken by the Managua government
three years ago.
ORTEGA, in an exclusive interview with Haaretz, said
Israel was being manipulated by the United States to back
the Contras operating from neighboring Honduras. He said
that he had documented evidence of Israeli aid to the Con-
tras and promised to publicize some of the material.
According to Ortega, the Sandinista government's
dispute with Israel stems from its support of the regime of
former dictator Anastasio Somoza, which was overthrown
in 1979. In the wake of the outbreak of the Lebanon war in
June, 1982, Managua severed ties with Jerusalem.
This is not just another
SECRETARY
Social Service Agency. Good shorthand and typing
skills. Five days, 9-5. Excellent benefit packjure
Call Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County.
832-2120.
SECRETARIES NEEDED
FOR SEASONAL ASSIGNMENTS. THE JEWISH
FEDERATION OF PALM BEACH COUNTY HAS
SEVERAL OPENINGS FOR PERSONS WITH
GOOD SECRETARIAL SKILLS IN DEPART-
MENTS REQUIRING HELP FROM LATE
SEPTEMBER THROUGH APRIL OR MAY. FOR
FURTHER INFORMATION PLEASE CALL
832-2120.
HELP WANTED
ad...
THE "NEARLY NEW" THRIFT SHOP
of the Morse Geriatric Center is looking for men and
women to volunteer in its new store located at 242 South
County Road (one block north of Royal Palm Way).
Part-time help is needed in sales and general assistance
to the store manager.
Become part of this new venture and help make the Near-
ly New Thrift Shop a special place in our community.
All donations of fine furniture, paintings, bric-a-brac and
S?,k 0,hes' and a" Proceeds from their sale will
benefit he many programs of the Morse Geriatric Center
- our Jewish Home for the Aged of Palm Beach County.
Please call 471-5111, Ext. 179 for further information.
/.


SpQCC Friday August jM), 1985/Tne Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 3
Israel's Newest Frontier
President Reagan's invita-
tion to Israel to participate in
"Star Wars" research raises
an intriguing question: Is the
Jewish State ready and willing
w venture into space?
Space science research is not
an entirely new field for Israeli
scientists. As long ago as 1961,
a meteorological research
rocket was successfully laun-
ched. Israel's high quality
missiles are a spin-off of that
research.
Israel now has the oppor-
tunity to enlarge and expand
its capabilities in space science
because of the new Center for
Space Research at the
Technion-Israel Institute of
Technology.
Professor Arnan Seginer of
Technion head of the
Aerodynamics Laboratories of
the Department of
Aeronautical Engineering, will
be the head of the Susman-
Ahser Space Center.
He suggests that "the space-
oriented research programs
will enable Israeli-made
rockets and satellites to enter
space." This must be a priority
in view of the 1985 launching
of Arab-Sat, a communications
satellite owned by a 19-nation
Arab consortium, including
the PLO, which will grant the
Arabs great intelligence
advantages.
NASA (the National
Aeronautic and Space Ad-
ministration) and the Euro-
pean Space Agency will be
cooperating with scientists at
the Center, sharing knowledge
acquired over the years. This is
a gesture of confidence in
Israel's ability to explore the
frontiers of space science.
In fact, Israel's role as a
world leader in electronics,
secured with the essential in-
put and brainpower of Tech-
nion scientists, and the exper-
tise and wide-ranging research
ongoing in varied areas, pro-
vide a sound basis for the
Space Center with expected
spin-offs for Israel's burgeon-
ing science-based industries.
New advances in medicine, for
example, have opened up with
the explosion of technology
developed by space scientists
and utilized in medical
research.
Technion is already involved
in a preliminary space pro-
gram. The growing need for an
independent Israeli space pro-
gram was foreseen years ago.
Related research began in the
1950's and continued. The
Department of Aeronautical
Engineering's Arc Plasma
Generator and high enthalpy
test facility, for instance, com-
pleted in 1984, are capable of
simulating aerodynamic
heating problems at high
velocities. The system will be
central to the new Center, as
will the Wind Tunnels
Laboratory (testing site for
the Kfir fighter aircraft), the
Jet Engines and Turbines
Laboratory (crucial to the
development of the Lavie
fighter's jet engine), and other
research facilities which will
be part of the challenge of
research into hypersonic flight
and the simulation of deep
space conditions.
The Center will be in-
strumental in the training of
young scientists who will con-
stitute the core of Israel's in-
dependent endeavors to enter
Sace. Among other projects, Dr. Daniel Levine of Technion's Faculty of Aeronautical
e Center will assume the Engineering performs wind tunnel experiments on a new air-
task of preparing space, craft design.
astronomy, and astrophysics
textbooks in Hebrew for the
science track in Israeli high
schools.
Helen and Norman Asher, in
the tradition of Louis Susman,
Mrs. Asher's father, have had
a long and fruitful affiliation
with the Technion. They have
established the Helen and Nor-
man Asher Visiting Professor-
ship, which enables the Tech-
nion to invite world-renowned
scientists to the Institute to
lecture to students and staff.
The Susman-Asher Space
Center and Research Lab at
Technion will be a giant leap
forward for Israel and for the
free world.
Wife Survived
Israeli Diplomat
Murdered in Cairo
JERUSALEM -
Murdered Israeli diplomat
Albert Atrakchi's body was
returned to Israel following
his death as he drove in a
car on a Cairo street with
his wife and another
woman.
A red Fiat drove past the
diplomat's car and gunmen
Morse Geriatric Center Residents Interviewed:
Bena Perry and Sam Goldie
By LLOYD RESNICK
The Morse Geriatric Center
of The Jewish Home for the
Elderly, a beneficiary agency
of the Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach county, is not a
"nursing homer' in the
stereotypical sense. The am-
biance at Morse, a fully-
staffed, 120-bed long-term
skilled facility, is brighter and
more cheerful than one might
expect. Although there are
some very ill people there, the
dedication and enthusiasm of
the staff, volunteers and
residents themselves make the
Place feel somewhat like a
community center rather than
a home for the aged."
Such optimism and vitality
was emanated by two first-
floor residents during a recent
interview. Seventy-eight-year-
ow Bena Perry has lived at the
tenter for one and a half
years, and Sam Goldie, an
^year-old, 30-year resident
JWestPalm Beach, has resid-
wat the Center for only two
w a half months, but both ex-
pressed gratitude for and
2w?0n **" the level of
re they are receiving.
Bena Perry, who is awaiting
SnvKa'of h^ fourth grea?
BS5l,d. Wi born in
"alt.more and lived there until
W^?.?g0:*when her hus-
hile t Bena said that
antXWmg UP 8he "never
felt rS. ^ything. I never
poor or restricted in any
jy- I had everything I need-
WmTeLgraduatin& from
fi all H,fhu School, the
ZZ Pli8 ^h school in
country Bena had planned
g to college to become a
W Lshe decided to get
when she met the
Bena Perry
"right man." Her husband,
who ran his own engraving
and advertising business for 50
years, died in 1972, and Bena
subsequently moved to Cen-
tury village in West Palm
Beach.
"I was always the healthy
one in the family," Bena said
nostalgically. But soon after
moving to Florida she
developed severe hypertension
and suffered a coronary one
evening while watching TV.
"The doctor said I couldn't live
alone anymore," Bena said.
Bena lost some of her heart
function as a result of the
heart attack, and at Morse she
is monitored carefully by doc-
tors and nurses. Yet Bena is
grateful for being relatively
healthy. "Thank G-d I can take
care of myself," Bena said, but
she also expressed a prudent
acceptance of her condition:
do what my body tells me I can
do."
Commenting on the lifestyle
at the Center, Bena said. If
Sam Goldie
you can't live alone, this is the
next best." Bena enjoys the
privacy of a single room, yet
she also appreciates the
careful medical supervision
and the social interaction with
other residents.
Bena relishes the many ac-
tivities offered by the Center,
such as painting, ceramics,
games and discussion groups.
She has discovered that she
has artistic talent that she
wasn't aware of, and she said
that the games and discussions
keep the residents' minds
alert. "I've never done so
much in my life as I've done
here," commented Bena.
Asked about the Center
staff, Bena remarked that she
was pleasantly surprised that
so many young people, several
of whom are not Jewish, would
want to work with a group of
old folks. She is constantly im-
pressed with the staffs pa-
tience and enthusiasm. "They
always try to encourage ydu,'
she pointed out.
Commenting on the
volunteers, Bena said, "They
like to come here; they have a
good time, and the residents
get along well with them."
Bena admits that the
medical condition of some of
the seriously ill residents
upsets her. I don't want to
live like some of these people.
I'm ready to go anytime,"
Bena said, suggesting that
she's lived a complete and
fulfilling life.
Visited often by her son and
his family, who live locally,
Bena also receives moral sup-
port from her daughter who
lives in Baltimore.
Although the kosher food
does not overly excite Bena's
already diminished appetite,
Bena said that the kitchen
does a good job, and she thinks
the diet restrictions are
healthy.
Bena enjoys services at the
Center on Friday night and
Saturday morning, although
she was not a routine shul-goer
before she came to the Center.
"I've gotten an education in
my Hebrew back round here,"
said Bena, and she praised
Rabbi Alan Sherman for his
understanding and sensitivity.
"The rabbi is so nice. If we
want we can have a session
with him privately, and he
always listens." Bena also
noted that the residents, with
the help of the volunteers, are
encouraged to participate in
the Sabbath services.
Bena is one of the residents
at Morse who has maintained a
steady pen-pal relationship
with a resident at the Bet Byer
home in Jerusalem. Her friend
in Israel is an English
Continued on Pag* 4
sprayed it with machinegun fire,
instantly killing him and woun-
ding both women. Atrakchi was
30 years old. .
Identification of Atrakchi was
not made until after the return of
his remains and notification of
other family members.
IN THE confusion following the
attack, sources in Cairo reported
that there was a second man in
Atrakchi's car, but later
statements declared that there
were only three in all.
The attack took place in Cairo's
upper-class Maadi suburb, which
is home to many foreign diplomats
and representatives of foreign
companies operating in Egypt.
According to Israel Radio, the
shots were fired from the red Fiat
as it followed and overtook
Atrakchi's car.
In Cairo, Embassy spokesman
Isaac Bar-Moshe declared that,
according to police reports, the
gunmen sped away after the at-
tack in the direction of an isolated
area east of Maadi called Mokat-
tam Hills. Bar-Moshe said that
Atrakchi died instantly, and both
women underwent surgery, one
for wounds in the leg and the
other for injuries to her face and
arms.
An unidentified doctor at al-
Salaam Hospital in Maadi, some
10 miles south of Cairo, confirmed
that both women remain
hospitalized.
IN JERUSALEM, Israeli
Foreign Ministry spokesman
Ehud Gol denounced the attack
and revealed that Egyptian
Charge d'Affaires Mohammed
Bassiouni has expressed his shock
and condemnation on Israel Army
Radio.
He said that Egypt's Foreign
Minister Esmat Abdul-Meguid has
sent a message of condolence to
Foreign Minister Yitzhak Shamir.
"We are shocked, and we grieve
at the death of the Cairo Embassy
employee (Atrakchi) who served
as an administration officer," Gol
said in a statement read on Israel
Army Radio.
"The Foreign Ministry is in
close touch with the Egyptian
authorities, and we know that
they are doing their best in con- N
nection with this deplorable
assassination," Gol declared.
Bassiouni was quoted as declar-
ing that "Egypt condemns and op-
poses any such acts of violence.
The Charge d'Affaires is the
highest-ranking Egyptian
representative now in Israel since
President Hosni Mubarak
withdrew his government's Am-
Continned on Page 7


Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach Copnty/Friday, August 30, 1985
Apartheid Agony
Seizes Us All
The apartheid agony in South Africa is
finally seizing us all. Unfortunately, the
seizures seem to be heavily tainted by per-
sonal political considerations. The amalgam
purports to be the humiliation of South
Africa's blacks against which the multitudes
now speaking out in their behalf extol the
right of all mankind to freedom and equality.
But the amalgam is tainted. The principle
is not clearly enunciated. What emerges is a
Tower of Babel, a cacophony of voices
shaped by national interest.
The Reagan Administration's bitter disap-
pointment with the Botha speech of last
week is on its face admirable. The Presi-
dent's quiet urging that Mr. Botha be more
forthcoming with respect to the one-man.
one vote struggle in South Africa is no less
so. But Mr. Botha has already said that
anyone who thinks South Africa will ever ac-
cept one man, one vote rule as that country's
political future is absurd.
Then why does the Administration press
the issue? Not for the dear political principle
invovled let alone the humanitarian con-
sideration but because of the cheap
backstage fear of those in the Congress who
are demanding that economic sanctions be
brought to bear upon South Africa until the
Botha regime submits.
Our Poor Motivation
The number and strength of those calling
for sanctions rise daily. Should they carry
the day, the damage to our own country
could well be greater than to Botha's mi-
nions. At least, that is how the Reaganites
perceive the apartheid struggle at this time.
American pragmatism may well argue
that the reasoning behind good intentions is
less significant than the intentions
themselves. Whatever it is that motivates
the Administration's pressure on Mr. Botha
to be more forthcoming, what does it mat-
ter, so long as in the endbe accede and does;-.-..
so? .... .-.;.-.-.
The answer to why it does matter may lie
in a better example of the significance of
motivation so far as end results are concern- -
ed. Consider the Rev. Jesse Jackson.
Speaking out the other day on apartheid
and the Rev. Jerry Falwel's visit with Presi-
dent Botha in Johannesburg last week,
Jackson remarked that "Anyone who would
choose Botha over (Nobel Laureate Bishop
Desmond) Tutu would choose Bull Conner
over Martin Luther King, would choose
Hitler over the Jews, would choose Herod
over Jesus, and would choose Pharaoh over
Moses."
It is not surprising that Rev. Jackson's
analogy should contain three references out
of four to Jews or things Jewish. As a Chris-
tian minister, for whom the Bible and its
history are central to the sensibility of his
faith, how could it be otherwise?
Resolution Far Off
But in constructing his analogy, whose
purpose was to place into his own perspec-
tive Rev. Falwelrs support of Mr. Botha and
to criticize Falwell's charge that Bishop
Tutu is a "phony," Rev. Jackson seems to
have forgotten his own "Hymie" and
"Hymietown" remarks about Jews during
his 1984 campaign for the presidency.
Even more, Rev. Jackson seems to remain
blind even today to the significance of his
unshakeable friendship with the viciously
anti-Semitic Black Muslim leader, Louis
Farrakhan.
There can be no questioning of Rev.
Jackson's fondest hopes so far as apartheid
in South Africa is concerned. But the intent
of his analogy is a deeply personal one that
betrays his own innermost, twisted needs.
Needs that have nothing to do with apar-
theid or South Africa. Needs that expose the
sense of his own bigotry and that in the end
must cast suspicious light on the high prin-
ciples of freedom for all mankind he pur-
ports to hold dear.
Understood in these terms, those who
speak out so loudly against apartheid today,
including our own government, have voices
that are cracked by their own deepest self-
interest and that bode ill for a genuine
resolution of the South African agony any
time soon.
NEW
CONSEJ^ATNeaSp^
&,
Morse Geriatric Center Residents Interviewed:
Bena Perry and Sam Goldie
the
Jewish floridian
ol Palm Beach Count,
USPSOS9030
ComfMning Our Voice and Federation Reporter
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Published WtMl, Oc.ooe. through M.d Ma, B. Weei oaiaTCeirJeaT^ Coordina.o.
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Era*. H Blonder. v,ce Pr..,dent, Alec Engai.ta.n. Arnold L Lampert Murr., M Goodman i?7n
IS&JSSSS&^lB'S^VS&lS*** s*n. ma,.,',,, .0^^,*,!"
Director- ot Public Relations. 501 South Fleet* Or. Wast Palm Beach. FL 33401
guarantee Kasnrutn oi Merchandise Advertised
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SUBSCRIPTION RATES Local U Annual |2 Yea- M,nunum JJ- 501 ", oVrViemrJe'sn,p Mmm
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Friday. August 30, 1985
Vvlume 11
13ELUL5745
Number 26
Continued from Page 3
speaking woman wno "seems
to be very happy there," accor-
ding to Bena.
In summing up her life at the
Center, Bena said, "The peo-
ple here have been very nice. I
don't know what else they
could do for us."
Before coming to the Morse
Geriatric Center, Sam Goldie
lived at the same West Palm
Beach address for 30 years.
Prior to that, however, he had
varied- experiences in many
different places. Born in Lon-
don at the turn of the century,
Sam came to East Boston in
1915 and then moved to Lynn,
where his sister and brother-
in-law lived. While working for
General Electric, Sam
repaired machine guns for the
Royal Air Force of Canada
during World War I.
Going without food for two
days while looking for work
during the Depression, Sam
finally ended up in the dry-
cleaning business, eventually
owning his own store in Quin-
cy. In the process Sam got
married, and his wife, an ex-
cellent seamstress, did some
dress-making and tailoring.
In 1954 Sam and his wife
moved to Florida with plans to
retire. But, as Sam says, "I
got ants in my pants, and
before long he was collecting
accounts for Allied Van Lines
and running a fur storage
operation.
Then one day while Sam was
getting a haircut, his heart
acted up. "I was sitting on the
chair and my barber friend
turned away and I passed out
and fell off the seat. I got all
banged up. He called the para-
medics, and when they ex-
amined me they said my heart-
beat was irregular. My doctor
told me I had to have a
pacemaker installed. Since
then my heart's been good and
regular," he said.
Meanwhile, Sam's wife had
gotten a job as a fitter in a
Worth Avenue dress shop, but
three and a half years ago she
suffered a stroke. "I had my
work cut out for me,"
remembered Sam, who initial-
ly tried to take care of his wife
himself. The strain on him
grew, however, and he was
grateful for the help he subse-
quently received from visiting
nurses, therapists and the
Meals-On-Wheels program.
Nevertheless, the doctor
warned Sam that the strain on
his physical and emotional
faculties might lead to further
trouble, so "against my will,"
Sam said, "I decided the best
thing for me to do was to put
my wife in a home. I used to
visit her every day around sup-
pertime, but she wasn't very
happy there."
After only two and a half
weeks in the home, Sam's wife
was rushed to the hospital, and
ten minutes later, when Sam
arrived, her heart had stopped
and she wasn't breathing. Sam
remembered. "They wanted to
know if I'd give them permis-
sion to work on her to try and
bring her back. And I said no. I
spoke with my in-laws and we
all agreed that it was best that
she passed away. She had told
me repeatedly, 'Sam, I hope
when I go to sleep tonight that
I won't wake up in the morn-
ing.' She was always concern-
ed that she was a burden on
me. She was such a wonderul
wife to me. She never
complained."
Sam expressed gratitude to
Shirley Campbell at Morse and
to Eugene Topper man at
Jewish Family and Children's
Service for their help in pro-
curing him a bed at the Center.
"It's a vast difference from
your own home, but they tell
me that this is by far the best
home around, and I've seen
some and I believe it," Sam
said.
Sam appreciates the quality
medical, dental and nursing
care provided at Morse, but he
tries to take care of himself as
much as possible. "I came here
to rest up," Sam explained.
"I'm a very stubborn guy, and
I'm determined not to be too
dependent on anyone."
Sam said that the volunteers
are "very nice," and although
he often keeps to himself, he
spoke fondly of fellow resident
Sussman Lipshitz, "a
remarkable man," who has im-
pressed Sam with his
knowledge, .of Hebrew, and
Torah.
Like Bena Perry, Sam's
religious life has been re-
juvenated at Morse. Although
his parents were Orthodox and
he went to Hebrew school in
London, it has been about 60
years since Sam has been
"religious." "Now, it's a dif-
ferent story," said Sam, who
enjoys the honor of being call-
ed for an aliyah every other
week at Sabbath services. "A
knowledge of Hebrew and
Israel is important," Sam now
realizes.
The Morse Geriatric Center
of the Jewish Home for the
Elderly gives elderly people
with health problems a unique
opportunity to socialize,
engage in constructive ac-
tivities, and, most important-
ly, to continue tapping the
educational and spiritual
resources of Judaism. Rather
than being a terminus, this
home for the elderly
represents, for many of the
residents, a new beginning.
fj Radio/TV/ Film
MOSAIC Sunday, August 30 and September 6, 9
a.m. Channel 5 with host Barbara Gordon.
L'CHAYIM Sunday, August 30, 7:30 a.m. WPBR
1340-AM with host Rabbi Mark S. Golub The Jewish
Listener's Digest, a radio magazine.
SHALOM Sunday, August 30 and September 6,6 a.m.
- WPEC Channel 12 (11:30 a.m. WDZL TV 39) with
host Richard Peritz.
ISRAELI PRESS RIVIEW Thursday, September 5
and 12, 1:15 p.m. WLIZ 1380-AM Summary of news and
commentary on contemporary issues.
' Sponsored by the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
' "ty.


