The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County the voice of the Jewish community of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
West Palm Beach, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 11, no. 27 (Sept. 13, 1985)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Feb. 20, 1987 called no. 4 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Mar. 31, 1989 called no. 12 in masthead and no. 13 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44605643
lccn - sn 00229551
ocm44605643
System ID:
AA00014309:00151

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)


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Full Text
THE VOICE OF
THE JEWISH
COMMUNITY OF
PALM BEACH
COUNTY
Jewish floridian
^ W OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
Volume 15 Number 29
PALM BEACH, FLORIDA FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1989
ft,
Price 40 Cents
Baker Proposes Plan To Revive Talks
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) U.S. Secretary of
State James Baker has sent the foreign minis-
ters of Israel and Egypt a five-point plan aimed
at reviving Egyptian-brokered negotiations
between Israeli and Palestinian delegations.
The move comes after Israel's Inner Cabinet
deadlocked 6-6 along party lines in a vote on
Egypt's invitation to host preliminary Israeli-
Palestinian negotiations in Cairo. A tie vote is
by law a negative one.
The American plan, which was transmitted in
writing, calls for Israeli-Palestinian talks in
Cairo, based on Israel's May 14 plan for Pales-
tinian elections in the West Bank and Gaza
Strip.
It suggests consultations among Israel, Egypt
and the United States over the composition of
the Palestinian delegation to participate in such
talks. And it specifically proposes that the
foreign ministers of Israel and Egypt come to
Continued on Page 7
] Lvov Synagogue Returned
To Jewish Community
NEW POLICY BRINGS CROWD Moscow -Anew U.S. embassy policy which requires that
applications be filed in Moscow, brought as many as 16,000 in an orderly queue, as they waited
their turn to get a form. (AP/Wide World Photo)
Many Of 80,000 Assimilated
World Jewish Congress
reported here that after 25
years, the sole remaining syna-
gogue in Lvov, Western
Ukraine, has been reopened
for use by the Jewish commun-
ity.
"The synagogue was closed
in accordance with the decision
by city authorities and we had
to hold illegal services in pri-
vate apartments,"Jewish
Community leader Filipp
Nyukh told TASS, the Soviet
News Agency.
In 1962 the synagogue was
closed after several articles
were published in the local
Ukraman newspaper, Lvivska
Pravda, complaining that the
synagogue served as a meeting
place for "speculators" and
other criminals.
"The Council for Religious
Affairs in Moscow treated our
request to reopen the syna-
gogue with sympathy, but
Lvov authorities continued to
impede our efforts," Nyukh
said.
It was only following the
intervention of a local repre-
sentative to the National
Soviet Parliament that "made
the City Council return the
Synagogue," Nyukh added.
Although the synagogue's
murals have survived largely
intact, the building itself needs
major repairs and restoration.
Lvov, also known by its Ger-
man name Lemberg, was one
of the old and great centers of
Jewish settlement in Eastern
Europe until the community
was all but destroyed during
the Holocaust.
Tragedy And Renewal: Story Of Hungarian Jewry
By RUTH E. GRUBER_______
BUDAPEST (JTA) -- The
story of the Jews in Hungary
is one of tragedy and renewal.
If anything can be considered
certain, it's the fact that
things change. Today, in the
midst of an unprecedented
postwar revival, partly fos-
tered by the sweeping social
and political liberalizations
throughout the Hungarian sys-
tem, Jews as are other
Hungarians are keeping a
wary eye out for future, less
positive, developments.
Despite Hungary's newly
reforged diplomatic links with
Israel, despite the renaissance
of interest in Jewish life and
education, despite a new gov-
ernment policy which guaran-
tees religious freedom, many
people are concerned both that
the Hungarian reforms could
fail, and that anti-Semitism
could begin again to flourish.
"This is a country in the
midst of crisis," Deputy Social
Services Minister Istvan Ban-
falvy said in Budapest at the
opening of the American Jew-
ish Jc;nt Distribution Commit-
tee' xirst East European
office.
"In a country where there is
social and economic hardship,
xenophobia could increase," he
said. "We all know what tra-
gedy this brings to communi-
ties exposed to prejudice."
