The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County the voice of the Jewish community of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
West Palm Beach, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 11, no. 27 (Sept. 13, 1985)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Feb. 20, 1987 called no. 4 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Mar. 31, 1989 called no. 12 in masthead and no. 13 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44605643
lccn - sn 00229551
ocm44605643
System ID:
AA00014309:00153

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)


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Full Text
THE VOICE OF
THE JEWISH
COMMUNITY OF
PALM BEACH
COUNTY
hjewish floridian
>^ W OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
Volume 15 Number 30
PALM BEACH, FLORIDA FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1989
Frlttnchl
Price 40 Cents
Leaders Deny
'Crisis' In Relations
EGYPT-LIBYA Tobruk Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi welcomes Egyptian President
Hosni Mubarak at Tobruk airport. The two leaders agreed on what appeared to be the first step
toward resuming diplomatic relations (AP/Wide World Photo)
Jews Allowed To Visit Yemen Arab Republic
NEW YORK (JTA) For
the first time in nearly four
decades, American Jews of
Yemenite descent were able to
visit the country of their ances-
try, the Yemen Arab Republic.
Traveling last month under
the auspices of the host gov-
ernment, they distributed reli-
gious articles including prayer
books and bibles, prayer
shawls and phylacteries to the
tiny Jewish community esti-
mated at no more than 1,500
in the YAR.
During their two-week visit,
they met with hundreds of
Yemenite Jews in Raydah, in
the central part of the country,
and Saada in the north.
"We are grateful to the gov-
ernment of the Yemen Arab
Republic," said Dr. Hayim
Tawil, an associate professor
of Hebrew languages and liter-
ature at Yeshiva University,
who headed the group.
Tawil said the group looks
forward to continued coopera-
tion with the YAR govern-
ment on behalf of the Jewish
community there.
Yemenite Jewry is believed
to be the most ancient Jewish
community in the world.
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
The leaders of the Conference
of Presidents of Major Ameri-
can Jewish Organizations are
trying to reassure the Jewish
community that there is "no
crisis" in U.S.-Israeli relations
and that Israel's peace initia-
tive is not in danger of falling
apart.
This was the essence of the
report made to a closed- door
consultation of the Conference
of Presidents by Seymour
Reich, its chairman, and Mal-
colm Hoenlein, its executive
director, on a meeting they
held with Secretary of State
James Baker last week.
At the same time, there is
speculation that unless Israeli
Prime Minister Yitzhak Sha-
mir and the Bush administra-
tion can resolve differences
over Baker's proposals for
Israeli- Palestinian talks, Sha-
mir may not come to Washing-
ton as expected next month.
The Israeli prime minister
would not want to engage in a
face-to-face clash with either
President Bush or American
Jewish leaders, some of whom
are known to be critical of the
tough position he has adopted
in recent weeks.
Reich and Hoenlein met with
Baker at the State Depart-
1,200 Acres Devastated
In Forest Fire
Nearly 1,200 acres of wood-
lands in the nature reserve on
Mt. Carmel, in Israel's north-
ern Galilee, were destroyed by
arsonists from September 19-
20, marking the worst forest
fire experienced by Israel dur-
ing 1989.
The fire was ultimately con-
tained after more than 30
hours of intense effort by Jew-
ish National Fund teams com-
prising hundreds of firefigh-
ters, backed by volunteers
from nearby settlements and
students from Haifa Univer-
sity. Due to the immensity of
the fire, 25 fire engines,
including five recently
acquired by JNF, and spe-
cially-equipped airplanes and
helicopters were brought in
from throughout the country.
Six Arabs have been arrested
on the suspicion of simultane-
ously igniting five fires in the
area.
Dr. Joseph P. Sternstein,
JNF president, explained that
JNF foresters stationed in
newly-built watchtowers were
the first to report the confla-
grations and arrive on the
scene. "Although damage to
Israel's forests has decreased
in 1989 due to JNF's advanced
capability to deal with forest
fires," he stated, "one is
always alarmed by what
onlookers termed 'iust like a
war!* He reported that thou-
sands of trees, animals and
rare species of wild life were
tragically lost; in addition,
some of the animals were air-
lifted from Iran at great peril
during the fall of the Shah. He
called the situation "not only a
great loss to the people of
Israel, but one more serious
blow to global efforts to
improve the ecosystem and to
preserve animal species near
extinction."
ment on Oct. 18, in the midst
of a public dispute be' .-en
Shamir and Baker. Th Ate
Department had critic 1 as
"unhelpful" Shamir's state-
ments the day before that the
United States was trying to
force Israel to negotiate with
the Palestine Liberation
Organization.
In a telephone interview,
Hoenlein denied that the Con-
ference of Presidents had
sought to meet with Baker in a
crisis atmosphere. He said the
session was part of the regular
consultations held with Baker.
"We are concerned, of
course," said Hoenlein. "But
everybody understands the
complexity of the issues."
Hoenlein said there is a "lot
of distortion" of the positions
on both sides. He rejected
reports that Baker had threat-
ened to wash his hands of
Shamir's election proposal,
claiming that there is no les-
sening of the U.S. commit-
ment to the peace process.
Baker told the Jewish lead-
ers that there is no stalemate,
that there are opportunities
for real progress, but that
patience is required, Hoenlein
reported.
The Jewish official conceded
that there are serious differ-
ences between the Bush
administration and Israel.
Israel's worst forest fire this year destroyed 1,200 acres of
woodland.
THIRD CLASS
BULK RATE
U.S. POSTAGE
PAID
OC* KA'ON 10IO
PERMIT NO. 1M3


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, November 3, 1989
III......>(IH
Again, PLO Shows True Face
Once again, the true face of the Palestine
Liberation Organization surfaced this week
with the publication of captured documents
of Al Fatah, the supposed moderate branch
of the PLO headed by Chairman Arafat.
The letters, seized by Israeli forces in
action against the intifada in August, viv-
idly describe Fatah's plans to attack both
Israelis and Palestinians suspected of col-
laboration with Israel.
These were written many months after
Arafat and the PLO told the United States
that they were renouncing terrorism and
recognized the State of Israel.
PLO Terrorism Continues
The letters spell out a plan to blame the
attacks which appear to have started
soon after they were written on mythical
organizations, thus "clearing" the PLO of
direct involvement.
This is, therefore, another compelling
reason why both Likud and Labor parties
in Israel insist that Israel not negotiate
with the PLO, which appears to maintain
its status as a terrorist organization com-
mitted to the destruction of the Jewish
State.
Prime Minister Shamir's reluctance to
accept either the Egyptian or American
variations of his proposal for Palestinian
elections may appear to be mere stalling
tactics to Cairo and Washington, and even
to some American Jewish organizations
and individuals.
Compelling Reasons
But an Israel which fought against com-
bined Arab armies in 1948-49, 1956, 1967
and 1973 is understandably wary of a PLO
which was formed at a time when Israel
held none of today's administered territor-
ies in Judea, Samaria or Gaza.
The Bush Administration should care-
fully review the captured PLO letters to
determine if they constitute the proof
necessary for the US to cut off its dialogue
with the PLO.
At first glance, the evidence is conclu-
sive.
B'nai B'rith Celebrates 146th
B'nai B'rith, one of the largest Jewish
organizations in the world, quietly cele-
brated its 146th birthday this year. Some of
its divisions, such as the Anti-Defamation
League and the Hillel Commission, are
household words.
Last year, both the Democratic and
Republican nominees for President took
part in a national B'nai B'rith dinner,
evidence of the high esteem in which the
nation holds the organization.
B'nai B'rith, now as at its birth in 1943, is
committed to the preservation of Jewry
and Judaism.
Jewish floridian
FRED K. SHOCHET
A Editor and Publisher
I
S
of Palm Beach County
Combining "Our Voice" and "Federation Reporter"
Fred Shochet
JOAN TEQLAS
Advertising Director
SUZANNE SHOCHET
Executive Editor

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Poland Needs Serious Attention
By Marc H. Tanenbaum
NEW YORK (JTA) On
Nov. 27, Sir Sigmund Stern-
berg, Lori George Weidenfeld
and this writer will travel to
Poland at the invitation of
newly elected Prime Minister
Tadeusz Mozawiecki, the con-
troversial Cardinal Josef
Glemp and the harried Car-
dinal Franciszek Macharski,
archbishop of Krakow.
