The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County the voice of the Jewish community of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
West Palm Beach, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 11, no. 27 (Sept. 13, 1985)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Feb. 20, 1987 called no. 4 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Mar. 31, 1989 called no. 12 in masthead and no. 13 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44605643
lccn - sn 00229551
ocm44605643
System ID:
AA00014309:00175

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)


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Full Text
THE VOICE OF
THE JEWISH
COMMUNITY OF
PALM BEACH
COUNTY
thjewish floridian
<^ M OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
Volume 16 Number 7
PALM BEACH, FLORIDA FRIDAY, APRIL 6, 1990
ff*4
Price 40 Cents
Peres Negotiates With Liberal Faction
Labor Hopes Slim As Knesset Recesses
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
Knesset headed for its Passo-
ver recess, apparently ready to
reconvene at short notice if
Shimon Peres can put together
a viable coalition government
for its approval.
The Labor Party leader has
only a few days left to accom-
plish the task, out of the 21-
day mandate he received from
President Chaim Herzog on
Shimon Peres
March 20.
He has made little progress
so far, but hope glimmered
faintly when the recently
formed Party for the Advance-
ment of Zionist-Liberal Values
announced this week that it
was prepared to hold coalition
talks with Labor.
The Zionist-Liberals consist
of five former members of
Likud's Liberal Party wing,
who defected from Likud in
February in protest against
Prime Minister Yitzhak Sha-
mir's peace diplomacy.
The new faction is headed by
Yitzhak Moda'i, the former
minister of economics and
planning, who has been one of
Shamir's most severe critics.
Political insiders believe its
willingness to meet with Labor
is a tactical ploy to improve its
bargaining position with
Likud. They say Peres*
Poland Offers To Fill Gap
Budapest Resumes 'Regular' Flights
By ALLISON KAPLAN
NEW YORK (JTA) The
Hungarian state airline Malev
resumed transporting Soviet
Jewish emigres on their regu-
larly scheduled flights from
Moscow and to Tel Aviv.
But it remained doubtful
whether the special Malev
charter flights that had carried
Soviet Jews from Moscow to
Budapest to Israel would also
begin again.
The marketing director for
Malev, Ferenc Urban, told
reporters in Budapest that the
special charters would not
resume.
But meanwhile, officials of
American Jewish organiza-
tions here were told by Daniel
Elias, counsel at the Hungar-
ian Embassy here, that the
charter flights would be rein-
stated.
The conflicting signals
appear to reflect continued
tension between the Hungar-
ian government and Malev,
which does not operate under
direct government control.
As a result of these tensions,
Hungary's minister of trans-
portation dismissed Lajos
Jahoda, Malev's general man-
ager.
The dismissal was yet
another development in the
diplomatic flap that began
when Malev announced it
would cease carrying Soviet
Jews on scheduled tourist
flights and the special char-
ters. Malev made the decision
after terrorist threats were
issued by the Islamic Jihad for
the Liberation of Palestine.
That move drew condemna-
tion from both Israel and the
United States, which promptly
lobbied Hungarian govern-
ment leaders to have the deci-
sion reversed.
Several new opportunities
for new routes of emigration
opened up this week, with
Poland offering its airport as a
transit point for emigrating
Soviet Jews.
American Jewish groups
praised the decision by Malev
to resume taking the emigres
on their regularly scheduled
flights, and asked that the
charters also be resumed.
"We welcome the Hungar-
ian government's decision to
reverse their earlier suspen-
sion of flights carrying Soviet
Jews from Moscow to Budap-
est and on to Israel," said
Shoshana Cardin, president of
the National Conference on
Soviet Jewry, in a statement.
"We hope that the Hungar-
ian government will soon insti-
tute special flights that will
carry even greater numbers of
Soviet Jews to freedom in
Israel," Cardin said.
Malcolm Hoenlein, executive
director of the Conference of
Presidents of Major American
Jewish Organizations, called
Malev's decision to continue to
fly Soviet Jews a "recognition
by the Hungarian government
Shoshana Cardin
that you can't give in to terror-
ist threats."
Moreover, Finnish leaders
met on Thursday with World
Zionist Organization chairman
Simcha Dinitz to discuss a pos-
sible Helsinki stopover.
chances of persuading the five
breakaways to join a Labor-led
government vary inverselj
with their ability to extnd
from Shamir the promise of
safe seats on the Likud list in
the next elections.
According to the Israeli
media, Peres will offer to
appoint Moda'i finance minis-
ter in his new government, an
office Moda'i held when Peres
last was prime minister in
between 1984 and 1986.
But the Labor Party leader
probably would find it impossi-
ble to guarantee safe seats for
the five Likud defectors on
Labor's election list. The
party's constitution strictly
forbids such arrangements.
Meanwhile, Peres was
reported to be seeking legal
assurances from Attorney
General Yosef Harish that the
Knesset can be called out of
recess should he have a new
government to present to it.
Knesset Speaker Dov Shi-
lansky said he, too, would seek
legal counsel. But if there is no
clear-cut legal opinion and the
decision were to rest with him,
Shilansky said he would order
parliament to reconvene to
vote confidence in a new gov-
ernment.
He explained that it was of
overriding importance consti-
tutionally to install a new gov-
ernment as quickly as possible.
THIRD CLASS
BULK RATE
US. POSTAGE
PAIO
BOCA RATON. FLORIDA
PERMIT NO. 1003
Rabbi Schach Denounced For Attacking Kibbutzniks
By DAYID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Rabbi Eliezer Schach, leader
of the strictly Orthodox Degel
HaTorah party, has been hit by
a fierce backlash for attacking
the kibbutz movement on
grounds that it has forsaken
religion.
The Lithuanian-born rabbi
from Bnei Brak delivered his
polemic at Degel's convention
in Tel Aviv. He claimed that
the kibbutzniks, from whom
the Labor Party draws much
of its support, are not true
Jews because they spurn reli-
gious practices.