Said a Hungarian-born jour-
nalist: "The Hungarian gov-
ernment is all for the Jews; the
Hungarian people, no."
These concerns were echoed
at a seminar in Vienna on
anti-Semitism in Hungary.
The seminar was told of a
boom in Jewish education,
Jewish children's camps, dir-
ect flights between Budapest
and Tel Aviv, Jewish cultural
association activities, the pop-
ular Hungary-Israel Friend-
ship Society and other aspects
of Jewish renewal.
But it also heard that only a
relatively small fraction of
Hungary's 80,000 Jews
actually take active part in
Jewish life: most are fully
assimilated.
"Hungarian Jewish life did
not die, but it is very different
now and not too strong,"
Budapest Prof. Tibor Engen-
der told the seminar.
"Both over-pessimism and
over-optimism have to be criti-
cized," he said. "Years ago,
many Jews thought anti-
Semitism had died, now many
think it is reborn," he said.
"Anti-Semitism is wearing a
mask. We have to recognize
the mask and recognize who is
wearing it."
Englander said there were
two big illusions about anti-
Semitism among Hungarian
Jews and "both are very dan-
grous." One was that "the old
ommunist regime would save
us from rightist anti-Semitism.
The second is that a new
democracy would save us from
Communist anti-Semitism."
In fact, some Hungarians
say that as Jews have become
more and more open about
their Jewish identity, overt
anti-Semitism has also grown.
One faction of the largest
opposition party, the Demo-
cratic Forum, has been
accused of being anti-Semitic,
in part because its political
roots are nationalistic, rural,
populist and steeped in Chris-
tian beliefs.
Daniel Lanyi, an activist at
the Democratic Forum head-
quarters in Budapest, denied
the party was anti-Semitic per
se. "Some of our members are
first generation intellectuals
with a rural background," he
said.
"There probably are people
in the Democratic Forum who
are anti-Semitic," he said,
"but it's very difficult to trace
back.
"The politics of the Forum
are very tolerant. I reject the
allegation that the Democratic
Forum is anti-Semitic. There
might be people in it who are,
but its broad politics are not."
Before World War II, Hun-
gary had about 825,000 Jews,
amounting to between 5 per-
cent and 8 percent of the local
population.
Communities flourished in
towns and villages around the
country as well as in Budapest,
although the government
between the world wars was
extremely anti-Semitic.
In the charming provincial
town of Debrecen, near the
Romanian border, for exam-
ple, an elderly man named
Continued on Page 3


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, October 20, 1989
Women Of The Wall Seek Torah Scroll
NEW YORK (JTA) A
nationwide campaign has been
mounted to purchase a Torah
scroll-that will be sent to the
Women of the Wall, a group
fighting for the right to con-
duct organized prayer services
at the Western Wall in Jerusa-
lem.
Women may currently pray
at the wall, but are under a
court prohibition from carry-
Hadassah Plants Trees In Burned Forest
NEW YORK To welcome
the New Year, Hadassah has
purchased 5,750 trees to be
planted in the Carmel Range
in Israel through the Jewish
National Fund.
The new trees will help
replace some of those lost to a
devastating series ot tires
which incinerated 800 to 1,200
acres of forest last month. The
blaze was reportedly caused by
arsonists and believed to be
related to the uprising in the
occupied territories.
"We are welcoming the new
year of 5750 by purchasing a
tree for every year of the
Jewish past as a symbol of our
commitment to Israel's
future," said Carmela Kalman-
son, national president of the
women's Zionist organization.
Last year, Hadassah pledged
to purchase 100,000 trees to
replace forests lost to arson.
ing Torahs and wearing prayer
shawls.
"The Western Wall is sacred
to all Jews. It must not become
the possession or fall under the
exclusive control of any one
group," said Norman
Schwartz, president of the
Association of Reform Zionists
of America.
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Friday, October 20, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 3
Festival For Rejoicing
By RABBI MARC H. TANENBAUM
(Copyright 1989,
Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Inc.)
NEW YORK Simchat
Torah, the Festival for Rejoic-
ing with the Torah, is a
remarkable balance wheel in
the mental health of the Jew-
ish people.
Preceded by the observance
of Yom Kippur, with its fast-
ing and repentance, one could
conclude superficially that
Judaism is a somber, self-
denying faith that requires
ascetic retreat from the world.