The inflamed controversy
over the Carmelite convent at
Auschwitz has made a number
of issues abundantly clear, one
of them being that there is
evidently a major intellectual,
religious/cultural and political
struggle going on within
Poland.
On the one hand, there is the
pre-World War II old political
culture, joined by the tradi-
tional Catholic church, which
reinforced each other by using
anti-Semitism to assert their
domination over the Polish
people. Read the political plat-
form of the National Demo-
cratic Union and "the Camp"
in the 1930s, which cynically
exploited anti-Semitism to
achieve political unity.
There is also the old anti-
Jewish tradition of Cardinal
Hlond, who called for an eco-
nomic boycott of Poland's
Jews prior to 1938.
But there is now a new
Poland being formed under
Mozawiecki and Solidarity's
Lech Walesa, who are
ashamed of that hateful past
and who wish to forge a new
relationship with world Jewry
and Israel.
Our visit to Poland is
intended to help move forward
the concrete steps to building
the new convent away from
Auschwitz. It is also intended
to help establish programs in
key areas of Polish culture and
religion that will in time
uproot the worst weeds of
anti-Semitism.
In the possible new East-
West reorientation, Poland
and Hungary may well become
linchpins in any European
reunion. It is in the interests of
the democratic West, and
especially of Israel and world
Jewry, to have a Poland rea-
sonably freer of its chronic
anti-Jewish past.
Rabbi Marc H. Tanenbaum is inter-
national relations consultant to the
American Jewish Committee and is
immediate past president of the Inter-
national Jewish Committee for Inter-
religious Consultations.
The Jewish Catacombs of Rome:
Preserving Our Ancient Past
Friday, November 3, 1989
Volume 15
5CHESHVAN5750
Number 30
By Elena Neuman
NEW YORK (JTA) After
years of political pressure
from the Jewish community of
Italy, the Jewish catacombs,
for a century under the guardi-
anship of the Vatican and now
of the state, will soon be avail-
able for public viewing that
is, if world Jewry can foot the
bill.
The Union of Italian Jewish
Communities, the Superinten-
dency of Archaeology of Rome
and the newly formed Jewish
Heritage Council, a subset of
the World Monuments Fund,
are sponsoring a complete doc-
umentation of the two surviv-
ing catacombs of Rome and the
preparation of an extensive
report for future preservation.
The actual excavation will be
up to Jewish philanthropy and
fundraising. "The stage is now
set," Tullia Zevi, president of
the Union of Italian Jewish
Communities, told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency in New
York. "It now depends on us.
We Jews can become masters
of these important relics of our
heritage if we can raise the
funds."
The support of the World
Monuments Fund, an Ameri-
can preservation organization
involved internationally, was
the result of years of political
maneuvering for the cata-
combs by the 35,000-member
Italian Jewish community.
Since Italy's reunification in
1870, and more formally since
the 1929 Concordat between
the Italian government and
the Holy See, the two remain-
ing Jewish catacombs in Rome
have been under the guardian-
ship of the Vatican.
During that time, the cata-
combs have remained closed to
the public, their artifacts
removed and stored in various
Vatican museums and ware-
houses.
In 1984, under Jewish com-
munity pressure, guardianship
was transferred back to the
state and ceremonies of trans-
fer took place in 1987 and
1988. Since then, the cata-
combs have been caught in a
bureaucratic spider web,
awaiting authorization and
funding for preservation pro-
jects.
"The Jewish community has
had to push very hard to get
authorization," said Bonnie
Burnham, executive director
of the World Monuments
Fund. "With only 35,000 Jews,
the state was unconvinced that
they had the resources. Moreo-
ver, for the private sector to
offer help is greeted with great
surprise by Italian authorit-
ies, who are overburdened
with worthy excavation pro-
jects.
The catacombs are of great
historical significance to Ital-
ian Jewry. Although it may be
small, the Italian Jewish com-
munity is the oldest continuous
Jewish settlement in Europe.
And the catacombs, which
date from the first to the
fourth centuries C.E., consti-
tute the most extensive evi-
dence of ancient Jewish Dias-
pora culture.
With detailed descriptions
about the people buried within
them, the catacombs reveal
the breadth of accomplishment
of the Jews of ancient Rome,
then comprising as much as 10
percent of the population of
the empire.
Wall frescoes depict menor-
ahs, the shofar and etrog, and
other Jewish ritual subjects
alone with peacocks, serpents,
cupids, garlands, winged victo-
ries and nude athletes. This,
along with the fact that
inscriptions are written in
Greek, Latin and Hebrew, sug-
gest the cultural assimilation
of Roman Jews and Roman
Continued on Page 7


Friday, November 3, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 3
Why
By Elsie Bliss
WASHINGTON -(JTA)I
am asked "The Question" by
my mother's friends at every
wedding reception. Also at
every party and family gather-
ing by well-meaning relatives
and sometimes strangers. If it
were not for this question and
my creative response, some of
the people I meet wouldn't
find anything to say to me. But
the time it hurts most is when
an eligible man I've just met is
simply wondering aloud, "Gee,
it's a wonder you aren't mar-
ried."
Am I supposed to admit that
I am insecure yet demanding?
That no one I have ever met
who was available was suffi-
ciently desirable to justify giv-
ing up my precious independ-
ence? That no matter how I
searched, while appearing not
to be searching, there has not
been anyone who met my
rather rigid list of criteria? Am
I expected to actually unload
this emotional baggage on
some poor shnook who might
himself prove to be truly desir-
able? Of course not. Because
then I would frighten him off.
Speaking for many nice,
attractive, loving and desira-
ble single people, I'd like to
climb up on my soapbox and
explain a few things. It may
not hold for all single people,
but for some who have stayed
single for an inordinately long
time .
Being single is quite respect-
able. It is a valid way of life. It
is not a tragedy or a handicap.
It is being the boss; the captain
of your ship. I quite like it,
even though I readily admit I
frequently miss what married
people have when their marri-
age is going well, just as they
miss the freedom I have to
decide my own goals and prior-
ities.
I am sorry to say that statis-
tics are against their marriage
going well, unfortunately.
Marriage in the 20th century is
in trouble. Singlehood is not in
trouble, despite its bad press.
Singlehood has a lot going for
it.
If you took a poll of your
friends and their feelings
about marriage, and if they
responded candidly, you'd find
that (as some brilliant mind
once noted), marriage is like a
besieged fortress: those who
are inside want to get out and
those who are outside want to
get in.
Perhaps the question should
be put to married people,
"Why is a nice person like you
married?"
Some day I may find a part-
ner who will allow me to be me
and who will even respect and
admire my need to be myself.
He won't criticize my liking
health foods or tell me I'm
uptight because I won't go to a
nude beach. He'll think I am
fine, quirks and all, even
though I love sitcoms and hate
game shows and violent mov-
ies.
If I am lucky, he will have
the same desire to be himself
and I'll respect and love him
for it. Our two selves may join
and become a couple of happy
individuals. Note, I did not say
we would become one, but a
couple of individuals. Where
did that myth originate that
you become part of another?
Better half, indeed.
Until that happens, no mat-
ter how long it takes maybe
never I will not be categor-
ized as a "JAP," "Jewish
Mother," "Liberated Woman"
or anything else. I am all of
these things and none of them.
I am the product of years of
development and growth,
including experiences of joy
and sorrow. I am like fine
chocolate, bittersweet.
I was liberated long before it
was fashionable and I was a
Jewish mother as a 10-year-old
child. (You don't even have to
be Jewish to be a Jewish
mother, nor do you have to be
female.) If the definition of a
J.M. is a protective, assertive,
overly sensitive, deeply
involved, demonstrative per-
son, then hallelujah! C'est moi!