Although they were seen as
a repudiation of Shimon Peres'
efforts to induce Degel to join
a Labor-led coalition govern-
ment, the elderly rabbi's
remarks drew angry criticism
from all over the political spec-
trum.
He was said to have wept
when told of the reaction of
Knesset member Rafael Eitan,
the former Israel Defense
Force chief of staff, who heads
the extreme right-wing Tso-
met party.
"I suggest that he visit the
military graveyards where lie
the kibbutz war dead," the
retired general said.
"Were it not for their
supreme sacrifice, Rabbi
Schach and the community he
represents would find it diffi-
cult to articulate the views he
voiced Monday."
Editorial cartoonists
in Ha'aretz and Ma'ariv inde-
pendently arrived at the same
conclusion. They depicted the
rabbi delivering his speech
amid the graves of kibbutz war
dead.
REINS OF POWER TEL AVIV Rabbi Eliezer Schach,
96-year-old Torah scholar, smiles at approval by Likud and
religion parties of his talk before 10,000. His speech dimmed labor
hopes to form a new Israel government coalition. AP/Wide World
Photos.


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, April 6, 1990
Poland Offers To Fill Gap
Budapest Resumes 'Regular' Flights
By ALLISON KAPLAN
NEW YORK (JTA) The
Hungarian state airiine Malev
resumed transporting Soviet
Jewish emigres on their regu-
larly scheduled flights from
Moscow and to Tel Aviv.
But it remained doubtful
whether the special Malev
charter flights that had carried
Soviet Jews from Moscow to
Budapest to Israel would also
begin again.
The marketing director for
Malev, Ferenc Urban, told
reporters in Budapest that the
special charters would not
resume.
But meanwhile, officials of
American Jewish organiza-
tions here were told by Daniel
Elias, counsel at the Hungar-
ian Embassy here, that the
charter flights would be rein-
stated.
The conflicting signals
appear to reflect continued
tension between the Hungar-
ian government and Malev,
which does not operate under
direct government control.
As a result of these tensions,
Hungary's minister of trans-
portation dismissed Lajos
Jahoda, Malev's general man-
ager.
The dismissal was yet
another development in the
diplomatic flap that began
when Malev announced it
would cease carrying Soviet
Jews on scheduled tourist
flights and the special char-
ters. Malev made the decision
after terrorist threats were
issued by the Islamic Jihad for
the Liberation of Palestine.
That move drew condemna-
tion from both Israel and the
United States, which promptly
lobbied Hungarian govern-
ment leaders to have the deci-
sion reversed.
Several new opportunities
for new routes of emigration
opened up this week, with
Poland offering its airport as a
transit point for emigrating
Soviet Jews.
American Jewish groups
praised the decision by Malev
to resume taking the emigres
on their regularly scheduled
flights, and asked that the
charters also be resumed.
"We welcome the Hungar-
ian government's decision to
reverse their earlier suspen-
sion of flights carrying Soviet
Jews from Moscow to Budap-
est and on to Israel," said
Shoshana Cardin, president of
the National Conference on
Soviet Jewry, in a statement.
"We hope that the Hungar-
ian government will soon insti-
tute special flights that will
carry even greater numbers of
Soviet Jews to freedom in
Israel," Cardin said.
Malcolm Hoenlein, executive
director of the Conference of
Presidents of Major American
Jewish Organizations, called
Malev's decision to continue to
fly Soviet Jews a "recognition
by the Hungarian government
that you can't give in to terror-
ist threats."
Shoshana Cardin
Moreover, Finnish leaders
met on Thursday with World
Zionist Organization chairman
Simcha Dinitz to discuss a pos-
sible Helsinki stopover.
Brandeis Hillel
Students Seek
6 Million Pennies
WALTHAM (JTA) Stu-
dents at the B'nai B'rith Hillel
Foundation at Brandeis Uni-
versity are collecting pennies
"to educate people about the
Holocaust."
They hope to amass 6 million
of them, or $60,000, by Yom
Hashoah on April 22, the
annual day of remembrance
for the six million Jews who
perished in the Holocaust,
according to David Paskin, an
18-year-old freshman from St.
Louis, who is coordinating the
drive.
AJCongress
Questions
Breakfast Letter
The head of the American
Jewish Congress' Commission
on Law and Social Action,
Richard Wolf son, and Director
Mark Freedman believe that
State Sen. John Grant's letter
asking lobbyists to contribute
funds to the Governor's Lead-
ership Prayer Breakfast
treads painfully close to the
line separating church from
state.
Grant's letter asks lobbyists
to contribute $500 to the
breakfast. It is written on sta-
tionery that carries the seal of
the Florida State Senate.
Senate Unites To Press
Bush On Jerusalem Stand
Sen. Daniel Moynihan
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Sen. Daniel Moynihan (D-N.Y.)
and Jewish organizations
urged President Bush to join
the Senate in declaring that
Jerusalem is the united capital
of Israel.
The Jewish groups expre-
ssed their appreciation for the
Senate's unanimous voice vote
adoption of Moynihan's resolu-
tion on Jerusalem, which had
83 cosponsors, 45 Democrats
and 38 Republicans.
The resolution declared that
"Jerusalem is and should
remain the capital of the State
of Israel," and that it "must
remain an undivided city."
A similar resolution has been
introduced in the House by
Rep. Eliot Engel (D-N.Y.). The
resolution has some 50 co-
sponsors so far, and Engel is
still gathering additional
names.
"The swift passage of this
resolution demonstrates the
broad bipartisan support in the
Senate for our ally Israel,"
Moynihan said.
"This sends a message of
reassurance to Israel reas-
surance which is essential to
making progress toward
peace."
The resolution also "calls
upon all parties involved in the
search for peace to maintain
their strong efforts to bring
about negotiations between
Israel and Palestinian repre-
sentatives."
