The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County the voice of the Jewish community of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
West Palm Beach, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 11, no. 27 (Sept. 13, 1985)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Feb. 20, 1987 called no. 4 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Mar. 31, 1989 called no. 12 in masthead and no. 13 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44605643
lccn - sn 00229551
ocm44605643
System ID:
AA00014309:00199

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
THE VOICE OF
THE JEWISH
COMMUNITY OF
PALM BEACH
COUNTY
Jewish floridian
>^ m OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
Volume 15 Number 19
F \LM BEACH, FLORIDA FRIDAY, JUNE 2, 1989
FrarfSlMclMt
Price 40 Cents
Bush Promises To
Seek Arab Backing
For Peace Initiative
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Israeli Defense Minister Yitz-
hak Rabin ended his three-day
visit to Washington with a
promise from President Bush
to help win Palestinian support
for Israel's peace initiative.
"My impression is that the
United States will like to assist
Israel in finding a partner
among the Palestinians in the
territories to move ahead
along the outline of the peace
process," Rabin said after a
White House meeting with
Bush.
But he would not reveal
what the Bush administration
would do to get Palestinians to
support the Israeli proposal. It
calls for the Palestinians to
elect representatives to nego-
tiate with Israel for self-rule in
the West Bank and Gaza Strip.
The Israeli proposal received
its highest endorsement yet
from the administration in a
statement read by State
Department spokeswoman
Margaret Tutwiler.
"We are wholeheartedly
supportive" of the election
proposal, Tutwiler said. "We
want to work with the Israelis
and the Palestinians to move
the peace process forward."
Israeli Foreign Minister
Moshe Arens called for full
U.S. support of the Israeli ini-
tiative during his visit to
Washington recently. But ini-
tially, the State Department
Inside
CJF begins Jewish
populations
study......................Page 2
Photos from WD
celebration
luncheon................Page 3
Feeding S.Florida's
needy......................Page3
Shavuos and
Yont Yerushalay im
features..................Page 4
Scenes from Morse
review of'Jewish
Lifecycle8"............Page 7
stopped short of using the
word "wholeheartedly" to
characterize its support for the
plan.
The meeting with Bush had
not been scheduled when
Rabin began his meetings with
administration officials. It
appeared to have been
arranged after Secretary of
State James Baker made a
hard-hitting speech to the
annual policy conference of the
American Israel Public Affairs
Committee.
Baker Speech Not Discussed
Rabin said he did not discuss
Baker's remarks with the
president. But he noted that
he has been arguing for the
last two days that Israelis,
Americans and Arabs who
want to move the peace pro-
cess forward should not focus
on the elements of a final
settlement, since all sides are
too deeply divided.
"If we can reach an agree-
ment today on them, there
would be no need to move
gradually toward peace," he
said. But he noted "even the
peace with Egypt was not
achieved by one act."
Rabin also refused to be
drawn into criticism of Baker's
speech when he was asked
HIGH LEVEL MEETING. Vice President Dan Quayle, left, meets with Israeli Foreign
Minister Moshe Arens at the White House. Arens said that Israel has asked the U.S. to lead
an international campaign to raise $2 billion to rehabilitate Palestinian refugee camps in
the Israeli administered territories. (APIWide World Photo)
about it earlier in the day,
after addressing a luncheon
sponsored by the Washington
Institute for Near East Policy.
"I don't believe that I have
to refer to any specific state-
ment, even if it is made by the
secretary of state," he said. "I
prefer not to argue with any-
one about issues that refer to
the permanent solution."
Rabin told the Washington
Institute that Israel did not
propose the elections as a way
of postponing a final settle-
ment.
"Israel doesn't intend just to
hold the first step and to
wait," Rabin said.
JCC Of The Palm Beaches
Changes Its Name
Steven Shapiro, President of
the JCC of the Palm Beaches
announced that the agency has
changed its name to the Jew-
ish Community Center of the
Greater Palm Beaches. "The
new name," said Mr. Shapiro,
"more truly reflects our
county-wide involvement. We
offer community services
spreading from our Boynton
Senior Center in the south, to
our Jupiter Early Childhood
Center in the north (planned to
open this Fall); from our Camp
and Family Park in the West
(Belvedere Road, west of the
turnpike) to our Early Child-
hood Center in Temple Beth El
to the east. It is the agency's
plan to ultimately offer the
Palm Beaches a spectrum of
community services compara-
ble to those offered by older,
more established JCCs serving
large, metropolitan areas."
House Approves Extra $75 Million
For Soviet Refugees
By HOWARD ROSENBERG
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
The House of Representatives
approved a $3.7 billion supple-
mental spending bill recently
containing $75 million to admit
an estimated 18,500 additional
Soviet refugees to the United
States this fiscal year.
The Senate will not act on
the bill until after it returns
from the Memorial Day recess.
On a parallel front, key law-
makers are expected to for-
mally notify President Bush
within a week that they
approve an administration
plan to raise the Soviet refu-
gee quota by 18,500 for this
fiscal year, which ends Sept.
30, a Senate source said.
The lawmakers, who are the
chairmen and ranking Republi-
cans on the House and Senate
Judiciary subcommittees on
immigration, met on May 17
with Attorney General Dick
Thornburgh, who formally
notified them of the adminis-
tration's intention to raise the
refugee ceiling.
The congressional and
administration moves are an
attempt to respond to the huge
influx of Soviet Jews seeking
to enter the United States.
More than 40,000 are
expected to emigrate from the
Soviet Union this year, and
there is already a backlog of
several thousand waiting in
Italy for permission to enter
the United States.
The U.S. quota of Soviet
refugees for this fiscal year
has already been exceeded. As
a result, the Hebrew Immi-
grant Aid Society and the
American Jewish Joint Distri-
bution Committee in April
accepted a longstanding
administration offer to admit
an additional 5,000 refugees
with only partial U.S. funding.
Under the agreement, HIAS
and the JDC are paying the
costs of refugee processing,
transportation and initial
resettlement, costs normally
absorbed by the State Depart-
ment, said Phillip Saperia,
assistant executive vice presi-
dent of HIAS.
Saperia said HIAS has used
about 2,500 of the refugee
slots, with the other 2,500 to
be used by mid-June. He said
HIAS hopes to be reimbursed
if and when the supplemental
appropriations bill gains final
passage.


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, June 2, 1989
Clergy Meet At Annual
Interfaith Breakfast
Duke University Recognizes 7th Grade Scholars
The annual Interfaith Break-
fast that is usually held on
Yom Haatzmaut (Israel Inde-
pendence Day) met this year at
Temple Judea with over 100
clergy of all denominations,
Jewish community leaders,
school principals and govern-
ment officials joining together.
Sponsored by the Local Con-
cerns Task Force of the Com-
munity Relations Council of
the Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County, breakfast par-
ticipants listened to music of
Israel by Karen Blum and an
educational talk on the seven
Noahide Laws by Dr. Israel
Drazin, Rabbi, Theologian,
Constitutional Lawyer, Ara-
maic Scholar, Biblical Author
and Army Chaplain.
Above are Rabbi Isaac Vander Walde of Temple Anshei Shalom
and Father James Paul Malvey at the Interfaith Breakfast.
Below is Dr. Israel Drazin.
Rabbi Levine Presents
Smuggled Chupah
To Soviet Couple
Pictured above are Alex and Bella Shainsky receiving their
family chupah from Rabbi Joel Levine.
Eleven outstanding seventh graders at the Jewish Community Day School were recognized for
their scholastic ability and potential by the Duke University Talent Identification Program
1988/89 Talent Search. They are (I to r) Danny Cane, Nathan Burgess, AbwSchwarzberg Ira
Weissberger, Amir Feistmann, Joey Rosen, Cynthia Simon, Lisa Gordon, Sosha Zaretsky, Adam
LeRoy and Scott Skier. These students were identified by scoring m the upper three percent on
nationally standardized achievement or aptitude measures and were invited to participate in the
talent search. They were asked to take the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT), a test designed
primarily for 11th and 12th graders considering college. The SAT, according to Duke University,
has also "been shown to be especially effective in helping access the verbal and mathematical
reasoning ability of very bright seventh grade students." Two of these students excelled in their
SAT scores and will receive invitations to attend special recognition ceremonies sponsored by
Duke University. They are Joey Rosen and Cynthia Simon.
CJF Begins Data Collection For 1990
National Survey Of American Jews
Three generations of Soviet
Jews have been secretly mar-
ried under the Shainsky family
Chupah. But the priceless wed-
ding tent was finally smuggled
from Leningrad to Leona,
New Jersey, where its new
^owners, Alex and Bella
g Shainsky, will be able to
g always protect it from possible
r confiscation or destruction by
* the KGB.
NEW YORK, NY The
Council of Jewish Federations,
which agreed last fall to con-
duct the 1990 National Survey
of American Jews as part of a
world-wide series of national
studies of Jewish populations,
has commissioned the ICR
Survey Research Group of
Media, PA to begin collecting
data in a three-stage phone
questionnaire.
Preliminary screening by
means of a random selection
procedure began in April in
order to accumulate prospec-
tive households. This proce-
dure allows for an equal proba-
bility of Jews to be se ected
from every state whether in
small towns or in major metro-
politan areas so that a national
picture will emerge. In May-
June 1990, 2,500 households
will be interviewed in-depth.
Through the statistical analy-
sis of data obtained from the
phone interviews, various com-
ponents of the Jewish com-
munity will be assessed such as
the demographic, social and
economic structure, migration
patterns, changes in size, com-
position and distribution as
well as patterns and levels of
births and deaths.
The CJF Research Depart-
ment has recently released the
publication, "A Handle on the
Future The Potential of the
1990 National Survey for
American Jewry," which out-
lines the purpose and goals of
this historic survey.
The publication features two
reprinted papers: "A 1990
National Jewisn Population
Study: Why and How" by Dr.
Sidney Goldstein, Chairman of
the National Technical Advi-
sory Committee on Jewish
Population Studies and Direc-
tor of the Population Studies
and Training Center at Brown
University, and "Jewish
Megatrends Planning for
the Twenty-First Century" by
Dr. Steven Huberman, Execu-
tive Director for Community
Services at the Jewish Federa-
tion Council of Los Angeles.
"It is our hope that this
publication will inform mem-
ber Federations of the impor-
tance of the survey for gaining
knowledge of future trends
among the mass of American
Jews," noted Dr. Barry Kos-
min, CJF's Director of
Research and Director of the
North American Jewish Data
Bank. He added that an initial
$200,000 has already been pro-
vided by the CJF Endowment
Fund for the 1990 survey and
that CJF member Federations
have been asked to contribute
their pro-rated shares for the
remainder of the project's
cost.
The North American Jewish
Data Bank was established by
the Council of Jewish Federa-
tions and the Center for Jew-
ish Studies of the Graduate
School and University Center
of The City University of New
York. Its primary role is to act
as the repository for com-
puter-based population and
survey data on Jewish commu-
nities in the United States and
Canada.
Plans are already underway
for specially commissioned
monographs to be included in
the North American Jewish
Data Bank's publication series
on topics such as (1) regional
and city-size differences, (2)
marriage, family and fertility,
(3) geographical migration and
distribution, (4) Jewish iden-
tity, (5) income, economic
status and education, (6) the
life cycle, (7) Jewish women
and (8) communal service
needs and implications.
Requests for copies of "A
Handle on the Future The
Potential of the 1990 National
Survey for American Jewry"
should be sent in writing to the
Council of Jewish Federations,
730 Broadway, New York, NY
10003.
The Council of Jewish Fed-
erations is the continental
association of 200 Jewish Fed-
orations, the central commun-
ity organizations which serve
nearly 800 localities embracing
a Jewish population of more
than 6.1 million in the United
States and Canada.
Established in 1932, CJF
helps strengthen the work and
the impact of Jewish Federa-
tions by developing programs
to meet changing needs, pro-
viding an exchange of success-
ful community experiences,
establishing guidelines for
fund raising and operations
and engaging in joint planning
and action on common pur-
poses dealing with local,
regional and international
needs.