Sukkot, which begins Oct.
19, climaxed by Shemini
Atzeret, Oct. 21, and Simchat
Torah, Oct. 22, are festivals
radiant with joy and celebra-
tion centered on recommit-
ment to the Torah.
On the eve of Simchat
Torah, gaiety fills the syna-
gogue as the Torah scrolls are
taken out of the ark. Each
scroll is carried around the
bimah, or pulpit, at least seven
times, and each adult carries
one around once.
The seven circuits, the rab-
bis observe, suggest that just
as Joshua encircled the walls
of Jericho seven times and
they collapsed, so the walls of
hatred and misunderstanding
should collapse.
The hakofot, the circling
procession, on Shemini
Atzeret, the eighth evening,
prepares for the next day of
Simchat Torah, when the last
verses and then the opening
verses of the Chumash, the
Five Books of Moses, are read,
thus beginning the yearly cycle
of the Torah' reading.
All over the world on these
festive days, with the same
prayers and the same intona-
tions, Jews rejoice over the
Torah and renew their loyalty
to the Covenant as the core of
their Jewish existence.
Rabbi Marc H. Tanenbaum is
international relations consult-
ant to the American Jewish
Committee and is immediate
past president of the Interna-
tional Jewish Committee for
Interreligious Consultations.
Jewry.
Continued front Page 1
Ludwig lives a life of loneliness
and memory as one of only
about 250 Jews left in the
town, where the pre-war Jew-
ish population was nearly
10,000.
Ludwig eagerly welcomed
some unexpected Jewish visi-
tors recently to his spacious
apartment, which stands
around the corner from both
functioning synagogues in the
town, and not far from the
town's kosher restaurant.
"We daven every day, but it
is often difficult to get a min-
yan," he said.
Ludwig's home is crammed
with heavy wooden furniture,
and paintings cover the walls.
A piano stood in one corner
and a violin lay on a sideboard,
closed in its case.
"I'm all alone here, now," he
said in a mixture of fractured
German and Yiddish. Then he
turned to the pictures neatly
displayed on a cabinet.
He counted on his fingers
two, three, four his family
members who died in the Holo-
caust. And he found a photo-
graph of the former main syna-
gogue an imposing building
with two towers, also now
destroyed.
"This was my grandfather, a
famous rabbi," he said, show-
ing a black and white shot of a
stern-faced man with a long
grey beard. "This was my sis-
ter," he said, showing another
picture, this tim of an attrac-
tive young woman. "She died
in Auschwitz."
B'nai B'rith Deplores Terrorists
WASHINGTON B'nai B'rith expressed profound
regret and disappointment that three confirmed terrorists
representing the Palestine Liberation Organization and the
Democratic Front for the Liberation of Palestine will be
participating in the United Nations General Assembly. The
DFLP alone has claimed credit for three terrorist attacks
since December.
Poland Ready To Renew Ties
TEL AVIV (JTA) Poland has decided in principle to
renew diplomatic relations with Israel, but no date has yet
been fixed for implementing that policy, Foreign Minister
Moshe Arens tola a television interviewer here.
Poland had severed diplomatic ties with Israel during the
1967 Six-Day War. The first thaw in relations occurred last
year, when Israeli and Polish offices were opened in
Warsaw and Tel Aviv.
Jewish floridian
of Palm Baacti County
Combmlnfl "Our Vote*" and "Fadafatlon Raportaf"
Frad Shochat
FRED K. SMOCHET
Editor and Publlanac
JOAN TEGLAS
Advartlalng Diractot
SUZANNE SHOCHET
Exacutlva Editor
Main Otflca Plant: 120 N.E. 8th St., Miami. FL 33132. Phona: 1-37S4S06
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Friday, October 20,1989
Volume 15
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Number 29
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Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, October 20, 1989
Jewish Arts Foundation Names
Chairman Of The Board
The Jewish Arts Foundation
of Palm Beach County has
elected West Palm Beach
Attorney Lewis Kapner as the
new Chairman of the Board.
Lewis Kapner was instru-
mental in establishing the non-
profit organization, which was
founded in 1987 to foster cul-
ture and art reflecting the
Jewish heritage.