The resolution noted that
"ambiguous statements" by
Bush and other members of his
administration "concerning
the right of Jews to live in all
parts of Jerusalem raise conc-
erns in Israel that Jerusalem
might one day be redivided
and access to religious sites in
Jerusalem denied to Israeli cit-
izens."
The Union of Orthodox Jew-
ish Congregations of America,
the Jewish Community Rela-
tions Council of New York, the
Zionist Organization of Amer-
ica and Na'amat USA expre-
ssed their support of the reso-
lution.
News
TAIBE The frustration of Israeli Arabs
is increasing, as the country gears up for
Land Day this Friday.
BONN The West German government
rejects new demands from an Arab Leban-
ese group to release two terrorists it is
holding.
BONN A West German industrialist in
custody for almost a year has been for-
mally charged with violating export laws
to build a poison gas factory in Libya.
TEL AVIV Israel is shortly expected to
launch its second satellite, Ofek 2.
TEL AVIV Over 4,000 buyers from 100
countries including some fro* .vjuntries
that do not maintain diplomatic relations
with Israel are here participating in
Agritech "90.
^ I he Jewish -m y
FloridiaN
of South Counl\
Fred Shochet
FRED K SHOCHET
JOAN TEQLAS
Advertising Director
? Editor and Publisher
m
Main Office & Plant: 120 NE 6th St, Miami. FL 33101. Phone 1 373-4805
For Advfrtmni information call rellcct Joan Tet-lu 3K-373-4MS.
SUZANNE SHOCHET
Executive Editor
/
Jewish Floridian does not guarantee Kashruth of Merchandise Advertised
^ SUBSCRIPTION RATES Local Area $4 Annual (2-Year Minimum $7.50), or by membership Jewish
t
Flissover
Greetings
From
Delta Air Lines
Delta Air Lines and its more than 60,000 professionals
extend best wishes to you and your family.
May your Passover season be filled with happiness.
WeLoveToFb/AndltShows:
Friday, April 6, 1990
Volume 12
6 NISAN 5750
Number 7
l'i*i|vli.i -\ir I iin-s In,
J


Friday, April 6, 1990/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 3
Israel Needs Repairs, Not Despair
By MARC H. TANENBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) The
fall of the unity government of
Israel has evoked widespread
concern in the Jewish commu-
nity and elsewhere. Are the
political rivalries between
Likud and Labor so intense
that Israel has become totally
paralyzed from pursing the
peace process? As polls indi-
cate, most Israelis and Dias-
pora Jews would certainly
hope that will not be the case.
Frustrating though the
heated debates in the Knesset
may be, what we are witness-
ing in Israel is not a decline in
democracy, but another reve-
lation of the complex parlia-
mentary democracy that
urgently needs reform, but not
despair.
Where else in the Middle
East do you find such basic
issues debated before the eyes
of the world, with no holds
barred? In Saudi Arabia?
Syria? Iraq? In such feudal
monarchies and military
despotisms, Israeli-style poli-
tics would lead to summary
executions.
After the political turmoil
settles down, I am persuaded
that a government will emerge
whether headed by Likud or
Labor that will have no
alternative but to move for-
ward on the peace process,
however muddled that process
might be.
Why, even some of the
Orthodox religious parties
have been negotiating on the
basis of foreign policy and
political concerns, and not just
making deals' on the sole issue
of how they might get greater
financing of their yeshivot.
A major issue that over-
hangs the prospects for peace
is whether President Bush
will, in effect, continue to sug-
gest the building of a Berlin
Wall in Jerusalem that would
split the holy city in a way that
has not been the case for most
of the past 3,000 years, or
since King David created a
unified city.
Na'amat Event To Slate
Tribute To Israel '42
Chaim Chester
A tribute to the State of
Israel's 42nd anniversary of
independence, which will be
formally observed in Israel and
South Florida the evening of
April 29, will be given Sunday,
as a feature of the annual
Donor Luncheon of the South
Florida Council of Na'amat
USA.
Lillian Hoffman of Sunny
Isles will offer the invocation
and Cantor Daniel Kaizler of
the Cuban Hebrew Congrega-
tion-Temple Beth Shmuel will
headline the entertainment
program at the noon event
slated for the Fontainebleau
Hilton Hotel.
Shirley Partner of Pembroke
Pines, vice president of the
South Florida Council, is
arrangements chairman for
the luncheon and Bebee Pull-
man of Fort Lauderdale, a
member of the national board
of Na'amat USA, is reserva-
tions chairman. Felice
Schwartz of Miami Beach,
national board member and
council vice president, is public
relations chairman.
Chaim Chesler, national
director of the Aliyah Center
for both the World Zionist
Organization and the Jewish
Agency for Israel, will be the
principal speaker. He will
update developments in Israel
and on the exodus of Soviet
Jewry.
Harriet Green of Miami
Beach, national president of
the Women's Labor Zionist
Organization of America, will
take part in the program. Gert
Aaron of Hallandale, council
co-president, will chair the
luncheon with Margot Berg-
thal of Miami Beach, counci
co-president, co-chair of the
event.
Schwartz said that the pro-
gram will include both musical
and non-musical salutes to
Israel's founding in
1948. Na'amat supports
hundreds of health, educa-
tional, vocational and cultural
facilities throughout the Jew-
ish State.
Boy Scouts Remove
Swastika-like Symbol
New York The Boy
Scouts of America will remove
an Indian symbol which resem-
bles a swastika from future
editions of the organization's
catalogue, the Anti-
Defamation League learned.
Decision was announced after
Jeffrey P. Sinensky, director
of ADL's Civil Rights Division,
wrote to Ben H. Love, the Boy
Scouts' chief executive.
It would be ironic and tragic
if Bush ends up moving the
Cold War from Eastern
Europe to the already embat-
tled Middle East.
