The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County the voice of the Jewish community of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
West Palm Beach, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 11, no. 27 (Sept. 13, 1985)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Feb. 20, 1987 called no. 4 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Mar. 31, 1989 called no. 12 in masthead and no. 13 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44605643
lccn - sn 00229551
ocm44605643
System ID:
AA00014309:00163

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)


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Full Text
THE VOICE OF
THE JEWISH
COMMUNITY OF
PALM BEACH
COUNTY
"Jewish floridian
<^ m OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
Volume 16 Number 1
PALM BEACH, FLORIDA FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 1990
am
Price 40 Cents
Weizman Accepts Demotion
Shamir Winner In Cabinet Crisis
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Prime Minister Yitzhak Sha-
mir may have saved the Likud-
Labor unity coalition govern-
ment by allowing Ezer Weiz-
man to stay in the Cabinet.
But his compromise with the
errant Laborite has aroused
the wrath of his chief rivals in
the Likud bloc, Ministers Ariel
Sharon, David Levy and Yitz-
hak Moda'i.
They were among the first to
congratulate the prime minis-
ter for toughness after he sum-
marily fired Weizman at the
Dec. 31 Cabinet meeting, for
allegedly maintaining contacts
with the Palestine Liberation
Organization.
But now they are heaping
scorn on the llth-hour deal
made Tuesday. Weizman
agreed to resign from the pres-
tigious, policy-making Inner
Cabinet of 12 senior ministers.
He will, however, retain his
Cabinet portfolio as minister
of science and development,
which has little influence on
affairs of state.
The compromise allowed
Vice Premier Shimon Peres
and Defense Minister Yitzhak
Rabin, the two senior Labor
ministers, to save face. Nei-
ther they nor their colleagues
wanted to break up the gov-
ernment over the firing of
Weizman, a political maverick
who is not considered to have
much of a popular following.
But Peres could hardly have
ignored Shamir's violation of
the coalition agreement, which
states that the prime minister
cannot dismiss a Labor minis-
ter without the consent of the
vice premier.
A number of political ana-
lysts viewed the compromise
as strengthening Shamir and
further weakening Labor.
But according to Levy, a
deputy premier who is minis-
ter of construction and hous-
ing, Shamir's compromise was
iTZHAK SHAMIR. _
Prime Minister of Israel
a serious blow to Likud. It
gave Labor a "recipe" to beat
Likud in the future, he
charged.
Jewish Agency Official
Asks Mandatory Loan
NORIEGA'S OFFICE Panama City PFC First Class Michael McCann of Texas looks over a
portrait of Adolf Hitler in the office of Manuel Noriega in the Panamanian Defense Forces
Headquarters in Panama City. (APIWxde World Photo)
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
head of the Jewish Agency's
Immigration and Absorption
Department thinks the Israeli
public should pay for the
absorption of the quarter mil-
lion Soviet Jews he estimates
will come here in the next
three years.
Uri Gordon is trying to con-
vince the government and the
Knesset to authorize a special
loan, along the lines of the
Yom Kippur War loan the gov-
ernment levied in 1973, which
was repayable in 15 years.
Gordon told the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency that Prime
Minister Yitzhak Shamir was
non-committal when he pre-
sented the idea to him last
week.
Vice Premier and Finance
Minister Shimon Peres has
spoken out publicly against
what he calls a "forced loan."
Gordon does not see it in
such terms.
THIRD CLASS
BULK RATE
U.S. POSTAGE
PAID
BOCA RATON. FLORIDA
PERMIT NO. 1093
European Upheaval, Soviet Jewry
ADL 's Top News Stories
NEW YORK (JTA) Surge
for democratic reform in
Eastern Europe and freer emi-
gration of Soviet Jews were
the most significant events for
the Jewish people in 1989,
according to the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith.
They topped the list of 10
events deemed most vital to
Jews during the outgoing
year, a list compiled by Burton
Levinson and Abraham Fox-
man, national chairman and
national director, respectively,
of the ADL.
The two observed that since
Jews historically thrive in
democratic societies, they
should be among the main ben-
eficiaries of events in Eastern
Europe.
The departure of 60,000
Jews from the Soviet Union
during the past year exceed-
ing the 1979 high was
another milestone, while inside
the Soviet Union, Jews
enjoyed more cultural and reli-
gious freedom.
Of those who left, more of
them settled in Israel, due to
the newly adopted U.S. immi-
gration policies, Levinson and
Foxman observed.
But those Soviet Jews who
remained also faced a serious
menace in the rise of virulently
anti-Semitic groups like Pam-
yat, which also have benefitted
from glasnost.
Third on the list of the ADL
officials was Israel's peace ini-
tiative toward the Palestini-
ans, advanced with U.S. sup-
port.
But with Yasir Arafat's
ambiguous acceptance of
Israel s existence, the Pales-
tinians remained intransigent,
according to Levinson and
Foxman.
They noted an alarming
increase in anti-Semitic vio-
lence and vandalism in the
United States, particularly on
college and university cam-
puses.
The Skinhead menace con-
tinued to proliferate, with acts
of violence occurring in vari-
ous parts of the country, but
federal indictments have been
forthcoming.
The ADL regretted strained
Jewish-Catholic relations over
a number of issues during the
year, the most serious being
the Carmelite convent on the
grounds of the former Aus-
chwitz death camp.
Election of former Ku Klux
Klan leader David Duke to the
Louisiana State Legislature
was seen by the ADL as a gain
Continued on Page 6


Page e The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, January 12, 1990
Viewpoint
Records Spotlight Challenge
The numbers themselves tend to numb.
A record 71,509 Jews left the Soviet
Union last year, far exceeding the 51,320
who emigrated in the previous 12-month
peak.
And Israel now expects a quarter of a
million immigrants from the USSR within
the next three or four years.
The only proper question is not whether
Israel can handle what is now termed
Exodus II, but how it will accept this
vitally-needed infusion of Jewish citizens.
A top-level Jewish Agency executive has
asked Israel to impose a mandatory loan on
its citizens, much as it did after the 1973
Yom Kippur War.