"Our organization is specifi-
cally concerned with programs
and events related to Jewish
people," Kapner said. "It is a
privilege for me to participate
in the enhancement of the
Jewish culture for presenta-
tion to the general public."
Kapner's duties as Chairman
of the Board will include
overseeing the operations of
the foundation with Irving
Rubinstein, JAF's new presi-
dent, and acting as the host for
fund raisers and special cul-
tural events. First on Kapner's
agenda is the presentation of
"The Immigrant: A Hamilton
County Album".
The play, written by Mark
Harelik, is based on the true
story of a Russian Jew who
immigrated to Galveston,
Texas at the turn of the cen-
tury.
Lewis Kapner
"Many in the Jewish com-
munity will relate to this story
because they themselves or
someone they know has lived
through similar experiences,"
said Kapner.
"The Immigrant" will be
performed by the Theater of
the Palm Beaches on the
second stage of the Duncan
Theater at the Lake Worth
Campus of Palm Beach Junior
College. It opens Friday, Octo-
ber 27th and runs through the
19th of November.
A special benefit perform-
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Friday, October 20, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 5
Prof. Cohen Honored
Robert Koch Prize for funda-
mental medical research,
awarded annually by the
Robert Koch Foundation of
the Federal Republic of Ger-
many, will be presented to
Prof. Irun Cohen of the Weiz-
mann Institute of Science in
Rehovot, Israel.
In making the award, the
Koch Foundation noted that
Prof. Cohen's work "has
greatly advanced our kno-
w ledge of autoimmunity" and
that his research on T-cell vac-
cinations has "opened new
avenues in our understanding
of the natural and therapeutic
control of autoimmune dis-
eases."
Prof. Cohen joined the Weiz-
mann Institute in 1968 when
he immigrated to Israel from
the United States.
He earned an MD at North-
western University in Evan-
ston, IL, interned at Hadas-
sah-Hebrew University in Jer-
usalem, joined the staff of the
U.S. Health Service at the
National Communicable Dis-
ease Center in Georgia, and
did a residency in pediatrics at
Johns Hopkins Hospital. In
addition to his research at
Weizmann, Prof. Cohen
helped plan the medical school
at Ben-Gurion University in
Beersheba and served as its
associate dean from 1971 to
1973.
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Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, October 20, 1989
V
Religious Directory
CONSERVATIVE
BOYNTON BEACH JEWISH CENTER-BETH KODESH: 501
NE 26 Avenue, Boynton Beach 33435. Phone 586-9428. Rabbi
David Shapiro. Cantor Abraham Koster. Daily, 8:30 a.m. Sabbath
services, Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.
CONGREGATION ANSHEI SHOLOM: 5348 Grove Street,
West Palm Beach 33417. Phone 684-3212. Office hours 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. Rabbi Isaac Vander Walde. Cantor Mordecai Spektor. Daily
services 8:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Friday night 5 p.m. and 8:15 p.m.
Saturday 9 a.m. and 7:15 p.m.
GOLDEN LAKES TEMPLE: 1470 Golden Lakes Boulevard,
West Palm Beach 33411. Phone 689-9430. Rabbi Joseph Speiser.
Daily services 8 a.m. Sabbath services Friday 8 p.m. Saturday 9
a.m. For times of evening services please call the Temple office.
BETH TIKVAH, LAKE WORTH JEWISH CENTER: 4550 Jog
Road, Lake Worth. Phone 967-3600. Rabbi Richard K. Rocklin.
Cantor Abraham Mehler. Services Friday 8 p.m., Saturday and
holidays, 8:45 a.m. Daily minyan 8:15 a.m., Sundays through
Fridays.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID: 4657 Hood Road, Palm Beach Gardens
33418. Phone 694-2350. Rabbi Randall J. Konigsburg. Cantor
Earl J. Rackoff. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m., Saturday 9:30
a.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 2815 No. Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach
33407. Phone 833-0339. Cantor Norman Brody. Sabbath ser-
vices Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9:30 a.m. Daily Minyan 8:15
a.m., Sunday and legal holidays 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 315 No. "A" Street, LaKe worm
33460. Phone 585-5020. Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg. Cantor
Howard Dardashti. Services Monday and Thursday, 8:15 a.m.