Probably what causes the
greatest angst among single
people is when someone looks
at us with a mixture of wonder
and pity and says, "You are so
attractive, it's a shame you
aren't married, tsk tsk."
Would I gaze at anyone and
say, "You are such an attrac-
tive person; it's a shame you
are overweight." Or: "How
come a couple like you who
argue so much are not
divorced?" Or, "You seem so
nice, why can't you find a good
job?"
Of course no civilized person
would ask these things. But
there are those who consider
being single a national
dilemma and one that permits
constant probing into the sin-
gle person's psyche to demand
to know why.
The truth is that being single
is a trade-off a mixed bless-
ing of being private with time
of your own to use as you see
fit plus the occasional twinge
of being left out as you observe
hand-holding couples strolling
happily down life's road
together.
To some single people, the
fear of failure is a great deter-
rent to marriage, especially if
they have feelings of insecur-
ity. Perhaps they are the chil-
dren of perfectionist parents
and this colors all decision-
making for them.
If you are single, and none of
the above applies to you, then
you will have no trouble reply-
ing easily when you hear that
ageless question: "Why isn't a
nice person like you married?"
You'll smile sweetly at your
friend's Aunt Minnie and say,
"Gee, I've been too busy to be
aware of it. But, gosh, you're
right. I'm not married! I didn't
realize. Thanks for telling me.
I'll give it some thought." That
ought to hold her, but only
until next time you meet.
Elsie Bliss is a Washington writer.
This article originally appeared in the
Washington Jewish Week.


THEATER DEFACED Warsaw Poland's only rabbi, Menachem Joskowitz, stands in front
of the vandalized Jewish State Theater. The vandalism on the theater's walls, windows and
entrance was apparently in connection with the ongoing controversy over Roman Catholic nuns at
the Auschwitz concentration camp. The vandals wrote, "(This is) for the convent." (AP/Wide
World Photo)
How to drive to the Northeast
with your eyes closed.
To arrive rested and relaxed, take Amtrak's Auto Train. While your
car rides in the back, you ride in comfort. You can sightsee in our
Dome |Bi Car. Meet new friends over cocktails. Even watch a complimen-
tary movie, yj Auto Train leaves each afternoon from Sanford, just outside
Orlando, and drops you off the next morning near Washington, DC. Two adults and
a car travel roundtrip for almost 40% off the regular fare* You can also save on private sleeping accommodations.
Included is a delicious full-course buffet dinner and a tasty continental | breakfast. Kosher
meals are available if you let us know in advance. The best fares go to fly those who make
their reservations early. Wl I So call your travel agent or call Amtrak at 1-800-USA-RAIL
Amtrak's Auto Train. It'll |yj I open your eyes to the comforts of taking the train instead.
'Seats are limited. Fares subject to change without notice. Some restrictions may apply.
ALL=
ABOARD
AMTRAK


Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, November 3, 1989
Blum To Chair
Fashion Show
Evelyn Blum has been
named Chairman of the 1989
Palm Beach Women's Division
Fashion Show at a recent
meeting of the National
Women's Division of Israel
Bonds.
Evelyn Blum has served as
Chairperson of the Women's
Division of Israel Bonds since
1961. She has received numer-
ous awards including the
"Myrtle Wreath" Award from
Hadassah, the "Hall of Fame"
B'nai B'rith Community
Award, and the "Community
Award" from the Human
Relations Counselor of the
Public School system.
Mrs. Blum is the past presi-
dent of the Center for Family
Services, Beth Sholom Sister-
hood in Belle Glade, and B'nai
B'rith Women of Palm Beach
County. She serves on the
Board of Directors of 14 Palm
Beach County agencies and
commissions, including the
Commission on the Status of
Women, is founder and presi-
dent of "Parents in Need"
child abuse program, the Child
Advocacy Board, the Task
Force for Child Abuse and
Neglect, the Governor's Com-
mittee as Ombudsman for long
term nursing care, District 9
Mental Health Board, Morse
Geriatric Home for the Aged,
Jewish Family & Children's
Service, and Hope House for
AIDS.
The Fashion Show will be
held on December 14th at the
Breakers Hotel. This affair is
being coordinated by Loeh-
mann's, and will feature fine
leathers and knits from Israel.
For information, call 686-8611.
At the Shaare Zedek Medual Center, Jerusalem, fc^.*"^^^
of the Isidore and Ethel Goldsmith Pediatric Wing. (L to ^^^^^S^^S
Pediatrics, Ethel Goldsmith, Benefactor, Dr. Jonathan Halevy Director-General oj the Medial
Center and Jack Adler, Financial Advisor to Ethel Goldsmith.
Ethel Goldsmith Endows
Wing At Shaare Zedek Medical Center
Hope House Benefit Set
Local newscasters: Chandra
Bill and Gary Tuchman have
been chosen as Honorary Co-
Chairs for the "Marilyn
Affair" benefiting Hope House
of the Palm Beaches, Inc.
The "Marilyn Affair" will
take place on Friday, Novem-
ber 10th, at the Carefree Thea-
tre, 2000 South Dixie High-
Prejudice Reduction:
way, West Palm Beach. The
evening will be the Opening
Night Gala for the Film Por-
tion of the Palm Beach Festi-
val featuring a showing of the
1959 classic "Some Like It
Hot," starring Marilyn Mon-
roe, Jack Lemmon and Tony
Curtis.
For information call (407)
582-2877.
Ethel Goldsmith from Deer-
field Beach, recently visited
Shaare Zedek Medical Center
in Jerusalem, where she has
endowed a Pediatric Wing.
She was accompanied by her
Financial Advisor, Jack Adler
and his wife and daughter
Mitzi, and Saul Zabel from
Shaare Zedek's Southeastern
Region office with his wife.
A dedication ceremony was
held in the Pediatric Day
Room where Dr. Halevy and
Prof. Freier spoke and expre-
ssed their gratitude for Golds-
mith's gift. Prof. Freier wel-
comed her as a new member of
the Shaare Zedek Family:
"The hospital is much more
than doctors ... it's nurses,
teachers, cleaners and a lot of
ancillary workers. This
Department was founded
nearly 30 years ago and as I
was its father, I suppose today
you can call me its grand-
father. Under Dr. Halevy's
leadership we are continually
developing. I know you have
been active in philanthropic
work, especially with children,
all your life, so I am sure that
you are aware of the problems
to be faced and the things that
have to be done." Prof. Freier
finished with a quotation: "We
are here to do good to those
who most have need of us."
And they according to Pro-
fessor Freier are the chil-
dren!
The visit concluded with a
luncheon for the honored
guests, hosted by Dr. Halevy
and held in the hospital's beau-
tiful B'rit Room.
ADL, Teachers, Strive For A World Of Difference
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
Situation: The office water
cooler is the central spot
where two employees, one
obviously a boss, exchange a
joke about how many people of
a certain nationality it takes to
change a light bulb. They see
another employee approach
but continue with the joke in
her presence even though she
is a member of that national-
ity.
Situation: The English
speaking customer walks into
a store and gets aggravated at
the man at the cash register
because she cannot under-
stand his information because
it is spoken with a Spanish
accent. "Can't you get some-
one who speaks English?' the
woman snaps. "Lady, what
language do you think I'm
speaking?" the frustrated
salesman answers back.
Situation: Two white police
officers are patrolling what is
obviously a middle class neigh-
borhood when they see two
black men in a car looking for a
house and for that reason
alone, apparently stop the
driver for a license check.
"What did I do wrong?" the
man asks. "Just a routine
check" says the police officer.
"Sure," says the man, his feel-
ings obviously hurt.
Ninety school teachers and
administrators representing
some 40 South Florida public
middle schools, attended an all-
day workshop recently as part
of the Anti-Defamation
League's three-year-old pro-
gram called "A World Of Dif-
ference."
In a series of events that
were not preachy, but rather
filled with humor and poignant
examples of how prejudices
are built, the serious message
was conveyed to the educat-
ors.
Of the several workshops
that are held each year, in
addition to in-school training
programs, this session was
aimed at the special needs of
teachers who work with stu-
dents between the ages of 12
and 15.