Rabbi Joel Levine, of Temple
Judea in West Palm Beach,
visited the Soviet Union last
July and was secretly given
the chupah in Leningrad to
bring the Shainskys in New
Jersey.
Afterward, Rabbi Levine,
Chair of the Community Rela-
tions Council of the Jewish
Federation, attended the Con-
sultation on conscience Con-
ference held in Washington,
D.C. and made special
arrangements for the
Shainskys to meet him in
Washington to receive their
family heirloom.
"I chose to present the w^-w^^* _-.-.
SSM^SaS AZA And BBG Elect New Officers
ence meeting because its spon-
sor, (the UAHC Religious
Action Center) has an out-
standing record of support for
the Soviet Jewry movement,"
Rabbi Levine said.
Also during the Consulta-
tion, Rabbi Levine and Joan
Graff, UAHC Regional Social
Action Chairperson, briefed
Sen. Connie Mack on the con-
tinuing needs of Soviet Jews
who are being resettled in the
U.S. and Israel.
The Gold Coast Council of
the B'nai B'rith Youth Organi-
zation recently elected new
officers for the 1989-90 year.
The elections and installations
were held at the Council's
annual Spring Convention,
held April 14-16 at the Holly-
wood Beach Hilton in Holly-
wood.
The new President of the
Aleph Zadik Aleph (A.Z.A.),
the boys component of the
BBYO, is Steve Finkelstein of
Pembroke Pines. Others on
the board are Brett Jaffe, Pro-
gramming Vice President;
Darren Friedman and Shawn
Barat, Membership Vice Presi-
dents; Howard Sobel, Secret-
ary; and Orin Shakerdge,
Chaplain.
The new President of the
B'nai B'rith Girls (B.B.G.)
component of the BBYO is
Marci Roberts of Coral
Springs. Others on the board
are Heather Smith, Program-
ming Vice President; Wendy
Smith and Leah Coletti, Mem-
bership Vice Presidents;
Judith Biller, Secretary; and
Jill Zwerner, Chaplain.
The B'nai B'rith Youth
Organization is the oldest and
largest Jewish youth organiza-
tion in the world, serving Jew-
Continued on Page 3



Friday, June 2, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 3
Women's Division Honors Board At Celebration Luncheon
Members of the Women's Division Board of Directors of the Jewish Federation
were honored recently for their dedication to the Campaign at an Awards
Celebration Luncheon at the home of WD President Carol Greenbaum in West
Palm Beach. The Women's Division Campaign has reached new heights of success
by exceeding the $2.5 million mark, noted Sheila Engelstein as she congratulated
the volunteer campaign workers. (L-r) Carol Greenbaum, WD President, Lee
Mazer, Gladys Meyers, Sheila Engelstein, WD Campaign Chair, Eleanor
Fleischman.
(L-r) Hinda Greenspoon, Eileen Talkov, Ruth Wilensky, Syd Schwartz, Marcia
Shapiro.
Mfc-> i
(L-r) Sandra Goldberg, Sandra Rosen, WD Education VP, Cynnie List, Berenice
Rogers, Zelda Mason.
(L-r) Alice Zipkin, Sonia Koff, Jackie Eder, Event Chair, Adele Simon, Angela
Lampert.
(L-r) Zelda Mason, Carol Greenbaum, Sheila Engelstein, Jackie. Eder,
Adele Simon.
(L-r) Helen Hoffman, Affiliate Campaign Chair, Irving Mazer, Gen. Campaign
Chair, Amy Jonas, WD Outreach VP.
Feeding The Needy In South Florida
The Palm Beach County
Board of Rabbis and South
County Board of Rabbis unani-
mously endorsed a proposal to
become involved in the crea-
tion of a Palm Beach County
Food Bank. It will join the
Daily Bread Food Bank, an
existing network of food distri-
bution that provided over
6,000,000 pounds of food to
the needy in 1988: food that
otherwise would have rotted
or been destroyed.
Today, about 400,000 South
Floridians live with the daily
pain of hunger and suffer the
terrible effects of malnutri-
tion. Many of them received
their meals from the federal
government until last fall
when the government was
forced to cut back their food
distributions due to reductions
in food surplus.
The surplus food, including
cheese, flour, butter, honey,
rice, cornmeal and powdered
milk, had been distributed to
nine Florida counties regularly
since 1983 by the U.S. Depart-
ment of Agriculture. The food
came from the farm subsidy
program. Rather than pay $2
million a day to store it in
warehouses, the government
gave the food away. Now the
stockpiles are reduced and the
free food program for the
needy has been cut back.
Several people in Palm
Beach County involved in vari-
ous hunger programs believe
there is a way of helping to
feed the needy without
depending on the surplus food
program. There is plenty of
food in Palm Beach County
that goes to waste in restau-
rants and markets. It could be
collected, stockpiled and distri-
buted to needy families, agen-
cies and churches that work
with the poor. In Miami, Food
Bank is able to serve 420 non-
profit charitable organiza-
tions, which amounts to
500,000 pounds of food distri-
buted to 45,000 people each
month. Did you know that $1
can be used to produce $15 of
edible food?
"Feeding the hungry is
really the only right thing to
do," said Joan Tabor, a Food
Bank volunteer. "Recruiting
help at a local, grassroots level
serves ecumenical purposes,
community needs and allows
us to become independent of
the federal government," she
explained.
The food bank works well in
Dade and Broward counties.
Currently, through the Miami
branch of the Daily Bread
Food Bank, several agencies in
Palm Beach County are receiv-
ing food that is distributed to
those in need. However,
because of the distance
between here and Miami, it
has become essential to create
a more central point of distri-
bution locally. Representatives
of churches, charitable organi-
zations and many county and
city officials are currently
negotiating for a warehouse to
begin the food bank here.
The Food Bank has already
raised $46,000 of the $100,000
needed to open and run a
facility. On June 10, a dance
will be held in Palm Beach
County to raise the rest of the
needed funds. In addition, a
contribution of $100 will add
your name to the Friends of
the Daily Bread Food Bank.
All donations are accepted.
For more information, con-
tact Ronald Rindler, Daily
Bread Food Bank, 724 N.E.
71st Street, Boca Raton, FL
33487, or Joan Tabor, 407-368-
8615.
Topel Award Winners Announced
The B'nai B'rith Youth
Organization is proud to
announce this year's recipients
of the Roselyn and Eli Topel
Leadership Awards. The
awards are given anually to
members of the Gold Coast
Council who, during their per-
iod of involvement in BBYO
programs, have demonstrated
a potential for future leader-
ship in BBYO and a commit-
ment to attend one of the
BBYO's Summer Leadership
Training Programs. Each
recipient will receive $250 to
go towards the cost of their
attendance.
Eight winners were chosen
for 1989. They are: Mark
Feiler, Plantation, Coral
Springs; Scott Frieser, Planta-
tion; Michael Saferstein,
North Miami Beach; Howard
Sobel, Plantation; Stephanie
Black, Coral Springs; Laura
Minsky, Boca Raton will be
attending BBYO's Interna-
tional Leadership Training
Conference (ILTC), a three
week program held at Perlman
Camp in Starlight, Pennsylva-
nia; Marci Roberts, Coral
Springs and Melissa Kaplan,
Coral Springs, will be attend-
ing Israel Summer Institute
(ISI) a six week tour of Israel;
Laura Minsky will also be
attending KALLAH, a four
week Judaism Institute also
held at B'nai B'rith's Perlman
Camp.
The Topel Awards are made
available through the Topel
Foundation, by Roselyn and
Eli Topel for the purpose of
providing financial assistance
to current and potential lead-
ers in the BBYO. The Awards
are presented annually at the
Gold Coast Council BBYO's
Awards Banquet, held this
year on April 16 at the Holly-
wood Beach Hilton in Holly-
wood.
The B'nai B'rith Youth
Organization is the oldest and
largest Jewish youth organiza-
tion in the world, serving over
1,200 Jewish teens throughout
the state of Florida.
New Officers
Continued from Page 2
ish teens ages 14-18. The Gold
Coast Council consists of 18
chapters in North Miami
Beach, Hollywood, Pembroke
Pines, Plantation, Coral
Springs, Boca Raton and West
Palm Beach. Anyone inter-
ested in finding out more
about the B.B.Y.O. and/or its
activities should contact the
B.B.Y.O. office at (305) 581-
0218 or 792-67fo).


Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, June 2, 1989
Shavuot's Modern Message
Shavuot, or the Festival of Weeks, which
begins next Thursday evening, June 8, is the
second of the three major "pilgrimage" festi-
vals.
While it might have had its roots in an
agricultural society in the days of the Temple,
its fundamental focus must be the subsequent
historical nature of the observance when
the Law was received at Mt. Sinai after the
chosen children from Egypt had wandered for
49 days.
On that 50th day, the people Israel gathered
as a unified community and received God's
law.
In the past year, the divisiveness of the
people Israel would probably have not deemed
us worthy to receive the Law. The polarization
between those who would have categorized
Jews and the rabbinical authorities who sanc-
tioned their conversions; the disunity created
and exacerbated in one of the Jewish state's
most critical political eras surely would have
worked against God's decision.
The object lesson of the holiday in the
current climate warns us to grasp our core
principles and eternal ethics and apply them to
our every action; it encourages us to work as
one for the betterment of every Jews's life in
the Diaspora and in the State of Israel; it
behooves us to function as a people wholly
committed to the Law that made us one and
which continues to unite us as one.
A Global View
The intifada or Arab uprising is in its 18th
month; the State of Israel fights its political
battle on Washington's Capitol steps and in its
foreign aid appropriations as often as it does
at its own Sunday Cabinet meetings; and
diplomatic maneuvering is necessary just to
stay even in the several international courts
where Palestinian interests press to have the
Jewish state delegitimized .
Without peripheral vision, the focus these
last months has been singularly on Israel's
constant crisis vis-a-vis the Palestine Libera-
tion Organization's efforts to curry the
world's favor for its illegitimate terrorist
priority.
The secretary of state, to a target Jewish
audience whose raison d'etre is lobbying for
Israel's very survival, scolds that the sole
democratic nation-state in the Middle East
should "forswear" its vision of a Greater
Jewish floridian
ol Palm Beach County
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Combining Our Voice" and "Federation Reporter"
FRED K SHOCMET
Editor and Publisher
SUZANNE SHOCHET
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Volume 15 Number 19
klrvterntfonal Labor Org.
xx food U AgivuHvTyl Org.
InlfjTUt.'Telt-^omm.UTiion
*JPV
Yom Yerushalayim: A Miracle
In The Rebirth Of Our Civilization
By RABBI OSCAR M. WERNER
Congregation Aitz Chaim
It will be 22 years since
Jerusalem was liberated in
1967 and united once again
with the holy shrines of
ancient times. Even the most
confirmed skeptic must con-
cede that yet another miracle,
besides the founding of the
State of Israel, took place
before our eyes. (For those
among us who do not see or
feel the miraculous events tak-
ing place almost daily, it may
be due to the possibility that
the idea of a miracle is so
strange and so foreign to our
limited understanding and
comprehension.)
To this very day, when some-
one mentions the Great Wall,
in all probability he is referring
to one wall, the 1,500 mile long
Great Wall of China. It was
designed about two and a half
thousand years ago to protect
the ancient Chinese empire
from its enemies. As far as
China is concerned, the wall is
now a museum piece.
It may be surprising even to
many Jews to learn that about
half a century before the Chi-
nese Wall was even thought
of, King Solomon had begun
building a different kind of
wall. In size it may be just
minute in comparison, but the
Wall surrounding the Holy
Temple in Jerusalem was built
not as a symbol of fear and
power but rather as a beacon
of spiritual enlightenment for
the Jewish people, as well as
for all mankind. Thus every
day, many people stream to
the Kotel Ha'maarivi, the
Western Wall to pray and
meditate at the holiest shrine
of Judaism.
While the Great Wall in
China can only be associated
with oppression and wars, the
Holy Wall in Jerusalem by
contrast is seen as the ever-
lasting symbol of hope for the
rebirth of our civilization,
rooted in G-dliness and peace.
Here the Jew has shown his
traditional bravery and her-
oism.
We find this year as we did
last, that Israel is somewhat
beleaguered and even isolated,
and our so-called friends in the
West may be losing patience
with us. Israel has made so
many sacrifices in the last four
decades for its freedom and
independence, and I wonder
how the West would have
reacted had their security and
survival been constantly at
stake.
The Jew in Zion and Jerusa-
lem has a rock-like faith that
those periods of misfortune
will never, never re-occur.
There is a popular song in
Israel entitled "The Wall." It
describes the sacrifices made
by young and old so that we
may now continue to be privi-
leged to join in prayer at the
Kotel. There is one refrain in
this song that describes the
personal message of the Wall
to all who flock there. "We
have, unfortunately, people
with hearts of stone but there
are also stones with the heart
of man."
As we highlight the libera-
tion and re-unification of our
Holy City on the 28th of Iyar,
which in this year 1989 falls on
Friday, June 2, let us remem-
ber that just as Jerusalem is
surrounded by many moun-
tains, so may the Almighty
surround and protect his peo-
ple and bless us with a lasting
and secure peace.
Israel and recognize Palestinian
political rights.
With a particularistic eye, the
world sees only urgency and exi-
gency.
Not to minimize the critical period
facing Israel, there needs also to be a
global view.
While hardly a simple 'guns or
butter' issue, an economy under the
gun these past 41 years must contin-
ually face the dilemma of slighting
its 'consumer' priorities for its life-
saving defense mechanisms.
In spite of the needs dictated by
such a siege system, Israel has, for
instance, been able to develop a
cadre of scientists and technologists
whose professional expertise and
reputations rival the West's best.
Sure, there is the proverbial
Catch-22 that faces Israel's private
universities forced to operate on
public school type tuitions and
decreasing government subsidy.
And, that is why the General Horevs
of Israel are soliciting Jews of Amer-
ica and Europe to make up the
shortfall for Israel's institution of
higher education.
But beyond the philanthropic solic-
itations is a core goal; to make Israel
its infrastructure increasingly
independent technologically and eco-
nomically so that it may be stronger
still to fight its particularistic politi-
cal and military problems.