Friday evening, 8:15 p.m., Saturday, 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 224 NW Avenue G, Belle Glade
33430. Phone 996-3886. Services: Second Wednesday of every
month, 7:30 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH ZION: 129 Sparrow Drive, Royal Palm Beach
FL 33411. Phone 798-8888. Sabbath services Friday 8 p.m '
Saturday 9 a.m. Rabbi Stefan J. Weinberg.
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB: 2177 So. Congress Ave., West Palm
Beach 33406. Phone 433-5957. Sabbath services Friday 8 p.m.,
Saturday and holidays 9 a.m., Monday through Friday 9 a.m.
Rabbi Morris Pickholz. Cantor Andrew E. Beck.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL: 190 North County Road, Palm Beach
33480. Phone 832-0804. Rabbi Leonid Feldman. Cantor David
Feuer. Sabbath services, Friday 7 p.m.; Saturday 9:30 a.m.
TEMPLE TORAH: Lions Club, 3615 West Boynton Beach
Boulevard, Boynton Beach 33437. Mailing address: 9851D Mili-
tary Trail, Box 360091, Boynton Beach 33436. Phone 736-7687.
Cantor Alex Chapin. Rabbi Theodore Feldman, part-time. Sab-
bath Services Friday evening 8 p.m.; Saturday 9 a.m.
TREASURE COAST JEWISH CENTER CONGREGATION
BETH ABRAHAM: 3998 SW Leighton Farms Road, Palm City
33490. Mailing address: P.O. Box 2996, Stuart 33495. Phone
287-8833. Services Friday evenings 8 p.m. and Saturday 10 a.m.
ORTHODOX
CHABAD HOUSE LUBAVITCH: 4623 Forest Hill Blvd
West Palm Beach, 108-3, 33415. Phone 641-6167. Rabbi Shlomo
Ezagui. Sabbath Services, Saturday, 10 a.m.
CONGREGATION AITZ CHAIM: 2518 N. Haverhill Road West
Palm Beach 33417. Phone 686-5055. Sabbath services 8:45 a.m.
and 7:30 p.m. Daily services 8:15 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. Rabbi Oscar
Werner.
REFORM
CONGREGATION BETH ISRAEL: 1390 SW Dorchester
Street, P.O. Box 857146, Port St. Lucie, FL 33452. Phone
335-7620. Friday night services 8 p.m., Saturday morning 10:30
a.m.
TEMPLE BETH AM: 759 Parkway Street, Jupiter. Phone
747-1109. Services Friday 8:00 p.m. Rabbi Rachel Hertzman.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 4600 Oleander Avenue, Fort Pierce FL
34982. Phone 461-7428. Sabbath Services Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM: St. Helen's Parish Hall, 20th
Avenue and Victory Boulevard, Vero Beach 32960. Mailing
address: P.O. Box 2113, Vero Beach, FL 32961-2113. Rabbi Jay
R. Davis. Phone 1-569-4700.
TEMPLE BETH TORAH: 900 Big Blue Trace, West Palm
Beach, FL 33414. Phone 793-2700. Friday services 8:15 p.m.
Saturday morning 10 a.m. Rabbi Steven R. Westman. Cantor
Elliot Rosenbaum.
TEMPLE ISRAEL: 1901 No. Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach
33407. Phone 833-8421. Rabbi Howard Shapiro. Cantor Stuart
Pittle. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE JUDEA: 100 Chillingworth Drive, West Palm Beach,
FL 33409. Rabbi Joel L. Levine. Cantor Rita Shore. Phone
471-1526
Y. U. May Have Found
Lost Commentary
NEW YORK (JTA) Jew-
ish scholars from Yeshiva Uni-
versity, studying 15th century
Jewish documents in Girona,
Spain, believe they have found
a lost commentary by the rab-
binic sage Nessim Gerondi.
The commentary was uncov-
ered as a result of a partner-
ship between the university's
Jacob Safra Institute and the
municipality of Girona. The
project enables the scholars to
translate Jewish documents
predating 1492, the year Jews
were expelled from Spain dur-
ing the Inquisition.