If, as Republicans claim, it
was the firmness of Presidents
Reagan and Bush that compel-
led the Russians to abandon
the cold war, perhaps the les-
son is that firmness against
the intransigent Arabs who
won't recognize Israel could
have a similar result.
As for Israel's hyper-
democracy," perhaps Winston
Churchill said it best: "Democ-
racy may be the messiest form
of government on earth, but it
is the best we got."
Rabbi Marc H. Tanenbaum is inter-
national relations consultant to the
American Jewish Committee and is
immediate past chairman of the Inter-
national Jewish Committee for Inter-
religious Consultations.
Fight Against
Tay-Sachs
Gaining
NEW YORK (JTA) With
the help of modern medical
testing, computer technology
and a $40,000 grant from the
United Jewish Appeal-
Federation of Jewish Philan-
thropies of New York, an age-
old Jewish disorder, Tay-Sachs
disease, may soon be brought
under control.
A testing program to detect
the Tay-Sachs gene has gained
acceptance in the past three
years among Hasidic Jews in
the New York area, and there
has been a marked decrease in
the number of children born
with the dreaded disease.
The key to the reduction is
the dramatic rise in the num-
ber of Hasidic high-school stu-
dents who take the blood tests
and the cooperation by Hasidic
matchmakers in making sure
carriers of the gene, once
detected, do not marry.

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Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, April 6, 1990
Split Develops In Gush Emunim
Viewpoirii
U.S. Senate Speaks Out
Unanimous passage by the United States
Senate of a resolution proclaiming Ameri-
can recognition of an undivided Jerusalem
has not been matched by an equally clear
statement by President Bush. Only Vice
President Quayle has made what could be
interpreted as Bush's policy, but Quayle's
comments were made in an unofficial set-
ting.
Unless the President quickly comes for-
ward, he will strengthen opponents of a
peaceful solution of the Israeli-Palestinian
conflict.
Mr. Bush should not regard the division
among Israel's political parties and the
more frequent criticism of some policies of
Prime Minister Shamir by American Jew-
ish organizations as a lack of unanimity on
the issue of Jerusalem.
No responsible Israeli official and no
mainstream American Jewish body sup-
ports the return of eastern Jerusalem to
Arab rule.
Coming on the heels of the continuing
failure of the Administration to determine
that the PLO has not renounced terrorism
as Chairman Arafat pledged, and thus to
cut off the dialogue with the Palestine
Liberation Organization, the silence of the
President is far from golden.
Columnists and commentators who have
been speculating that the Bush-Baker com-
bine is far less inclined towards objectivity
towards Israel than the Reagan-Schultz
team must be considered correct if the
President doesn't reject the Arabist tilt of
the State Department.
Pressure On Moscow Needed
Pressure by the United States on the
Soviet Union to implement its agreement
with Israel for direct flights between Mos-
cow and Tel Aviv must not let up.
With the sudden withdrawal of a Budap-
est gateway to Israel, the refusal of the
Soviet to permit direct flights by Jewish
emigrants threatens to severely slow the
exodus.
Poland's desire to replace Hungary,
though most welcome, was voiced by its
outspoken prime minister before an Ameri-
can audience. It has not yet been translated
into an actual route.
In the wake of the fate of Pan Am Flight
103, destroyed over Scotland by Palestin-
ian terrorists, countries of eastern Europe
hesitate to permit travel to Tel Aviv.
Washington should stress to both the
Soviet Union and the newly democratic
nations of Europe that their requests for
massive economic assistance require major
commitments.
Opening of air travel to and from Israel is
just such a commitment, and one which
should be made without delay.
Nearly 13,000 Jews who are waiting in
Moscow cannot be permitted to grow in
number. If these emigrants, with visas to
Israel in hand, are not quickly put on planes
to Ben-Gurion Airport, terrorism will have
won a major victory.
JERUSALEM (JTA) -A
split has developed within the
Gush Emunim, the militant
settlement movement in the
West Bank, between its prag-
matic and more ideological
wings.
Yitzhak Armoni, who
resigned as secretary-general
over the weekend, blamed
"elements in the Gush" for
thwarting his efforts to demo-
cratize the movement.
One of his opponents has
been Rabbi Moshe Levinger
the charismatic Gush leader
from Hebron known for his
hard-line ways.
Armoni, who came from
Ramat Magshimim, a kibbutz
in the Golan Heights, took
office last May with Levinger's
support. But they have since
drifted apart.
Fight Against Tay-Sachs Gaining
NEW YORK (JTA) With
the help of modern medical
testing, computer technology
and a $40,000 grant from the
United Jewish Appeal-
Federation of Jewish Philan-
thropies of New York, an age-
old Jewish disorder, Tay-Sachs
disease, may soon be brought
under control.
A testing program to detect
the Tay-Sachs gene has gained
acceptance in the past three
years among Hasidic Jews in
the New York area, and there
has been a marked decrease in
the number of children born
with the dreaded disease.
The key to the reduction is
the dramatic rise in the num-
ber of Hasidic high-school stu-
dents who take the blood tests
and the cooperation by Hasidic
matchmakers in making sure
carriers of the gene, once
detected, do not marry.
Senate Unites To Press
Bush On Jerusalem Stand
By DAVID KUlKDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Sen. Daniel Moynihan (D-N.Y.)
and Jewish organizations
urged President Bush to join
the Senate in declaring that
Jerusalem is the united capital
of Israel.
The Jewish groups expre-
ssed their appreciation for the
Senate's unanimous voice vote
adoption of Moynihan's resolu-
tion on Jerusalem, which had
83 cosponsors, 45 Democrats
and 38 Republicans.
The resolution declared that
"Jerusalem is and should
remain the capital of the State
of Israel," and that it "must
remain an undivided city."
A similar resolution has been
introduced in the House by
Rep. Eliot Engel (D-N.Y.). The
resolution has some 50 co-
sponsors so far, and Engel is
still gathering additional
names.
"The swift passage of this
resolution demonstrates the
broad bipartisan support in the
Senate for our ally Israel,"
Moynihan said.