^m
Friday, June 2, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 5
Briefs
Czechs Now Trading With Israel
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Israel and Czechoslovakia have
established direct trade connections.
They are doing business valued at about $11 million
annually through a trading company acquired for the
purpose by the Czech government.
Until recently, trade between Israel and Czechoslovakia
had been conducted through a third country. There are still
no diplomatic relations, which the Czechs broke in 1967.
PLO Official Blasts Elections Plan
By CATHRINE GERSON
JERUSALEM (JTA) Salah Khalaf, the Palestine
Liberation Organization's second in command, claimed
that Israel's proposal for elections in the West Bank and
Gaza Strip is "a deception of world public opinion" and a
ruse to crush the Palestinian uprising.
Khalaf, popularly known as Abu Iyad, made the remark
in a television interview in the United Arab Emirates.
Khalaf was quoted as saying that "elections cannot be
held under the shadow of occupation." He vowed that the
intifada, as the Palestinians call their uprising, would
continue until the Israeli "occupation" ends.
Palestinians Refute
News Stories On
Care Of Arabs
By Hadassah
NEW YORK The Hadas-
sah Medical Organization
(HMO) recently released a
report citing both Arab and
Israeli sources who offer a
picture of health care for
Palestinians in Gaza and the
West Bank sharply different
from that painted in the Amer-
ican news media.
The report, prepared at the
request of the Hadassah
National Board, includes state-
ments by an Arab physician, a
nurse from Gaza, an Arab
stone mason being treated for
cancer, and an official at a
West Bank university whose
son is also a Hadassah patient
all refuting press reports
that Palestinians have been
tunred away from the medical
complex because the govern-
ment no longer guarantees
payment for their care.
In addition, the report
quotes Israeli health officials,
Hadassah leaders, HMO Direc-
tor General Dr. Samuel Pen-
chas and Hadassah staff physi-
cians as denying the reports
which were originally pub-
lished in three American news-
papers.
The HMO report cites arti-
cles by Glenn Frankel in the
Washington Post, Daniel Wil-
liams in the Lost Angeles
Times and Jonathan Broder in
the San Francisco Examiner
which were published in late
January, and syndicated
nationally by the newspapers,
for failing to balance their arti-
cles "with positive comments
from Palestinian Arabs about
their treatment at Hadassah."
"It is not that Palestinians
wilii pro-Hadassah and;or pro-
Israel views were not available
to be interviewed for these
articles," the HMO report
states. "On the contrary,
Palestinian members of the
Hadassah medical staff,
nurses from Gaza undergoing
advanced training and
patients and their families
were forthcoming with such
comments when interviewed
for this report.
The report quotes "Dr. A.,"
a West Bank Arab physician
who is receiving advanced
training at the Hadassah Medi-
cal Center, as saying that
"there is no differenece
between Arabs and Jews" in
terms of admission and treat-
ment at Hadassah. (The iden-
tities of Arabs quoted in the
report have been disguised to
protect them against repri-
sals.)
"They lie side by side and
get the best and most sophisti-
cated treatment available
today," Dr. A. says in the
report. "Those who are more
seriously ill are placed in pri-
vate wards irrespective of
race, color or creed.
Dr. A. adds that "despite the
unrest, all of the patients I
have recommended to Hadas-
sah have had no problems get-
ting guarantees for payment"
for their care from the Israel
government's Civil Adminis-
tration for the West Bank.
The Hadassah report also
quotes "Mr. B.," a 63-year-old
stone cutter from a West Bank
town that has been the scene
of some of the most violent
outbursts during the unrest,
who is a patient in the Medical
The Sun Never Sets On
Possibilities For Jewish Philanthropy
THERE'S NO TIME LIKE THE PRESENT. This old cliche has relevance to
charitable giving. In maximizing philanthropic opportunity, it's always important
to plan ahead, and often very advantageous to act early as well.
To illustrate this point, we suggest how planning and action early in 1989 can
accelerate and/or lock-in certain tax benefits of charitable gifts.
HAVE YOU CONSIDERED:
1. Whether your investment portfolio contains appreciated securities whose
price right now looks high historically? If you are in this position, now may
be an ideal time to make a gift to our institution of appreciated long-term
gain securities. If you intend to make the gift, and if your review of your
holdings indicates this is an auspicious time from the standpoint of the
stock market, please contact us.
2. That the creation of a charitable remainder trust can increase your annual
income and that you may start benefiting from this even sooner by
creating such a trust early in 1989? Charitable remainder trusts offer many
important advantages. Among other things, such trusts may make it
possible (without eroding your capital through paying capital gains tax) to
achieve the shift you have been looking for out of low dividend stocks and
onto the kind of securities one would purchase if looking primarily for
income. Shifting from low dividends to high interest is our focus.
3. That having decided to update your will and actually do so are two different
things, and that people who are meticulous about charitable gift planning
also tend to be up to date in all other aspects of personal and family
financial planning? A decision to update your will to add a bequest to the
Federation can be the occasion for a periodic review of your estate plan. If
your will does not reflect on paper the sentiments and intentions that are in
your head, we know you will agree with us that you are being unfair to
yourself by ignoring your own wishes.
THE OPPORTUNITY IS YOURS.
4. Finally, the greatest reason of all to make a gift early in the year is to begin
now experiencing the joy and satisfaction that will be yours through this
charitable contribution. Whenever in the year you give, and whatever you
give, the ultimate reasons for giving are not based on tax deductibility.
Tax-advantaged giving does not provide the desire to give, but taking full
advantage of the opportunities in the tax laws can provide the means to
give more than you might otherwise have thought possible.
Please review your specific situation with your tax and financial advisors. Our
recent Quarterly Newsletter contains "teasers" that we hope will help you think
about your own philanthropic program. We would be pleased to provide you with
more details and information concerning how you can take maximum advantage
of the ideas and concepts, but you are strongly encouraged to consult your
attorney and tax advisor as to how gifts and/or bequests to our institution
should be structured for you. When contemplating gifts of appreciated
long-term gain securities, be sure to talk with your advisors about any
Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT) implications which might impact gifts of
appreciated long-term gain property.
The Foundation of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
501 Flagler Drive, Suite 305
West Palm Beach, FL 33401
(407) 832-2120
Edward Baker
Endowment Director
Erwin H. Blonder
Chairman
Morris Rombro
Emdowment Associate
THE FOUNDATION
of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
Center's Hematology Depart-
ment.
Mr. B. says that he's "been
treated like any other patient
here," and express confidence
that "there will be no problem
about my coming back once a
month for chemotherapy,"
even though the unrest contin-
ues in the occupied territories.
His only complaint is that "I
do wish they could speak Ara-
bic with me."
"Mr. C," one of a group of
all male nurses from Gaza,
cites a farewell party given for
him and a colleague in Hadas-
sah's Oncology Department as
an example of the closeness
between Arabs and Jews at
Hadassah.
"The first principle I learned
in my nursing school," Mr. C.
states, "is that the nurse must
never discriminate among
patients of different races and
creeds, and I find that this
principle is observed to the full
in Haddassah."
The Hadassah report also
quotes "Dr. D.," an official at
a West Bank university and a
Palestinian Arab who is also
an Israeli citizen. His 16-year-
old son has been treated for
cancer at Hadassah for the
past three years.
Dr. D. Says that he and his
family "never sensed any dis-
crimination because we are
Arabs." He also is quoted as
saying that he has met many
Arabs from the West Bank
during his son's routine check-
ups over the past 15 months,
including hospitalized patients
and their families, whom he
says "are very much at home,
and certainly never complain
about their treatment."
A copy of the complete
report is enclosed.
EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITY
Religious School Teachers
and Bar/Bat Mitzvah Tutor
Needed 1989-90 School Year.
Temple Beth Zion
Royal Palm Beach
Call Temple Office
798-8888 or 798-4971


Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, June 2, 1989
Public Speaking & Debate Competition Held At JCDS
Each year Mrs. Leznoff's
seventh grade at the Jewish
Community Day School holds a
public speaking contest and
her eighth grade participates
in a debate competition. The
variety of subjects and the
heated emotions this year
were an indication of the
enthusiasm of the participants
and audience alike.
Ten seventh graders spoke
on subjects as varied as "The
History of Scuba Diving" to
"First Amemdment to the
Constitution" to "Diamonds."
The winners were: first place
Sosha Zaretsky, "Toxic
Waste;" second place Cynthia
Simon, "Illiteracy;" third
place tie between Lisa Gordon,
"Allergies" and Scott Skier,
"Blacks in Sports Manage-
ment."
The eighth grade debates led
to a heated discussion.
"Resolved that Gun Control
Would Reduce Crime" speak-
ers for the affirmative were
Ori Feistmann and Karli Pas-
ton and for the negative were
Justin Brass and Mark
Rothenberg. "Resolved that
Terrorism is Justified" speak-
ers for the postive were Rachel
Klein and Marshall Rosenbach
and for the negative were
Geoffrey Mullen and Danielle
Trabin. In both debates the
negative sides prevailed. Over-
all debate winners were: first
place Rachel Klein, second
place Karli Paston, and third
place tie between Danielle Tra-
bin and Justin Brass.
(L to r) Mrs. Leznoff, Shosha Zaretsky, Cynthia Simon, Lisa
Gordon, Scott Skisr.
Aquatics Committee Forming Thirteenth
Patti Abramson, Vice Presi-
dent in charge of Program-
ming, has announced that the
agency, in conjunction with its
aquatics consultant, John R.
Spannuth, has initiated plans
for an Aquatics Program and
is now seeking community vol-
unteers to serve on the new
aquatics committee. Anyone
interested in sharing ideas and
time for this project contact
Jack R. on the JCC Hotline
689-7702.
Holocaust Survivors
Support Day School
The Holocaust Survivors of the Palm Beaches recently made a
contribution to the Jewish Community Day School during the
school's Holocaust Memorial Ceremonies. Mr. Ed Lejkouritz (left.),
President of the organization presented a check for $500 to Dr.
Nissim Elbaz, Executive Director of the school. Students from
grades 4-8 were deeply moved by remarks by Mr. Lefkowitz and by
a slide presentation by Steve Derringer, a student at the
University of Michigan, who recently visited the death camps of
Europe. The Holocaust Survivors also made a recent contribution
to the Anti-Defamation League, accepted by Louise Shure,
Regional Director of the ADL.
JCC Speakers Bureau
Steven Shapiro, President of the Jewish Community
Center of the Greater Palm Beaches, has announced that
the agency is opening a Speaker's Bureau this Fall to
provide Jewish groups and organizations with people
highly qualified to speak on Jewish affairs. Volunteer
speakers possess a wide-range of experience and know-
ledge covering the total spectrum of Jewish affairs. One
function of the Bureau is to keep the community abreast of
the progress being made in the new Jewish Community
Campus and the new JCC. Should your organization wish
to schedule a JCC speaker, call Valerie Silverman today at
the JCC, 689-7700.
JEWISH FAMILY AND CHILDREN'S SERVICE
Are you caring for someone with a memory
problem? Let us take care of your loved one in
our ongoing group which meets at Temple
Israel, Mondays and Wednesdays, from 10:00
a.m. to 1:00 p.m. Lunch is included. Contact
Anne Epstein, Project Director of Respite care
Program, at 684-1991.
WE CARE!
Graduation
At JCDS
The Thirteenth Annual Gra-
duation Exercises for the Jew-
ish Community Day School will
be held on Wednesday, June
14, at 7:30 p.m. at the Day
School.
The 13 eighth graders
receiving their diplomas are:
Justin Brass, Ori Feistmann,
Rachel Klein, Geoffrey Mullen,
Karli Paston, Joshua Perrin,
Evan Robinson, Marshall
Rosenbach, Mark Rothenberg,
David Slonim, Michael Slowik,
Danielle Trabin and Jessica
Weingard. They bring the
total number of alumni from
the Jewish Community Day
School to 145.
Award presentations will
take place during a school
assembly on Monday, June 12
at 9 a.m. The Benjamin S.
Hornstein Scholarship Award
for the outstanding student in
the graduating class will be
awarded at graduation cere-
monies on Wednesday even-
ing.
' ft
(L to r) Ori Feistmann, Karli Paston, Mark Rothenberg, Justin
Brass, Marshall Rosenbach, Rachel Klein, Danielle Trabin,
Geoffrey Mullen.
A-AAbot Answerfone offers:
TELEPHONE ANSWERING SERVICE
|| BEEPER PAGING SERVICE
PRIVATE LINE SERVICE
MONITORING SERVICE
WAKE UP SERVICE MAIL SERVICE
and
"person to person service"
24 hours a day
A-AAbot Answerfone (407)586-7400
213 N. Dixie Highway Lake Worth, FL 33460
TOVAH FELDSHUH: ON UNIQUENESS
Oncol the great
motivating forces m my
life is uniqueness As an
actress uniqueness is impor-
tant, because acting is
more than just role-playing.
It squires being able to
expose a quality that is
uniquely you
In other areas of my
life, I ltx>k lor uniqueness
Even m my decaffeinated
coffee. Sanka" Brand
Decaffeinated Col lee is
unique, because it's the only
leading, national brand that
is naturally decaffeinated
with pure water and
nature's own sparkling
effervescence So. not only
is Sanka" smooth-tasting,
but it addresses my
(*) koshkr
concerns about caffeine
and food that is naturally
processed.
All of us have the poten-
tial to be unique. All wc
need is to experience that
part of us that's different
and enjoyable. Kir me, it
can be a challenging role in
a new play, or something
as simple as relaxing with
acupofSanka" Uniqueness
. then.' arc so many ^mt
way s to enjoy it! \Ju
GfNERAl
fOOOS


BIRTH/CIRCUMCISION. (L-r) Sidney and Helen Spiegel, Rabbi
Oscar Werner and Donna Ricketts.
BAR/BAT MITZVAH. (L-r) Rafi Cohen, Joe Rosen, Cynthia
Simon, Lisa Gordon and Rabbi Alan Cohen.
EDUCATION. Dr. Elliot Schwartz conducts discussion with
Morse residents.
Friday, June 2, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 7
Morse Residents Review
"Jewish Life Cycle" During
"Older Americans Month"
A week-long series covering the "Jewish Life Cycle" was pre-
sented to the residents of the Joseph L. Morse Geriatric Center May
15 through 19, as part of the facility's observance of "Older
Americans Month." The series included presentations on birth and
circumcision, education, bar/bat mitzvah, marriage and death.
E. Drew Gackenheimer, Executive Director of the Morse,
explained, "Older Americans Month" is set aside to honor and pay
respect to our elderly. We can think of no better way to do this than
to join with our residents in reliving the most important moments in
their lives."
According to Donna Ricketts, Morse Activities Coordinator, to
accommodate the schedules of the five speakers, the subjects in the
series were not presented in order. "As it turned out, we ended the
series with the up-beat 'marriage,' which worked out to everyone's
satisfaction."
Three of the five presentations included demonstrations, while
two presentations were held as discussions. Dr. Elliot Schwartz,
Director of Education for the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach, led
the series with a discussion on Jewish education. His comments
ranged over the history of Jewish education and how it has been
modified by today's circumstances. He also evoked response from
his listeners when touching on the continuing importance of Jewish
education.
Rabbi Alan Cohen of Temple Beth El was joined by his son, Rafi,
and three young people in demonstrating bar/bat mitzvah ceremo-
nies. The other youngsters included Cynthia Simon, Lisa Gordon
and Joe Rosen. All attend the Jewish Community Day School.
A discussion on the subject of death was led by Morse volunteer
Frieda Berman.
"It was a heavy discussion, with more than a few
tears shed," said Ricketts. She added, "Several residents asked Mrs.
Berman to return to lead similar discussions."
With the assistance of two members of his Temple, Congregation
Aitz Chaim, an anatomically correct doll and a Morse resident, Rabbi
Oscar Werner discussed and demonstrated the rituals, traditions
and ceremonies of birth and circumcision. The Temple members,
Helen and Sidney Spiegel, served as "God Parents," while resident,
Sam Goldie, was involved in the naming ceremony. (After the
ceremony, 87-year-old Goldie joked,"He (the doll) looks just like me,
doesn't he?")
To end the series, residents Abraham Grabler, 97, and Ida Grabler,
93, renewed the vows of their 73 year marriage in a garden wedding
conducted by Rabbi Allen Sherman. Rabbi Sherman, who is Director
of the Community Relations Council Chaplaincy and Director of
Religious Life for the Morse, explained the rituals of the wedding to
the other residents, staff and family members who gathered for the
occasion.
Fourteen Morse residents and three staff members played parts in
the wedding which was eagerly photographed by newspaper and TV
station crews.
"All in all," said Gackenheimer, "It was a very special and
meaningful week for all of us."
DEATH. Frieda Ber-
man listens to resident
describe her feelings
about death and dying.
MARRIAGE. (L-r) Morse Executive Director, E. Drew Gacken-
heimer, Sarah Weinstein, resident, (playing father and mother of
the bride) Ida and Abe Grabler and Rabbi Sherman.


Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, June 2, 1989
Celebration Of B'nai B'rith
Our Youth Need YOU Bicentenial Shabbat
m* -k i 11 i \ i. i\- hoc ''II *h*.i nt '!'<.: :mil _aH_a|^__H^^|aaaB^^BM^^^H
Happily Ever H
The B'nai B'rith Youth
Organization is now recruiting
volunteers to serve as advisors
for local high school age youth
groups.
Requirements for this
rewarding assignment are as
follows:
If vou are at least 21 years
old .
If you are committed to
Judaism and to Jewish life .
If you have a genuine liking for
youth and enjoy working with
them .
If you are willing to work
under close supervision and
participation in ongoing train-
ing .. .
Then BBYO would like to
meet you .
The local BBYO Program
currently nas ZU chapters and
reaches out to almost 700 Jew-
ish teens in the Palm Beach
Gardens, Boca Raton, Coral
Springs, Plantation, Holly-
wood, Pembroke Pines and
North Miami Beach areas. The
girls component is BBG (B'nai
B'rith Girls) and the boys is
AZA (Aleph Zadik Aleph).
Together they are a dynamic
and important part of our Jew-
ish community.
Our youth need your sup-
port. If you are interested in
becoming involved in this ful-
filling and vital part of our
young people's lives, please
call Pam Bernstein or Richard
Kessler at the Gold Coast
Council B'nai B'rith Youth
Organization office at 581-
0218 for more information and
to arrange for an interview.

REGISTER NOW!
SUMMER CAMPS
CAMP SHORESH -
Summer programs for 12 mos.
old infants through 4 year olds
at 5335 No. Military Trail (at
45th St.) Call Gail to register
689-7700.
CAMP SHALOM -
7875 Belvedere Rd., West Palm
Beach. For 3 yr. olds 14 yr.
olds. Call Jack for more infor-
mation 689-7700.
PRESCHOOL
IN THE FALL
For infants through 4 "1 year olds
FOUR LOCATIONS
7875 Belvedere Road
(Camp Shalom)
5335 No. Military Trail
(at 45th St.)
920 Town Hall Ave.
(Jupiter)
2815 No. Flagler Dr.
(Temple Beth El)
Call Gail at 689-7700 for
Early Childhood Pro-
gram Information.
OF THE GREATER
PALM BEACHES
For Additional InlcumaVon
689-7700
700 Spencer Drive
wes: Palm Beach. FL 33409
YOUR CAR IN ISRAEL
RESERVAT. M. PRPYMMT.:
1 800-533 8778
IN MY: 212-629-6090
BFN CURION INTl AIRPORT f HAT
HFR7LIYA HAIFA JERUSALEM
ASHKEION NETANYA TEl AVIV
A joint community program was shared recently by Lucerne
Lakes Lodge B'nai B'rith and Beth Tikvah Lake Worth Jewish
Center. A special Sabbath service attended by a capacity audience
was prepared by Rabbi Richard Rocklin, spiritual leader oj Beth
Tikvah and Len Turk, Chairman of Community Volunteer
Services of Lucerne Lakes Lodge S132. The celebration commem-
orated the 200th anniversary of the Constitution, one oj the
greatest documents in American history which drew upon the
Hebrew Bible for many of its precepts and ramifications.
Pictured left to right: Max Brock, Pres. Lucerne Lakes Lodge,
B'nai B'rith; Ruth Turk, Author, Columnist, Lecturer; Len
Turk, C.V.S. Chairman, Lucerne Lakes Lodge; Rabbi Richard
Rocklin, Lake Worth Jewish Center; Sam Raskin, Past-
President, Lucerne Lakes Lodge; Howard Cwick, Board Member,
Lucerne Lakes Lodge. Not pictured: Leonard Greenberg, Martha
Freedberg.
Louis and Minnie Brown, the.
celebrate their 70th anniversary
July 9th in Century Village. L01
Jewish Federation for many w i
Chai Hadass
m
n.
Board members of Chai
surprise luncheon for outgoing\pr>
left). On the right is Ruth WevL
Publix is a store greatest variety and best
dedicated to superlatives. value around. Because we
Our goal is to provide you knowyou want the very best
with the utmost convenience, that's available. Whether
it be fresh out of the oven
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it all together with Publix.
Where shopping is a pleasure.
Hi, jJi*,tun-J*ailM, .i/i.iPbWk Mn ith fmk[XimihKAmri
The Upper
Crust.