"Back then, they used to
make cardboard by gluing
together paper or pages from a ments uncovered include a
book," explained Dr. M. Mit- dowry, and a list of congreg-
chell Serels, associate director ants who owed money to the
of the Safra Institute and uni-
versity director of Sephardic
programs.
"When (archivist) Ramon
Alberch tweezed apart the
cover of one book, he found
over 200 Hebrew documents.
One of the pages turned out to
be what we believe to be part
of Nessim Gerondi's commen-
tary," Serels said.
That commentary concerns
the Talmudic laws on the Suk-
kot holiday, and was referred
to in later writings by Gerondi
but never found. Other docu-
local synagogue.
JFCS Opens Satellite Office
The Jewish Family and
Children's Service of Palm
Beach County expects to open
this month a satellite office in
Boynton Beach Trail Center,
located at Military Trail and
Boynton Beach Boulevard in
Boynton Beach.
Headquartered in West
Palm Beach, the Jewish Fam-
ily and Children's Service of
Palm Beach is a non-profit
organization which offers a
wide range of professional ser-
vices to families and individu-
als with social or emotional
problems. Programs are pro-
vided to anyone living within
Palm Beach County with fees
based upon ability to pay.
The organization offers com-
prehensive services for the
elderly, emergency financial
assistance to families in dire
straits, career guidance for
clients and operates an infor-
mation and referral service to
assist in the solution of a broad
spectrum of family and individ-
ual problems.
Candlelighting
Oct. 20
Oct. 27
Nov. 3
Nov. 10
6:31p.m.
6:25 p.m.
5:20 p.m.
5:16 p.m.
Benediction upon Kindling
the Sabbath Lights
BORUCH ATTO AD-ONAI
ELO-HEINU MELECH HO-
OLOM ASHER KID-
SHONU BEMITZ-VOSOV
VETZI-VONU LE-HAD-
LIK NEYR SHEL
SHABBOS.
Dr. Barbara G. Melamed, pro-
fessor of clinical and health
psychology and director of the
Behavioral Medicine Labora-
tory and Fear Clinic at Uni-
versity of Florida at Gaines-
ville, has been appointed dean
of Yeshiva University's Fer-
kauf Graduate School of Psy-
chology in New York.
RCA Head Urges
Orthodox Unity
NEW YORK Rabbi Max
Schreier, president of the Rab-
binical Council of America,
urged all Orthodox Jewish
groups to "bury their differ-
ences" and unite in order to
respond to what he called an
"onslaught by the Reform
movement" facing Orthodox
Jewry.
Levitt-Weinstein wants to put
your name on this $100 check
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the best decisions. That's why Levitt-
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that allows you time to plan, the funeral
and burial, freezes the cost at today's
prices and relieves you or your family
of taking care of everything at a very
difficult time.
And as an incentive to
plan now, Levitt-Weinstein
will write your name on a $100
check and apply it to a new Guaranteed
Security Plan pre-arrangement program
for you. And if you currently hold a pre-
need plan other than GSP, we will be
pleased to evaluate whether it best serves
your needs. Our $100 offer is valid only
through October 31, 1989.
Boca/Deerfield West Palm Beach
(305) 42*6500 (407) 689-8700
Because the grief is enough to handle later.
Serving Dade, Bnxoerd and Pehn Beach Qnmtm.


Baker Proposes Plan
Friday, October 20, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 7
Continued from Page 1 -------
Washington, within two
weeks, to meet with Baker on
the matter.
In Washington, Israeli
Embassy spokeswoman Ruth
Yaron said that Israel is study-
ing the Baker proposal and has
not yet reached any formal
position.
The American plan appears
to be a response to calls from
the Likud bloc to help Israel
and Egypt reach agreement on
the scope of and participants
in preliminary negotiations in
Cairo, first proposed last
month by Egyptian President
Hosni Mubarak.
While the six Likud minis-
ters in the Inner Cabinet for-
mally voted against Mubarak's
invitation, Likud is apparently
unwilling to bear the onus of
obstructionism.
Prime Minister Yitzhak Sha-
mir, the Likud leader, report-
edly cabled Washington after
the vote to say that he did not
want the peace initiative to
die.
Shamir is due to meet at the
White House with President
Bush on Nov. 15 and appar-
ently wants to ensure that
there is still momentum in the
peace process at that time.