"The teachers who were
there recognized the impor-
tance of the adolescent years
and their role in shaping atti-
tudes regarding ethnic diver-
sity and prejudice preven-
tion," said Valerie Herman,
associate director for the Flor-
ida Regional Office of the Anti-
Defamation League.
"In elementary schools, chil-
dren's attitudes are not yet
crystallized. The adolescent
years are a greater challenge
because students have been
exposed to large amounts of
information and to influences
of significant adults around
them: their parents, clergy and
peers."
The morning program
included presentations by Dr.
Stephen M. Fain, professor,
College of Education, Florida
International University and
Arthur Teitelbaum, Southern
Area Director Anti-
Defamation League.
Fain approached the subject
with antecdotes rather than a
preacher's sermon by sharing
an experience that he had as a
young Jewish student in a
seventh grade class. His
assignment was to list a diet-
ary menu for a day and Fain,
who was raised under the laws
of keeping kosher, listed a
menu plan that failed to mix
meat and milk and a meat
product such as ham and bacon
with the morning menu. Fain
recalls how his teacher told
him that if only he would
include the latter, he would get
an "A."
He urged the teachers to be
aware of the "prime time"
students in middle schools are
at when developing the subtle-
ties of human relations and
prejudice formation.
Teachers must be trained to
pick up on the thinking pat-
terns of students such as
Eduardo, who once explained
to Fain that he never told
people he couldn't read Eng-
ish because "I am a Colom-
bian. If I told people that,
they'd think I am Puerto
Rican."
But as important as it is for
Continued on Page 5
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Kapner Assumes
Presidency
Lewis Kapner, former Chief
Judge of Palm Beach County,
has been elected President of
the Florida Chapter of the
American Academy of Matri-
monial Lawyers during their
annual meeting held last
month.
Kapner, a West Palm Beach
divorce lawyer, was a Palm
Beach County Circuit Court
Judge from 1973 to 1984 and
served for two years as Chief
Judge from 1981 to 1983. Cur-
rently, he heads the two-
lawyer firm of Lewis Kapner,
P.A. in West Palm Beach.
Board Certified in Marital
and Family Law, Kapner is a
Fellow in the America Acad-
emy of Matrimonial Lawyers
and a member of the American
Law Institute. He has served
as the Chairman of the Family
Law Section of the Florida Bar
Association and Chairman of
the Grievance Committee and
is an active member of the
Palm Beach County Bar Asso-
ciation.
In 1982, Kapner was recog-
nized by the Chapter for "the
most outstanding contribution
to the field of matrimonial law
by a member of the Judiciary.''
As President of the Florida
Chapter, Kapner will study
and help develop proposals for
topics including divorce, child
custody, adoption, alimony,
Solomon
Appointed
President
Allan B. Solomon of Boca
..Ratea, has been appointed
President of the Florida Asso-
ciation of Jewish Federations,
according to Mandell L. Ber-
man, President of the Council
of Jewish Federations.
Solomon is presently Chair-
man of the Campaign for the
South Palm Beach County
Federation and serves on its
Executive Committee and
Board of Directors. His new
position entitles him to sit on
the CJF Board of Directors.
The Florida Association of
Jewish Federations, which is
staffed by Barry Swartz, Con-
sultant for the CJF Southeast
Area Office, is an organization
which functions on a state-
wide level in areas tradition-
ally undertaken by local Feder-
ations. It seeks to: enhance the
quality and range of services
provided to Jewish citizens of
Florida.
Solomon is listed in "Who's
Who in America," "Who's
Who in American Jewry" and
"Who's Who in World Jewry."
He received a B.S. in Econom-
ics from the University of
Pennsylvania Wharton School
of Finance and Commerce, a
J.D. Degree from Boston Col-
lege Law School and a Mas-
ter's Degree in Law in Taxa-
tion from New York Univer-
sity School of Law.
Newspapers:
Freedom in Our Hands
***** "*K i
Friday, November 3, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 5

ADL World Of Difference
Continued from Page 4
the students to learn about
prejudice reduction, the teach-
ers and administrators must
also become aware of their
own prejudices. It's natural to
have prejudices, Teitelbaum
Lewis Kapner
and child support.
Also elected during the
annual meeting of the Florida
Chapter of the Academy of
Matrimonial Lawyers were:
Donald Sasser, President
Elect; Maurice Kutner and
Marsha Elser, Vice President;
and Robert Fields, Secretary
Treasurer.
Arthur N. Teitelbaum
assured them. But, he said,
there is a difference between
having a prejudice and recog-
nizing it than acting on it so
that it becomes discrimination.
Failure to grasp such sensit-
ivities can, in its worst form,
lead to major tragedies such as
the Holocaust. He showed a
film about Skinheads, which
reveals youths of the 1980s
calling for a pure Anglo nation
and the suppression through
violence of groups such as
Jews and blacks.
These youth movements
feed on violence, hatred and
misunderstanding and the
youths themselves are targets
of recruitment by such estab-
lished hate groups as the
Aryan Nation and the Ku Klux
Klan.
Teitelbaum stressed the
importance of two Florida
laws that went into effect Oct.
1 the toughest measures of
their kind in the nation
which require law enforcement
agencies to report "Hate
Crimes." The laws have set
tougher penalties and legal
recourse against persons
whose crimes involve religious
or racial motives.
The World of Difference pro-
gram was initiated by the ADL
in 1985 as a national public
service campaign. It is now in
15 metropolitan communities
around the country, and
involve? coalition of agen-
cies, schocis and the media.
The program has resulted in
an extensive audio-visual
library which is available to
interested public and private
school groups by calling the
ADL at 373-4605.
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Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, November 3, 1989
News Briefs
IDF Wants Tax Strike Ended
JERUSALEM (JTA) The Israel Defense Force
appears bent on breaking down of the few non-violent
manifestations of the intifada.
A priority mission now is putting an end to a tax strike
being staged by residents of the largely Arab-Christian
town of Beit Sahur in the West Bank.
The strike, which has gone on for more than a month
now, is challenging Israeli authority in the territory and
depriving the Treasury of legitimate revenue.
Congress Ask For Arm Sales
WASHINGTON (JTA) Thirty-seven members of the
House of Representatives signed a letter sent to Secretary
of State James Baker asking for more information on the
Bush administration's proposed $3 billion sale to Saudi
Arabia of 315 tanks and other military equipment. The
letter, initiated by Reps. Mel Levine (D-Calif.) and
Lawrence Smith (D-Fla.), was described by a Capitol Hill
source as "moderate."
American-Arab Poster Campaign
WASHINGTON (JTA) Citing a sharp decline in media
coverage of the Palestinian uprising, the American-Arab
Anti-Discrimination Committee has revived its poster
campaign in the Washington-area subway system.
Egypt: PLO Has Not Rejected Plan
WASHINGTON (JTA) Egypt believes that the Pales-
tinian Liberation Organization has not rejected Israel's
plan for Palestinian elections in the West Bank and Gaza
Strip, an Egyptian Embassy official said here.
Ask Congress For Pollards Support
NEW YORK (JTA) Two members of the Israeli Knesset
are trying to get Congress involved in re-evaluating
whether Jonathan and Anne Pollard received justice when
they were sent to prison respectively for espionage and
illegal possession of classified documents.
Yiddishist, Dov Sadan, Dies At 87
JERUSALEM (JTA) Funeral services were held here
for Dov Sadan, Israel's leading academic Yiddishist and an
outstanding Hebrew scholar who died recently at the age of
87.
Mother Of Hadassah President Dies
NEW YORK (JTA)- Batia Efros, a Jewish educator and
mother of the national president of Hadassah, died after a
brief illness Oct. 13 at a Long Island Hospital.
Efros, born in Jerusalem, was a member of the first
graduating class of the Hebrew University.
Her daughter, Carmela Efros Kalmanson, was elected
president of Hadassah, the Women's Zionist Organization
of America, in 1988.