Friday, August 30, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach Comity Page 5
New President of County Board of Rabbis

Community
Calendar
September 1
Golden Lakes Temple Sisterhood board 10 a.m. Jewish
War Veterans No. 501 9:30 a.m. American Red Magen
David for Israel Netanya Chapter Miami Beach through
Sept. 4 Temple Beth David Men's Club beach party
September 2
Congregation Anshei Sholom Sisterhood board 9:45 a.m.
Women's American ORT Okeechobee Women's
American ORT Mid Palm board 1 p.m.
September 3
Congregation Anshei Sholom Men's Club board 9:30 a.m.
Temple Beth David board 8 p.m. Hadassah Bat
Gurion board 9:30 a.m. B'nai B'rith Women Mitzvah
Council 7:30 p.m. Jewish Community Center preschool
begins 9 a.m. Jewish Federation Chaplains Aide
Meeting 2 p.m.
September 4
Jewish Federation Women's Division Business and
Professional Meeting, 6 p.m. Women's American ORT -
Golden Rivers board 1 p.m. Hadassah Bat Gurion -
10:30 a.m. Jewish Federation Women's Division -
Jewish Women's Assembly Committee Meeting, 10 a.m.
Temple Beth Sholom Men's Club board 9 a.m.
Hadassah Shalom 12:30 p.m. Jewish Community
Center board 8 p.m.
September 5
Hadassah Yovel board 9:30 a.m. B'nai B'rith No. 2939
- board 1 p.m. National Council of Jewish Women -
Okeechobee Unit board 10 a.m. Temple Beth Zion
Sisterhood board National Council of Jewish Women -
Evening board 7:30 p.m. B'nai B'rith Women Ohav -
12 noon Hadassah Golda Meir board 10 a.m.
Hadassah Aliya board 10 a.m.
September 8
Hadassah Tamar board 9:45 a.m. Congregation An-
shei Sholom Men's Club 9:30 a.m. B'nai B'rith No. 3196 -
picnic Temple Beth David Hebrew school opens 9 a.m.
Lake Worth Jewish Center reception for new Rabbi
September 9
Jewish Federation Women's Division Outreach Coffee -
10 a.m. Hadassah Tikvah board 1 p.m. American
Red Magen David for Israel Natanya Chapter board 1
p.m. Women's American ORT Lakes of Poinciana -
12:30 p.m. Women's American ORT Palm Beach board
- 9:45 a.m. Temple Emanu-El Sisterhood board 9:45
a.m. Hadassah Henrietta Szold 1 p.m. Women's
American ORT Poinciana board 1 p.m. Jewish Com-
munity Center Parent/Toddler begins 9 a.m. Jewish
Community Day School 7:45 p.m. B'nai B'rith Women -
Boynton Beach noon
September 10
Jewish Federation Leadership Committee 8 p.m.
Temple Beth Zion hoard 7:30 p.m. Hadassah Lee
Vassil noon Pioneer Women Ezrat 12:30 p.m. B'nai
B'rith No. 2939 7:30 p.m. Temple B'nai Jacob
Sisterhood board 10:30 a.m. B'nai B'rith Women -
Masada board 7 p.m. B'nai B'rith Women Ohav -
board 9:30 a.m. Jewish Federation Education Com-
mittee Meeting, 8 p.m. Women's American ORT West
Palm Beach 1 p.m. Hadassah Henrietta Szold board -
1 p.m.
September 11
National Council of Jewish Women Palm Beach -10 a.m.
Congregation Anshei Sholom board 1 p.m. Brandeis
University Women Lake Worth board 9:30 a.m. Tem-
ple Beth El Men's Club board 8 p.m. Jewish Federa-
tion "Midrasha" Open House and Registration 7 p.m.
B nai B'rith Women Olam board -10 a.m. Lake Worth
Jewish Center board 7:30 p.m. Women's American
ORT Willow Bend Meed board 10 a.m. Hadassah -
West Boynton board 9:30 a.m.
September 12
Golden Lakes Temple board -10 a.m. Hadassah Yovel -
noon Temple Beth Zion Sisterhood B'nai B'rith No.
J196 Temple Beth David Sisterhood board 8 p.m.
Hadassah Shalom board 1 p.m. Hadassah Aliya 1
P-m- Women's American ORT Poinciana canasta tour-
nament n am. Jewish Federation Leadership
"eyelopment Parlor Meeting, 8 p.m. Pioneer Women -
Na Amat Council 10 a.m.
Fr more information on the above meetings
Jeu>tsh Federation office 832-2120.
call the
Last May Rabbi William
Marder of Temple Beth David
was installed as the new presi-
dent of the Palm Beach Coun-
ty Board of Rabbis, succeeding
Rabbi Joel Chazin of Temple
Emanu-El, whose two-year
term ended in April.
Consisting of 20 active,
retired and non-pulpit rabbis
from Jupiter-Tequesta to
Boynton Beach, the board of
rabbis represents the rab-
binate at community events
and provides a spiritual and
consultative resource for the
entire Jewish community.
Since the board of rabbis is
closely involved with the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County and the Jewish
Community Day School, pro-
ductive working relationships
between the rabbinate and the
community at large are
maintained.
Rabbi Marder, who received
a BA from Harvard and was
ordained at the Jewish
Theological Seminary of
America, pointed out that the
board of rabbis was instrumen-
tal in creating the Single
Parent Committee of the
Jewish Federation, which is
chaired by board member Rab-
bi Howard Shapiro.
The Board of Rabbis also
Rabbi William Marder
sponsored the highly-
successful Conversion In-
stitute, which coordinated
community efforts in assisting
people who wished to "choose
Judaism." Board members sit
on the Bet Din (Jewish court)
to interview conversion
candidates.
Rabbi Marder hopes that
this year the board will issue
"position papers" on impor-
tant topics in order to inform
and challenge the local Jewish
community. "We would really
like to deepen our com-
munity's insights into
Judaism," he said.
Rabbi Marder would also like
to see the board become more
involved in community-wide
education. Noting that last
year the board of rabbis co-
sponsored a colloquium with
Rabbi Dr. Irving Greenberg of
the National Jewish Resource
Center, Rabbi Marder said he
hopes to bring visiting scholars
into the community and
establish open forums in which
guests can meet with area rab-
bis and Jewish professionals.
This year, for the first time,
the Board of Rabbis has
established a Resolutions Com-
mittee, presently consisting of
Rabbi Melvin Keefer and Rab-
bi Alan Sherman, Chaplain
and Community Relations
Director for the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County. The committee will be
responsible for making recom-
mendations which will be
presented to the overall body
for votes.
Other officers serving on
this year's Palm Beach County
Board of Rabbis are Rabbi
Howard Shapiro, first vice-
president; Rabbi Steven
Westman, second vice-
president; Rabbi Ed Kohn,
secretary; and Rabbi Isaac
Vander Walde, treasurer.
Sam learned about
The GUARDIAN PLAN, program and
changed his mind about
buying cemetery property in Florida.
Like your family. Sam's family also had strong traditions. One of those was
burial in the family cemetery property in New York. But now that he and his wife
have retired to Florida, he was led to believe that his family tradition was no
longer practical, even though he would prefer to have funeral services back
home. Sam was worried about the emotional burden on his family And frankly,
he was worried about the cost.
Then a friend told him about The GUARDIAN PLAN, insurance funded
prearranged funeral program.' Here are the facts Sam got.
He learned he could have funeral services in New York at a very reasonable
price. He learned he could arrange all the details in advance and set the price
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program would guarantee the amount would never increase. He also learned he
could select RIVERSIDE or one of the other guardian family of lewish funeral
directors including BOULEVARD PARK-WEST. SCHWARTZ BROTHERS or
IEFFER who honor The GUARDIAN PLAN program in Florida and in New York
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SVOOO 00 shall be funded through a trust established in accordance with Chapter 639. Fla Stats


Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, August 30, 1985
Update/Opinion
By TOBY F. WILK
Parliamentary wives from
14 countries met in London in
an international conference
highlighting the plight of
Soviet Jewry. The seminar in-
cluded Prime Minister That-
cher, who reiterated her
government's determination
to ensure that human rights
continue to figure in the East-
West agenda until the Soviet
Union lives up to its interna-
tional commitments. Although
the wife of Soviet leader Gor-
bachev was invited to this con-
ference, no response was
received from her.
Farmers can lose up to 40
percent of stored crop to in-
sects over a year. This
depressing fact plus millions of
starving in Africa motivated
Israeli scientists, who com-
pleted experiments pointing to
a safe and inexpensive way to
keep pests out of grain. They
found that the best natural
storehouses for grain could
prove to be the world's poorest
and driest regions such as
Ethiopia. This could have pro-
found implications in the
global battle against Third
World starvation.
Steve Emerson's new book
The American House of Saud,
received rave reviews. It deals
with Saudi Arabia's influential
American corporate sup-
porters cultivated through the
allure of petro-dollars, who
have changed American
foreign policy, manipulated
the American public and
generated an impact in many
ways on American society.
To develop better public
understanding of Israel as a
free and democratic society,
and of its important contribu-
tions to the defense of the free
world in the volatile Mid-East,
the American Jewish Congress
has initiated the Hasbara Pro-
ject. Hasbara is a Hebrew
word meaning public informa-
tion. This program brings
Israeli diplomatic, executive
and defense officials to the
U.S. and trains them under the
supervision of leading U.S.
public relations firms.
Israel's Biblical Landscape
Reserve is a new and unique
living museum of fabled flora
that figures in the Bible and
New Testament. Visitors can
see, feel and smell what the Bi-
ble is talking about. An exam-
ple is branches of the Moriah
bush which biblical scholars
believe was Bezelel's inspira-
tion when creating the seven-
branched Menorah. Also in-
cluded is "The Dale of the
Song of Songs" with flowers,
shrubs and trees mentioned in
that highly poetic book.
A kibbutz on the Golan
Heights is getting clean water
from the sun. Dirty water is
purified by solar energy using
a system designed by Israeli
scientists to rid the water of
the dreaded E-coli bacteria.
Half the world's population
suffers from infectious condi-
tions caused by this bacteria in
contaminated water in the
Third World countries. If the
Israeli scientists can interest
the UN in covering the cost of
the system, E-coli could be
brought under control.
The ultra-religious in Israel
are fanatically opposed to
Statehood, and the fanatic
anti-religionists would erase
Israel's Jewish character. This
could lead to two Israels: one
secular and one religious
caught in a combat that can
have no winner. "Gesher" is
an organization which seeks
through education to build a
bridge of understanding bet-
ween the two.
An oil exploration group
belonging to oil magnate Ar-
mand Hammer will invest
some $19 million in the search
for oil in the Negev.
The first synagogue at any
European airport has been
dedicated at Brussels Interna-
tional Airport. It is located
near the Catholic and Protes-
tant chapels and symbolizes
Belgium's respect for freedom
of religion.
STATE OF
ISRAEL BONDS
BOUGHT AND SOLD
Invest in
Israel Securities