ifter 70 Years
\ruv*l couple pictured above, will
-v with their family and friends on
4 ,is Brown had been active in the
ah Presidents
iU8dh of Lake Worth, made a
if president, Evelyn Andelman (on
its. incoming president.
Cantor
Rita Shore
Returns To
Temple
Judea
Cantor Rita Shore
Cantor Rita Shore returns as
Cantor of Temple Judea begin-
ning Friday, June 2, at Shab-
bat Services, which begin at 8
p.m. She will join Rabbi Joel
Levine in conducting the Ser-
vice and officiating at the Con-
firmation ceremony of Laurel
Mayer.
The theme of the liturgy will
be "Turn Friday Night into
Shabbat." Through congrega-
tional singing Rabbi Levine
and Cantor Shore will create
the feeling of Shabbat which
has been hallowed throughout
Jewish tradition.
Cantor Shore was Cantor of
Temple Judea from the con-
gregation's inception in June,
1981. In the summer of 1984,
she became Cantor of Temple
Emanuel of Ft. Lauderdale.
Cantor Shore returns to Tem-
ple Judea following a residence
in New York City with her
husband Ira.
Cantor Shore holds member-
ship in the American Confer-
ence of Cantors. She became
the first female Cantor in 1978
Continued on Page 11
Friday, June 2, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 9
Ex-Refusenik Geller Addresses Bonds
Dr. Boris Geller
Dr. and Mrs. Mark Rattinger
recently hosted a Sunday
reception on behalf of the New
Leadership Division of State of
Israel Bonds. The speaker was
Dr. Boris Geller, a former
Soviet refusenik who has been
living in Israel since November
1987.
Dr. Geller, born in 1954 to an
assimilated Jewish family in
Na'Amat Installs New Officers
Pictured above are the new Na'Amat USA Palm Beach Council
officers elected for 1989/90. (L-r) Sandra Cohen, President,
Delray Beach; Pearl Epstein, Executive V.P., Boca Raton;
Shirley Fayne, Installing Officer; Fran Lehn, Co-Membership
V.P., Delray Beach; Florence M. Kaufman, Programming V.P.,
Delray Beach; Jean Weitz, Treasurer, Delray Beach; Grace
Freisler, Recording Secretary, West Palm Beach; Corresponding
Secretary, West Palm Beach; not pictured are Elsie Meyers,
Financial Secretary, Lake Worth and Harriet Herfield, Co-
Membership V.P., Delray Beach.
Air Corximorma t Heatad
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WBEM
M
M OlUDMJEf%l* (y) 2 Hu More ot
MM KOSHEP HOTEL GLATT Sunshine do*v
^^ YOUR HOME AWAY FROM HOME
rREDUCED RATES
Beginning
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JUNE 27
HEATED THfRAPfUTTC WHIRLPOOL
PRIVATE BEACH FREE PARKING
COLOR TV a RADIO IN ALL ROOMS
NIGHTLY ENTERTAINMENT
WE CATER TO All DIETS
FREECABUTV phone
_ 1-407-531-0061
Entire Oceoniront Bkx* 37m to 38lh Ss Miami Beoch
JUNE 27
HIGH HOLY DAYS & SUCCOTH
SCHECHTER FAMILY Management
M
WIN-PAC
Women's Pro Israel National Political Action Committee
Invites you to join us at the
White House and The State Department
on Capitol Hill
June 12 and 13, 1989
at our National Convention in Washington, D.C.
WIN'PAC, the strongest Women's Political force for Israel
was founded to support Israel's friends in Congress. Let your
voices be heard on behalf of Israel.
For reservations contact Fruema Klorfein
(407)842-2835
THE FLIGHT
THELIMO
THE RESORT
THE POOD
THE TON
THE TWO WEEKS
ONE CALL DOES IT ALL
TWO
WEEKS
FOR ONLY
$1,289
R
low rates tor entenOeO stays
ine*
Your Choice
of Airline
Sooth Falrsburs, New Vbrk 18779 (914) 434-6000
CALL TOLL FREE: (800) 431-3124
O it low *afi Ani MtUBdwy "* Honored
That's right. We'll fly
you to The Pines for
two full weeks for
only $1,289. And
back again, your
stay at The Pines
also includes three
meals a day and
your exclusive
Pines limousine.
Call us today for
complete details
1*1 all on the premises
Indoor & Outdoor
tennis & tree golf
Plus 36 notes of
golf nearby
Indoor & Outdoor Pools
Health Club
Steam Room
Sauna
Air Conditioned
Card Rooms
Dance Classes &
Exercise Oasses
"Speedy Garfm" Band
Top Star-Studded
Entertainment
Moscow, earned degrees in
computers and physics and
was employed for eight years
at the USSR Academy of
Sciences. He of course lost his
job as soon as he applied for an
exit visa. This was followed by
a series of jobs from which he
was fired until, after a two-
year wait, he was allowed to
emigrate to Israel with his
wife and two daughters.
In Israel, Dr. Geller is
Continued on Page 11

MOON OVER
MIAMI
STARS OVER
KUTSHER'S
&ZY2y SUMMER STARS &
*f~ JOAM RIVERS
1^" ALAN KING
j DAVID MENNEft
7^ SHECKY GREENE
i^~ YAKOV SMIRNOFF
Xsf AND MANY MORE
MAUREEN McGOVERN / PAT COOPER
Memonol Doy Weekend
Don't moon over Miami this summer Get owoy to Kutsher's
where the days ore cool and the nights are filled with stars.
You'll bask in the warmth of the friendly atmosphere instead
of sweltering in Miami's heat And we'll fill your days with
dozens of delightful activities from guest lectures to bridge
instruction and tournaments There II be get-togethers that are
true socials and a variety of programs to satisfy oil your needs
On the premises: 18-hole. 7.157 yard championship golf
course. 12 all-weather and cloy tennis courts, a fully-equipped
health club and exercise center, lokeside walking trails, outdoor
and indoor pools, rocquetboll courts, fitness consultant, jogging
track, indoor ice skating, private lake, aerobics nursery 0 super-
vised day comp. teen programs, and nite patrol
Three delicious meals doily, geared to your own special diet
Call us for Information about transportation from New York area airports!
Kutsher's Country Club
Monticello. New York 12701 19141 794-6000
CALL TOLL FREE: (800) 431 1273
Complete Convention Facilities Major Credit Cards Honored
/" CAMP SHALOM FAMILY PARK "\
Now open to JCC members and their guests
tennis, basketball, volleyball, special Sunday pro-
grams, kosher snack bar.
FAMILY PARK HOURS: Saturdays 1:00 PM 5:00 PM
Sundays 11:00 AM 5:00 PM
DAILY ADMISSION: JCC Members FREE -
Guests: Adults $2.00 Children under 17 $1.00
BRING YOUR FAMILY AND FRIENDS
For Information
689-7700
700 Spencer Drive, West Palm Beach, FL 33409
swimming,
OF THE GREATER
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JESKr *.*"
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25*r..C^.*~
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^CT-OHtONOErsfW*
305-53*5721^ ^


Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, June 2, 1989
COME CELEBRATE JCC WEEK WITH US
Join your Jewish Community Center in a week-long celebration of the past year s
accomplishments and the wonderful plans we have for the future.
MONDAY, MAY 29
Opening of our Family Park at Camp Shalom and cel-
ebration of its renovation.
TUESDAY, MAY 30
First Anniversary celebration of our Preschool West.
WEDNESDAY, MAY 31
First Anniversary celebration of our very active and
successful Boynton Beach Senior Center.
THURSDAY, JUNE 1
First Anniversary celebration of Preschool Central.
FRIDAY, JUNE 2
Late morning celebration of our new WPB Senior &
Social Center and affixing of the mezzuzah on the
new Campus Office. Bus caravan to site of the new
Jewish Community Campus for the celebration of a
14 year dream: the beginning of the development of
the Campus. Inauguration of the Community Cam-
paign for the new building.
Please watch for more details as this exciting week approaches.

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NATHAN SEIDNER BURGESS
B'nai Mitzvah
Friday, June 2, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 11
Nathan Seidner Burgess,
son of liana Burgess of West
Palm Beach, will be called to
the Torah as a Bar Mitzvah on
Sunday, June 4 at Temple
Beth El. Rabbi Alan Cohen
and Cantor Norman Brody will
officiate.
Nathan is a seventh grade
student at the Jewish Com-
munity Day School. He is a
member of the National Junior
Honor Society, the basketball
team and Softball team. He
enjoys stamp collecting, tra-
veling and music. Nathan will
be twinned with Nikolay Gol-
denberg of Moldavian, USSR,
who was denied his freedom to
be called to the Torah as a Bar
Mitzvah.
Special Awards For Special Children
Back row: Ruth Turk, Len Turk. George Columbus. Front:
Special Children holding their awards.
Lucerne Lakes Lodge B'nai
H'rith recently presented its
sixth annual Special Awards
For Special Children program
at the Sheraton Inn in West
Palm Beach. With the coopera-
tion of the South Area Admin-
istrative Staff of the Palm
Beach County School Board,
Len Turk, Chairman of Com-
munity Volunteer Services and
Co-Chairman George Colum-
bus, developed guidelines for
Palm Beach County schools to
recognize handicapped young-
sters who have demonstrated
noteworthy efforts to over-
come handicaps academically,
socially, and on the community
level. Framed scrolls were pre-
sented to the students by
Superintendent of Schools,
Tom Mills; Mrs. Beverlyann
Barton, South Area Elemen-
tary Administrator; Mr. H.W.
Berryman, South Area Secon-
dary Administrator; and Dr.
Joseph A. Orr, Associate
Superintendent of Instruction.
Ex-Refusenik
Geller
Continued from Page 9
employed in the Department
of Medical Biophysics and
Nuclear Medicine at the
Hadassah University Hospital
in Ein Karem, Jerusalem. His
wife is also employed, teaching
physics. According to the Gel-
ler family, their aliyah to Israel
lias been a very happy and
successful experience despite
that they are still living in an
absorption center due to the
limited housing available.
Dr. Geller related some of
his experiences in Moscow that
led up to his leaving. He
strongly believes that Russian
lews should be going to Israel
to learn about the country
because he says they know
very little. At a time when so
many retusniks are not going
t<> Israel, his message is most
important and vital to the
large numbers that are leaving
Russia, and he warns that that
number could be cut at any
time. He answered many ques-
tions from the appreciative
and enthusiastic audience of
young professionals.
J?5

ROBERT IPP
Robert Ipp, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Steven Ipp of West Palm
Beach, was called to the Torah
as a Bar Mitzvah at Temple
Beth Sholom in Lake Worth on
May 27. Rabbi Emmanuel
Eisenberg conducted the ser-
vice.
Bobby attends the Jewish
Community Day School, and
participates in all sports activi-
ties. He is currently on the
school softball team as first
baseman. He recently served
on the school yearbook com-
mittee, and was named one of
the top fifteen finalists in the
Palm Beach County American
Lung Association poster con-
test.
He is currently a member of
Kadima. His interests include
comedy, cartoon drawing and
skateboarding.
This special occasion will be
shared by his brother Aaron,
his paternal grandparents Mr.
and Mrs. Louis Rosenblatt of
Delray Beach and his maternal
grandparents Mr. and Mrs.
Edward Schurga of Lake
Worth.
Cantor Returns
when she served Temple Judea
of Coral Gables. Cantor Shore
also has served as Cantor of
Temple Bet Breira of Miami.
At Temple Judea of West
Palm Beach, Cantor Shore will
Continued from Page 9
be teaching adults, religious
school children, and working
with Rabbi Levine in creating
unique liturgical approaches to
the Sabbath, Festivals, and
High Holy Days.
REGISTERED REAL ESTATE BROKER
AcreageHomesLot9Aprtr.ientsIncome Property
232A Royal Palm Way Office: 656-7885
PALM BEACH. FLORIDA RES: 582-0184
^WE NEED DONATIONS TODAY!^
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LAMPS DECORATIVE ACCESSORIES
HOUSEWARES CLOTHING LINENS
We'll even accept your old Cars and Boats
WE'RE THE ONLY THRIFT SHOP OF THE JEWISH COMMUNITY
CENTER OF THE GREATER PALM BEACHES
THANK YOU FOR CARING!
Hours:
Mon thru Fri 9am-4pm
Sunday 1lam-4pm t t
i y All proceeds benefit
Free Furniture Pick-up
Free Appraisals over $5,000
Ihe Jewish Commun
ily Center of me
Pjlm Beaches
for Additional kilocmition
471-1077
J331 N. Military Tf (Sol Okeechobee Blvd.) WPB FL 33409