Uris Finds USSR Unpleasant
NEW YORK The celebrated novelist Leon Uris is
winding up a three-city lecture tour of the Soviet Union
that he describes as having "quite a bit of unpleasantness
surrounding it."
"I think when we get out of the Soviet Union, we have to
take a long, second look at what has happened," Uris said.
Air France-Israel Tourism Agreements
The Israel Minister of Tourism, Gideon Patt, joined with
Air France and Jet Vacation officials to mark the launching
of bi-lateral agreements increasing tourism between
France and Israel.
Poland-Israel Could Restore Ties
ROME (JTA) The leader of Poland's first non-
Communist government since World War II has affirmed
here that Poland will re-establish diplomatic relations with
Israel, though he could not say exactly when.
Prime Minister Tadeusz Mazowiecki, on his first trip
abroad since taking office, told a news conference that such
a move was definitely expected.
Community Reimbursements Requested
Washington ... Congressman Dante Fascell (D-Fla) has
urged two key House committee chairman to ensure that
communities impacted by ever-increasing numbers of
immigrants and refugees receive reimbursements from the
federal government for the services provided to these
individuals.
a a a r\ a a a fl a U .n a^T n 2 A 0
/>We're a little short op pucks ^nighj^boys^
*t we're qonna have to use some kishke." a
1948, 1950 Communications Made Public
British Secretly Ended
Prosecution Of Nazis
NEW YORK The World
Jewish Congress has released
a 1950 letter from the British
Foreign Office to the member
states of the United Nations
War Crimes Commission, in
which it informs them that
Britain would no longer hand
over suspected war criminals
for trial.
According to the confiden-
tial communication, "His Maj-
esty's Government will no lon-
ger regard themselves as
under any obligation to deport
an alien on the ground that
there is a prima facie case that
he was a war criminal."
In an earlier secret tele-
gram, the British government
informed the commonwealth
countries that it would end all
prosecutions of war criminals
in its occupation zone of Ger-
many on August 31, 1948. "It
is now necessary to dispose of
the past as soon as possible,"
the telegram states.
In its letter to the UN War
Crimes Commission members,
the British Foreign Office
acknowledged its 1945 unde-
rtaking to deport war crimes
suspects found living in Eng-
land.
But, the letter continued,
the British government no lon-
ger found itself bound by that
obligation, noting, "over five
"ears have now passed since
the conclusion of hostilities
and His Majesty's Govern-
ment, after reviewing the mat-
ter, have decided that the
undertaking into which they
entered can now be held to
have been discharged."
In the 40 years since that
secret British government
decision, no legal action has
been taken against suspected
Nazi war criminals hiding in
Britain. "This failure is a stain
on civilization and a mockery
of the memory of those mur-
dered by the Nazis," the WJC
said.
Britain's Parliament will
next month begin debate on
legislation urging changes in
the law to allow prosecutions
of war crimes suspects. Pro-
posed changes arose from
recommendations of a govern-
mental group which cited the
assistance of the WJC in for-
mulating its conclusions.
"Parliament has the belated
opportunity to right an historic
injustice. If it fails to do so on
this occasion, the last of the
surviving Nazi murderers still
hiding in Britain will escape
scot-free," said WJC Execu-
tive Director Elan Steinberg.
YOUR CAR IN ISRAEL
Ex-Nazi Arrested
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Bruno Karl Blach, an alleged
Nazi war criminal living in Los
Angeles, was arrested by the
Justice Department following
an extradition request issued
by West Germany in late June.
The 69-year-old Blach has
been accused by a West Ger-
man district court of "having
killed three persons in Austria
en route from Wiener Neudorf
to Mauthausen between April
2 and April 14, 1945, in a cruel
manner and acting from base
motives." Wiener Neudorf and
Mauthausen were concentra-
tion camps.
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Religious Directory
CONSERVATIVE
BOYNTON BEACH JEWISH CENTER-BETH KODESH: 501
SE 26 Avenue, Boynton Beach 33435. Phone 586-9428. Rabbi
David Shapiro. Cantor Abraham Koster. Daily, 8:30 a.m. Sabbath
services, Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.
CONGREGATION ANSHEI SHOLOM: 5348 Grove Street,
West Palm Beach 33417. Phone 684-3212. Office hours 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. Rabbi Isaac Vander Walde. Cantor Mordecai Spektor. Daily
services 8:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Friday night 5 p.m. and 8:15 p.m.
Saturday 9 a.m. and 7:15 p.m.
GOLDEN LAKES TEMPLE: 1470 Golden Lakes Boulevard,
West Palm Beach 33411. Phone 689-9430. Rabbi Joseph Speiser.
Daily services 8 a.m. Sabbath services Friday 8 p.m. Saturday 9
a.m. For times of evening services please call the Temple office.
BETH TIKVAH, LAKE WORTH JEWISH CENTER: 4550 Jog
Road, Lake Worth. Phone 967-3600. Rabbi Richard K. Rocklin.
Cantor Abraham Mehler. Services Friday 8 p.m., Saturday and
holidays, 8:45 a.m. Daily minyan 8:15 a.m., Sundays through
Fridays.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID: 4657 Hood Road, Palm Beach Gardens
33418. Phone 694-2350. Rabbi Randall J. Konigsburg. Cantor
Earl J. Rackoff. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m., Saturday 9:30
a.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 2815 No. Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach
33407. Phone 833-0339. Cantor Norman Brody. Sabbath ser-
vices Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9:30 a.m. Daily Minyan 8:15
a.m., Sunday and legal holidays 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 315 No. "A" Street, Lake worm
33460. Phone 585-5020. Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg. Cantor
Howard Dardashti. Services Monday and Thursday, 8:15 a.m.
Friday evening, 8:15 p.m., Saturday, 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 224 NW Avenue G, Belle Glade
33430. Phone 996-3886. Services: Second Wednesday of every
month, 7:30 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH ZION: 129 Sparrow Drive, Royal Palm Beach,
II. 33411. Phone 798-8888. Sabbath services Friday 8 p.m.,
Saturday 9 a.m. Rabbi Stefan J. Weinberg.
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB: 2177 So. Congress Ave., West Palm
Beach 33406. Phone 433-5957. Sabbath services Friday 8 p.m.,
Saturday and holidays 9 a.m., Monday through Friday 9 a.m.
Rabbi Morris Pickholz. Cantor Andrew E. Beck.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL: 190 North County Road, Palm Beach
33480. Phone 832-0804. Rabbi Leonid Feldman. Cantor David
Feuer. Sabbath services, Friday 7 p.m.; Saturday 9:30 a.m.
TEMPLE TORAH: Lions Club, 3615 West Boynton Beach
Boulevard, Boynton Beach 33437. Mailing address: 9851D Mili-
tary Trail, Box 360091, Boynton Beach 33436. Phone 736-7687.
Cantor Alex Chapin. Rabbi Theodore Feldman, part-time. Sab-
bath Services Friday evening 8 p.m.; Saturday 9 a.m.
TREASURE COAST JEWISH CENTER CONGREGATION
BETH ABRAHAM: 3998 SW Leighton Farms Road, Palm City
33490. Mailing address: P.O. Box 2996, Stuart 33495. Phone
287-8833. Services Friday evenings 8 p.m. and Saturday 10 a.m.
ORTHODOX
< IIA BAD HOUSE LUBAVITCH: 4623 Forest Hill Blvd.,
West Palm Beach, 108-3, 33415. Phone 641-6167. Rabbi Shlomo
Ezagui. Sabbath Services, Saturday, 10 a.m.
CONGREGATION AITZ CHAIM: 2518 N. Haverhill Road, West
Palm Beach 33417. Phone 686-5055. Sabbath services 8:45 a.m.
and 7:30 p.m. Daily services 8:15 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. Rabbi Oscar
Werner.
REFORM
CONGREGATION BETH ISRAEL: 1390 SW Dorchester
Street, P.O. Box 857146, Port St. Lucie, FL 33452. Phone
335-7620. Friday night services 8 p.m., Saturday morning 10:30
a.m.