"This sends a message of
reassurance to Israel reas-
surance which is essential to
making progress toward
peace."
The Union of Orthodox Jew-
ish Congregations of America,
the Jewish Community Rela-
tions Council of New York, the
Zionist Organization of Amer-
ica and Na'amat USA expre-
ssed their support of the reso-
lution.
RUSSIAN MUSICOLOGISTS TRAIN IN U.S. NEW YORK
Two Soviet Jewish musicologists are pursuing advanced
cantorial studies in the U.S. under a grant from the Memorial
Foundation for Jewish Culture. Reviewing a musical score with
Cantor Vladimir Pliss, right, of Moscow's Choral Synagogue, are
Mikhail Touretski. left, director of the choral group established
last year at the Choral Synagogue, and Mikhail Pisman, an
instructor and soloist in the choir, who is studying to be a cantor.
The young Russians, who are at Yeshiva University, delivered to
the Memorial Foundation copies of a Passover Haggadah and
Pirlce Avot (Ethics of the Fathers) in Hebrew and Russian -first
two books of Jewish interest published in the Soviet Union since
the 1917 revolution. A total of 10,000 copies of each volume were
published last year with the support of the Memorial Foundation.
Sen. Daniel Moynihan
The resolution also "calls
upon all parties involved in the
search for peace to maintain
their strong efforts to bring
about negotiations between
Israel and Palestinian repre-
sentatives."
The resolution noted that
"ambiguous statements" by
Bush and other members of his
administration "concerning
the right of Jews to live in all
parts of Jerusalem raise conc-
erns in Israel that Jerusalem
might one day be redivided
and access to religious sites in
Jerusalem denied to Israeli cit-
izens."
Passover
Greetings
From
Delta Air Lines.
Delta Air Lines and its more than 60,000 professionals
extend best wishes to you and your family.
May your Passover season be filled with happiness.
ADEZZ4
MLoue'bFh/AndhShoujs:
< 1990 Delta Air Linn. Int


Friday, April 6, 1990/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 5
Israel Needs Repairs, Not Despair-
By MARC H. TANENBAIM
NEW YORK (JTA) The
fall of the unity government of
Israel has evoked widespread
concern in the Jewish commu-
nity and elsewhere. Are the
political rivalries between
Likud and Labor so intense
that Israel has become totally
paralyzed from pursing the
peace process? As polls indi-
cate, most Israelis and Dias-
pora Jews would certainly
hope that will not be the case.
Frustrating though the
heated debates in the Knesset
may be, what we are witness-
ing in Israel is not a decline in
democracy, but another reve-
lation of the complex parlia-
mentary democracy that
urgently needs reform, but not
Na'amat Event To Slate
Tribute To Israel '42
Chaim Chester
A tribute to the State of
Israel's 42nd anniversary of
independence, which will be
formally observed in Israel and
South Florida the evening of
April 29, will be given Sunday,
as a feature of the annual
Donor Luncheon of the South
Florida Council of Na'amat
USA.
Lillian Hoffman of Sunny
Isles will offer the invocation
and Cantor Daniel Kaizler of
the Cuban Hebrew Congrega-
tion-Temple Beth Shmuel will
headline the entertainment
program at the noon event
slated for the Fontainjebleau
Hilton Hotel.
Shirley Partner of Pembroke
Pines, vice president of the
South Florida Council, is
arrangements chairman for
the luncheon and Bebee Pull-
man of Fort Lauderdale, a
member of the national board
of Na'amat USA, is reserva-
tions chairman. Felice
Schwartz of Miami Beach,
national board member and
council vice president, is public
relations chairman.
Chaim Chester, national
director of the Aliyah Center
for both the World Zionist
Organization and the Jewish
Agency for Israel, will be the
principal speaker. He will
update developments in Israel
and on the exodus of Soviet
Jewry.
Harriet Green of Miami
Beach, national president of
the Women's Labor Zionist
Organization of America, will
take part in the program. Gert
Aaron of Hallandale, council
co-president, will chair the
luncheon with Margot Berg-
thal of Miami Beach, counci
co-president, co-chair of the
event.
Schwartz said that the pro-
gram will include both musical
and non-musical salutes to
Israel's founding in
1948. Na'amat supports
hundreds of health, educa-
tional, vocational and cultural
facilities throughout the Jew-
ish State.
despair.
Where else in the Middle
East do you find such basic
issues debated before the eyes
of the world, with no holds
barred? In Saudi Arabia?
Syria? Iraq? In such feudal
monarchies and military
despotisms, Israeli-style poli-
tics would lead to summary
executions.
After the political turmoil
settles down, I am persuaded
that a government will emerge
whether headed by Likud or
Labor that will have no
alternative but to move for-
ward on the peace process,
however muddled that process
might be.
Why, even some of the
Orthodox religious parties
have been negotiating on the
basis of foreign policy and
political concerns, and not just
making deals on the sole issue
of how they might get greater
financing of their yeshivot.
A major issue that over-
hangs the prospects for peace
is whether President Bush
will, in effect, continue to sug-
gest the building of a Berlin
Wall in Jerusalem that would
split the holy city in a way that
has not been the case for most
of the past 3,000 years, or
since King David created a
unified city.
It would be ironic and tragic
if Bush ends up moving the
Cold War from Eastern
Europe to the already embat-
tled Middle East.
If, as Republicans claim, it
was the firmness of Presidents
Reagan and Bu comm
led the Russians the cold war, perhaps the les-
son is that firmness against
the intransigent Arabs who
won't recognize Israel could
have a similar result.
As for Israel's hyper-
democracy," perhaps Winston
Churchill said it best: "Democ-
racy may be the messiest form
of government on earth, but it
is the best we got."