Both Israel Bonds and the United Jewish
Appeals have agreed to historic campaigns
for funds with which to help absorb the
Russians into the mainstream of Israeli
society.
Simultaneously, the numbers of Soviet
Jews who are gaining admission into the
United States remain at high levels,
further taxing the resources of American
Jewry.
But if we are to demonstrate that our
pleas of "Let My People Go" were sincere,
we cannot hesitate at meeting and exceed-
ing all of the requirements and goals.
The Israelis will have to endure addi-
tional hardships to maintain the Law of
Return for every Jew. Diaspora Jewry, and
particularly American Jews, must gladly
share the burden.
Fascell Merits Honor
South Florida's Congressional delegation
has historically demonstrated unusually
strong support for Israel, with both Demo-
cratic and Republican representatives out-
spoken in their views.
Dean of the delegation, Rep. Dante B.
Fascell (Dem.-Fla.) has championed the
cause of the Jewish state throughout his
35-year tenure in Congress.
His position as Chairman of the House of
Representatives Committee on Foreign
Affairs makes Fascell's pro-Israel stance
even more significant.
It is therefore most fitting that he will be
honored with a doctorate in philosophy by
the University of Haifa at a Miami Beach
dinner and academic convocation next
month.
We congratulate Dr. Fascell, whose
record as a legislator has been rewarded by
a lifetime of political victories. His stature
on the national scene is a tribute to our
entire community.
Jewish floridian
ol Palm Beach County
Combining "Out Voice" and "Federation Rapoflar"
Fred Shochet
He.rtie.t congratulations! yoovo boon selected a. Lrtanon'a next Pr.aid.ntl
Geopolitical Shifts
Pose Challenges
By MARC H. TANENBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) In
speculating on what the upco-
ming 1990s might hold for the
Jewish people, Dorothy
Baker's well-known bon mot
comes to mind: "Jews are like
everybody else, only more so!"
No serious reflection on Jew
ish interests in the 1990s can
take place without locating
them within the geopolitical
forces of East-West and
North-South relations.
Massive revolutions for
democracy and in opposition to
the ancient regimes of Com-
munist tyranny will have fate-
ful, and ambiguous, conse-
quences not only for European
Jewry, but for Jews every-
where, and especially for
Israel.
Glasnost and perestroika
will continue to result in mas-
sive emigration for Soviet
Jewry, probably the dominant
human issue for world Jewry
in the 1990s. Challenges to
financial and human resources
for resettlement will be monu-
mental and will call for unpar-
alleled commitment and
patience.
IMf
Provision of Jewish religi-
ous, cultural and educational
support for the million-plus
Jews who opt to remain in the
Soviet Union will be a parallel
commanding Jewish concern.
Glasnost has made possible
unprecedented freedom of
speech in the Soviet Union and
in the East European coun-
tries, and certainly that human
right is to be welcomed by
Jews.
But now, right-wing, nation-
alist and bitterly anti-Semitic
groups, foremost among them
the Pamyat, are beginning to
have a field day in spewing out
their anti-Jewish bile. Echoes
of that historic anti-Jewish
bias now circulates in the cul-
tural bloodstreams of Poland,
Hungary, East Germany,
Rumania and the other for-
merly Communist tyrannies.
Knowledgeable and skillful
Jewish leaders will have their
hands full counteracting both
the anti-Semitic and anti-
Israel biases which have sur-
faced on both sides of the
collapsed Iron Curtain.
The Vatican, which has qui-
etly emerged as a major archi-
tect in mobilizing the anti-
Communist forces in Eastern
Europe, could play a construc-
tive role in countering the reli-
gion-based anti- Semitism
that is, if Jews do not manage
to alienate the Vatican com-
pletely by strident, reckless
attacks on the Pope and the
Catholic Church when a mode-
rate, diplomatic strategy
would prove to be far more
effective in the Jewish inter-
est.
World Jewry also will have
to be vigilant over the poten-
tial negative impact of a reun-
ification of East Germany with
the Federal Republic of West
Germany.
Four decades of the GDR's
hostility toward Israel and its
pro-PLO, pro-terrorist activity
could become a serious nega-
tive influence on West Ger-
many's positive attitudes tow-
ard Jews and Israel. Watch
that closely in the 1990s.
The North-South coordin-
ate's impact on Jews and
Israel is nowhere more dra-
matically shown than in the
Continued on Page 6
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i FRED K. SHOCHET
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OB
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SUZANNE SHOCHET
Executive Editor
4

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Friday, January 12, 1990/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 3
New One-Year Record
> '' ,"
71,509 Jews Leave USSR In 1989
Figures released by the
World Jewish Congress show
that 71,509 Jews emigrated
from the Soviet Union in 1989,
the highest number ever.
Previous high for annual
emigration of Jews from the
Soviet Union was in 1979
when 51,320 left the USSR.
In December 8,540 Jews left
the Soviet Union, while the
highest monthly emigration
figure was registered in
November when 11,170 Soviet
Jews left the country.
Of the emigrants, 11,994
have settled in Israel, the most
since the early 1970's.
The WJC reports that since
Oct. 1, when new American
immigration regulations came
into effect, a steadily increas-
ing percentage of Soviet Jew-
ish emigrants has settled in
Israel. In December 1989,
ADL
Continued from Page 1
for the forces of racism and
bigotry.
Israel's slow but steady
gains in diplomatic relations
with the Soviet bloc and black
African nations was cited as a
favorable development.
Another was the conviction
and sentencing of political
extremist and anti-Semitic
propagandist Lyndon LaR-
ouche.
Finally, the ADL saw signifi-
cance for Jews in the U.S.
Supreme Court's seemingly
contradictory decisions in two
cases involving the separation
of church and state.
The court ruled that a Nativ-
ity scene in a Pennsylvania
county courthouse was uncon-
stitutional.
At the same time, it upheld
the display of a Chanukah
menorah on the steps of the
Pittsburgh City Hall, a block
away, "delivering at best a
mixed message," the ADL
said.