TEMPLE BETH AM: 759 Parkway Street, Jupiter. Phone
747-1109. Services Friday 8:00 p.m. Rabbi Rachel Hertzman.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 4600 Oleander Avenue, Fort Pierce, FL
34982. Phone 461-7428. Sabbath Services Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM: St. Helen's Parish Hall 20th
Avenue and Victory Boulevard, Vero Beach 32960. Mailing
address: P.O. Box 2113, Vero Beach, FL 32961-2113. Rabbi Jay
R. Davis. Phone 1-569-4700.
TEMPLE BETH TORAH: 900 Big Blue Trace, West Palm
Beach, FL 33414. Phone 793-2700. Friday services 8:15 p.m.,
Saturday morning 10 a.m. Rabbi Steven R. Westman. Cantor
Elliot Rosenbaum.
TEMPLE ISRAEL: 1901 No. Flagler Drive. West Palm Beach
33407. Phone 833-8421. Rabbi Howard Shapiro. Cantor Stuart
Fittle. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE JUDEA: 100 Chillingworth Drive, West Palm Beach,
FL 33409. Rabbi Joel L. Levine. Cantor Rita Shore. Phone
471-1526.
Friday, November 3, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 7
Golden Years Bat Mitzvahs
J
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
Ruth Ross and Barbara Dun-
evitz will celebrate Bat Mitz-
vahs together in their Golden
Girls years because of separate
trips they took to the same
place.
Ross, 80, visited Israel for
the first time in 1971. She's
made ten trips back since then.
"The first time I went there
and I arrived in Israel I had
something happen that made
me aware of the wonderful
culture I belong to and I made
a promise that somehow or
other I would show my
thanks...," Ross said.
Dunevitz, 55, took a trip to
Israel five years ago with her
husband Burton. Since they
came back, they have been
celebrating the Sabbath by
their special design at home.
"I have a legacy established
by my children. Little did I
dream as I proudly watched
my three children perform
their bar and bat mitzvahs that
I would follow their footsteps
much later," said Dunevitz.
Catacombs
Continued from Page 2
toleration for Jews.
"The catacombs open a new
book of how our forefathers
centuries ago lived," said Zevi.
"We want this to become a
regular monument that tour-
ists in Rome see."
Burnham agreed. "The cata-
combs are an important histor-
ical resource and a corner-
stone of the Italian Jewish
heritage. They are an aspect of
the history of antiquity that
deserves to be better known.
We hope to make a major
contribution."
The Jewish Heritage Council
will begin with an investiga-
tion of the micro-climate, site
stability and fresco condition
of the catacombs, the cost of
which is approximately
$50,000. The Council esti-
mates the cost of possible
future preservation at
$400,000. Previous estimates
have been as high as $5 mil-
lion, however.
According to Zevi, the Ital-
ian state will pick up a large
share of the preservation
costs, but the major financial
problem is paying for guards.
The cost of keeping up a public
site is high, and Zevi's plans at
present is to have the cata-
combs open only two days a
week.
Zevi is hoping that with the
recent opening of "Gardens
and Ghettos: the Art of Jewish
Life in Italy" at the Jewish
Museum in New York, Ameri-
can Jews will become
acquainted with the rich Jew-
ish heritage of Italy and the
need for financial help in pre-
serving its ancient past.
Tourism Up
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
Sukkot-Simchat Torah holiday
iust ended appears to have
been the most successful for
Jerusalem in the nearly two
years since the Palestinian
uprising began.
And she wrote these
thoughts to share with the
participants at her Bat Mitz-
vah Nov. 3 at Temple Zamora
"When I was 13, to my
knowledge, there was no such
thing as a bat mitzvah. The
accolades were reserved for
the young men, who as our
religion dictates, were special
in the eyes of the Jewish com-
munity.
"Incredibly, we girls
accepted this as had our
mothers, grandmothers and
ancestors before us.
"My religion simply meant
an unwelcome trip to Hebrew
school from which I was a
dropout at an early
age...Something I have come
to realize only recently is that I
have always had an abiding
faith which has carried me
through the last 50 something
years."
Ross met Dunevitz when she
went to inquire about a
Hebrew language course
awhile back at Florida Interna-
tional University. Dunevitz's
husband is a professor of phys-
ical therapy at FIU. And she
works in the school's Depart-
ment of Religion and Philoso-
phy.
Ross met Rabbi Akiva Bril-
liant at Temple Zamora and
later made the introduction to
Dunevitz.
"I checked out many tem-
ples and talked to many rabbis
and Rabbi Brilliant was the
most compassionate and inter-
ested in what I wanted to do
and I chose him," Ross said.
"We're glad to have them
because this is helping bring
them closer to their Judaism
and obviously that is some-
thing that is desirable," Bril-
liant said.
Dunevitz admits she is a bit
nervous.
"I feel a little bit Hke a
13-year-old probably felt," she
said.
Synopsis Of The Weekly Torah Portion
. "Go forth from the ark, thou, and thy wife"
(Gen. 8.16).
NOAH
NOAH Noah was commanded to build an Ark for shelter from
the Flood that would overwhelm the earth. In the Ark he placed
his wife and three sons, Shem, Ham, and Japheth, together with
their wives; also two of each species of creature on earth, one
male and one female to perpetuate the species (seven were
allowed for the species that were ritually clean). The Flood that
covered the earth drowned all living things except those in the
Ark with Noah. After a year, the waters receded and the earth
dried. Noah let all the creatures out of the Ark, that they might be
fruitful and multiply on earth. He sacrificed in thanksgiving to
God. God, for His part, promised Noah that He would never again
send a flood that would destroy the earth. The sign for this
agreement, or covenant, is the rainbow.
Men increased and spread over the world; in the land of Shinar
they sought to build a tower whose peak should reach to heaven.
Here, they thought to concentrate all the earth's population. But
God, irked at man's presumption, confused their speech. Previ-
ously all men had spoken one language. Now they spoke various
languages; not being able to understand each other, they could
not work together, and the building of the Tower of Babel ceased.
Terah, the father of Abram, came to Haram.
(The recounting of the Weekly Portion of the Law is extracted and
based upon "The Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage," edited by
P. Wollman-Tsamir, published by Shengold. The volume is available
at 75 Maiden Lane, New York, N.Y. 10038.)
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Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, November 3, 1989
Arab UN Romance Deepens
By DAVID HOROWITZ
ami GREGG SITRIN
(United Nations) Despite
the fact that 20 members of
the League of Arab States
(LAS) drafted and supported a
resolution that would have had
Israel's credentials to the
United Nations General
Assembly declared null and
void, 143 member nations on
the same day voted in favor of
a resolution "to strengthen
cooperation between the UN
and the LAS; only the United
States and Israel voted against
it.
Paradoxically, a majority of
the 143 countries that voted in
favor of the resolution sup-
porting closer ties between the
UN and the LAS also believes
that "an international peace
conference for the Middle
East" should be held under
UN auspices. Therefore, it is
an enigma why those countries
that support a role for the UN
in the Middle East peace talks
could approve a closer rela-
tionship for the UN with an
organization like the LAS that
is attempting to oust one of the
main participants Israel.
Or, in the words of Israeli
ambassador to the UN,
Johanan Bein. "what is ironic
is the demand for an interna-
tional peace conference under
the auspices of the United
Nations which is made by the
same forces (all the Arab coun-
tries except Egypt) seeking to
expel Israel from this organi-
zation."
Besides the Arabs' credenti-
als fiasco, Aaron Jacob, Coun-
sellor of the Israeli Mission,
cited more indictments against
the LAS as he gave Israel's
response to the UN/LAS coop-
eration vote. Jacob said that
since Israel's establishment,
the LAS had pursued objec-
tives and activities against
Israel which were in direct
contradiction to the Charter of
the United Nations.
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Full Text
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Religious Directory
CONSERVATIVE
BOYNTON BEACH JEWISH CENTER-BETH KODESH: 501
NE 26 Avenue, Boynton Beach 33435. Phone 586-9428. Rabbi
David Shapiro. Cantor Abraham Koster. Daily, 8:30 a.m. Sabbath
services, Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.