Rabbi Marc H. Tanenba tm is inter-
national relations consultant to 'ke
American Jewish CwmmMm and is
immediate past crw i m an of the Inter-
national Jewish Committtt for Inter-
vligious Consultations
THIS SUMMER
COOL IT
AT KUTSHER'S
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where you'll enjoy the best in show business.
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guest lectures, bridge instruction ana tournaments, get-togethers
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Three delicious meals daily, geared to your own special diet.
Coll us for information about ground transportation from
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CHASE SUNSWEET GROWERS INC


Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, April 6, 1990
Administration Delays Stand On $400 Million Loan
By HOWARD ROSENBERG
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
The U.S. government has yet
to state publicly whether it
supports a $400 million hous-
ing loan guarantee to help
Israel resettle Soviet Jewish
immigrants, an Israeli
Embassy official said.
According to Embassy spo-
kesman Ruth Yaron, the Bush
administration is still unde-
cided.
The Embassy was comment-
ing on remarks made by
Deputy Secretary of State
Lawrence Eagleburger, before
the Senate Appropriations
Committee on Foreign Opera-
tions.
Eagleburger said the United
States is still seeking assur-
ances from Israel on "the use
of these funds."
U.S. policy forbids their use
to help anyone in the Israeli
administered territories
except the "indigenous Arab
population."
Yaron said "we don't know"
what assurances if any the
administration would seek, but
she expected to hear within a
few weeks.
The United States and Israel
have yet to discuss any specific
language or text, she said.
Israel has indicated that it
would not use the $400 million
to help build housing for Soviet
emigres in the administered
territories.
But a State Department
source said that it was unre-
solved whether the $400 mil-
lion in housing loans Israel
would use within its pre-1967
borders would not free other
resources to resettle Soviet
Jews in the West Bank.
The Israeli Embassy official
observed that the United
States has not asked Israel
specifically not to use its own
funds to resettle the Soviet
Jews in the territories.
"I don't think they've put it
to us in that bold a form," the
official said.
The loan guarantee has
strong bipartisan support in
Congress. Sen. Robert Kasten
(R-Wis.) one of the bill's two
sponsors, vowed to an Ortho-
African Diplomats
Meet Orthodox Leaders
By HOWARD ROSENBERG
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Diplomats from seven African
countries that have full rela-
tions with Israel were greeted
warmly here by 75 members of
the Union of Orthodox Jewish
Congregations of America.
The event kicked off a Wash-
ington lobbying mission by the
O.U., the congregational arm
of the Orthodox movement.
Most of the countries Cam-
eroon, Ethiopia, Ivory Coast,
Kenya, Liberia, Togo, Zaire -
have renewed relations with
Israel in the last few years,
after having severed ties fol-
lowing the 1973 Yom Kippur
War.
O.U. officials indicated that
they will try to hold similar
meetings in New York with
U.N. ambassadors of those
countries, as part of a cam-
paign to gain greater interna-
tional support for Israel.
Ambassadors who were seen
chatting with O.U. delegates
included Paul Pondi of Camer-
oon; Charles Gomis of the
Ivory Coast; Eugenia Word-
sworth-Stevenson of Liberia;
Ellom-Kodjo Schuppis of
Togo; and Mukendi Tamboa-
Kabila of Zaire. Other coun-
tries sent lower emissaries.
"Israel's experience in suc-
cessful development in a harsh
physical environment is unri-
valed and is, of course, directly
relevant to what Africa is fac-
ing," Allison Rosenberg,
deputy assistant secretary of
state for African Affairs, said
at the reception.
Israel has "the last word on
agricultural techniques in arid
areas," and has expertise in
civil engineering, construction
and community development,
she added.
"We pay tribute," Rosen-
berg said, "to those African
nations who have already
wisely taken those steps, and
we urge our African friends to
look at the fine example that
they set."
Richard Okwaro, counselor
at the Kenyan Embassy, said
in an interview that his coun-
try "would like Israel to do
much more" to help Kenya in
various fields.
"They are good business-
men," Okwaro said of the
Israelis.
dox Jewish audience that he
would add language of the loan
to a bill providing emergency
aid to Panama and Nicaragua
scheduled for next month.
Meanwhile, a senior U.S.
Middle East expert said that
Jews "have the right to live in
East and West" Jerusalem.
The statement, by Daniel
Kurtzer, deputy assistant
secretary of state for Near
Eastern and South Asian
Affairs, appeared to clarify
President Bush's statement
about Jews having the right to
live in East Jerusalem "in the
context of a negotiated settle-
ment."
Members of Congress and
Jewish groups have been blast-
ing the Bush administration
for raising questions about the
settlement of Jews in East
HI AS Book Aids
Soviet Emigrants
NEW YORK In an effort
to help Soviet immigrants get
acculturated to American and
Jewish life, the Hebrew Immi-
grant Aid Society has just pub-
lished its second bilingual
book, which it will be distribut-
ing to the 40,000 Soviet Jews
who have arrived in the United
States in the last year.
"The Jewish World" will
introduce Soviet Jews, the
majority untrained in Jewish
religion and culture, to the
fundamentals of Judaism in
terms and language the
emigre can understand and
absorb.
Not since the asking of the Four Questions
has something so tiny made it so big.
*
It's Tetley's tiny little tea leaves They've been making it big in
Jewish homes for years Because, just as tiny lamb chops and
tiny peas are the most flavorful the same thing is true for tea
leaves. So. for supenontea and qualitea. there's only one
guarantea Tetley tea
K Certified Kosher For Passover
TETLEY TEA
Beteha gonna like it better.
1990 TtWy Inc
Jerusalem, which Israel con-
siders part of its capital.
They have charged that the
United States opposes the set-
tlement of Jews in East Jeru-
salem.
But Kurtzer only criticized
those Israeli settlements in
"Judea, Samaria and Gaza,"
which he said should not be
there "until we have a negoti-
ated settlement. And it's on
this position that we have dif-
fered with the official Israeli
position for some 23 years."