WERE SPECIALISTS IN
ISRAEL SECURITIES
*
TRANSACTIONS DAILY VIA TELEX
TO ISRAEL STOCK EXCHANGE
Leumi
I Sum. l|rMl S M
NASD
18 East 48th Street
New York. NY 10017
MCUmiS (212)759-1310
itiOfl Toll Free (800) 221 48381
Mathematician and
refusenik Dr. Victor
Brailowsky has been awarded
an honorary doctorate by the
Milton Keynes-based Open
University. But he is forbidden
permission to travel from
Moscow to Britain to receive
the degree. The University is
considering awarding the
degree to him in absentia
the first time the University
has taken such a step.
Prime Minister Margaret
Thatcher made a resounding
declaration against terrorism
when she appeared before the
American Bar Association
meeting recently in London.
Yet she and her government
continue putting their seal of
approval on documents enforc-
ing the Arab boycott of Israel.
They make sure goods being
supplied contain no component
of Israeli origin, or that the
companies involved in a sale do
not appear on the Arab
boycott blacklist or that the
company has no kind of trade
relations with Israel. This per-
nicious practice discriminates
against a friendly nation that
is a major trading partner of
the United Kingdom.
Twenty members of the
Italian Jewish Youth Federa-
tion were among the
200-strong Italian delegation
attending the World Youth
Festival in Moscow.
Local Leaders Elected ADlJ
Honorary Life Members
Announcement of the ela-
tion was made by Kenneth I
Bialkin, ADl/s nSn j
chairman. '
The National Commission
serves as the policy^
body of the agency which w*
founded in 1913 "to stop the
defamation of the Jewish peo-
pie ... to secure justice and
fair treatment to all citizen*
alike."
Morton Yulman and Irving
Kaufman of the Palm Beach
Regional Anti-Defamation
League Board were elected
Honorary Life members of the
National Commission of the
Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith during ADL's an-
nual National Commission
meeting held at the Grand
Hyatt hotel in New York, June
5-9.
WANTED:
Social And
Recreational
Director.
We need a real professional
willing to relocate to South
Florida. A self-starter with
experience in planning &
implementing social,
recreational & enter-
tainment activities and
events for large residential communities.
Must be able to handle administrative details.
Terrific benefits.
Write: A. Krieff, 3854 Sheridan St., Hollywood. FL 33021 I
All replies will be kept in strict confidence
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New Programs Mark Opening
Of Midrasha For 1985
Friday, August 30, 1985/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 7
The Midrasha Judaica High
School will open its doors for
the new school year with an
open house for all students and
parents on Wednesday even-
ing, Sept. 11. Students and
parents will hear about the
new and exciting programs
which will begin with the first
night of classes on Sept. 18.
An outstanding new feature
of Midrasha is that it will now
encompass grades 8 to 12. In
previous years the Midrasha
ran from grades 9 through 12.
The addition of the eighth
grade is a direct result of the
model program run last year
by the Education Directors of
three local synagogues. Open
to all students, the Machon
program was funded and coor-
dinated by Temple Israel,
Temple Beth David and Tem-
ple Beth El. This pilot pro-
gram provided post Bar/Bat
Mitzvan students with the op-
portunity to socialize and learn
together. This will now be for-
mally a part of the Midrasha
and students will hopefully
develop the practice of atten-
ding Midrasha throughout
their high school years. Dr.
Paul Klein, chairman of the
Midrasha Committee stated,
"We are very excited about
this new program and know it
will provide an added dimen-
sion to the Midrasha. The
students will benefit from a
community wide eighth grade
and it will enable us to assist
the synagogues in delivering
quality Jewish education to
our youth." Another new
dimension of Midrasha is that
it will run- (tfr .fffi/r 'periods
rather than the three offered
in previous years. This will
allow more flexibility for
students who can choose to at-
tend periods 1, 2 and 3 (6
p.m.X:40 p.m.) or periods 2, 3
and 4 (6:55 p.m. to 9:35 p.m.).
"Anyone wishing to take
classes in all four periods is
mure than welcome," stated
Ms Lipton, Director of
Midrasha.
Some of the new courses be-
ing offered this year include
The Jewish Skills Workshop, a
course in practical skills of
Jewish living; Jewish arts and
crafts, a course which will not
only study great Jewish works
of art and art forms, but give
students the opportunity to ex-
press their Jewish identity
through art; Life is Precious, a
course on bio-medical ethics
and how it relates to Halacha;
Mission to Israel, a course for
students who plan to study and
travel in Israel next summer;
To give and to receive: prac-
tical Tsedakah, a course
designed to study the sources
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and meanings of Tsedakah and
to provide an opportuni-
ty for students to get involved
in community projects, and ap-
ply Tsedakah to daily life.
Along with the new courses
there are many which are of-
fered every semester such
as Hebrew, Bible, Jewish
Values, Holocaust, com-
parative religions, drama, etc.
Returning on the staff of
Midrasha will be Mark Mendel,
Skip Paille, Miriam
Emihovich, Rachel Stein and
Yaacov Sassi. New additions
include Ronni Epstein, Kari
Bower, Julie Cooke, Perry
Schafler and Ayala Rosen. In
addition guest instructors will
join the staff for special
courses. Included in this
special course area are Dr.
Norma Schulman and Dr.
Steve Roth, both practicing
clinical psychologists, and
several Rabbis from the com-
munity, including Rabbi Joel
Levine, Rabbi Steve Westman
and Rabbi Howard Shapiro. In
addition to formal classroom
study, there are several ex-
citing informal learning ac-
tivities planned which in-
clude a social element.
These include a Succoth din-
ner, a Purim Costume Ball, a;
Shabbat retreat, Israel night,
college night and much more.
All Jewish teens, grades 8
through 12 are encouraged to
attend. The registration for
tuition and books is $100 for
the entire year. Nathan
Kosowski, chairman of the
Jewish Education Committee
stated, "The atmosphere at
Midrasha is infused with ex-
citement. The students care
about each other, and the staff
are friends as well as teachers
to their students. It is a very
exciting place to be on
Wednesday evenings."
For further information call
the Jewish Education Depart-
ment of the Jewish Federation
of Palm Beach County,
655-7706.
Israeli Dipolmat
Continued from Page 3
bassador to Israel following the Israe) now that Israei
June, 1982 launching of the Begin withdrawn from Lebanon.
Government s Operation Peace
for Galilee military campaign in
Lebanon.
has
EGYPTIAN officials are said to
Assam Maghed, an official of
the Egyptian Embassy, told
reporters in Tel Aviv that Cairo
believes that the attack on
believe that the assassination of Atrakchi was launched by guer-
Atrakchi was aimed at sabotaging ri|las who oppose peace between
President Mubarak's recent
moves to improve relations with
Israel and Egypt.

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HIGH HOLY DAY SERVICES
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TEMPLE EMANU-EL
IN PALM BEACH
Rosh Hashanah Sept. 15,16,17
Yom Kippur Sept. 24 and 25
Services Conducted by:
Rabbi Joel Chazin
and
Cantor David Dardashti
Temple Emanu-EI is a Conservative Synagogue
i and invites the unaffiliated of
the Palm Beaches to join it in membership
and worship.
FOR INFORMATION REGARDING
TICKETS OR MEMBERSHIP
Please Phone: 832-0804,9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Write: 190 N. County Rd., Palm Beach, Fl. 33480
RICHARD A. LYNN, M.D., President
IMMEDIATE POSITION AVAILABLE
Staff Associate
Full-time position as assistant to Director of Develop-
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Public Relations and/or Marketing experience
preferred. Potential for career growth and advancement.
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Att: Director of Development & Public Relations.
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Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, August 30, 1985
Organizations
AMERICAN RED MAGEN DAVID FOR ISRAEL
The Boynton Beach Chapter will meet Thursday, Sept.
12, 10 a.m. at the Royal Palm Clubhouse, 22nd Ave. Boyn-
ton Beach.
Future programs for the year will be formulated. The
Boynton Beach Chapter will meet each second Thursday of
each month at the same place, same time.
Members and guests are invited. No charge.
Dr. Joseph Nower of Century Village recently presented
a fully equipped, emergency ambulance to the American
Red Magen David for Israel for use by Magen David Adorn
in Israel.
The ambulance being sent to Israel for Magen David
Adorn, Israel's Emergency Medical. Ambulance, Blood and
Disaster Service, is dedicated in Memory to his late wife
Dr. Leah E. Nower.
AMIT WOMEN
Rishona Chapter is planning a weekend at the Tarleton
Hotel, Miami Beach on Oct. 25-28.
B'NAI B'RITH WOMEN
Maaada Chapter is happy to announce the following
programs:
October 2nd: "Ain't Misbehavin" at Burt Reynolds
Theatre Wednesday Matinee and lunch.
November 7th: Thursday Luncheon and Card Party at
the Sherbrooke Country Club.
December 18th: Wednesday, "Man of La Mancha" Burt
Reynolds Theatre Luncheon and Matinee.
New Years Weekend being planned More details at a
later date. Contact Fran Chodash for information.
HADASSAH
Aliya Lake Worth Chapter will hold its first meeting of
the fall season on Sept. 12 at 1 p.m., at the Sunrise Meeting
Room, 4645 Gun Club Road West (next to Winn-Dixie).
Guest speaker will be Jim Edwards, director of the News
Bureau of Radio Station WJNO. Mr. Edwards has had an
interesting career in Naval Intelligence and broadcasting,
joining WJNO in November 1984.
Reservations are still available for the two three-day two-
night deluxe trips Aliya is sponsoring and can be made at
this meeting. The Thanksgiving trip features Cypress
Gardens and a tour of St. Augustine; the New Year's trip is
to Clearwater, Busch Gardens, and Tarpon Springs both
with many extras in the way of food and entertainment.
Lee Vaasil Chapter will hold its first meeting on Tues-
day, Sept. 10, at Temple Beth Sholom, 315 "A" Street, at
12:30 p.m. Note: There will be a Board Meeting at 10 a.m.
same date at the Sunrise Bank. Bring a dairy sandwich.
The program for the afternoon, "Sharing Thoughts and
Feelings" is by audience participation, and will give our
members a chance to know each other a little better.
On October 16 there will be a Membership Tea at the
home of Vivian Stone. Anyone interested in joining contact
Esther Marx or Matty Makow.
Refreshments will be served. Come out and see your
friends after the summer vacation.
Shalom West Pain Beach invites members and friends
to the opening membership meeting on Wednesday, Sept.
4, 12:30 p.m. at Congregation Anshei Sholom. Jeanette
Greenberg, a member of the presidium, will report on the
Hadassah National Convention held in New York in
August.
NATIONAL COUNCIL OF JEWISH WOMEN
NCJW Okeechobee Section, will hold their first general
membership meeting after the summer months, on Thurs-
day, Sept. 19, at the American Bank, Westgate, 12:30 p.m.
The board will meet on Sept. 5, 10 a.m. at the Chase Bak.
NATIONAL JEWISH CIVIL SERVICE
EMPLOYEES, INC.
Sid Levine, president of the South Florida Jewish Civil
Service Employees, a chapter of the National Jewish Civil
Service Employees, Inc., an affiliate of the National Coun-
cil of Jewish Government Employee Organizations, Inc., is
inviting all government or public service employees both
actively employed or retired with any county, city,
township, state, village, or federal agency together with
their spouses to attend the chapter's first meeting after the
summer recess on Sunday, Sept. 8 at 1 p.m. at the Sunrise
Vacation and Travel Service, Inc. meeting room, 4645 Gun
Club Road Gun Club Shopping Center West Palm
Beach, (off Military Trail, between Summit and Southern
Boulevards).
Dee Figueroa, manager, Sunrise Vacation and Travel
Service, Inc., will be presenting a film and talk on the Dec.
14 week cruise on the Norwegian Caribbean Lines M/S
starward which will include Jamaica's Ocho Rios, Grand
* Continued on Pace U
BUYING RARE COINS
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Friday, August 30
Saturday, August 31
8:15 P.M.
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At THE JEWISH COMMUNITY DAY SCHOOL "MERKAZ'
5801 Parker Avenue West Palm Beach
High Holy Day Services will be held at the Royal Poinciana Puryhouee^alrri Beach
Non-member guest tickets are available at an affordable price. Phone: 478-2922
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Friday^ August 30, 1985/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 9
1


Page 10 The Jewish Florfcfian of Palm Beach County/Friday, August 30, 1985
Separation 'Subversion9
17
Continued from Page 1
beguiled judges, the instrument
for nothing less than a kind of
ghettoizing of religion."
MEESE, meanwhile, in
remarks to the same group earlier
in the day, did not mention
specifically the court's decisions,
described as severe setbacks for
the Administration and its
policies. He did suggest that
religious freedom in American
society had been threatened by
the court.
"In its application, the principle
of neutrality toward all religions
has been transformed by some in-
to hostility toward anything that
is religious," he said. "In order to
protect the religious liberty of the
American people, this Ad-
ministration has argued against
the idea of religious nihilism as a
principle of government."
Theodore Mann, president of
the AJC, said it regretted the
statements by Meese and Ben-
nett, and hailed the court's affir-
mation of church-state separation.
The AJC, Mann asserted, remains
convinced that efforts to inject
either the Jewish or Protestant or
Catholic religious values into the
school will not only deeply offend
the numerous other religious
groups but will convert our
schools and communities into
religious battlegrounds."
THE AJC said that while it sup-
ported the right of religious
schools to receive publicly-funded
remedial education, it did so only
as long as it takes place off the
premises of religious schools.
Local chapters of the AJC are cur-
rently engaged in efforts to aid
local school districts to restruc-
ture programs invalidated by the
court so remedial aid "can be pro-
vided religious school students in
a Constitutional manner."
Bonn Police
Hit Rightists
BONN (JTA) Police have
arrested three rightwing ex-
tremists who menaced people
demonstrating against the
meeting in the Bavarian town of
Passau of the German Peoples
Union (DVU), the largest neo-
Nazi organization in West Ger-
many, or who resorted to violence
there. They also confiscated a
number of weapons.
Some 1,500 persons took part in
the meeting in Passau, which
discussed the situation of the neo-
Nazi movement in this country.
The 15,000-member DVU is head-
ed by Gerhard Frey, the publisher
of the National Zeitung of Munich.
Wally Hickman
Auto Service
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Take finding the right doctor
into your own hands.
It's up to you to find the right
doctor for your family.
So where do you begin?
Do you take recommendations
from friends or neighbors?
The doctor your friends or
neighbors recommend might suit
them just fine, but it doesn t neces-
sarily mean he's the doctor for you.
Do you page through the phone
book? Or do you drop in on the
nearest doctor?
How do you know you're getting
the right doctor if you only have his
name to base your decision on.
And just because a doctor is
located near you doesn't make
him the right doctor for you and
your family.
Unfortunately, none of these
methods is a foolproof way of
finding the right aoctor for you
and your family.
The Physician Referral Center at
JFK Hospital is a sure way of finding
a personal physician quickly and
conveniently. At absolutely no
charge to you.
Finding your own personal
physician isn't something you
want to take chances with. Because
chances are you're going to end up
with the wrong doctor.
That's why the Physician Referral
Center at JFK Hospital is the right
choice for you.
Whether you've lived here a
long time, have just moved in, or
are visiting for a short time, the
Physician Referral Center at JFK
Hospital can find the right doctor
for your family.
By spending a few minutes on the
'///,



,
*r?-
r
305
1
H.
V
phone with one of our counselors, for you. All you need to do is make personal physician for vour familv
call the Physician Referral Center
at JFK Hospital today.
Take finding the right doctor into
your own hands, because your
family's good health for today and
tomorrow is in your hands.
we can put you in touch with a
"doctor that's compatible with your
families' particular needs. And
one that's convenient for the
whole family.
the call.
Maintaining .good health for
you and your family has never
been easier
So if you don't already have a
JFK Hospital
The Future of Health Care is Here]
4800 South Congress Avenue
Adantis, Florida 33462
We even set up the appointment doctor, and you're looking for a
The Physician Referral Center
at JFK Hospital Call 433-3634.


[Organizations
Continued from Page 8-
Cayman and Mexico's Cozumel, plus much more.
The guest speaker for the meeting will be Pat Schultz,
rN who will speak on nutrition as related to blood
pressure, coronary ailments, diabetes, hypertension, etc.
Mrs. Schultz has been associated with various hospitals and
senior citizen nursing homes as a charge nurse. Mrs.
Schultz has consented to do blood pressure reading for any
of our members or guests at the conclusion of the meeting:
there will be a question and answer period at the conclusion
0f her talk.
Collation will be served prior to the meeting at 12 noon.
Members Guests Friends are invited and welcome to
attend! -------
The chapter is sponsoring a fun filled Thanksgiving
weekend, commencing Thursday, Nov. 28 for four days and
three nights via deluxe motorcoach tour to the West Coast,
Tampa area, including a one day cruise from Tampa on the
Sea Escape.
WOMEN'S AMERICAN ORT
West Palm Chapter, will hold its first meeting of the
season on Tuesday, Sept. 10 at 12:30 p.m. at the Clubhouse
in Century Village.
A bus trip to Ocean World in Fort Lauderdale, has been
arranged for Oct. 16. Call Ann Sporn for information and
reservations.
Our Flea Market will take place on Friday, Nov. 15.
Please save all saleable items, household goods, electrical
appliances, bric-a-brac, etc. Call Ann Cohen for pick-up and
information.
A board meeting of Royal Chapter, will be held
on Monday, Sept. 9, at the village hall at 12:30 p.m. This
will be the opening meeting, and programs for the coming
season will be formulated and discussed.
PIONEER WOMEN
Theodore Herzl Club will hold their regular meeting
Thursday. Sept. 5, 1 p.m. at the Lake Worth Shuffleboard
Courts, 1121 Lucerne Avenue, Lake Worth. Slides and
commentary of "Tapestry of Many Colors" will be shown.
Refreshments will be served.
A FREE CAREER COUNSELING WORKSHOP
If you are having problems selecting a vocation, getting
job satisfaction, need a career change or strategies for job
search, then attend the Jewish Family And Children's Ser-
vice Career Workshop held Monday Sept. 9 at 10 a.m. Call
Carol Roth for reservations 684-1991.
Friday, August 30, 1985/The Jewish Florichan of Palm Beach County Page 11
For Holiday Greetings
Call
Staci
588-1652
High Holy Days
Package
Rosh Hashanah Sept 15, 16, 17
Yom Kippur Sept. 24, 25
Deluxe accommodations for 5 nights
8 kosher meals including a sumptuous
break-the-fast buffet of traditional
delicacies prepared under the supervision
of our Mashgiach, Nathan Hershberg
Rabbi Arnold Lasker and Cantor Yehuda
Mandd officiating
Tickets for Rosh Hashanah and Yom
Kippur services
$345 $400
Extended packages available.
All tax and gratuities included.
For reservations call 472-5600
1711 N. University Drive, Plantation, Florida
"of Northern P.B. County"
A Conservative Congregation Serving the needs of all ages
We Cordially Invite You to Join us at Worship
for High Holy Day Services
Colonnades BeachHotel... Singer Island
For Tickets, Membership, Religious & Pre-School Info.
Call Temple Office: 694-2350
Child Care Available
Rabbi W. Marder
Cantor E. Rackoff
Religious School of
190 North County Road
Palm Beach, Florida 33480
For Information Call 832-0804 9:00 a.m. 3:30 p.m.
* Individual attention in small classes
Close involvement of parents and Rabbi
Dedicated professional teachers
United Synagogue Curriculum
Full Bar/Bat Mitzvah program
RICHARD A. LYNN, M.D.
President
JOEL CHAZIN
Rabbi
i w i aeg
Wednesday and Sunday classes
A warm, caring environment
designed to strengthen your
children's Jewish identity
and commitment
JACK ROSENBAUM
Principal
Preston and Nancy Mighdoll,
Emily, Diana, and Samantha invite you to
Join Our Temple Judea Family
High Holy Day Tickets Available
Sabbath Services v
Fridays at 8:00 p.m.
Open House Following Services
August 30 and Sept. 6
St. Catharine's Cultural Center
Southern Blvd. end Flagler Drive
Innovative Religious Services and Creative Programming Largest
Religious School in the Palm Beaches Sisterhood Brotherhood
XYZ Club Singles Groups Youna Couples Club Good Timers Club
Senior and Junior Youth Groups Comprehensive Adult Education
Adult Bar and Bat Mitzvah Class Bar and Bat Mitzvah Rabbinic
Tutoring Confirmation Outreach
Rabbi Joel Levine Cantor Anne Newman Stephen Berger, President
Sheree Friedlander, Educational Director
New Membership Events
August 29, September 11 and 12
471-1526
UAHC Affiliate Cong.


Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, August 30, 1985
Senior News
FROM THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
The Jewish Community Centers Comprehensive
Senior Service Center is a network of services for seniors
designed to encourage and foster growth, independence
and activity for persons in their later years. Varied services
through a Federal Grant Title III of the Older Americans
Act, awarded by Gulfstream Area Agency on Aging,
enhance the everyday lives of older adults throughout the
community.
TRANSPORTATION
Transportation is available
in our designated area for per-
sons 60 years of age or over
who do not use public
transportation. We take peo-
ple to treatment centers, doc-
tors' offices, to hospitals, nurs-
ing homes to visit spouses, to
social service agencies and
nutrition centers. There is no
fee for these services, but par-
ticipants are encouraged to
contribute their fair share.
There is a great demand for
this service, so please make
your reservations in advance.
For information and/or reser-
vations, call 689-7703 Monday
through Friday.
HOT KOSHER
LUNCH CONNECTION
Each weekday, seniors
gather for intimate talk,
educational discussions, game
playing, leisure and song.
These activities are followed
by a hot, kosher, nutritious
lunch served with warmth and
hospitality by our dedicated
volunteers. Join the unique
and enriching Kosher Lunch
Program at the Jewish Com-
munity Center. We offer im-
aginative and innovative ac-
tivities plus stimulating discus-
sions and lively musical
presentations. A delicious
strictly kosher lunch is served.
There is no set fee, but persons
are asked to make a contribu-
tion each meal. Reservations
must be made in advance. Call
689-7703 for information.
MENU FOR THE WEEK OF
SEPTEMBER 3-6
MONDAY: LABOR DAY -
CLOSED.
TUESDAY: Pineapple juice,
chopped steak with brown
gravy, instant potatoes, mixed
vegetables, plums. Italian
bread.
WEDNESDAY: Orange
juice, baked chicken, chopped
broccoli, sliced carrots, fresh
apple, rye bread.
THURSDAY: Grapefruit
juice, gefilte fish with
horseradish, boiled potatoes,
green beans, sliced peaches,
pumpernickle bread.
FRIDAY: Pineapple juice,
baked chicken with ^tomato
sauce, potato kugel, carrot and
pineapple tzimmas, mixed
fruit, challah bread.
MENU FOR THE WEEK OF
SEPTEMBER 9-13
MONDAY: Apple juice,
turkey with giblet gravy,
sweet potato, tiny whole peas,
fresh organge, whole wheat
bread.
TUESDAY: Orange juice,
beef with cabbage sauce, suc-
cotash, carrots, fresh apple,
Italian bread.
WEDNESDAY: Grapefruit
juice, fish filet with lemon,
boiled potato, chopped broc-
coli, sliced pears, rye bread.
THURSDAY: Pineapple
juice, veal patties with pepper
sauce, rice, spinach, fresh
orange, pumpernickle bread.
FRIDAY: Tomato juici, boil-
ed chicken, glazed carrots, zuc-
chini with celery and onions,
cookies, challah bread.
HOME DELIVERED
MEALS
Persons who are homebound
and need a Kosher meal please
call for information. Call Carol
in West Palm Beach at
689-7703.
TRIPS
LIDO SPA HOTEL Sun-
day, Oct. 27 Wednesday Oct.
30.
MEMBERS $140 per per-
son, double occupancy, in-
i eluding gratuities.
NON-MEMBERS $145 per
person, double occupancy, in-
cluding gratuities.
MEMBERS $155 single oc-
cupancy, including occupancy.
NON-MEMBERS $160
single occupancy, including
gratuities.
Make your reservations now
for a fun and health holiday!
Call Nina Stillerman,
689-7703.
NEEDED SPECIAL
VOLUNTEER LEADERS
Retired professionals
Social workers, doctors,
lawyers, teachers, etc. are
needed to lead small groups on
subjects of your expertise. A
great opportunity to share
your knowledge with others.
Please call Nina at 689-7703 to
set up an appointment.
Beginning Sept. 3, the
Kosher Lunch Connection will
have a change in schedule.
Lunch will now be served at
12:30 p.m. Persons must
register in advance for both
lunch and the following pro-
grams. All participants must
be here at noon.
TUESDAY. SEPT. 3 -
Kosher Meal Program 1:15
p.m. Sing-a-Long; "An Hour
of Nostalgia," Lou Mass,
Poetry. Timely Topics 2:15
p.m.
WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 4 -
Kosher Meal Program -1:15
p.m. "Fitness Over Sixty,"
Bea Bunze; "The Great Radio
Comedians Part I" Film.
THURSDAY, SEPT. 5 -
Kosher Meal Program 1:15
p.m. Games. "The Great Radio
Comedians-Part II" Film.
FRIDAY. SEPT. 6 Kosher
Meal Program 1:15 p.m.
"Circle of Love," Harreen
iBertisch Lifetron Blood
! Pressure Screening.
MONDAY, SEPT. 9 -
Kosher Meal Program -1:15
p.m. Games. Speakers Club -
2:30 p.m.
TUESDAY, SEPT. 10
Kosher Meal Program 1:15
p.m. Second Tuesday Activity
- 1:15 p.m. "Music of the
Holidays," Cantor Elaine
Shapiro.
WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 11 -
Kosher Meal Program 1:15
p.m. "Fitness Over Sixty,"
Bea Buze.
THURSDAY, SEPT 12 -
Kosher Meal Program 1:15
p.m. "Exploring the Meaning
of the High Holy Days," Ann
Lipton.
FRIDAY. SEPT. 13 -
Kosher Meal Program 1:15
p.m. Pre-Holiday Program -
Rabbi Alan Sherman.
JCC Singles
SEPTEMBER STARTS
FOR SINGLE PURSUITS
The Single Pursuits (35-58)
of the Jewish Community
Center will be meeting Tues-
day, Sept. 3 at 7:30 p.m. at the
home of Phyllis Loeb for a
planning meeting. Suggestions
and ideas will be placed on the
table for discussion and action.
Call Phyllis, 848-5240, for ad-
ditional information and direc-
tions. Donation: $1.
Thursday, Sept. 5 at 8 p.m.,
Toby Chabon, who is
associated with Palm Beach
Jr. College will lead the discus-
sion on "Stress Management
For Singles." Group size will
be limited. Donation: $4 in-
cludes refreshements. Call
Phyllis at 848-5240 for direc-
tions to Barbara Prince's home
as well as reservations.
FALL MATERIAL
ON THE WAY
The Jewish Community
Center's Fall Brochure/Desk
Calendar for 1985/86 5746 is
now at the printer and will
soon be available for distribu-
tion. This beautiful book will
also contain a calendar that
can be used as an appointment
book, information about
cultural events in the com-
munity, emergency telephone
numbers, recipes and much
more.
. Watch the mail for your
copy.
YOUNG SINGLES SWING
INTO SEPTEMBER
The Young Singles of the
Jewish Community Center
(21-35) will be gathering at
"Casa de Goldberg" 9 p.m.
Saturday, Sept. 7 for the new
season's first "House Party."
Donation: $3 for JCC
members, $5 for non-
members. Call Terrie at
689-7700 for reservations and
information.
BORED? FRUSTRATED?
ECONOMICALLY DISTURBED?
A leader in the Financial & Business Planning fields
offers unique career opportunity. 3 year training
program. Earn $50-100,000 in 3-5 years. 9
Resume to: M. Davis, Suite 589
1645 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd.
West Palm Beach, FL 33401
or call: 683-0088
M0*L
KOSHER
CATERING
HYATT PALM BEACHES
833-1234
\HOr\E CLUB
^^P HOTEL* BEACH CLUS^ GLATT KOSHER []
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OPETI ALL YEAR
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e 2 meals dairy plus mid-day snacks and nightly tea
e Private beach, pod. right on the ocean e Lovely
rooms, each with TV Movies, entertainment
e Mashgiach fir Synagogue on Premises Pree
Parking e Personal Attention
SPECIAL YEARLY RATES OT1 REQUEST
Reserve Mow for the
HIGH HOLIDAYS r SUCCOTH
Services conducted by Prominent Cantor
PACKAGES from *215 per person, dbi occ
Phone 536-7811
Your Ho* OoOO. Gmpai OrtrrOond
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HIGH HOLY DAYS & SUCCOTH
Traditional Services Will Be Conducted By
Cantor YITZCHAK HAMMERMAN
LABOR DAY & HOLIDAYS INCLUDE:
2 OeHciout Kohe Meats Dolly u___,. .
3 on me Saboofn ft HoNooys Heolln Soo ft Sauna
. Nee NM* Tea Boom ********
Color TV (nan Room, Oceonfront Boorawo*
Spooom Synagogue
FULL PROGRAM Of DAYTIME & EVENING ENTERTAINMENT
Spec Diets Colored lo On Request
THE MULTI-MILLION DOLLAR KOSHER
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HOTEL
i\
On The Ocean 40th to 41 t St. Miami Beocri Hotel
For Reservations Phone: 1-531-5771
_____ Your Ho the BerkowMi Family ft Max Smllow Anoc
THE AIR CONDITIONED
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Your Hosts The WoWmon & Wiener FomWes
HIGH HOLIDAY SPECIALS
R0SH HASHANA Y0M KIPPUR
12 Days-11 Nights ****#*<
Sept. 15 to Sept. 26 *340 **
3 meals Sol, and holidays ""w rw ""_
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Formerly the Atlantic Towers Newly renovated
IAll Meals at WALDMAN I 12 days & 11 nights (AAA
| Sleep at WALDMAN II Sept. 15 to Sept. 26 pJQRf 3p*
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Sept. 15 to Sept. 18* Sept. 24 to 26 5230
Including meals "*'
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SERVICES CONDUCTED BY RENOWNED CANTOR
EARLY RESERVATIONS SUGGESTED
Phone 1-538-5731 or 1-534-4751
ON THE OCEAN AT 43t STREET
occ



Specter Says
U.S. Aid to Israel Needs Boost
Friday, August 30,
1985/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page. 13
ntinued from Page 1
Lr that the "sister nation of
U| is dedicated to democracy
[the same values as the U.S."
IddressinK the same session,
el's Ambassador to the United
us Meir Rosenne affirmed
"no Israel) government will
jpt" the Palestine Liberation
anization as part of a Middle
., negotiating team and em-
Ljzed that Israel would not be
Cenced by its allies in reaching
[agreement with its Arab
ihbors.
No government of Israel will
accept terms dictated by
another," Rosenne told the
delegates at the Convention,
because a dictated peace is the
beginning of war."
The Ambassador said Israel was
"reassured" by the U.S. govern-
ment's statements that it will not
conduct formal talks with the
PLO or representatives
designated by the PLO.
ROSENNE SAID that
American Jews, in their hope for
Mideast peace, should keep faith,
determination and love for Israel;
keep ties with Israel and world
Jewry; and maintain solidarity
with the Jewish people. "Israel
will remain the nicest monument
to world Jewry and will enable us
to transfer this wonderful legacy
from past generations to future
ones," he said.
The Ambassador stated "In
this world where Israel is con-
demned by the United Nations,
and accused of all the evils of the
world" there is something to be
proud of: "We (Israel) are still
there in spite of everything ."
Commenting on the recently
concluded UN's End of the
Decade Women's Conference in
Nairobi, Kenya, Rosenne hailed
the deletion of the infamous
Aionism equals racism statement
in the final document. He said the
deletion was a success that merits
recognition.
This years theme of the
Hadassah convention, "I Lift My
Lamp" from the Emma
Lazarus poem inscribed on the
Statue of Liberty hailed
Hadassah as a symbol of freedom.
THE CONVENTION, which
ended Wednesday, is designed ac-
cording to National Convention
chairperson Blanche Shukow, "to
review Hadassah's history .
assess its present and ap-
praise its future .."
Ruth Popkin, Hadassah's na-
tional president, read a message
from President Chaim Herzog of
Israel, urging that Hadassah
members "recall the close links of
understanding you have forged
with Israel."
Congregation Beth Kodesh
501 N.E. 26th Avenue
Boynton Beach, FL 33435
A CONSERVATIVE SYNAGOGUE
Join Us For
High Holy Day Services
CONDUCTED BY:
Rabbi Avrom L. Drazin
Cantor Abraham Koster
ROSH HASHONAH: Sept. 15-16-17
YOMKIPPUR: Sept. 24-25
Seats Available, Call
586-9428 732-2555 734-3858
!NTRAL CONSER-
ITIVE SYNAGOGUE an-
nces "Lunch with the
bbi" series with Rabbi
vard J. Hirsch will be
on Tuesday, September
12 noon at Sunrise Travel
|ency, Military Trail and
Club Road. The series
continue after the
Idays in Ocr66eV"Yn ''
ekly basis, For more infor-
tion call the synagogue
Ice.
Israeli MIA
Still Alive?
Continued from Page 1
reported miss-
near Sultan Yaackoub in
tern Lebanon following a tank
lie with Syrian forces in 1982.
Itner soldier, Sasmir Asad of
IDruze village of Beit Jann in
TOalilee, was captured near
n during another battle.
pes told a group of families of
m soldiers that Asad was be-
he|d m Damascus by
ratmehs group. The Premier
[Israel is holding Syria respon-
yor the fate of the missing
^ where shopping is a pleasure 7 days a week
Publix Bakeries open at 8:00 A.M.
I YOUTH MOVEMENT
k with elementary A
) school age Israel ex-
nee preferred. 1 year
nmitment 947-0637.
P DELIVERY FLORIDA
L'ALM BEACH 832-0211
HOWARD
ACKAGING
Available at Publix Stores with
Freah Danish Bakeries Only.
Choose from Our Selection of
Variety Cakes
$099
7-Inch W
size tmm
Available at Publix Stores with
Fresh Daniah Bakeries Only.
Top with Publix
Premium Ice Cream
Blueberry Pie
$199
each
Available at Publix Stores with
Freah Daniah Bakeries Only.
Baked Freah Daily
Hamburger or
Hot Dog Rolls
o9
Available at All PuMx Stores
and Danish Bakeries.
For the Chocolate Lover
Gourmet Brownies....... a** $ 169
Chocolate Chip, Sugar, Oatmeal, Peanut Butter
or Chocolate Pecan
Assorted Cookies........ 2T*2M
Apricot Coffee Cake-
Banana Bran Muffins
$-|69
Available at Publix Stores with Fresh
Danish Bakeries Only.
Plain or Seeded
Rye Bread..................... <,.* 69*
Prices Effective
Aug. 29 thru Sept. 4 J 985
each
* $-|29
box