CONGREGATION ANSHEI SHOLOM: 5348 Grove Street,
West Palm Beach 33417. Phone 684-3212. Office hours 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. Rabbi Isaac Vander Walde. Cantor Mordecai Spektor. Daily
services 8:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Friday night 5 p.m. and 8:15 p.m.
Saturday 9 a.m. and 7:15 p.m.
GOLDEN LAKES TEMPLE: 1470 Golden Lakes Boulevard,
West Palm Beach 33411. Phone 689-9430. Rabbi Joseph Speiser.
Daily services 8 a.m. Sabbath services Friday 8 p.m. Saturday 9
a.m. For times of evening services please call the Temple office.
BETH TIKVAH, LAKE WORTH JEWISH CENTER: 4550 Jog
Road, Lake Worth. Phone 967-3600. Rabbi Richard K. Rocklin.
Cantor Abraham Mehler. Services Friday 8 p.m., Saturday and
holidays, 8:45 a.m. Daily minyan 8:15 a.m., Sundays through
Fridays.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID: 4657 Hood Road, Palm Beach Gardens
33418. Phone 694-2360. Rabbi Randall J. Konigsburg. Cantor
Earl J. Rackoff. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m., Saturday 9:30
a.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 2815 No. Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach
33407. Phone 833-0339. Cantor Norman Brody. Sabbath ser-
vices Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9:30 a.m. Daily Minyan 8:15
a.m., Sunday and legal holidays 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 315 No. "A" Street, Lake worui
33460. Phone 585-5020. Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg. Cantor
Howard Dardashti. Services Monday and Thursday, 8:15 a.m.
Friday evening, 8:15 p.m., Saturday, 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 224 NW Avenue G, Belle Glade
33480. Phone 996-3886. Services: Second Wednesday of every
month, 7:30 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH ZION: 129 Sparrow Drive, Royal Palm Beach,
FL 33411. Phone 798-8888. Sabbath services Friday 8 p.m.,
Saturday 9 a.m. Rabbi Stefan J. Weinberg.
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB: 2177 So. Congress Ave., West Palm
Beach 33406. Phone 433-5957. Sabbath services Friday 8 p.m.,
Saturday and holidays 9 a.m., Monday through Friday 9 a.m.
Rabbi Morris Pickholz. Cantor Andrew E. Beck.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL: 190 North County Road, Palm Beach
:480. Phone 832-0804. Rabbi Leonid Feldman. Cantor David
Feuer. Sabbath services, Friday 7 p.m.; Saturday 9:30 a.m.
TEMPLE TORAH: Lions Club, 3615 West Boynton Beach
Boulevard, Boynton Beach 33437. Mailing address: 9851D Mili-
tary Trail, Box 360091, Boynton Beach 33436. Phone 736-7687.
Cantor Alex Chapin. Rabbi Theodore Feldman, part-time. Sab-
bath Services Friday evening 8 p.m.; Saturday 9 a.m.
TREASURE COAST JEWISH CENTER CONGREGATION
BETH ABRAHAM: 3998 SW Leighton Farms Road, Palm City
.53490. Mailing address: P.O. Box 2996, Stuart 33495. Phone
287-8833. Services Friday evenings 8 p.m. and Saturday 10 a.m.
ORTHODOX
CHABAD HOUSE LUBAVITCH: 4623 Forest Hill Blvd.,
West Palm Beach, 108-3, 33415. Phone 641-6167. Rabbi Shlomo
Ezagui. Sabbath Services, Saturday, 10 a.m.
CONGREGATION AITZ CHAIM: 2518 N. Haverhill Road, West
Palm Beach 33417. Phone 686-5055. Sabbath services 8:45 a.m.
and 7:30 p.m. Daily services 8:15 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. Rabbi Oscar
Werner.
REFORM
CONGREGATION BETH ISRAEL: 1390 SW Dorchester
Street, P.O. Box 857146, Port St. Lucie, FL 33452. Phone
335-7620. Friday night services 8 p.m., Saturday morning 10:30
a.m.
TEMPLE BETH AM: 759 Parkway Street, Jupiter. Phone
747-1109. Services Friday 8:00 p.m. Rabbi Rachel Hertzman.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 4600 Oleander Avenue, Fort Pierce, FL
34982. Phone 461-7428. Sabbath Services Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM: St. Helen's Parish Hall, 20th
Avenue and Victory Boulevard, Vero Beach 32960. Mailing
address: P.O. Box 2113, Vero Beach. FL 32961-2113. Rabbi Jay
R. Davis. Phone 1-569-4700.
TEMPLE BETH TORAH: 900 Big Blue Trace, West Palm
Beach, FL 33414. Phone 793-2700. Friday services 8:15 p.m.,
Saturday morning 10 a.m. Rabbi Steven R. Westman. Cantor
Elliot Rosenbaum.
TEMPLE ISRAEL: 1901 No. Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach
33407. Phone 833-8421. Rabbi Howard Shapiro. Cantor Stuart
Pittle. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE JUDEA: 100 Chillingworth Drive, West Palm Beach,
FL 33409. Rabbi Joel L. Levine. Cantor Rita Shore. Phone
471-1526.
Friday, November 3, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 7
Golden Years Bat Mitzvahs
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
Ruth Ross and Barbara Dun-
evitz will celebrate Bat Mitz-
vahs together in their Golden
Girls years because of separate
trips they took to the same
place.
Ross, 80, visited Israel for
the first time in 1971. She's
made ten trips back since then.
"The first time I went there
and I arrived in Israel I had
something happen that made
me aware of the wonderful
culture I belong to and I made
a promise that somehow or
other I would show my
thanks...," Ross said.
Dunevitz, 55, took a trip to
Israel five years ago with her
husband Burton. Since they
came back, they have been
celebrating the Sabbath by
their special design at home.
"I have a legacy established
by my children. Little did I
dream as I proudly watched
my three children perform
their bar and bat mitzvahs that
I would follow their footsteps
much later," said Dunevitz.
Catacombs
Continued from Page 2
toleration for Jews.
"The catacombs open a new
book of how our forefathers
centuries ago lived," said Zevi.
"We want this to become a
regular monument that tour-
ists in Rome see."
Burnham agreed. "The cata-
combs are an important histor-
ical resource and a corner-
stone of the Italian Jewish
heritage. They are an aspect of
the history of antiquity that
deserves to be better known.
We hope to make a major
contribution."
The Jewish Heritage Council
will begin with an investiga-
tion of the micro-climate, site
stability and fresco condition
of the catacombs, the cost of
which is approximately
$50,000. The Council esti-
mates the cost of possible
future preservation at
$400,000. Previous estimates
have been as high as $5 mil-
lion, however.
According to Zevi, the Ital-
ian state will pick up a large
share of the preservation
costs, but the major financial
problem is paying for guards.
The cost of keeping up a public
site is high, and Zevi's plans at
present is to have the cata-
combs open only two days a
week.
Zevi is hoping that with the
recent opening of "Gardens
and Ghettos: the Art of Jewish
Life in Italy" at the Jewish
Museum in New York, Ameri-
can Jews will become
acquainted with the rich Jew-
ish heritage of Italy and the
need for financial help in pre-
serving its ancient past.
Tourism Up
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
Sukkot-Simchat Torah holiday
just ended appears to have
been the most successful for
Jerusalem in the nearly two
years since the Palestinian
uprising began.
And she wrote these
thoughts to share with the
participants at her Bat Mitz-
vah Nov. 3 at Temple Zamora
"When I was 13, to my
knowledge, there was no such
thing as a bat mitzvah. The
accolades were reserved for
the young men, who as our
religion dictates, were special
in the eyes of the Jewish com-
munity.
"Incredibly, we girls
accepted this as had our
mothers, grandmothers and
ancestors before us.
"My religion simply meant
an unwelcome trip to Hebrew
school from which I was a
dropout at an early
age...Something I have come
to realize only recently is that I
have always had an abiding
faith which has carried me
through the last 50 something
years."