Kurtzer, who was speaking
to the Union of Orthodox Jew-
ish Congregations of America,
is himself an Orthodox Jew
and a Yeshiva University gra-
duate.
"Right now, Jews are living
happily and successfully all
over the city," he said.
Argentina Upholds Extradition Order
NEW YORK (JTA) Jewish leaders here and abroad
have expressed satisfaction with the Argentine Supreme
Court's decision to uphold an extradition order against
accused Nazi war criminal Josef Schwammberger. The
78-year-old former SS officer will stand trial in West
Germany for the killings of at least 5,000 Jews while he was
commandant of the concentration camps at Przemysl and
Mielec in Poland in 1943-44.
Soviet Union Signs Scientific Agreement
TEL AVIV (JTA) Israel and the Soviet Union signed
their first scientific cooperation agreement in Jerusalem.
The pact calls for joint research in the social sciences,
including archeology, history and ancient cultures. It is
seen by both countries as the precursor to cooperative
ventures in the physical sciences as well.
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where you'll enjoy the best in show business.
Plus dozens of cool programs for your pleasure...socials and
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and cocktail parties. And more. Lots more.
m TIE IliT SUM WHO WILL MAKE IT COOL THIS SUMMER
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and nite patrol.
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UNITED NATIONS (JTA) The Egyptian ambassador
here asked the two superpowers to guarantee that Soviet
Jews emigrating to Israel would not be settled in the West
Bank or Gaza Strip. Ambassador Amre Moussa, speaking
before the Security Council, said his country would not
take issue with the overall right of "Soviet Jews or others"
to emigrate to Israel.
NEW YORK (JTA) The chairman of the Democratic
National Committee said that Rep. Gus Savage (D-Ill.), who
used anti-white, anti-Semitic rhetoric to win a primary for
his seat last week, will not receive "one penny" from the
committee in his re-election bid in November because of his
remarks.
TEL AVIV A dozen Israeli employees at the U.S.
Embassy in Tel Aviv are under investigation for allegedly
handing out hundreds of illegal American visas.
JERUSALEM The daughter of Anwar Sadat calls on
the head of the Degel HaTorah party urging him to
influence Rabbi Schach to support the Labor Party.
BONN El Al is planning to open an office in Berlin, in
order to facilitate direct flights from Israel. BONN
The European Community will not lift its ban Tuesday
against scientific ties with Israel, as had been expected.
PARIS Racist-inspired violence is decreasing in
France but oral threats, written insults and acts of
vandalism have dramatically increased over the last three
years.
PARIS Extreme right-wing leader Jean-Marie Le Pen
is formally charged with "incitement to racial hatred," and
will probably be brought to trial by the end of the year.
WASHINGTON It was only pressure from the United
States that protected Jews in Romania during the 24-year
regime of President Nicolae Ceausescu, according to Chief
Rabbi Moses Rosen of Romania.
LOS ANGELES The Moscow Film Festival gets off to
a flying start, without any anti-Semitic demonstrations as
officials had allegedly feared.
TEL AVIV The Israeli Philharmonic will travel to the
Soviet Union for its first ever concerts there, to take place
in Moscow, Leningrad and Riga.
PASSOVER
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Nightly entertainment Cocktail parties Nightly tea room
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31 St. & Colkns Ave., Miami Beach. FL 33140 oa occPP
Friday, April 6, 1990/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 7
Bar Mitzvah
PAUL STRAUSS
MARC STEPHEN
KOWALSKY
Paul Strauss
On Saturday, March 31, Paul
Strauss, son of Susan & Dr.
Abbey Strauss, was called to
the Torah of Temple Beth El
of Boca Raton as a Bar Mitz-
vah.
As an ongoing Temple pro-
ject he was "Twinned" with
Lev Bronshtein of the Soviet
Union.
Paul is a 7th grade student
at Pine Crest School and
attends the Temmple Beth El
Religious School.
Family members sharing in
the Simcha were his sister,
Allison; and grandmothers,
-Gertrude Lesser of Hollywood,
and Ruth Strauss of Levit-
town, Pa.
Dr. & Mrs. Strauss hosted a
Kiddush in Paul's honor fol-
lowing Shabbat Morning Ser-
vice.
Marc Stephen Kowalsky
On Saturday, April 7, Marc
Stephen Kowalsky, son of
Ilene & Dr. Richard Kowalsky,
will be called to the Torah of
Temple Beth El of Boca Raton
as a Bar Mitzvah.
Marc is a student at Boca
Raton Academy and attends
the Temple Beth El Religious
School.
Family members sharing in
the simcha are his brothers,
Perri & Gregg; and grandpar-
ents, Jean & Jack Kreshover
of Tamarac and Sylvia & Har-
old Kowalsky of Boynton
Beach.
Dr. and Mrs. Kowalsky will
host a kiddush in Marc's honor
following Shabbat Morning
Service.
ADAM FLEISCHER
On Saturday morning,
March 24, Adam Fleischer,
son of Gershon and Lea
Fleischer, was called to the
Torah, as a Bar Mitzvah, at the
Congregation B'nai Israel of
Boca Raton. He read the Vay-
akhel portion of the Torah.
Adam was joined not only
by his sister Allison but his
grandmothers Sylvia Minker
of Boca Raton and Mitzi
Fleischer of New York.
A student at Logger's Run
Middle School Adam enjoys
playing baseball and basketball
and is adding to his considera-
ble baseball card collection.