THRIFT
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y
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Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, June 2, 1989
Senior News
FROM THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
The Comprehensive Senior Service Center, through a
Federal Grant Title III of the Older Americans Act,
provides a variety of services to persons 60 years or
older, along with interesting and entertaining, educa-
tional and recreational programs. All senior activities
are conducted in compliance with Title VI of the Civil
Rights Act and Section 504 of the Vocational Rehabilita-
tion Act of 1973.
The JCC's Senior Center, 5029 Okeechobee Boule-
vard, West Palm Beach is an active place for all Seniors.
Hot kosher meals are served every day and programs
and activities will be scheduled throughout the year.
KOSHER MEALS
Kosher lunches are served
Monday through Friday at
11:15. The three locations are:
JCC in West Palm Beach -
5029 Okeechobee Boulevard;
JCC in Boynton Beach
501 N.E. 26th Avenue;
and JCC in Delray Beach
16189 Carter Road.
Meet new friends while
enjoying delicious, nutritious
food along with planned activi-
ties everyday. Volunteers are
always needed. No fee is re-
quired but contributions are
requested. Reservations re-
quired. Call Carol in West
Palm Beach at 689-6332, Julia
in Boynton Beach at 582-7360,
or Nancy in Delray Beach at
495-0806. For transportation
call Department of Senior Ser-
vices 627-5765.
HIGHLIGHTS OF KOSHER
LUNCH CONNECTION IN
WEST PALM BEACH
FOR JUNE
Friday, June 2 Celebra-
tion of opening JCC Senior
Center, hanging of Mezzuzah
Monday, June 5 Bingo
with Fred Bauman.
Tuesday, June 6 Lisa
Gilders Blood Sugar Tests
Wednesday, June 7 Dr.
Sheldon Konigsberg, Gastro-
enterologist
Thursday, June 8 Phil
Puro, a "One Man Band"
Friday, June 9 CLOSED
FOR SHAVOUT
Monday, June 12 Bingo
with Fred Bauman
Tuesday, June 13 Medi-
care Assignment with William
Leminsky
Wednesday, June 14 to
be announced
Thursday, June 15 Rose
Dunsky Current Events
Friday, June 16 Pre-
Sabbath Services with Rabbi
Schmuel Ezaejar, Shur Cha-
bad
KOSHER HOME
DELIVERED MEALS
Are you homebound? Is your
neighbor homebound? Are you
unable to cook for yourself?
Have you just come home from
the hospital and have no way
to maintain your daily nutri-
tional requirements? The
Jewish Community Center's
Kosher Home Delivered Meals
Service is just for you!!!
This is a most essential on-
going or short term service for
the homebound. No fee, but
contributions requested. For
Boynton Beach, Lake Worth
or West Palm Beach call Carol
at 689-6332. In Delray Beach,
call Nancy at 495-0806.
JCC
TRANSPORTATION
SERVICE
The Jewish Community
Center is providing transpor-
tation for persons who wish to
visit loved ones in nursing
homes, hospitals or have to go
to Day Care Centers. Tickets
are required for each one-way
trip and may be obtained from
the driver. Each one-way trip
donation is $1 and persons
purchasing blocks of ten will re-
ceive two free. Reservations
are required. Call Libby at
689-7700 between 9 a.m. and
1 p.m. For Century Village
clients only, for medical and
meal site transportation, call
division of senior services at
627-5765. All other clients
call 355-4740.
CLASSES AND
ACTIVITIES
Adult Education Classes
The Jewish Community
Center is proud to offer classes
provided by Palm Beach Com-
munity College and Palm
Beach County School Board
Adult Education. Fees are
required for these classes
along with registration. Watch
for Spring schedule. Call
Louise at 689-6332 for infor-
mation.
OVERVIEW OF HEALTH
ISSUES 1989
The Jewish Community Cen-
ter and the Palm Beach Com-
munity College are proud to
co-sponsor the first presenta-
tion of Overview of Health
Issues 1989.
This six week series will
include a "How To" conduct
constructive, candid discus-
sions regardless of the topic.
Discussions will center around
strategies for good health pre-
vention of chronic problems, as
well as explore the needs of
the American population as
regards to a Health Care sys-
tem we can be proud of. The
series is offered to community
organizations, community
leaders and interested mem-
bers. Dates: Tuesday after-
noons, May 9 June 13 at
2:30 to 4:30 at JCC Senior
Center. Fee: $4, registrations
limited. Call Louise at 689-
6332 for information and re-
servations. Presented by:
Gert Friedman, Specialist,
Disease Prevention Wellness
Programs, P.B.C.C.
Do You Feel Misunder-
stood? Do you often feel mis-
understood and find yourself
"putting up with it," "shutting
up about it," or "giving up?"
This course will zero in on how
people bury their feelings and
often say "I've done so well,
why do I feel so bad?" You will
be taught how to communicate
your feelings, learn to be bet-
ter listeners, and become com-
fortable with making your own
decisions. Pre-registrations a
must! Call Louise at 689-6332.
Instructor: Faye Schecter,
Palm Beach Community Col-
lege, date: June 7, 14 and 21,
Wednesdays at 10 a.m. Fee:
$2.
OTHER CLASSES
AND ACTIVITIES
June Book Review "A
Late Divorce" by a young
Israeli, A. B. Yeshoshua will
be given by the outstanding
Marjorie Dreier on Thursday,
June 1 at 1:30 at the JCC
Senior Center. Please call
Louise at 689-6332 for reser-
vations. Contributions $1.
Timely Topics: Ongoing
Mondays at the JCC. Program
starts at 2. A stimulating
group discussing an exciting
variety of topics including
current events. Please call
689-6332.
Speakers Club Ongoing
Thursdays at 9:30 a.m. at JCC.
For persons who wish to prac-
tice the art of public speaking
a great group.
AARP 55/Alive Driving
Class. Two-four hour sessions.
Graduation card will entitle
bearer to a discount from all
insurance companies. Fee: $7
payable to AARP. Send check
to Louise at JCC. Your check
is your reservation. Instruc-
tor: Bobbe Taffel. Dates:
Thursday, June 14 and Thurs-
day, June 15, 1:30-5:30 at the
JCC Senior Center.
Twilight Dining and
Dancing returns on Thursday,
June 22 at 4:30 p.m. at the
JCC Senior Center. Enjoy
dancing to the music provided
by our JCC disc jockey Izzie
Goldberg along with a deli-
cious kosher dinner. Reserva-
tions required. Please call
Louise before June 19 at 689-
6332.
SECOND TUESDAY
COUNCIL
A dedicated, loyal group who
enjoy planning fun fund rais-
ing events and work unsel-
fishly with our Nutrition pro-
gram. Chairperson, Sabina
Gottschalk.
SECOND TUESDAY
MINI LUNCH &
CARD PARTY
Wednesday, June 28th at
1:45 Mini Lunch & Card
Party Door Prizes. Enjoy a
delightful afternoon at the
new JCC Senior Center at the
Village Marketplace. Bring
your own cards. Reservations
required. Call Sabina 683-0852
or Louise at 689-6332. Fee:
JCC Member $3, Non-member
$3.50.
JCC SENIOR BRAIN BOWL
MONTHLY MEETING
Meeting Friday, June 9 at
1:30 p.m. at the JCC Senior
Center. All are welcome. A
fast-paced activity designed to
challenge and stimulate. This
is good preparation for next
year's state-wide Senior
Smarts competition.
AT YOUR SERVICE
The Jewish Community
Center provides by appoint-
ment: Health Insurance Assis-
tance with Edie Reiter; Legal
Aid by Palm Beach County
Legal Aid Society; Home
Financial Management with
Herb Kirsch
VOLUNTEER NEWS
"Hi-Neighbor," the very
special JCC Mitzvah Corps is
a group of persons reaching
YOUNG SINGLES (20s & 30s)
Saturday, June 3, 9 p.m. Partytime at Jason's (4919
Okeechobee Blvd., WPB), a private club where we'll have
our own section. Cash bar and inexpensive snack menu.
Tuesday, June 6, 5:30 p.m. Happy Hour at Margarita
Y* Amigas (Palm Beach Lakes Blvd., west of 1-95, behind
Bennigan's). Cool drinks and free taco bar.
Thursday, June 8, 6:45 p.m. Movie and drink night.
Meet in the lobby of Cinema 'N Drafthouse (N.E. comer of
10th Ave. No. and Congress, Lake Worth), for our popular
movie night. Food, beer and munchies available off the
menu. (Cost: $2 for movie.)
Sunday, June 11, 10:30 a.m. Fun in the sun at Six
Flags Atlantis. Meet at the JCC (700 Spencer Dr., WPB)
parking lot to carpool down for a wet and wild day. Bring
bathing necessities lockers, food and beverages are
available at extra fee. Cost: Special group rate $9.95 plus
$1 to driver. RSVP by June 8 to ensure group rate. Call for
reservations.
Wednesday, June 14, 5:45 p.m. Dine Japanese style
at Samurai Steakhouse (1837 No. Military Tr., corner
Military and Okeechobee). Watch master chefs prepare
dinner at your table. Early Birds begin at $6.95. Call for
reservations.
SINGLE PARENTS
Monday, June 5, 7:30-9 p.m. Discussion entitled
"How To Get What You Really Want!" at the JCC
Pre-School, corner Military Trail and 45th St. (in the
Southwind Shopping Plaza). The group will be led by
Bonnie Altman, M.E.D. Learn how to create more love,
money, fun, or whatever you want in life. Babysitting
available upon request prior to meeting.
30s & 40s
Wednesday, June 7, 6:30 p.m. Dine Italiano at C.J.
Pastorelli's (5805 Congress Ave., N.W. corner Congress
and Lantana). "All you can eat" spaghetti, salad and garlic
bread for $4.95 per person.
30s & 40s and
SINGLE PURSUITS (40-59)
Thursday, June 15, 7 p.m. Discussion entitled "How
To Figure Out A Woman" at the JCC Sr. and Social Ctr.,
5029 Okeechobee Blvd., off Haverhill (in Village Market
Place). Lecture will be led by author, Joella Cain and will
offer insight for women to learn what type they are and for
men to learn what type of woman to look for. Audience
participation. Refreshments will follow. Cost: JCC mem-
bers $2, non members $3. Call for reservations.
SINGLE PURSUITS (40-59)
Friday, June 2, 7:30 p.m. Join us in the library of
Temple Judea (100 Chillingworth Dr., WPB) for wine and
conversation followed by Friday Night Services and Oneg
Shabbat.
Tuesday, June 6, 5-7 p.m. Happy Hour at the 391st
Bomb Squadron (3989 Southern Blvd., off Kirk Rd.). Join
us for drinks, buffet and to watch the planes arrive and
depart from PBIA. Cost: $1 for tip plus your own fare.
Wednesday, June 7, 7:30 p.m. An evening of
stimulating discussion at a member's home. Cost: JCC
members $1, non members $2. Space is very limited so
advance registration is a must. Call for reservations.
Saturday, June 10, 8 p.m. Ballroom dancing at the
new Tropic Ballroom (6295 Lake Worth Rd. in the Pine
Brook Square Mall). Coffee and soft drinks only. Entry
Fee: $4 per person.
Sunday, June 11, 2 p.m. An afternoon at the Boca
Raton Museum of Art (801 W. Palmetto Park Rd.) to view
the current displays. Admission: free.
Tuesday, June 13, 7:30 p.m. Culture Club meeting at
a member's home. Get involved bring your suggestions
and ideas and help us plan events for the upcoming months.
Cost: $1. *
For more information call the JCC at 689-7700.
out, keeping in touch with our
homebound and others in
need. Join this dedicated
group of persons who enjoy
doing Mitzvahs. Call Ellie
Newcorn at 689-6332.
Volunteers Needed:
Telephone receptionists.
Grandmas and Grandpas
wanted pre-school class-
room aides for two to four year
olds. Creativity Crafts assist-
ant for preschool. Yiddish
instructor.
Call Ellen at 689-7700.
NEIGHBOR HELPING
NEIGHBOR
A consortium program with
Jewish Family and Children's
Services. Persons interested in
being trained to work in a new
Alzheimer's program a few
hours a week at $4 per hour.
Call Barbara at JFCS 684-
1991.
JCC CULTURAL CLUB NEWS
By Sondra Werbel, Tour Guide
A special tour of the
Morikami Museum on Thurs-
day, June 8. A docent tour of
the magnificent Japanese gar-
dens and Museum. You may
lunch (bring your own) in the
beautiful picnic pavilion. Enjoy
Continued on Page 13