Page 14 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, August 30, 1985
U.S. Jews
Denounce Kahane's Visit Here
Continued from Page 1-
of the U.S.A., National Council of
Jewish Women, Union of
American Hebrew Congregations,
United Synagogue of America,
Women's League for Conser-
vative Judaism, and Women's
American ORT.
Noting that the signers "repre-
sent the overwhelming majority
of America's organizationally af-
filiated Jews," the statement,
alluding to recent press reports
that "Kahaneism" was becoming
an "epidemic" in Israel, says:
"We do not dismiss the findings
of polls that, under unrelenting
economic, military, political, and
terrorist pressure, 'Kahaneism'
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB
2177 S. Congress Avenue
(corner Lillian Road)
HIGH HOLY DAYS SERVICES
Rabbi Morris Silberman
Cantor Hyman Lif shin
SEATS ARE STILL AVAILABLE
CALL OFFICE
433-5957 or 439-1541
The Lake Worth
Jewish Center
Conservative Synagogue
Of Suburban Lake Worth
Rabbi Richard K. Rocklin
Cantor Irving Grands ten
Cordially Invite You To Worship With Us At
HIGH HOLY DAYS SERVICES
At The Polnciana Golf and Racquet Club
Rosh Hashana
ShabbatShuva
Yom Kippur
Sun. Sept 15*46 pm
Mon.Sept1*-*30am
Tu.Spt. 17-8:30 am
I--------------
Sal.Spt.21-9m Tu. Spt. 24-6:45 pm[
(KoiNMre)
W*)Spl.25-im
For Ticket and Other Information Call:
Harold Gordon Murray Milrod Joslah Donner
968-6878 965-6053 433-8723
t
Central Conservative
Synagogue
A New Conservative Congregation With
A Warm Heart For Tradition
Invites you to join in
High Holy Day Worship
at
The Royal Polnciana Playhouse
Palm Beach
Rabbi Howard J. Hirsch will officiate
And deliver the sermons
Hazzan Israel Barzak
Will chant the liturgy
Synagogue membership
and High Holy Day
ticket inquiries
478-2922
(
Be part of our new
synagogue family as you
preserve Jewish life
in our growing community.
has found a few more sympathetic
listeners ... But to confuse this
still isolated virus with an
epidemic threatening Israel's
vibrant democracy is to
misconstrue the phenomenon and
exaggerate its threat far beyond
its troubling but limited
dimensions."
"(KAHANE) and what he
stands for," the statement con-
tinues, "have been emphatically
rejected by Israel's government
leaders and its parliament. The
record is clear and should be
known." On that record, the
statement says, are these facts:
Israel's Declaration of In-
dependence proclaims equal
rights to all "irrespective of
religion, race or sex."
Israel's President, Chaim
Herzog, when meeting with the
political leaders whose parties
won Knesset seats, "pointedly
refused to meet with Kahane,
whose ideology he considered
repugnant to (Israel's) democratic
principles ..."
On July 31st the Knesset
unanimously passed a bill banning
from parliamentary elections any
party that "incites people to
racism or negates Israel's
democratic character .. ."
Israelis "in government and in
the private sector are intensifying
their ongoing efforts to promote
better relations between Arabs
and Jews, as have many of the
organizations" signing the joint
statement.
"Ironically, it was Israel's
tradition of democracy that enabl-
ed Kahane to run for his current
seat in the Knesset, since he was
ruled off the ballot and subse-
quently restored by a judgment of
Israel's Supreme Court. In
several previous attempts to at-
tain office in Israel, he had failed.
Finally gaining a seat, Kahane
received only 26,000 votes, barely
one Israeli vote in a hundred ...
THE STATEMENT concludes:
"We reject (Kahane's words and
actions) and what they stand for;
we reject this affront to our
history, to our tradition and
beliefs, and to our abiding com-
mitment to peace and
brotherhood."
The newly-formed Florida
Division of American Jewish
Congress' National Commis-
sion on Women's Equality
has appointed Leslie Klein,
an enthusiastic advocate for
women's rights and interna-
tionally known artist, as its
new chairperson. The
Florida Commission plans to
focus on issues related to
women and religion, women
and work, women and the
family, and women in
politics.
Religious Directory
Conservative
CENTRAL CONSERVATIVE SYNAGOGUE OF THE Palm
BEACHES: Services held Friday 8:15 p.m. and Saturday18
a.m. at The Jewish Community Day School, 5801 Parker Ave
West Palm Beach. Mailing address: 5737 Okeechobee Blvd West
Palm Beach 33409. Phone 478-2922. Rabbi Howard J. Hirsch
Hazzan Israel Barzak.
CONGREGATION ANSHEI SHOLOM: 5348 Grove Street West
Palm Beach 33409. Phone 684-3212. Rabbi Isaac Vander Walde
Cantor Mordecai Spektor. Daily: 8:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. Friday-
8:30 a.m., 5 p.m. and a late service at 8:15 p.m., followed by Onee
Shabbat. Saturday: 8:30 a.m., 5 p.m., Mincha followed by Sholosh
Suedos.
CONGREGATION BETH KODESH OF BOYNTON BEACH
501 N.E. 26 Avenue, Boynton Beach 33435. Phone 586-9428
Rabbi Avrom L. Drazin, Cantor Abraham Koster. Monday 8:30
a.m.; Thursday 8:30 a.m. Sabbath services, Friday 8:15 p.m.,
Saturday 9 a.m.
GOLDEN LAKES TEMPLE: 1470 Golden Lakes Blvd., West
Palm Beach 33411. Phone 689-9430. Rabbi Joseph Speiser. Daily
services 8:15 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. Sabbath services Friday 8:15
p.m. Saturday 9 a.m., 5 p.m., Mincha followed by Sholosh Suedos.
LAKE WORTH JEWISH CENTER: St Luke's United
Methodist Chapel, 165 Ohio Road, Lake Worth. Mailing address:
69% Quince Lane, Lake Worth, FL 33467. Phone 965-6053. Fri-
day night services 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m. Rabbi Richard K.
Rocklin.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID: 4657 Hood Road, Palm Beach Gardens
33418. Phone 694-2350. Rabbi William Marder, Cantor Earl J.
Rackoff. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m. Saturday 10 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 2815 No. Flagler Dr., West Palm Beach
33407. Phone 833-0339. Cantor Elaine Shapiro. Sabbath services
Friday 6:30 p.m. (June 14-July 26), Saturday 9:30 a.m. Daily Mi-
nyan 8:15 am., Sunday and legal holidays 9 am.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 315 N. "A" Street, Lake Worth
33460. Phone 585-5020. Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg. Cantor
Howard Dardashti. Services Monday and Thursday 8:15 a.m.,
Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 224 N.W. Avenue G, Belle Glade
33430. Sabbath services Friday, 8:30 p.m. Phone 996-3886.
TEMPLE BETH ZION: Lions Club, 700 Camelia Dr., Royal
Palm Beach. Mailing address: PO Box 104, 650 Royal Palm Blvd.,
Royal Palm Beach, FL 33411. Sabbath services Friday 8 p.m.,
Saturday 8:45 am. Rabbi Seymour Friedman. Phone 793-9122.
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB: 2177 So. Congress Ave., West Palm
Beach 33406. Phone 433-5957. Rabbi Dr. Morris Silberman, Cat
tor Hyman Lifshin. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m., Saturday
and holidays 9 a.m., Monday and Thursday 9 am.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL: 190 North County Road, Palm Beach
33480. Phone 832-0804. Rabbi Joel Chazin, Cantor David Dar-
dashti. Sabbath services, Friday 6 p.m.; Saturday 9 am.
TREASURE COAST JEWISH CENTER Congregation Beth
Abraham: 3257 S.E. Salerno Road, Port Salerno. 287-8833. Mail-
ing Address: P.O. Box 2996, Stuart, FL 33495. Services Friday
evenings 8 p.m. and first Saturday of each month 10 a.m.
Orthodox
CONGREGATION AITZ CHAIM: Century Village, West Palm
Beach. Phone 689-4675. Sabbath services 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. Daily
services 8:15 a.m. and 6:30 p.m.
Reform
CONGREGATION BETH ISRAEL: 1592 Floresta, P.O. Box
857146. Port St. Lucie, FL 33452. Friday night services 8 p.m.,
Saturday morning 10:30 a.m. Phone 465-6977.
THE REFORM TEMPLE OF JUPITER-TEQUESTA: 759
Parkway Street, Jupiter. Phone 747-1109. Rabbi Alfred L Fned
man. Services Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 4600 Oleander Avenue, Fort Pierce, FL
33450. Phone 461-7428.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM: St. Helen's Parish Hall. 20th
Avenue and Victory Blvd., Vero Beach 32960, mailing address:
P.O. Box 2113, Vero Beach, FL 32961-2113. Rabbi Richard D.
Messing. Phone 1-569-0180.
TEMPLE BETH TORAH: at Wellington Elementary School,
13000 Paddock Dr., West Palm Beach. Mailing address: P.O. Box
17008, West Palm Beach, FL 38406. Friday services 8:15 p.m.
Rabbi Steven R. Westman. Cantorial Soloist Elliot Rosenbaum.
Phone 793-2700.
TEMPLE ISRAEL: 1901 No. Flagler Dr., West Palm Beach
33407. Phone 833-8421. Rabbi Howard Shapiro, Cantor Robert
Bloch. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE JUDEA: at St. Catharine's Greek Orthodox Church
Social Hall, 4000 Washington Rd., at Southern Boulevard.
Joel L. Levine. Cantor Anne Newman. Mailing address: bu*
Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach, FL 33409. Phone 471-1SJ*
"V.