FROM
m?mmi
UIIUMIltON IMCI
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1-7/4
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HOURS OF NEGOTIATIONS JERUSALEM Israel's
Deputy Prime Minister Shimon Peres, left, shakes hands with
Rabbi Yitzhak Peretz, whose Shas Party is divided on supporting
Prime Minister Shamir's Likud Party. It was Shas' decision to
abstain which resulted in the no-confidence Knesset vote which
ended Israel's coalition government. (APIWide World Photo)
Computerized Israel Center
Available Through AZF
Ul N CUHION INTl AIRPOHT I II AT
HIR/I IVA HAIFA JERUSALEM
A'.MKI ION NET ANY A TE I AVIV
ASHOOD BE E R SHI V A
The World Zionist Organiza-
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distribution of the "Computer-
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tionary educational and infor-
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Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, April 6, 1990
Leaders' Meeting With PLO Aid
Triggers Los Angeles Controversy
By TOM TUGEND
LOS ANGELES (JTA) A
secret meeting that a number
>f local Jewish leaders held
with a top aide to Yasir Arafat
has set off a heated contro-
versy within the Jewish com-
munity here, followed by an
attempt to establish guidelines
for any such meetings in the
future.
The emissary was Khalid al-
Hassan, chairman of foreign
relations and parliamentary
affairs committee of the Pales-
rine National Council.
Together with Arafat, he
founded Al Fatah, the largest
and most moderate faction of
Palestine Liberation
Organization.
hi recently was
lescribed by The New York
I mea as Arafat's "trouble-
shooter" and senior adviser.
Hassan's stay in the United
States lasted several months.
During that time, the PLO
official took part in about half
a dozen meetings with Ameri-
can Jews in at least three
cities.
But aside from his meeting
in Los Angeles, only one of
Hassan's encounters with the
American Jewish establish-
ment was made public a
meeting with Henry Siegman,
executive director of the
American Jewish Congress.
A meeting scheduled to take
place in San Francisco report-
edly was canceled before it
could take place.
The Los Angeles meeting
was arranged in late January
through Stanley Sheinbaum, a
longtime peace activist who
was one of five American Jews
to meet with Arafat in Stock-
holm in December 1988.
Palestinian Killer May Be Freed
BRUSSELS (JTA) A Palestinian who killed a Jewish
schoolboy in Antwerp 10 years ago may be freed in a
prisoner-for-hostage exchange reportedly under negotia-
tion by Belgian authorities and the Abu Nidal terrorist
group. The Palestinian, Ali Said Nasser, has been in prison
since 1981, serving a 20-year sentence.
Sri Lankan Orders Mission Closed
NEW YORK (JTA) The president of Sri Lanka has
ordered Israel to close its diplomatic mission there within
30 days, according to reports obtained by the World Jewish
Congress and verified by Israeli, American and Sri Lankan
officials.
Barcelona Memorial Honors Anti-Fascists
TEL AVIV (JTA) A memorial to the 7,000 Jews from
all over the world who fought against fascism in Spain from
1936-39 was unveiled in Barcelona on Sunday. President
Chaim Herzog of Israel was surprised but not displeased to
learn that the 6-foot-high stone monument is engraved with
a quotation from a speech he delivered in Tel Aviv several
years ago.
Argentina Upholds Extradition Order
NEW YORK (JTA) Jewish leaders here and abroad
have expressed satisfaction with the Argentine Supreme
Court's decision to uphold an extradition order against
accused Nazi war criminal Josef Schwammberger. The
78-year-old former SS officer will stand trial in West
Germany for the killings of at least 5,000 Jews while he was
commandant of the concentration camps at Przemysl and
Mielec in Poland in 1943-44.
Soviet Union Signs Scientific Agreement
TEL AVIV (JTA) Israel and the Soviet Union signed
their first scientific cooperation agreement in Jerusalem.
The pact calls for joint research in the social sciences,
including archeology, history and ancient cultures. It is
seen by both countries as the precursor to cooperative
ventures in the physical sciences as well.
Accused Nazi Criminal Loses House
TORONTO (JTA) The home of accused Nazi war
criminal Imre Finta has been ordered seized and sold, to
help pay off legal debts incurred when he launched a libel
suit against a television network.
"Hassan contacted me and
asked me if I could arrange
some meetings for him, with-
out any publicity," said Shein-
baum. "I always feel that any
discussion (with Palestinians)
is good," he added.
During Hassan's two-day
visit, he attended a reception
of about 60 people in Shein-
baum's house, then with a
smaller group of 15 at lunch
the following day.
Among those at the lunch
meeting were prominent mem-
bers of the board of directors
of the Jewish Federation
Council, including Marcia Vol-
pert and Rabbi Harvey Fields,
chairpersons respectively of
the federation's Jewish Com-
munity Relations Committee
and of its Commission on the
Middle East.
Strongest condemnations of
the meetings were leveled by
two members of the Middle
East commission, Rabbi Abra-
ham Cooper, associate dean of
the Simon Wiesenthal Center
for Holocaust Studies, and
Jonathan Mitchell.
In a letter of resignation to
the commission, Cooper
charged that "those in posi-
tions of communal trust nave
violated it in pursuit of private
agendas."
Cooper had earlier threat-
ened to quit if Volpert and
Fields did not resign from the
Federation Council.
At that time, he told the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency,
"If they (Volpert and Fields)
don't go, I'll gb.
"That leaders of the second
largest Jewish community in
the world would meet with a
PLO representative is com-
pletely unacceptable," he said.
"Federation leaders can't
meet with the PLO one day
and next day tell us that the
whole community has to work
together and raise huge dollars
to help settle Soviet Jews in
Israel. This can be incredibly
damaging to Israel it's a
great chutzpah."
Mitchell said that those who
had met with Hassan had
"violated the trust of the Jew-
ish community."
During Hassan's visit to Los
Angeles, he also met with staff
members of the Rand Corpora-
tion a think tank; editors of the
Los Angeles Times; and a
group of academicians.
Federation board members
who attended the meeting
with Hassan gave it mixed
reviews. Dorothy Goren said
she was disappointed that "we
got the usual answers. I asked
him about all the Arabs being
killed by other Arabs, and he
never gave me a straight
answer."
PUBUX WISHES TO
A GLORIOUS
R\SS0VER CELEBRATION.
WHERE SHOPPING IS A PLEASURE I pGbSx


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