Friday, June 2, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 13
HADASSAH
On June 6 at 7:30 p.m. Mt.
Scopus Boynton Beach Chap-
ter will meet at Billy's Restau-
rant at the K Mart Center,
Military Trail and Boynton
Beach Boulevard. Mayor Dena
Skalka, Mayor of South Palm
Beach, will be the guest
speaker.
Shalom Chapter future
events:
Youth Aliyah luncheon, at
The Royce, Nov. 16.
Thanksgiving holiday at the
Caribbean (kosher), Miami
Beach, five days, Nov. 23-27.
"Cabaret," at the Royal
Palm Dinner Theatre, mati-
nee, Nov. 25.
"Guys and Dolls," at the
Royal Palm Dinner Theatre,
matinee, Jan. 31.
Tikvak West Palm Beach
coming events: June 29, Mati-
nee, "Broadway Bound" at the
Royal Palm Theatre, comedy
by Neil Simon. Aug. 2, Mati-
nee, "A Funny Thing Hap-
pened On The Way To The
Forum" at Burt Reynolds The-
atre. Sept. 13, Matinee, "Ain't
Misbehavin" at Hirschfield
Dinner Theatre, Miami Beach,
musical.
B'NAI B'RITH
Lucerne Lakes Lodge #
3132 has scheduled its final
spring program for Sunday,
June 4, 9:30 a.m. at the Mid-
County Senior Citizens Cen-
ter, 2nd Avenue at Dixie High-
way, in Lake Worth. Bill
McGoun, Deputy Editorial
Page Editor of the Palm Beach
Post will discuss "The World
Today." A question and
answer format will follow.
Senior News
Continued from Page 12
the splendor of a little bit of
Japan. Registrations are lim-
ited. Your check is your res-
ervation. Call Louise at 689-
6332 for information. Bus
leaves Carteret Bank at Cen-
tury Village in West Palm
Beach at 9 a.m. Fee: $6 for
JCC Members, $7 for non-
members.
CLASSES
IN BOYNTON BEACH
The JCC will be providing a
variety of classes and pro-
grams at Congregation Beth
Kodesh along with the daily
hot Kosher lunch program.
"Wisdom of the Body, Part
III," a four week discussion
series sponsored by Palm
Beach Community College,
Adult Education at the Boyn-
ton JCC Senior Center by Gert
Friedman, Specialist of dis-
ease prevention and wellness
and aging. Once you under-
stand the "Wisdom of the
Body," how your body relates
to eating habits, weight,
stress, blood pressure, etc.,
you can establish a fine quality
of life for yourself. Call Julia at
582-7360. Dates: Wednesday
mornings, June 7 and 14. Fee:
$2 for the six sessions.
THIS & THAT
JOBS FOR SENIORS
OPPORTUNITY KNOCKS!!
Are you interested in start-
ing a new career, in a part-
time job? Following are some
suggestions:
1. McDonald's wants Senior
Citizens. Stop in at any
McDonald's to fill out an appli-
cation.
2. Florida Power and Light
is hiring persons to do clerical
work in their correspondence
department. 20 hours a week
at $7 per hour. Schedule flexi-
ble. Call Ms. Larson 684-7641.
3. Senior Aides/Senior
Employment. A special
employment program for older
adults. A variety of positions
available. Call 355-4782.
Sunday, June 4 & 11, 1989
MOSAIC 11 a.m. WPTV Channel 5, with host Bar-
bara Gordon Green. June 4: Mira Linder, Beauty Consult-
ant. June 11: Interview with renowned columnist William
Safire and Irving Mazer, Jewish Federation Campaign
Chair (rerun).
L'CHAYIM 7:30 a.m. WPBR 1340 AM with host
Rabbi Mark S. Golub The Jewish Listener's Digest, a
radio magazine.
PAGE ONE 8 a.m. WPBR 1340 AM A weekly review
of news and issues pertinent to the Jewish community.
SHALOM 9 a.m. WFLX Channel 29, with host
Richard Peritz. Interviews with local and national figures
focusing on Jewish issues.
THE RABBI LEON FINK SHOW 2-5 p.m. WPBR
1340 AM, with host Rabbi Leon Fink. A Jewish talk show
that features weekly guests and call-in discussions.
'Sponsored by the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County.
The Hyman Nadrich Memo-
rial Scholarship Fund will be
awarded to three Palm Beach
County High School Seniors
who are members of B'nai
B'rith Youth Organization.
B'nai B'rith is proud of these
deserving young people who
reflect the best attributes of
our youth.
B'NAI B'RITH WOMEN
Menorah Chapter will meet
Tuesday, June 13, noon at
Congregation Aitz Chaim.
There will be entertainment,
boutique and refreshments.
Coming Events:
June 7, Viking Princess
cruise. June 25, Frankie Klein
show at the Marco Polo Hotel,
Miami Beach. June 29 "The
Discovery" cruise.
4. Burdines is hiring older
adults. Call Rhonda at JCC-
689-7700.
REMEMBER YOU HEARD
IT HERE AT THE JCC!
New Car Pool.
Is your parent sitting at
home with nothing to do? We
are calling adult children who
have problems transporting
their elderly dear ones to the
JCC. Shirley at 686-3232
wants to hear from you so that
together and with much ease
your parents can enjoy a new
way of life at the JCC.
ff.....f# mf
Saturday, June 3 Federation, Leadership Develop-
ment Graduation at the home of Jim and Soni Kay,
9 p.m.
Sunday, June 4 Federation, Annual Meeting, at the
Airport Hilton, 7 p.m.
Monday, June 5 Jewish Community Day School, Annual
Meeting, 7:45 p.m. Women's American Ort Palm
Beach, 9:30 a.m.
Tuesday, June 6 Temple Beth El, board, 7:30 p.m.
Temple Beth David, board, 8 p.m. Federation,
Central Planning and Allocations Committee, 5:30
p.m.
Wednesday, June 7 Lake Worth Jewish Center Sister-
hood, board, 9:30 a.m. Congregation Aitz Chaim
Sisterhood, 1 p.m. B'nai B'rith Palm Beach
Council, 12:30 p.m. B'nai B'rith Women Olam,
Luncheon/Card Party, noon Na'Amat USA Golda
Meir, board, 1 p.m. Holocaust Survivors of the Palm
Beaches, 9:30 a.m. Federation, Human Resource
Development, Volunteer Placement Committee
Meeting, 7:30 p.m. Federation, Foundation Meet-
ing, Noon and 4 p.m.
Thursday, June 8 Shavuot Eve
Friday, June 9 First day of Shavuot
Saturday, June 10 Second Day of Shavuot
Sunday, June 11 Congregation Aitz Chaim Sisterhood,
Luncheon/Card Party, 10:30 a.m. Temple Beth
David Men's Club, Theatre Party Jewish Commun-
ity Center, Annual Meeting, 7 p.m.
Tuesday, June 13 American Jewish Congress, board, 1
p.m. Na'Amat USA Theodore Herzl, board, 10
a.m. Temple Beth Zion, Executive Board, 8 p.m.
Federation, Jewish Education Committee, 7:30
p.m.
Wednesday, June 14 B'nai B'rith Yachad, 7:30 p.m.
Holocaust Survivors of the Palm Beaches, board, 2:30
p.m. Jewish Community Day School Graduation
exercises, 7:30 p.m.
Thursday, June 15 B'nai B'rith Palm Beach Council,
board, 10 a.m.
For more information call the Jewish Federation 882-
2120.
Levitt-Weinstein wants to put
your name on this $100 check
.
QtttWeimK*
>l'
ajHBW
\V
cute* **

**.
V*
Or*
ft***
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overwhelming may not insure the best
decisions being made. That's why Levitt-
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Plan... the pre-arrangement program
that allows you time to plan, freezes the
cost of funeral and burial at today's
prices and relieves you or your family
of taking care of everything at a very
difficult time.
And as an incentive to
plan now, Levitt-Weinstein
will write your name on a $100
check and apply it to a new Guaranteed
Security Plan pre-arrangement program
for you. And if you currently hold a pre-
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pleased to evaluate whether it best serves
your needs. Our $100 offer is valid only
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Because the grief is enough to handle later.
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MEMORIAL CHAPELS
Serving Date, Brwxrd end Palm Beach Counties.