Ross met Dunevitz when she
went to inquire about a
Hebrew language course
awhile back at Florida Interna-
tional University. Dunevitz's
husband is a professor of phys-
ical therapy at FIU. And she
works in the school's Depart-
ment of Religion and Philoso-
phy-
Ross met Rabbi Akiva Bril-
liant at Temple Zamora and
later made the introduction to
Dunevitz.
"I checked out many tem-
ples and talked to many rabbis
and Rabbi Brilliant was the
most compassionate and inter-
ested in what I wanted to do
and I chose him," Ross said.
"We're glad to have them
because this is helping bring
them closer to their Judaism
and obviously that is some-
thing that is desirable," Bril-
liant said.
Dunevitz admits she is a bit
nervous.
"I feel a little bit Kke a
13-year-old probably felt," she
said.
Synopsis Of The Weekly Torah Portion
. "Go forth from the ark, thou, and thy ivife"
(Gen. 8.16).
NOAH
NOAH Noah was commanded to build an Ark for shelter from
the Flood that would overwhelm the earth. In the Ark he placed
his wife and three sons, Shem, Ham, and Japheth, together with
their wives; also two of each species of creature on earth, one
male and one female to perpetuate the species (seven were
allowed for the species that were ritually clean). The Flood that
covered the earth drowned all living things except those in the
Ark with Noah. After a year, the waters receded and the earth
dried. Noah let all the creatures out of the Ark, that they might be
fruitful and multiply on earth. He sacrificed in thanksgiving to
God. God, for His part, promised Noah that He would never again
send a flood that would destroy the earth. The sign for this
agreement, or covenant, is the rainbow.
Men increased and spread over the world; in the land of Shinar
they sought to build a tower whose peak should reach to heaven.
Here, they thought to concentrate all the earth's population. But
God, irked at man's presumption, confused their speech. Previ-
ously all men had spoken one language. Now they spoke various
languages; not being able to understand each other, they could
not work together, and the building of the Tower of Babel ceased.
Terah, the father of Abram, came to Haram.
(The recounting of the Weekly Portion of the Law is extracted and
based upon "The Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage," edited by
P. Wollman-Tsamir, published by Shengold. The volume is available
at 75 Maiden Lane, New York, N.Y. 10038.)
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Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, November 3, 1989
News Briefs
IDF Wants Tax Strike Ended
JERUSALEM (JTA) The Israel Defense Force
appears bent on breaking down of the few non-violent
manifestations of the intifada.
A priority mission now is putting an end to a tax strike
being staged by residents of the largely Arab-Christian
town of Beit Sahur in the West Bank.
The strike, which has gone on for more than a month
now, is challenging Israeli authority in the territory and
depriving the Treasury of legitimate revenue.
Congress Ask For Arm Sales
WASHINGTON (JTA) Thirty-seven members of the
House of Representatives signed a letter sent to Secretary
of State James Baker asking for more information on the
Bush administration's proposed $3 billion sale to Saudi
Arabia of 315 tanks and other military equipment. The
letter, initiated by Reps. Mel Levine (D-Calif.) and
Lawrence Smith (D-Fla.), was described by a Capitol Hill
source as "moderate."
American-Arab Poster Campaign
WASHINGTON (JTA) Citing a sharp decline in media
coverage of the Palestinian uprising, the American-Arab
Anti-Discrimination Committee has revived its poster
campaign in the Washington-area subway system.
Egypt: PLO Has Not Rejected Plan
WASHINGTON (JTA) Egypt believes that the Pales-
tinian Liberation Organization has not rejected Israel's
plan for Palestinian elections in the West Bank and Gaza
Strip, an Egyptian Embassy official said here.
Ask Congress For Pollards Support
NEW YORK (JTA) Two members of the Israeli Knesset
are trying to get Congress involved in re-evaluating
whether Jonathan and Anne Pollard received justice when
they were sent to prison respectively for espionage and
illegal possession of classified documents.
Yiddishist, Dov Sadan, Dies At 87
JERUSALEM (JTA) Funeral services were held here
for Dov Sadan, Israel's leading academic Yiddishist and an
outstanding Hebrew scholar who died recently at the age of
87.
Mother Of Hadassah President Dies
NEW YORK (JTA)- Batia Efros, a Jewish educator and
mother of the national president of Hadassah, died after a
brief illness Oct. 13 at a Long Island Hospital.
Efros, born in Jerusalem, was a member of the first
graduating class of the Hebrew University.
Her daughter, Carmela Efros Kalmanson, was elected
president of Hadassah, the Women's Zionist Organization
of America, in 1988.
Uris Finds USSR Unpleasant
NEW YORK The celebrated novelist Leon Uris is
winding up a three-city lecture tour of the Soviet Union
that he describes as having "quite a bit of unpleasantness
surrounding it."
"I think when we get out of the Soviet Union, we have to
take a long, second look at what has happened," Uris said.
Air France-Israel Tourism Agreements
The Israel Minister of Tourism, Gideon Patt, joined with
Air France and Jet Vacation officials to mark the launching
of bilateral agreements increasing tourism between
France and Israel.
Poland-Israel Could Restore Ties
ROME (JTA) The leader of Poland's first non-
Communist government since World War II has affirmed
here that Poland will re-establish diplomatic relations with
Israel, though he could not say exactly when.
Prime Minister Tadeusz Mazowiecki, on his first trip
abroad since taking office, told a news conference that such
a move was definitely expected.
Community Reimbursements Requested
Washington .. Congressman Dante Fascell (D-Fla) has
urged two key House committee chairman to ensure that
communities impacted by ever-increasing numbers of
immigrants and refugees receive reimbursements from the
federal government for the services provided to these
individuals.
a a a r\ a a a f) a i) 7n a ^-.n } A $
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1948, 1950 Communications Made Public
British Secretly Ended
Prosecution Of Nazis
NEW YORK The World
Jewish Congress has released
a 1950 letter from the British
Foreign Office to the member
states of the United Nations
War Crimes Commission, in
which it informs them that
Britain would no longer hand
over suspected war criminals
for trial.
According to the confiden-
tial communication, "His Maj-
esty's Government will no lon-
ger regard themselves as
under any obligation to deport
an alien on the ground that
there is a prima facie case that
he was a war criminal."
In an earlier secret tele-
gram, the British government
informed the commonwealth
countries that it would end all
prosecutions of war criminals
in its occupation zone of Ger-
many on August 31, 1948. "It
is now necessary to dispose of
the past as soon as possible,"
the telegram states.
In its letter to the UN War
Urimes Commission members,
the British Foreign Office
acknowledged its 1945 unde-
rtaking to deport war crimes
suspects found living in Eng-
land.
But, the letter continued,
the British government no lon-
ger found itself bound by that
obligation, noting, "over five
"ears have now passed since
the conclusion of hostilities
and His Majesty's Govern-
ment, after reviewing the mat-
ter, have decided that the
undertaking into which they
entered can now be held to
have been discharged."
In the 40 years since that
secret British government
decision, no legal action has
been taken against suspected
Nazi war criminals hiding in
Britain. "This failure is a stain
on civilization and a mockery
of the memory of those mur-
dered by the Nazis," the WJC
said.
Britain's Parliament will
next month begin debate on
legislation urging changes in
the law to allow prosecutions
of war crimes suspects. Pro-
posed changes arose from
recommendations of a govern-
mental group which cited the
assistance of the WJC in for-
mulating its conclusions.
"Parliament has the belated
opportunity to right an historic
injustice. If it fails to do so on
this occasion, the last of the
surviving Nazi murderers still
hiding in Britain will escape
scot-free," said WJC Execu-
tive Director Elan Steinberg.
YOUR CAR IN ISRAEL
TT3K
Ex-Nazi Arrested
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Bruno Karl Blach, an alleged
Nazi war criminal living in Los
Angeles, was arrested by the
Justice Department following
an extradition request issued
by West Germany in late June.
The 69-year-old Blach has
been accused by a West Ger-
man district court of "having
killed three persons in Austria
en route from Wiener Neudorf
to Mauthausen between April
2 and April 14, 1945, in a cruel
manner and acting from base
motives." Wiener Neudorf and
Mauthausen were concentra-
tion camps.
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