Shifts
Continued from Page 2
current surrealistic drama in
Panama.
While the Panamanian
struggle was, in general, a
conflict between U.S. and pro-
democratic forces and Nor-
iega's drug- sustained
tyranny, when the looting
started, Panamanian Jewish
shopkeepers and business-
people got the worst of it.
Undoubtedly, Latin American
Jewry will look increasingly to
their North American co-
religionists for appropriate
aid, both political and eco-
nomic.
As my mother of blessed
memory used to say to
describe a special Jewish
pleasure; "A Jewish pleasure
is a cool Yom Kippur. I worry
with my fellow Jews, whether
the 1990s with all its upheavals
might not be a "cool Yom
Kippur."
Rabbi Mare H. Tanenbaum u inter-
national relations consultant to the
American Jewish Committee.
more than 40% of the total
emigrants came to Israel
3,500 out of 8,540 who left the
Soviet Union.
Israeli officials predict that
between 30,000 and 50,000
Soviet Jews will arrive in 1990
because of liberalized Soviet
emigration laws and the new
U.S. immigration regulations.
Jerusalem Post
Publisher Fires 20
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Jerusalem Post, Israel's only
English-language daily, is in
the throes of a fierce dispute
over policy between its senior
editorial staff and its recently
appointed president and publi-
sher, retired Israel Defense
Force Col. Yehuda Levy.
The Post reported on its
front page that nine senior
editorial staff members, led by
Managing Editor David Lan-
dau, and 11 other journalists
sent letters of resignation to
Levy and to David Radler,
chairman of the Canada-based
Hollinger newspaper chain,
which bought the Post last
April.
They said they would leave
the paper in 30 days if Levy
were not replaced.
Levy responded by firing
them.
More than 20 staff members
threatened last week to strike
unless Radler removed Levy in
30 days as the Post's president
Continued on Page 8
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Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, January 12, 1990
In Yugoslavia
Ethnic Rivalries Put Jews In Middle
By RUTH E. GRUBER
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia
(JTA) There is concern
among some Yugoslav Jews
that the complex ethnic and
political rivalries besetting
Yugoslavia may be placing its
tiny Jewish community in a
delicate and potentially diffi-
cult situation.
"Jews have been used as
short change in internal ethnic
conflicts," one Jewish source
put it bluntly.
Resulting tensions have
already been reported within
the Jewish community, but so
far, they have not been seri-
ous.
Yugoslavia is a loose federa-
tion of six republics and two
provinces, mostly drawn up on
ethnic lines. Recent years have
seen longstanding tensions
and rivalries among the repub-
lics become sharper, as focal
ethnic nationalism has grown
more powerful.
Yugoslavia's estimated
5,000 Jews out of a pre-
Holocaust population of 75,000
to 85,000 are centered
mostly in the republic of Ser-
bia, its province of Voyvodina,
and in the republics of Croatia
and Bosnia-Herzegovina.
More than once, amid the
complicated and emotional
ethnic conflict, attitudes by
one ethnic group against
another have been compared
to historic persecution of the
Jews.
Lately, concern that Jews
may be squeezed by internal
tensions has been heightened
by the recent formation of a
Serbian-Jewish Friendship
Society and overtures to Israel
by Serbia.
This included a visit to Israel
this past fall by Serbia's
regional foreign affairs secret-
ary, Aleksandar Prlja, despite
the fact that Yugoslavia as a
whole does not have diplomatic
relations with Israel.
Motives Behind
Friendly Overtures
While on the surface, noth-
ing could seem better than
overtures of friendship to Jews
and Israel, there is concern
that these moves are not disin-
terested.
Shapiro Endows Chair
At Brandeis U.
Carl J. Shapiro of Palm
Beach, has endowed a chair in
international finance at Bran-
deis University in Waltham,
Mass. A philanthropist and a
trustee of Brandeis, Shapiro is
the founder, past president
and chairman of the board of
Kay Windsor, Inc., a manufac-
turer of women's apparel. In
1987, he established the Carl
and Ruth Shapiro Center for
Library Technology and Jour-
nals at Brandeis.
In her announcement of the
establishment of the Carl
Shapiro Chair in International
Finance, Brandeis President
Evelyn E. Handler said: "Carl
Shapiro has always been stead-
fast in his belief in the Bran-
deis mission to cultivate the
best and the brightest. His
choice of a chair in interna-
tional finance is most appropri-
ate, and we are grateful for his
foresight and generosity."
The first incumbent of the
Carl Shapiro Chair in Interna-
tional Finance is Peter A.
Petri, professor of economics
and director of the Lemberg
Program in International Eco-
nomics and Finance at Bran-
deis. Petri, who received both
undergraduate and graduate
degrees from Harvard Univer-
sity, is the author of The
Future of the World Economy
(Oxford) and Modeling Japan-
ese-American Trade: A Study
in Asymmetric Interdepend-
ence (Harvard). He has served
as a consultant to the World
Bank and the National Science
Foundation.
"Under today's circum-
stances, there are various
manipulations, particularly
nationalist manipulations,"
said Filip David, a Jewish
writer in Belgrade. "A society
like (the Serbian-Jewish
Friendship Society) can
become the object of manipula-
tions and can fit into a scenario
that may be written outside
it," he said.
"Why have a Serbian-Jewish
Friendship Society?" asked
one Belgrade Jew. "I'm as
much a Serb as a Jew.
Wouldn't it be better to have a
Yugoslavia-Israel Friendship
Society?"
Serbia is the largest of
Yugoslavia's six republics, and
its Communist leadership has
used appeals to rampant Ser-
bian nationalism to win
unprecedented popularity,
while at the same time antago-
nizing other republics.
Jews who are concerned
about developments feel that
the Serbian nationalist author-
ities are trying to use expres-
sions of friendship with Jews
and Israel to win support for
Serbian interests in the out-
side world.
"It's all so transparent that
you need not be a genius to see
through it," said one Jewish
intellectual in Belgrade.
"The final idea is to get the
Jewish lobby to lobby for the
Serbs," he said. "This is to go
through the Jewish people
here and Jews abroad in the
United States to explain cer-
tain things happening here.
'We Trust The Jewish
People'
The Serbs want to tell Jews
and Israel their side of the
story, to counter the criticism,
a senior Serbian official said.
He did not want to be quoted
by name.
"Friendship with the Jews is
sort of a collective national
identity of Serbs," the official
said. "When you feel that you
are in unpleasant circum-
stances, you feel for your old
friends.
"We trust the Jewish people
as people who have always
been friendly with the Serbs,
as we were victims together
and lived in peace alongside
each other," he said.
Throughout history, he said,
the Serbs considered several
peoples to be their enduring
friends: the Jews, the Russians
and the French, in particular.
How to react to these Ser-
bian initiatives has caused
some tensions in the Jewish
community.
On the one hand, said Cadik
Danon, Yugoslavia's only
rabbi, "it's difficult to reject a
hand extended in friendship,
certainly in Serbia, where
there is a tradition."
On the other hand, in addi-
tion to the uneasiness felt by
some Jews in Belgrade, Jews
in other republics particu-
larly the active community in
Croatia distrust the Serbian
motives, as Croats generally
distrust the Serbs. Croatian
Jews tend to align themselves
politically with Croats.
One Jewish source who dis-
trusts the Serbian initiatives
predicted that everything
could backfire onto the Jews
themselves.
"Consequences of this med-
dling are already evident," he
said. "Naturally, there are dis-
agreements between Jews
within Yugoslavia in the dif-
ferent regions. Ultimately, it
will boomerang back.
Meanwhile, there are some
indications that Yugoslavia's
federal government may even
tually broaden relations with
Israel. Diplomatic links were
cut in 1967, but since then, the
two countries have maintained
commercial and cultural ties.
P.B. Dedicates New Cruise Ship Terminal
The Port of Palm Beach
Board of Commissioners and
Crown Cruise Line will dedi-
cate a new $1.7 million cruise
ship terminal on January 12.
The terminal is two stories
high and has an all-weather
telescoping jetway to service
the cruise ships.
Crown Cruise Line has been
operating at the Port of Palm
Beach since December 1985
and is a major tenant of the
Port. The terminal is vital in
accommodating the increased
passenger loads expected in
the future.
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Park Admissions Department or by mail to CulfstrearpPVK
Admissions Dept U S Highway One. milandale, ft 53009
*& A-AAbot Answerfone (407)586-7400
213 N. Dbde Highway Lake Worth, FL 33460
FLORIDA'S
SUPERT RACK 2EEZEDIW*TOr


Friday, January 12, 1990/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 5
Bonds To Honor Forsteins Jan. 28
DONATES EYEWITNESS ACCOUNTS Sunrise, FL Leibl
Koniuchow8ky, 80, holds files which meticulously document
civilian Nazi collaboration in the Holocaust through eyewitness
accounts. Koniuchowskys recent decision to donate the records to
Jerusalem's Yad Vasnem memorial archives has given Nazi
hunters new leads on war crime suspects. Files also draw
attention to the civilian role in the mass killings of European
Jews in World War II. (AP/Wide World Photo)
A Testimonial Luncheon
Sunday, January 28th, at
11:15 will be held at The Abbey
Road in Lake Worth, to honor
Daniel & Shirley Forstein and
present them with the City of
Peace Award by Temple Israel
and State of Israel Bonds.
Distinguished guest speaker
will be Honorable Yoram
Eytan-Ettinger, Minister for
Congressional Affairs at the
Embassy of Israel in Washing-
ton, D.C. Chairmen are Mae
and Mar tell Folb, Associate
Chairman Elaine Berman and
Reservations Chairman Lillian
Dobrow.
Mort Freeman At
Century Village
Mort Freeman actor, singer
and raconteur will entertain at
the Yiddish Culture Group on
Tuesday, February 6th,
10 a.m. in the Century Village
Auditorium of West Palm
Beach.
Mr. Freeman performs clas-
sics and folk songs to sacred
music and Broadway hits. He
sings in more than a dozen
languages, including French,
Italian, Hebrew, Spanish, Yid-
dish and Russian.
Chairman of the event is
Morris Berlinsky. The event is
sponsored by the Yiddish Cul-
ture Group of Century Village
and State of Israel Bonds. For
information, call 686-8611.
Shirley and Daniel Forstein
II ^ /& Glatt Kosher
J Passover
Deauville
AT
THE
1990
5750
HOTEL
BEACH A
TENNIS
CLUB
Re-Invest Offer
From Bonds
Holders of Israel Bonds pur-
chased in 1975 and 1976 can
get credit for the full maturity
value of their 4% bonds up to
24 months in advance, if they
re-invest in new bonds, it has
been announced by Dr. Eman-
uel Newmark, Chairman of the
Palm Beach County Bond cam-
paign. Dr. Newmark said "all
Israel 4% bonds issued
through 1976 are eligible for
this credit, provided holders
add additional funds and pur-
chase a higher denomination
than the bond they currently
hold."
Securities which may be pur-
chased under this plan include
Seventh Development Issue
Bonds and Individual Variable
Rate Issue Bonds.
Dr. Newmark emphasized
the important role Israel Bond
reinvestment plays in the
effort to help absorb the influx
of Soviet immigrants to Israel.
These extra Bond proceeds
will help Israel to provide jobs
and housing for the newcom-
ers.
"Check your safe deposit
box and your files," Newmark
said. "If you are holding 4%
bonds issued through 1976,
call the Israel Bond office at
686-8611 for information
about the simple reinvestment
procedure."
Czech, Hungarian
Artifacts Secured
WASHINGTON Addi-
tional material evidence of the
Holocaust will be on public
view here as a result of formal
agreements just concluded
between the United States
Holocaust Memorial Council
and national institutions in
Hungary and Czechoslovakia.
Hebrew U. Schedules
Symposium Feb. 27
The American Friends of
Hebrew University will hold
its Fourth Annual Symposium
on February 27, at The Break-
ers.
Keynote speaker will be
Ambassador Arthur A. Hart-
man, former U.S. Ambassador
to the Soviet Union.
A celebration dinner mark-
ing the Hebrew University's
65th anniversary will be held.
For information call (407) 655-
8085.
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8 9 & 10
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Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, January 12, 1990
Jews Of Germany:
Why They Continue Living There
By WINSTON PICKETT
Northern California Jewish Bulletin
WEST BERLIN (JTA) -
Friday night. The synagogue
pews are amply filled. The
women are seated off to the
side, or in the balcony. An
organ plays, the cantor intones
the Lecha Dodi, and a nervous
anticipation builds as a 13-
year-old's Bat Mitzvah cere-
mony begins.
During the Shabbat service,
the cantor and rabbi call a
throng of children to the
ornate bimah in a synagogue
that was destroyed during
Kristallnacht and restored
after World War II. Youthful,
excited voices ring festively
through the air.
By all appearances, a nor-
mal, thriving Jewish gather-
ing. But look again. At least a
third of the more than 350
people who have gathered are
not Jews but visiting Chris-
tians. All have been frisked
and electronically screened for
weapons by a policeman at the
front door.
Welcome to West Berlin.
Why do Jews still live in
Germany?
It is a question that seems to
haunt many Jews, for whom
the country is forever branded
as the cradle of the Holocaust.
How can they live there,
with the memories, the pla-
ques where synagogues once
stood, and the ghosts of a
Jewish culture that once was
the most vibrant and progres-
sive in all of Europe?
Question the 30,000 Jews
who live in the 56 Jewish com-
munities scattered throughout
the Federal Republic of Ger-
many and you'll get 30,000
answers: from the Israelis who
have come for economic oppor-
tunity; the Soviet Jews who
now make up perhaps a quar-
ter of the Jewish population;
the children of Holocaust sur-
vivors; and the aging survivors
themselves.
Whomever you ask, how-
ever, a simple fact will
emerge: Jews are in Germany
to stay. Perhaps not forever,
and perhaps with one bag
packed. But they are there.
What follows are some
glimpses of the Jews them-
selves and their explana-
tions as to why they remain.
Berlin Rabbi
Rabbi Ernst Stein is the
spiritual leader of the liberal
Pestalozzistrasse Synagogue
in Berlin, where the recent
Friday night Bat Mitzvah took
place. He is a 60-year-old
native of Germany who was
ordained at the Leo Baeck
College in London 1985 and
took over the Berlin pulpit five
years later. He can also be
disarmingly frank about Jew-
ish life in Germany.
Despite its inordinate wealth
and its surfeit of educational
and cultural programs, Stein
says, German Jews are starv-
ing for energetic Jewish pro-
fessionals rabbis, cantors,
teachers. "If you don't have
these, you can't do anything,"
he says between telephone
calls in his capacious, book-
lined study.
When Stein isn't managing
the affairs of his 6,500-
member congregation, he is
busy providing services to
East Berlin's tiny, 200-
member Jewish community.
He returned to Berlin, he says,
after seeing "the pitiful condi-
tion of German Jews" in the
1970s.
He said he is not in Berlin
because he believes Germany
to be a viable place for Jews to
live, however, but out of a
sense of responsibility.
"There is a Jewish commun-
ity here and it has to be
served," he says, eyes widen-
ing for impact. "I personally
would rather not see it be
here."
Prague Native
Jana Urbach's ambivalence
is of a different sort. A native
of Prague, she came to Bonn
via South Africa, where she
was raised. Soft-spoken,
poised and thoughtful, she and
her husband manage a mid-
priced hotel. She is one of
Bonn's 200 Jews, most of
whom, she says, are either
foreign-born, intermarried or
both.
As a Jew, her identity is
secure. Her parents survived
the Holocaust. Her father,
Alexander Singer, was the
leading cantor of Prague. She
has lived briefly in Israel. She
sends her two children to mid-
week Hebrew school in Bonn,
and she participates in a once-
a-month adult Torah study
group.
Still, she longs for the
warmth and cohesion of a lar-
ger Jewish community where
she lives. And she remains
wary of anti- Semitic senti-
ments she hears around the
hotel and on the street.
"In Germany, we are
Czechs," she says of herself
and her husband. Sometimes,
she admits, "it's easier to be
invisible and not tell that you
are Jewish."
Holocaust Survivor
Martin Poss doesn't have
that option. Born and raised in
Hanover, he is one of a seg-
ment of German Jews whose
East European parents
decided to stay on in Germany
after surviving the Holocaust.
Because of their Polish heri-
tage, he doesn't quite feel Ger-
man, either.
Nevertheless he declares,
"Germany is not a bad place.
You can live here."
Self-consciously, though. As
a pensive social worker, the
35-year-old dark-bearded man
who moved to Berlin 10 years
ago has seen a rise in national-
ism and anti-foreign senti-
ments, which he feels could
easily spill over to the Jews.
Poss, who takes much of his
orientation from the slice of
American Jewish life he expe-
rienced when he spent a year
in Southern California,
observes that living in Ger-
many perpetually reminds
Jews of their separateness.
"It's a constant thing here,"
he says. "You go to temple and
you have to be searched; there
are police all over because
LURIES BUSINESS WORLD
CM1 MTIMUIOW CUIWI IT CMI0GMM
UNIFICATION
there are threats. Jewish kin-
dergartens are like Fort Knox,
they're so highly guarded."
The prejudice Ross says he
sees while working with some
of West Berlin's 14,000 home-
less, as well as its Turkish,
Polish and Yugoslavian guest
workers, "leads to the ques-
tion, 'Do we really belong
here?' "
Another Stripe
Micha Guttmann is a Ger-
man of another stripe.
For a native, he is the anti-
thesis of what Israelis deris-
ively, and sometimes affection-
ately, call a "yecke" the
button-down, punctilious Ger-
man Jew. He dresses for work
in slacks and a sweater, has an
unruly nimbus of blond curly
hair, and drives a late-model,
dark-metallic blue Porsche
with newspapers, books and
videotapes scattered every-
where inside.
Born in Berlin to parents
who had fled Germany before
World War II, he is in the
midst of a career change. Edu-
cated as an attorney and
trained as a journalist, Gutt-
mann recently left his job as a
commentator for West Ger-
man Broadcasting to become
the secretary-general of the
Central Council of Jewish Ger-
many.
He is candid about the future
of Germany's Jews. Most of
the smaller Jewish communit-
ies, aging remnants with any-
where from 20 to 50 members,
will dissolve in the next two
decades, he predicts.
That will leave the bulk of
Jews in Germany's three main
communities of Berlin, Frank-
furt and Munich approxi-
mately 6,000, 4,000 and 3,500,
respectively.
Whatever the size, however,
Jews will always need political
representation, says Gutt-
mann, whose organization is
the public relations, lobbying,
news and culture-coordinating
arm of the Jewish community.
The Bonn-based zentralrat, as
it is known in Germany, cam-
paigns for federal funds for
Jewish schools and museums,
and on behalf of Israel.
In terms of real size, Gutt-
mann calls Germany's Jews
politically negligible. But in
terms of influence, including
the 60,000-circulation weekly
newspaper published by zen-
tralrat, and especially on Holo-
caust-related issues or matters
of anti- Semitism, "we defin-
itely have a voice."
Regarding voices, Guttmann
maintains that his is that of a
new generation of German
Jews Jews not haunted by
the memories of their parents
who survived the Holocaust,
Jews willing to assert their
Jewishness and civil rights
openly and publicly.
Like many, however, he is
worried about a resurgent
anti- Semitism and the rise of
the far right-wing Republican
Party. But not enough to dam-
pen his vision of the future.
"For me, anti-Semitism is a
reality, but no more than in
other countries, like France,"
says the 42-year-old resident
of Cologne. "I am not afraid of
it, like my parents."
Instead, he has chosen to
combat it by making increased
contacts with German Jewish
youth Jews who, like him-
self at the Free University of
Berlin in the 1970s, are trying
to forge their Jewish identities
through study, Zionism, travel
to Israel and dialogue with
non-Jews.
In the months ahead, for
example, he will be helping
coordinate an international
conference in Berlin on "Jews
in the '90s," as well as other
forums for German Jewish stu-
dents and professionals.
Y COUNTRY CAMP
HAS SOMETHING
TO OFFER EVERY
FAMILY & CHILD
CO-ED RESIDENT CAMP OF THE YM-YWHA
THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTRE OF MONTREAL
LOCATED IN THE LAURENTIAN MOUNTAINS
Regular Camp Prop-am A Tradition of Excellence
SESSION 1
SESSION 2
BOTH
SESSIONS
JRCITS
sr errs
June28-July22
July 23-August 16
June 28-August 16
June 28-August 16
June28-August 16
FEE
$1675
$1675
$2795
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PROGRAM ACTIVITIES
Campers In Mch bunk map out a balanced weekly program together with their
counaallor. Tha amphaala la on fun In a aafa, supervised environment that provide*
opportunity tor learning and personal development. Activities Include:
Tennn Canadian Tennis Aseoc. Basketball, volleyball 4 tstherball
Aerobics, dance a fitness
Arts 1 crafts
Oneg Shabbat a creative cultural programs
Theatre, music a drama
Movies, video filmmaking i photography
Naturt farm, ecology, animal care a gardening
Elective programming 4 much more
certified Instruction
Recreational Red Cross certified
instructional swimming
Sailing, windsurfing, kayaking.
Boating, canoeing
Baseball, soccer 1 football
Archery, water skiing, fishing
SPECIAL PROGRAMS
STARTER CAMP OR 1-3
tor those children who ere not ready for a
whole session and It Is their first time el camp
August 2-16 $906.00
SPECIALTY CAMP
1 week experience for a child to choose 1
activity to specialize In Tennis. Fine Arta,
Baseball or water sports
August 18-24
$250 before May 1. $300 after May 1,1990
For more Information call Harvey Flnkelberg, 514-737-6551,
or In Florida Merle Fleher.....................................305-962-4221.
STAFF POSITIONS AVAILABLE. Will be In your area In early January for appointments.

M


Friday, January 12, 1990/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page. 7
*
Religious Directory
CONSERVATIVE
BOYNTON BEACH JEWISH CENTER-BETH KODESH: 501
NE 26 Avenue, Boynton Beach 33435. Phone 586-9428. Rabbi
David Shapiro. Cantor Abraham Koster. Daily, 8:30 a.m. Sabbath
services, Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.
CONGREGATION ANSHEI SHOLOM: 5348 Grove Street,
West Palm Beach 33417. Phone 684-3212. Office hours 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. Rabbi Isaac Vander Walde. Cantor Mordecai Spektor. Daily
services 8:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Friday night 5 p.m. and 8:15 p.m.
Saturday 9 a.m. and 7:15 p.m.
GOLDEN LAKES TEMPLE: 1470 Golden Lakes Boulevard,
West Palm Beach 33411. Phone 689-9430. Rabbi Joseph Speiser.
Daily services 8 a.m. Sabbath services Friday 8 p.m. Saturday 9
a.m. For times of evening services please call the Temple office.
BETH TIKVAH, LAKE WORTH JEWISH CENTER: 4550 Jog
Road, Lake Worth. Phone 967-3600. Rabbi Richard K. Rocklin.
Cantor Abraham Mehler. Services Friday 8 p.m., Saturday and
holidays, 8:45 a.m. Daily minyan 8:15 a.m., Sundays through
Fridays.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID: 4657 Hood Road, Palm Beach Gardens
33418." Phone 694-2350. Rabbi Randall J. Konigsburg. Cantor
Earl J. Rackoff. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m., Saturday 9:30
a.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 2815 No. Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach
33407. Phone 833-0339. Cantor Norman Brody. Sabbath ser-
vices Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9:30 a.m. Daily Minyan 8:15
a.m., Sunday and legal holidays 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 315 No. "A" Street, LaKe worui
33460. Phone 585-5020. Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg. Cantor
Howard Dardashti. Services Monday and Thursday, 8:15 a.m.
Friday evening, 8:15 p.m., Saturday, 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 224 NW Avenue G, Belle Glade
33430. Phone 996-3886. Services: Second Weanesday of every
month, 7:30 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH ZION: 129 Sparrow Drive, Royal Palm Beach,
FL 33411. Phone 798-8888. Sabbath services Friday 8 p.m.,
Saturday 9 a.m. Rabbi Stefan J. Weinberg.
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB: 2177 So. Congress Ave., West Palm
Beach 33406. Phone 433-5957. Sabbath services Friday 8 p.m.,
Saturday and holidays 9 a.m., Monday through Friday 9 a.m.
Rabbi Morris Pickholz. Cantor Andrew E. Beck.
TEMPLE EMANUEL: 190 North County Road, Palm Beach
33480. Phone 832-0804. Rabbi Leonid Feldman. Cantor David
Feuer. Sabbath services, Friday 7 p.m.; Saturday 9:30 a.m.
TEMPLE TORAH: Lions Club, 3615 West Boynton Beach
Boulevard, Boynton Beach 33437. Mailing address: 985ID Mili-
tary Trail, Box 360091, Boynton Beach 33436. Phone 736-7687.
Cantor Alex Chapin. Rabbi Theodore Feldman, part-time. Sab-
bath Services Friday evening 8 p.m.; Saturday 9 a.m.
TREASURE COAST JEWISH CENTER CONGREGATION
BETH ABRAHAM: 3998 SW Leighton Farms Road, Palm City
33490. Mailing address: P.O. Box 2996, Stuart 33495. Phone
287-8833. Services Friday evenings 8 p.m. and Saturday 10 a.m.
ORTHODOX
CHABAD HOUSE LUBAVITCH: 4623 Forest Hill Blvd.,
West Palm Beach, 108-3, 33415. Phone 641-6167. Rabbi Shlomo
Ezagui. Sabbath Services, Saturday, 10 am.
CONGREGATION AITZ CHAIM: 2518 N. Haverhill Road, West
Palm Beach 33417. Phone 686-5055. Sabbath services 8:45 a.m.
and 7:30 p.m. Daily services 8:15 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. Rabbi Oscar
Werner.
REFORM
CONGREGATION BETH ISRAEL: 1390 SW Dorchester
Street, P.O. Box 857146, Port St. Lucie, FL 33452. Phone
335-7620. Friday night services 8 p.m., Saturday morning 10:3C
a.m.
TEMPLE BETH AM: 759 Parkway Street, Jupiter. Phone
747-1109. Services Friday 8:00 p.m. Rabbi Rachel Hertzman.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 4600 Oleander Avenue, Fort Pierce, FL
34982. Phone 461-7428. Sabbath Services Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM: St. Helen's Parish Hall, 20th
Avenue and Victory Boulevard, Vero Beach 32960. Mailing
address: P.O. Box 2113, Vero Beach, FL 32961-2113. Rabbi Jay
R. Davis. Phone 1-569-4700.
TEMPLE BETH TORAH: 900 Big Blue Trace, West Palm
Beach, FL 33414. Phone 793-2700. Friday services 8:15 p.m.,
Saturday morning 10 a.m. Rabbi Steven R. Westman. Cantor
Elliot Rosenbaum.
TEMPLE ISRAEL: 1901 No. Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach
33407. Phone 833-8421. Rabbi Howard Shapiro. Cantor Karen
Blum. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE JUDEA: 100 Chillingworth Drive, West Palm Beach,
FL 33409. Rabbi Joel L. Levine. Cantor Rita Shore. Phone
471-1526.
1
Engagement
Mrs. Edward Bartlett and
Mr. Shepard Lesser, both of
West Palm Beach, announce
the engagement of their
daughter, Tami Rose Lesser to
James Blaker Baldinger, son
of Dr. and Mrs. Sheldon
Robert Baldinger of Chevy
Chase, Maryland. An October
wedding is planned.
Ms. Lesser, a graduate cum
laude of the University of
Pennsylvania, is in her last
year at George Washington
University National Law Cen-
ter. She worked as a summer
associate at the law firm of
Holland & Knight in Washing-
ton, D.C. After graduation she
will join the law firm of Yerrid,
Knopik and Valenzuela in
Tampa.
She is the granddaughter of
LESSER-BALDINGER
Mrs. Mona Warshaw of Miami
Beach, the late Mr. Philip
Warshaw and the late Mr. and
Mrs. Joseph Lesser of West
Palm Beach.
Mr. Baldinger was gra-
duated from the University of
Pennsylvania. After working
as a summer associate at the
Washington, D.C. law firm of
Arnold & Porter, he is now in
his final year at Georgetown
University Law Center. After
graduation he will clerk for a
Federal District Judge in
Tampa, where the couple will
reside.
Mr. Baldinger is the grand-
son of Mrs. Cecelia Glassman
of Silver Spring, Maryland,
the late Mr. A.L. Glassman
and the late Mr. and Mrs.
Chaim Baldinger.
Tami Lesser
Jews For Judaism
Fight Against
Conversion Effort
Candlelighting
Jan.12
Jan.19
Jan. 26
Feb. 2
5:31p.m.
5:36 p.m.
5:42 p.m.
6:01p.m.
By BEN GALLOB
NEW YORK (JTA) Well-
financed Christian missionary
groups are zeroing in on a
particularly vulnerable target
Soviet Jews bureaucrati-
cally trapped in Italy. The mis-
sionaries are following them
with friendly persuasion and
material help when those Jews
settle in the United States.
That is the scenario outlined
to the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency by a Jewish organiza-
tion as dedicated to enlighten-
ing such Jews as the mission-
aries are to converting them.
Jews for Judaism, headquar-
tered in Baltimore, was
founded seven years ago by
Hannah Storch, a Baltimore
Jewish philanthropist.
It was created as a counter-
force to Jews for Jesus, a
group that Jews reluctantly
concede has a highly imagina-
tive leaflet program.
But the principal adversary
is the Conservative Baptist
Foreign Mission Society,
which actively seeks converts
among Soviet Jews.
Larry Levey, first director
of Jews for Judaism and him-
self a former "Hebrew Chris-
tian," said any Jew who does
not have strong personal, fam-
ily or spiritual roots is suscep-
tible to missionary appeals at a
time of vulnerability or transi-
tion, a description fitting many
Soviet Jews.
Opening of long-closed exits
has produced a flood of Jewish
emigrants from the Soviet
Union. Especially susceptible
are those waiting at Ladispoli,
an Italian seaside town near
Rome, while U.S. immigration
officials and American immi-
gration agencies try to sort out
their status.
Jews for Judaism is
described as a small organiza-
tion of largely volunteer young
Jews working out of offices in
seven U.S. and one Canadian
city. In addition to Baltimore,
it has offices in Manhattan,
Harrisburg, Pa., Detroit,
Teaneck, N.J., Los Angeles
and Toronto.
Mark Powers, the current
director, said the annual
national budget is "less than
$500,000," mainly from indi-
vidual contributors. He added
- Continued on Page 8
Benediction upon Kindling
the Sabbath Lights
BORUCH ATTO AD-ONAI
ELO-HEINU MELECH HO-
OLOM ASHER KID-
SHONU BEMITZ-VOSOV
VETZI-VONU LE-HAD-
LIK NEYR SHEL
SHABBOS.
FUND RAISER
International Jewish organization seeks self-starter professional to
coordinate Fund Raising activities such as phone-athons, direct
solicitations and giving programs in Port Lauderdale/Palm Beach
area. Candidate must be creative and mature minded with
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Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, January 12, 1990
Canada Makes
Get Mandatory
By BEN KAYFETZ
TORONTO Canada has
amended its Divorce Act to
prevent the requirements of a
religious divorce from being
used as a "bargaining chip" in
civil divorce proceedings.
The new regulations are
aimed at abuses of the get,
which Jewish religious Taw
requires must be delivered by
the husband and accepted by
the wife.
Without a get, neither party
can remarry. Under the new
laws, neither one may get a
civil divorce in Canada until
the religious barriers to remar-
riage are removed.
"It was felt that the with-
holding of the religious divorce
has been used as a device to
obtain concessions from a
spouse for custody and access
to children or monetary sup-
port," Justice Minister Doug-
las Lewis explained.
Under the recent amend-
ments, "a spouse who tries to
use religious divorce in this
fashion would not be permitted
Post
Continued from Page 3
and publisher.
Their action followed the
Dec. 25 resignation of Editor
Erwin Frenkel, who charged
that Levy had compromised
his editorial integrity.
Levy told army radio Tues-
day night that he had
appointed a new editor and
that the newspaper could pub-
lish easily with the remaining
news staff.
to present his or her case
before a civil court until the
barriers to remarriage are
removed," Lewis said.
The change was welcomed
by the Reform, Conservative
and Orthodox branches of
Judaism and the major Cana-
dian Jewish organizations.
A study by B'nai Brith Can-
ada found that from 1982 to
1985, some 200 to 300 couples
were involved in cases where
the get was used to try to
extract concessions in civil
divorce proceedings.
Neo-Nazis
Join Forces
BONN (JTA) Reunifica-
tion of Germany may not be an
immediate prospect. But neo-
Nazis on both sides of the
crumbling Berlin Wall are los-
ing no time.
Official East German news
agency, ADN reported that
neo-Nazi groups in East Ger-
many have contacted their
West German counterparts for
mutual support and to coordin-
ate their activities.
The news agency estimates
there are as many as 1,100
neo- Nazi activists in East Ger-
many.
But in recent weeks, many
reports have surfaced of neo-
Nazi incidents, and fear has
been voiced that it may be out
of control.
Scholars and experts on the
subject are warning of an
upsurge of extreme right-wing
violence, ADN reported.
Respond To ADL Request
Lakeland Police Refuse Klan Offer
Florida Regional Office of
the Anti-Defamation League
of B'nai B'rith has urged the
Lakeland Police Department
to reject an offer by the Ku
Klux Klan to act as its "eyes
and ears" in gathering evi-
dence against drug dealers.
Responding to the ADL,
Lakeland Police Chief Ron
Nenner, said his department
would have nothing to do with
the Klan, and would "vigor-
ously pursue any violation by
the law" by Klan members.
ADL contacted Chief Nen-
ner following a report describ-
ing a "Krush Krack Kocaine"
Jews
Continued from Page 7
that except for special pro-
jects, Jews for Judaism does
not get funds from the federa-
tions. But the agency works
with federation and any other
Jewish organization "we can
find," he added.
Powers said the readiness of
Soviet Jewish emigres in Ladi-
spoli to listen to the missionar-
ies was understandable. He
said the missionaries exploit
their ignorance about Judaism
and their uncertain status as
refugees hoping to settle in the
United States.
It is inevitable, he added,
that such Jews would accept
"the friendly cup of coffee and
the warm welcome offered by
the missionaries."
He said contacts within the
Soviet Union have reported
approaches to Jews there.
initiative by Klan members. It
involved two incidents in
which Klansmen identified
themselves as police officers
while supposedly gathering
evidence regarding prostitu-
tion and narcotics in a predom-
inantly black area of the city.
The ADL said it was pleased
by the firm rejection of the
Klan by Chief Nenner.
Arthur Teitelbaum, South-
ern Area director of the ADL,
said "It is the height of hypo-
crisy for the Klan, an organiza-
tion which has a long record of
lawlessness and violence, to
offer its services on behalf of
law and order." He noted
should a Klan member commit
a violation based on racial bias,
it would violate Florida's
recently-enacted Hate Crimes
Act which mandates increased
penalties for such crimes.
Teitelbaum said "If the Klan
wants to be of service to the
community, let it dissolve
itself."
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