Ill
News
CENTRAL
CONSERVATIVE
SYNAGOGUE
The Central Conservative
pynagogue of the Palm
Beaches, a new conservative
Ugregation, ynll hold High
Holiday Rosh Hashana and
torn Kippur Services at the
loyal Poinciana Playhouse,
hdm Beach. Rabbi Howard J.
flirsch will officiate. The
iturgy will he sun y Hazzan
Vael J. Barzak. Hazzan Bar-
ak has an extensive Hebraic
nd musical background, and
as been a member of the Can-
fcrs' Assembly for 21 years,
for information and tickets,
1 the Synagogue office.
CONGREGATION
BETH KODESH
On Sunday, Sept. 8, Con-
jregation Beth Kodesh
listerhood is sponsoring a
heatre Party at the Burt
eynolds Dinner Theatre to
*the pre-Broadway produc-
on of "The News." There are
limited number of tickets
vailable $30 if you use your
or $35 if you go by bus. See
call Magda Katz, Sally
eiser, Marilyn Grunin for
our tickets.
I Sisterhood Beth Kodesh is
Bving a meeting on Sept. 10,
12:30 p.m. at 501 NE 26th
Ivenue, Boynton Beach.
Mark Wednesday, Oct. 9 on
bur calendar. We will have a
uper errjoyabl* 'aY?f pa>fyi:'
lanned for that date.
[Keep Nov. 20 open. Details
i follow.
LAKE WORTH
JEWISH CENTER
IA reception has been ar-
knged by the Lake Worth
pish Center to install and in-
bduce its first full-time
fciritual leader, Rabbi Richard
I Rocklin.
iRabbi Rocklin joined the
fcnservative, suburban Lake
Forth Synagogue on Aug. 1,
Per serving Temple Israel in
narlotte, North Carolina, for
years.
[Palm Beach County rabbis,
[her distinguished area
jergymen of all faiths, as well
} dignitaries from all walks of
P- wi" be present to welcome
obi Rocklin and his wife,
fane, to our midst.
[About 400 people are ex-
feted to attend the
[remonies at the Poinciana
land Racquet Club on Sun-
|V evening, Sept. 8 at 7:30
^ TEMPLE
S2LEL SISTERHOOD
PF WEST PALM BEACH
[Sue Benilous, program vice
El6!!! announced Temple
PJ. El Sisterhood's first
"*ang for 1985.86 will be
ia on Tuesday, Sept. 10,
r \f p^m- at Center Hall,
l N. Flagler Dr., West
W;Beach .The topic: Jewish
Jjval The Threat From
fun. Guest speaker will be
T- Ann Lipton, Jewish
aeration Education director
gta Beach County, will
RW an open dialogue and
.Tf"nn"Living Jewish In
IcorHilH ent^ry- The Pub,ic
f**ally invited to attend.
A light lunch will be served.
For reservations call the tem-
ple office.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
OF LAKE WORTH
Hebrew class registration
now open for beginners, in-
termediate, Bar-Bas Mitzvah.
Judaism's future rests with
our young. Do not deny a
Jewish child his or her identity
as a Jew, and pride in the
ageless heritage of its people.
Classes are personally super-
vised by the rabbi in an infor-
mal round table atmosphere
creating a close rapport bet-
ween student and rabbi.
Registration continues
throughout the year.
On Saturday, Sept. 7, at 9
p.m., Temple Beth Sholom will
usher in the solemn period of
the High Holy Days with the
beautiful and inspiring slichot
services conducted by Cantor
Howard Dardashti.
It is a time for self examina-
tion and preparation for the
Holy Days of Rosh Hashanah
and Yom Kippur.
The evening will commence
with the showing of a most in-
teresting film, with
refreshments by Sisterhood.
Slichot services will begin at
11:30 p.m.
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Rabbi Howard Shapiro will
explain and explore the mean-
ing of Elul with the congrega-
tion on Friday evening, Aug
30 at 8 p.m.
The month of Elul is the last
month in the Jewish year It
precedes Rosh Hashanah,
which is the first day of the
Jewish New Year and the
month of Tishri. Jewish tradi-
tion weaves many mystical
traditions concerning Elul
Cantor Robert Bloch will lead
the congregation in song.
TEMPLE JUDEA
The Membership Committee
2cmple Judea *>" sponsor
an Open House following Sab-
bath Services, Friday, Aug. 30
at 8 p.m. at St. Catherine's
Cultural Center, Southern
Blvd. and Flagler Drive. Rabbi
Joel Levine and Cantor Anne
Newman will officiate.
Representatives of Temple
activities and affiliate groups
will sit at round tables ready to
describe their programs to
prospective members and to
answer questions.
Rabbi Joel Levine will speak
on "Orthodox, Conservative,
Reform Judaism: Are We
Divided? Can We Be United."
He will focus on a series of
remarks by Rabbi Irving
Greenberg, a leading Jewish
thinker and Director of the Na-
tional Jewish Resource
Center. Rabbi Levine will
make his own predictions as to
the present and future unity or
disunity of Judaism.
The Membership Committee
will also sponsor an Open
House folowing Sabbath Ser-
vices, Friday, Sept. 6 at 8 p.m.
Rabbi Joel Levine will speak
on "5745: Year in Review."
He will highlight the most vital
and important Jewish issues
Friday, August 30, 1985/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 15
MENORAH GARDENS
HAS PALM BEACH'S
UNBEATABLE PRE-NEED
CEMETERY PACKAGE
1 Grave, 1 Concrete Liner/Vault,
Grave Opening & Closing, 1 Single
Granite Marker w/Instaiiation &
Inscription, Documentary Stamps
& State Sales Tax, Perpetual Care.
Single
Package
Includes:
PRE-NEED PACKAGE
PRICED AT
DOUBLE PACKAGE
PRICED AT
$1,117.80
$2,124.50
Available only at Palm Beach County's only all-Jewish
memorial park and funeral chapel at one convenient location.
(This is a limited-time offer, and prices are not guaranteed
unless pre-paid. so call today?)
ASK ABOUT OUR INTEREST-FREE INSTALLMENT
PAYMENT PLAN
r?Atenoiah^
Gardens and Funeral Chapels
627-2277
9321 Memorial Park Road
7 minutes west of 1-95 via Lake Park Road Exit.
Cemetery Mausoleum Funeral Chapel Pre-Need Planning
Other locations in North Miami Beach,
Sunrise. Margate and DeerHeld Beach
Candle lighting Time
-9L a"9- 30 7:26 p.m.
*aKlo Sept. 6 7:16 p.m.
during the past year and offer
guidance on what to expect
during the new year of 5746.
Rabbi Levine is a member of
the Rabbinic Cabinet of the
United Jewish Appeal and a
frequent participant in na-
tional seminars which probe
the problems of the Jewish
present and future.
For more information, call
the temple office.
Temple Judea High Holy
Day Services will usher in the
New Year of 5746 beginning
Sunday evening, Sept. 15 at
St. Catherine's Cultural
Center, Southern Blvd. and
Flagler Drive. Rabbi Joel
Levine and Cantor Anne
Newman will officiate.
Rabbi Levine's sermon
theme this year is "A Reform
View of the Reform Jew." On
Sunday evening, services will
begin at 8 p.m. Rabbi Levine
will speak on "The Reform
Jew and the Freedom to
Choose." At morning services,
Monday, Sept. 16 at 10 a.m.,
Rabbi Levine will speak on
"The Reform Jew and God."
Doug Kleiner will sound the
Shofar at morning services.
Family Services are schedul-
ed for Rosh Hashanah day,
Monday, Sept. 6 at 2:30 p.m.
This service will last for one
hour in order to encourage
participation by the youngest
children.
Membership in Temple
Judea includes High Holy Day
Tickets. Tickets are also
available to non-members. For
mem&ership ticket' informa-
tion, call the Temple office.
Area Deaths
KATZ *
Harry J.. 90. of 423 46th St., West Palm
Beach. Northwood Funeral Home, West
Palm Beach.
LANG
Rose. 73, of West Palm Beach. Levitt
Weinstein Guaranteed Security Plan
Chapel, West Palm Beach
LEDERMAN
Gertrude, 69, of Lake Worth. Levitt
Weinstein Guaranteed Security Plan
Chapel, West Palm Beach.
LERNER
Isadore. 76. of 1314 SW 18th St., Boynton
Beach. Riverside Guardian Funeral Home,
West Palm Beach.
LIVENTHAL
Fijances, 7, otfitntimVWa*ttVi^PMw
Beach. Levitt-weinstein Guaranteed
Security Plan Chapel. West Palm Beach.
MASSER
May. 83. of West Palm Beach. Levitt
Weinstein Guaranteed Security
Chapel, West Palm Beach.
MOSS
Goldie, 74, of Lake Worth. Riverside
dian Funeral Home.
Plan
Guar-
'
RABBI
Experienced in the various
sections of Rabbinical func-
tion*. Ordained, college and
university degrees, would
tk JntO consideration
congregation with broad
activities Minimum salary
futf-tlme $16,000. 'Ml' MA
c/o Jewish nortdlan, p.o. box
012973, Miami, Ha. 33101.
Mr. Medwin Jeffer
formerly of
Jef f er Funeral Homes, Inc.
Hollis & Brooklyn, New York
announces his association as consultant to
Levitt-Weinstein
Memorial Chapels, Inc.
of
West Palm Beach, North Miami Beach,
Hollywood, Boca Raton,
Deerfield Beach, Florida
689-8700
Check why it makes sense
to pre-arrange your funeral now.
Pre-arranging the
details now means
your spouse and/or
your children never
nave to be burdened
later because (he gnef
is enough to handle
TneGUARAiVTEED ___ -
SECU RITY PLAN- allow* you to make your choice* l-X]
now II s a loving thing to do lor your family \W |
0
0
Everything wilt be taken care of
by Levitt Wtinstein
Me can pay now with extended
payments, without interest
Allot the about.
It really makes same
0
I. (or my spouse) won't have to make
decisions under stress or sorrow
Neither will my children
*
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AfcCTVUTo/
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Col fc Fre* Brochure
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0 V* Ol'PC N
CVAtUNIOD SCCMUTV H AJ
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Wart **m iMck. n. SMM
CUUlANinO MCUUIV MAM-
jV. c---------a_
-^ M.----------- M M, .


Page 16 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, August 30. 1985
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