Labor, whose six ministers
supported the Egyptian invita-
tion, indicated it would not
break up the unity coalition
government, pending new
American efforts to keep the
initiative alive.
Following the vote, Baker
spoke by telephone to Israeli
Foreign Minister Moshe Arens
of Likud and his Egyptian
counterpart, Esmat Abdel
Meguid.
The State Department
would not reveal details of the
conversations. But it now
appears they were the first of
a series of intensive diplomatic
contacts over the weekend
that resulted in the five-point
Baker plan.
Baker said Sunday on NBC-
TV's "Meet the Press" pro-
gram that he had discussed
"some specific language" that
the two foreign ministers were
considering.
"This is not a separate or
competing proposal," he ins-
isted. "What we are trying to
do is to implement the basic
Shamir election proposal.
"We are working with lan-
guage to try to bridge the gap
between Israelis, on the one
side, and Palestinians on the
other. And we will continue to
work very hard to do that," he
said.
Commission
Appointments
The Palm Beach County
Commission appointed A.E.
(Bud) Osborne III to the Flor-
ida Atlantic Research and
Development Authority for a
four-year term and Richard L.
Schmidt to the Authority.
Osborne, president of the
First Commercial Bank in
Boca Raton, was one of the
Commission's charter appoint-
ments in 1985.
Schmidt is the founder of
Schmidt, Raines, Trieste,
Dickenson, Adams & Co., an
area accounting firm. An
active member of the commun-
ity and an alumnus of Florida
Atlantic University, he has
taught accounting at FAU.
But the secretary of state
rejected suggestions that the
United States play a more
active role in the peace pro-
cess. "We are very actively
involved. But we are not
involved by getting on an air-
plane and flying over to the
Middle East,1' he made clear.
Shamir, in an interview with
the Hebrew daily Ha'aretz,
credited the United States
with being "very interested in
promoting the peace initiative.
They really want to help," he
said.
But the prime minister
added, "That does not mean
that we have to accept every-
thing that they say or think
up."
The Baker plan seeks to
overcome one of the thorniest
issues blocking Likud's accep-
tance of the Egyptian proposal
for Israeli-Palestinian talks in
Cairo: the composition of the
Palestinian delegation.
Likud will not countenance
negotiating with a Palestinian
delegation that includes any-
one from outside the West
Bank and Gaza Strip whom it
considers would automatically
be an agent of the Palestine
Liberation Organization.
Shamir reiterated in
the Ha'aretz interview that
Israel would accept American
efforts to revive the peace
initiative only if they ensure
that the PLO has no role what-
soever in the proposed talks.
He said the Egyptian pro-
posal as it now stands "means
a delegation set up by the PLO
and that contravenes the
policy guidelines of our gov-
ernment."
While Shamir wants to avoid
being painted as the obstacle
to further progress in the
peace process, he also is facing
THE FIVE-POINT BAKER PLAN
(JTA)
Israel to meet in Cairo with a yet-to-be-named
Palestinian delegation.
Israel, Egypt and the United States to meet to discuss
the composition of the Palestinian delegation to the Cairo
talks.
That Cairo meeting to focus on Israel's May 14 election
proposal for Palestinians in the territories.
Israel to permit Palestinians at the Cairo meeting to
seek clarification about the election plan and to react to it.
A meeting in Washington within two weeks between
Baker, Arens and Egyptian Foreign Minister Esmat Abdel
Meguid.
trouble from extremist ele-
ments of his party who oppose
any approach to the Palestini-
ans.
Hard-line Ministers Ariel
Sharon and Yitzhak Moda'i are
urging Shamir and Arens to
reject the Baker proposal. To
further that end, they have
called a meeting of their sup-
porters in the Likud Central
Committee.
Moreover, the so-called
"Eretz Yisrael Lobby" of
Knesset members assembled
in Jerusalem on Tuesday to
demand that Shamir resolutely
reject the American effort.
The group is composed of
about 30 Knesset members
representing elements of
Likud, the National Religious
Party and the right-wing
Tehiya, Tsomet and Moledet
parties.
But Shamir dismissed the
lobby. Their activities are
"superfluous and damaging"
he told Ha'aretz.
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Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, October 20, 1989


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