.1


Page 14 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, June 2, 1989
Each Way Based on Roundtnp Purchase
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Athens mhxnr H65
Berlin mhxnr *399
Brussels mxntro *239
Copenhagen m*mffli
DusseldorfMx,NTRo *239
FrankfurtMH,NR $389
Geneva mhxnr $389
Hamburgh *274
Helsinki mhxnr H69
Istanbul mhxnr *504
LondonSST *284
MilanMHXNR H72
Munich mhxnr s399
Nice mhxnr H34
Nuremberg mhxnr $399
OSlO MHXNR H34
ParisSSF '379
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One way to drive down the cost of your vacation is to rent a car
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Deals on hotels-up to 50% off.
We can also find you a place to sleepat prices you won't lose
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With deals like these, going to Europe could
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Each Way Based on Roundtnp Purchase
Rome H94
Stockholm,*-.- ^49
StuttgartMH.R '389
TelAvivMH H84
ViennaMHXNR $414
ZurichMHXNR $389
Other Low Flares
Each Way Based on Roundtnp Purchase
Belgrade W
Bucharest.. H504"
Budapest* SOO60
Dubrovnik 52260
Krakow^ W0
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Friday, June 2, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 15
V
dffiKSb
^BBAT SHALo
4*
Religious Directory
CONSERVATIVE
BOYNTON BEACH JEWISH CENTER-BETH KODESH: 501
NE 26 Avenue, Boynton Beach 33435. Phone 586-9428. Cantor
Abraham Koster. Daily, 8:30 a.m. Sabbath services, Friday 8:15
p.m.. Saturday 9 a.m.
CONGREGATION ANSHEI SHOLOM: 5348 Grove Street
West Palm Beach 33417. Phone 684-3212. Office hours 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. Rabbi Isaac Vander Walde. Cantor Mordecai Spektor. Daily
.-.rvices 8:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Friday night 5 p.m. and 8:15 p.m.
Saturday 9 a.m. and 7:15 p.m.
GOLDEN LAKES TEMPLE: 1470 Golden Lakes Boulevard,
West Palm Beach 33411. Phone 689-9430. Rabbi Joseph Speiser.
Daily services 8 a.m. Sabbath services Friday 8 p.m. Saturday 9
a.m. For times of evening services please call the Temple office.
BETH TIKVAH, LAKE WORTH JEWISH CENTER: 4550 Jog
Road, Lake Worth. Phone 967-3600. Rabbi Richard K. Rocklin.
Cantor Abraham Mehler. Services Friday 8 p.m., Saturday and
holidays, 8:45 a.m. Daily minyan 8:15 a.m., Sundays through
Fridays.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID: 4657 Hood Road. Palm Beach Gardens
38418. Phone 694-2350. Rabbi Randall J. Konigsburg. Cantor
Earl J. Rackoff. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m., Saturday 9:30
a.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 2815 No. Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach
,53407. Phone 833-0339. Rabbi Alan L. Cohen. Cantor Norman
Hrody. Sabbath services Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9:30 a.m.
Daily Minyan 8:15 a.m., Sunday and legal holidays 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 315 No. "A" Street, Lake Worth
33460. Phone 585-5020. Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg. Cantor
Howard Dardashti. Services Monday and Thursday, 8:15 a.m.
Friday evening, 8:15 p.m., Saturday, 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 224 NW Avenue G, Belle Glade
33430. Phone 996-3886. Services: Second Wednesday of every
month, 7:30 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH ZION: 129 Sparrow Drive, Royal Palm Beach,
FL 33411. Phone 798-8888. Sabbath services Friday 8 p.m.,
Saturday 9im,- Rabbi. Stefan J. Weiuberg.
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB: 2177 So. Congress Ave., West Palm
Beach 33406. Phone 433-5957. Sabbath services Friday 8 p.m.,
Saturday and holidays 9 a.m., Monday through Friday 9 a.m.
Rabbi Morris Pickholz. Cantor Andrew E. Beck.
TEMPLE EMANUEL: 190 North County Road, Palm Beach
:480. Phone 832-0804. Rabbi Leonid Feldman. Cantor David
Feuer. Sabbath services, Friday 7 p.m.; Saturday 9:30 a.m.
TEMPLE TORAH: Lions Club, 3615 West Boynton Beach
Boulevard, Boynton Beach 33437. Mailing address: 9851D Milit-
ary Trail, Box 360091, Boynton Beach 33436. Phone 736-7687.
I antor Alex Chapin. Rabbi Theodore Feldman, part-time. Sab-
liath Services Friday evening 8 p.m.; Saturday 9 a.m.
TREASURE COAST JEWISH CENTER CONGREGATION
BETH ABRAHAM: 3998 SW Leighton Farms Road, Palm City
190. Mailing address: P.O. Box 2996, Stuart 33495. Phone
XH33. Services Friday evenings 8 p.m. and Saturday 10 a.m.
ORTHODOX
CHABAD HOUSE LUBAVITCH: 4623 Forest Hill Blvd.,
West Palm Beach, 108-3, 33415. Phone 641-6167. Rabbi Shlomo
Ezagui. Sabbath Services, Saturday, 10 a.m.
CONGREGATION AITZ CHAIM: 2518 N. Haverhill Road, West
I'aim Beach 33417. Phone 686-5055. Sabbath services 8:45 a.m.
and 7:30 p.m. Daily services 8:15 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. Rabbi Oscar
Werner.
REFORM
CONGREGATION BETH ISRAEL: 1390 SW Dorchester
Street, P.O. Box 857146, Port St. Lucie, FL 33452. Phone
335-7620. Friday night services 8 p.m., Saturday morning 10:30
a.m.
TEMPLE BETH AM: 759 Parkway Street, Jupiter. Phone
747-1109. Services Friday 7:45 p.m. Rabbi Rachel Hertzman.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 4600 Oleander Avenue, Fort Pierce, FL
34982. Phone 461-7428. Sabbath Services Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM: St. Helen's Parish Hall, 20th
Avenue and Victory Boulevard, Vero Beach 32960. Mailing
address: P.O. Box 2113, Vero Beach, FL 32961-2113. Rabbi Jay
R. Davis. Phone 1-569-4700.
TEMPLE BETH TORAH: 900 Big Blue Trace, West Palm
Beach, FL 33414. Phone 793-2700. Friday services 8:15 p.m.,
Saturday morning 10 a.m. Rabbi Steven R. Westman. Cantor
Elliot Rosenbaum.
TEMPLE ISRAEL: 1901 No. Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach
33407. Phone 833-8421. Rabbi Howard Shapiro. Cantor Stuart
Pittle. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE JUDEA: 100 Chillingworth Drive, West Palm Beach,
FL 33409. Rabbi Joel L. Levine. Cantor Anne Newman. Phone
471-1526.
BETH TIKVAH/LAKE
WORTH JEWISH CENTER
Sisterhood is hosting a
luncheon/card party at Tem-
ple, 4450 Jog Road, Lake
Worth 33463 on June 14 at
11:30 a.m. Call the Temple for
reservations.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID
A special family service in
honor of the children of Pre-
school will be held on Friday
evening, June 2, at 7 p.m.
Rabbi Randall J. Konigsburg
and Cantor Earl J. Rackoff
will officiate. Members of the
community are invited to
attend.
Shavuot, one of the oldest of
all Jewish festivals, falls
exactly seven weeks after the
second day of Passover. This
year the holiday begins on
Thursday evening, June 8.
"Shavuot," which means
"weeks," is a triple holiday
commemorating the giving of
the Torah (The Ten Command-
ments) on Mount Sinai, the
harvesting of wheat in Israel,
and the ripening of the first
fruit in the Holy Land.
Because of the association
between Shavuot and the
theme of Torah and learning,
it has become customary to
hold the Confirmation Service
and program then. Services
honoring the members of the
Confirmation Class will take
place at 8 p.m. Friday evening,
June 9.
The complete schedule of
Shavuot Services is as follows:
Thursday, June 8 at 8 p.m.
Friday, June 9 at 9:30 a.m.;
Obituaries
APSTEIN. Theodore E.. 82, of West
Palm Beach. Riverside Guardian
Chapel, West Palm Beach.
BKAEN, George J.. of Singer Island.
Levitt-Weinstcin Memorial Chapel.
West Palm Beach. Services in Way-
land. Mass.
CANIN. Sally. 81, of West Palm
Beach. Beth-Israel Rubin Memorial
Chapel. Delray Beach.
DAITZ. Lillian, 82, of Boynton Beach.
Riverside Guardian Chapel, West
Palm Beach. Services in Bangor.
Maine.
FINK, Sidney, 87, of Century Village.
West Palm Beach. Riverside Guard-
ian Chapel, West Palm Beach. Ser-
vices in Paramus, N.J.
FISCHER, Perry A.. 70, of West
Palm Beach. Levitt-Weinstein
Memorial Chapel, West Palm
Beach.
GREENBERG, Dorothy G., 83, of
Lake Worth. Riverside Guardian
Chapel, West Palm Beach.
ISAACSON, Henrietta, 79, of West
Palm Beach. Riverside Guardian
Chapel, West Palm Beach. Services
in Valhalla, N.Y.
KAPLAN, Arthur, 77, of Lake Worth.
Menorah Gardens and Funeral
Chapels, West Palm Beach.
MAIZNER, Abram J., 73, of Lake
Worth. Menorah Gardens and Fun-
eral Chapel, West Palm Beach.
MARGALIT, Moshe, 77, of West Palm
Beach. Levitt Weinstein Memorial
Chapel.
PICKAR, Doris. 77, of South Palm
Beach. Riverside Guardian Chapel,
West Palm Beach.
RUBINSTEIN. Mollie, 85, of Palm
Springs. Menorah Gardens and
Funeral Chapels, West Palm Beach.
SHAPIRO, Jean R., of Lake Park.
Levitt-Weinstein Memorial Chapel,
West Palm Beach.
SILLER, Dr. Harry, 60, of West Palm
Beach. Menorah Gardens and Fun-
eral Chapel. West Palm Beach.
Friday, June 9 at 8 p.m.; Fam-
ily and Confirmation Service;
Saturday, June 10, 9:30 a.m.
Holiday Service, including Yis-
kor.
TEMPLE BETH ZION
A major feature of the Sat-
urday morning June 3rd Sab-
bath service is that it will
feature the graduation of the
religious school's seventh
grade graduating class, who
will also be conducting the
services, in addition to being
honored for their successful
completion of the Religious
School program. The gra-
duates are: Stephanie Alto-
mari, Jennifer Brown, Max
Marion, Carrie Miner, Roy Sal-
ins, Sam Schwartz and
Danielle Zwick.
Sunday, June 4, will be the
last day of religious school for
this year, with a special closing
awards ceremony to occur, fol-
lowed by maccabiah games and
a special Lag B'Omer picnic on
the Temple grounds. Parents
and friends of the religious
school students are urged to
attend the festivities.
For more information about
this event, and for further
information regarding Temple
membership and other activi-
ties, contact the Temple office.
Temple will be sponsoring a
trip to Israel in conjunction
with Margaret Morse Tours.
This 17 day trip leaves October
16, 1989. For more informa-
tion contact the Temple office.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
Temple will have new sum-
mer Shabbat hours. Services
will be held Friday evening at
7 p.m. and Saturday morning
at 9:30 a.m. Minyan services
will not be held during the
summer, they will resume in
September.
Shavuot Services will be held
at Temple Emanu-El Thurs-
day, June 8 at 7 p.m. and
Friday, June 9 at 7 p.m.
SENIOR ADULT EVENTS
Thiridaj,JiM8.18S-9AM
Docent Tour Morikami
Museum and Japanese Gar-
dens Enjoy the splendor of
a little bit of Japan.
FEES: JCC Member $6.00
Non Member $7.00
Wednesday, June 14th and
Ttundt, Jiie IS, 1989
A.A.R.P. 55/ALIVE
Driving class at 5029 Okee-
chobee Blvd. (New JCC
Senior & Social Center)
Two 4 hour sessions FEE: $7
Thirtdsv. Jue 22 4:30 PM
TWILIGHT DINING & DANCING
For Information Call Louis*
689-6332 -
700 SPENCER DRIVE. WEST PALM BEACH. FL 33409
Of THE GREATER
PALM BEACHES
Candle
Lighting
Time
June 2
7:50 p.m.
June 9
7:53 p.m.
June 16
7:56 p.m.
Synopsis Of The
Weekly Torah Portion
. "A good way off shall they pitch round about
the tent of meeting"
(Num. 2.2).
BAMIDBAR
BAMIDBAR "And the Lord spoke unto Moses
in the wilderness of Sinai, in the tent of meeting,
on the first day of the second month, in the second
year after they were come out of the land of
Egypt, saying: 'Take ye the sum of all the con-
gregation of the children of Israel, by their
families, by their fathers' houses, according to the
number of names, every male, by their polls; from
twenty years old and upward, all that are able to
go forth to war in Israel: ye shall number them by their hosts,
even thou and Aaron' (Numbers 1.1-3). Exclusive of the Levites,
who were not numbered, the total sum of men of military age was
603,555. There follows a description of the Israelites' encamp-
ments during their journeys through the desert: there were four
major camps, each of three tribes; one under the flag of Judah,
one under the flag of Reuben, one under the flag of Ephraim, and
one under the flag of Dan. The Levites camped separately near
the sanctuary; among the Levites, each clan had a particular
service to render in regard to the sanctuary.
(The recounting of the Weekly Portion of the Law Is extracted and
based upon "The Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage," edited by
P. Wollman-Tsamlr, published by Shengold. The volume is available
at 45 West 45 Street, New York, NY 10038 (212) 246*911.)


r
Page 16 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, June 2, 1989

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REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID E6C8CF7KI_GY891X INGEST_TIME 2013-07-18T07:46:19Z PACKAGE AA00014309_00199
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES