The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County the voice of the Jewish community of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
West Palm Beach, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 11, no. 27 (Sept. 13, 1985)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Feb. 20, 1987 called no. 4 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Mar. 31, 1989 called no. 12 in masthead and no. 13 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44605643
lccn - sn 00229551
ocm44605643
System ID:
AA00014309:00125

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
THE VOICE OF
THE JEWISH
COMMUNITY OF
PALM BEACH
COUNTY
Jewish floridian
.^ W OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
Volume 15 Number 6
PALM BEACH, FLORIDA FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1989
FrlShocUtt
Price 40 Cents
Bush: No Upgrade
In PLO Negotiations
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) The Bush administration is resisting
pressure to upgrade talks with the Palestine Liberation Organi-
zation to the level of a meeting between Secretary of State
James Baker III and Yasir Arafat.
"You crawl before you walk," President Bush said in rejecting
the possibility of such a meeting for now. He spoke at a White
House news conference.
Bush supported the Reagan administration's decision in
December to begin talks with the PLO once it was satisfied that
Arafat had accepted longstanding U.S. conditions for such
contact. These conditions were recognition of Israel's right to
exist, acceptance of UN Security Council Resolutions 242 and
338, and a renunciation of terrorism.
Since then, the only authorized channel for talks with the PLO
has been Robert Pelletreau Jr., the U.S. ambassador to Tunisia.
"As long as they (PLO) stay hooked and stay committed to
those three principals, we will have quite appropriate meetings
with the PLO," Bush said. He said he had not given any thought
to when a meeting with Arafat would be appropriate.
The European Community, however, has found Arafat's
recent gestures appropriate for talking to the PLO leader. The
foreign ministers of France, Greece and Spain, representing the
community, met with Arafat in Madrid and began pressing for
an international conference on the Middle East.
Bush is expected to come under pressure from King Hussein of
Jordan and Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak to open talks
with Arafat when he sees the two Arab leaders in Tokyo, where
they will be attending Emperor Hirihito's funeral, scheduled for
Feb. 24.
Arafat has indicated he will not seek a visa to come to
Washington, where he has been invited to address a meeting of
the American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee in April,
unless he is assured of meetings with administration officials.
This takes the administration off the hook in deciding whether
or not to grant him a visa. Secretary of State George Shultz
came under intense international criticism after he refused to
issue Arafat a visa to address the UN General Assembly in New
York in December.
The UN meeting was then shifted to Geneva, where Arafat,
after several attempts, finally said the words accepted by
Washington.
Bush stressed that he wants to see what is accomplished in the
present low-level talks with the PLO before considering any
further steps.
"The point in talking to them is to try to facilitate peace in the
Middle East," he said. "And it seems to me that if there's some
logical step that requires high-level sign-off by participants over
there, then and then only would it be proper to elevate the
meetings to that level."
But, he stressed, "we're just starting."
PROTESTING NAZIS' PARDON. Demonstrators protest outside the Dutch Parliament in
The Hague after that governmental body voted to pardon Franz Fischer, 87 and Ferdinand
Aus der Fuenten, 79 who had been serving life sentences for Nazi war crimes. The two had
served US years in prison and were believed to have been the world's longest-held war
criminals. Following their release from prison, Fischer and Aus der Fuenten were
transported via Dutch ambulance to the Dutch-West German border. (AP/Wide World Photo)
t
i
t
De Facto Implementation Of
4 Who Is A Jew' Ruling
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Orthodox-controlled Interior
Ministry is effectively denying
immigrant status to Reform
and Conservative converts to
Judaism, though it insists it
has not instituted a new policy.
The potentially explosive
action came to light in a state-
ment by Interior Minister
Arye Deri of the ultra-Ortho-
dox Shas party, read to the
High Court of Justice. The
Inside
'This Call's For You'
Super Sunday
1989.......................Pare 3
Lion of Judahs photo
Spread................Page 8-9
Golden Jubilee photo
spread.............Page 12-13
Anti-semitism reaches
five-year pact.....Pace is
Yiddish theater goes
public...................Page 18
Task Force On Jewish
Education Begins Study
By LORI SCHULMAN
Like most every aspect of
this flourishing Jewish com-
munity, Jewish education in
Palm Beach County has been
challenged to grow and expand
to accommodate the needs of
the diverse populations it
serves.
As a central and pivotal
force in building and maintain-
ing a strong Jewish commun-
ity, Jewish education as one of
the primary challenges of con-
temporary Jewish life has
required that communal lead-
ers face pressing issues with a
more systematic and coordin-
ated approach.
To this end, the Jewish Fed-
eration of Palm Beach County
established a Task Force on
JewiSTi Education in 1987,
comprised of leaders from syn-
agogues, temples, local educa-
tional institutions, social ser-
vice agencies and Federation,
to help shape an effective plan
for Jewish education that will
carefully guide this community
into the 21st century.
Since its inception, the task
Continued on Page 6
statement was addressed to
Attorney General Yosef Har-
ish.
He said the ministry's aver-
sion to registering non-
Orthodox converts as Jews
would henceforth be extended
to the issuance of immigrant
visas to such converts.
Some observers see that as
tantamount to implementing
the "Who Is a Jew?" amend-
ment to the Law of Return,
long demanded by the ultra-
Orthodox, but consistently
rejected by the Knesset.
But Benny Ya'ari, the Inter-
ior Ministry's deputy legal
adviser, denied that Deri's
statement represented a new
policy.
He said it meant only that
ministry officials are now
referring converts to rabbini-
cal courts as a matter of
"friendly advice."
"Our officials are not know-
ledgeable about Jewish com-
munities around the world, so
as a matter of friendly advice
we refer converts to those who
know about Jewish communi-
ties around the world the
local rabbinical courts," Ya'ari
said.
He admitted it is virtually
unthinkable that a rabbinical
court would validate a non-
Orthodox conversion certifi-
cate.
He denied that Deri started
Continued on Page 17
:

i

1.


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, February 10, 1989
Wilensky To Chair Women's Division Open Board Meeting
Women's Division President
Carol Greenbaum and
Women's Division Leadership
Development Vice-President
Marcy Marcus have announced
that Ruth Wilensky will chair
the WD Open Board Meeting
on Wednesday, March 15, 9:30
a.m., at the Palm Beach Air-
port Hilton. Special guest
speaker will be Rabbi Leonid
Feldman, a former Refusenik
and Spiritual Leader of Tem-
ple Emanu-El in Palm Beach.
"The whole community is
invited to see our Board at
work," said Mrs. Marcus.
"This meeting will provide
many people with a great
chance to learn about the Fed-
eration and why we need to
on board the
VIKINGPRINCESS
(chartered exclusively far Hunter's Run
on behalf of the
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County/
United Jewish Appeal Campaign
Wednesday, March 8, 1989
1989 minimum commitment: $550
Couvert: $80 per person
For information call Debbie Hammer,
Boynton Beach Federation Office, 737-0746.
SAVE
THE DATE
for
Something
Spectacular

I




ft
a
-
SUNDAY,
MARCH 12, 1989
The Breakers
Palm Beach
In Support of the
JEWISH FEDERATION OF PALM
UNITED JEWISH APPEAL
BEACH COUNTY/
CAMPAIGN
o
give our support."
Those who attend will also
have the unique opportunity to
hear Rabbi Feldman discuss
his life in the Soviet Union,
added Mrs. Wilensky. "He's
an inspiring speaker and an
important new figure in the
American Jewish Commun-
ity."
Ruth Wilensky is currently a
member of the Women's Divi-
sion Board of Directors and
Campaign Cabinet.
She has also been involved
with fundraising at the Lands
of the President for the past 16
years and is Co-Chair of the
campaign. A life member of
Hadassah, Mrs. Wilensky has
traveled to Israel where she
had the opportunity to see
first-hand the needs of that
country.
For more information, con-
tact Faye Nelson, Director,
Women's Division, Jewish
Federation, 832-2120.
Ruth Wilensky
Twenty-One Communities To Participate
In Boynton Beach Happening
The biggest and most ex-
citing "Boynton Beach Hap-
pening" which will include
residents of 21 Boynton Beach
area communities, will take
place Thursday, March 2, 12
p.m., at the Hunters Run Club-
house. The luncheon is given
on behalf of the 1989 Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County/United Jewish Appeal
Campaign. Featured guest
speaker will be Barry Rudel,
Intermediate Campaign Con-
sultant for UJA.
Jerry Gross, Chairman of
the Boynton Beach Council,
noted this year there will be Jerry Gross
more people attending the
annual event than ever before.
He also indicated that in addi-
tion to providing an excellent
opportunity to socialize with
friends and neighbors, the
Happening brings people
together who are concerned
with helping Jews locally and
around the world.
Since moving to Palm Beach
County eight years ago, Jerry
Gross has helped to create the
Boynton Beach Council and
has served as the Chairman for
the past two years. He is also
affiliated with the Lake Worth
Jewish Center and is a mem-
ber of B'nai B'rith and the
Jewish War Veterans.
Members of the Boynton
Beach Committee are Jessica
Bernstein, Andy Cohen, Sylvia
Cohen, Benjamin Ettinger,
Sarita Ettinger, Judge Louis
L. Flaum, Mildred Kellner,
Paul Kellner, Lillian Lenovits,
Nick Lenovits, Ida Linsen-
berg, Al Moskowitz, Donald
Novey, Jay Ossen, Morris
Scheiner, Edie Tevelin, Henry
Tevelin, Herbert Weiss, Mir-
iam Weiss, Alice Wise and
George Wise.
For more information, con-
tact Fran Witt, Assistant Dir-
ector, Boynton Beach Federa-
tion Office, 737-0746.
Berg & Mandeau To Chair B&P Program
Are you in the dark about
breast cancer?
The Women's Division Busi-
ness & Professional group has
gathered a panel of six leading
specialists who will discuss the
methods they use to diagnose
and treat breast cancer during
a program meeting called
"Lifeline To Health," Wednes-
day, March 1, 7 p.m. 9:30
p.m. at the Palm Hotel in West
Palm Beach.
Lyn Mandeau
been a member of the Manage-
ment Board of the Jewish
Community Day School for
two years. Ms. Berg, the
owner of an interior design
business, was Co-Chair of the
JCDS Dinner Dance last year
as well as Chair of the
Women's B&P $365 Minimum
Gift Category this year.
Most recently from Dallas,
Texas, Lynn Mandeau moved
to Palm Beach County one and
a half years ago. She is an Art
Director for an advertising
firm in North Palm Beach and
has recently become more
involved with the Jewish Fed-
eration here. Ms. Mandeau is a
graduate of the School of Vis-
ual Arts in New York City.
"I believe that the more
information we can give to
women about breast cancer
the better," Ms. Mandeau said
about the upcoming program.
"The panelists are well-re-
spected leaders in their field
whose knowledge will hope-
fully put the women at ease
about this disease."
For more information, con-
tact Faye Nelson, Women's
Division Director, Jewish Fed-
eration, 832-2120.
Marjorie Berg
"This is a subject that every
woman should be concerned
about today," said Marjorie
Berg, Program Meeting Co-
Chair. "For that reason, we
thought it would be a pertinent
and interesting topic for the
B&P Women." Ms. Berg and
Lynn Mandeau have berth been
appointed Co-Chairs for this
event by Betsy M. Cohen, B&P
Program Chair.
Marjorie Berg has been
involved with the Jewish Fed-
eration of Palm Beach County
since she moved here nine
years ago. She is a past mem-
ber of the Executive Commit-
tee and Board of Directors of
the Women's Division and has
Making Jewish History Exciting
Dr. Hyman Chanover
An eight-week mini-course
on How To Make Jewish His-
tory Exciting will begin Mon-
day February 13, 7-8:30 p.m.
at the Jewish Community Day
School in West Palm Beach.
Dr. Hyman Chanover, cur-
rently the Executive Vice-
President Emeritus of the Bal-
timore Board of Jewish Educa-
tion, will be the guest instruc-
tor. Throughout the series he
will discuss new techniques in
teaching experiential Jewish
history including 24 methods
that can turn any history
teacher into a success.
This is the second in a series
of teacher-training seminars
designed to stimulate creative
planning and classroom activ-
ity. The first in the series
included 17 teachers from
eight schools in the area.
Continued on Page 21


Friday, February 10, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 3
Pacesetters' Petite Luncheon Siskin Memorial Institute For
Former Refusenik Zieman
To Tell Story Of Survival
Tanya Zieman knew hunger,
cold, darkness and illness as a
little Soviet girl whose family
had fallen victim to the trage-
dies of WWII. When her fam-
ily was exiled to a region in the
Volga during Stalin's anti-
Semitic campaign, she learned
even more about never giving
up no matter what the hard-
ships. The difficulties she
faced then prepared her for
the life she would later lead as
a refusenik waiting for an exit
visa from the Soviet Union.
Today, Tanya Zieman's Rus-
sian past is just a memory.
Ms. Zieman will tell her per-
sonal story of survival on Wed-
nesday, Feb. 22, at 11 a.m. at a
Petite Luncheon for the
Women's Division's annual
$1200 to $4999 minimum gift
Pacesetters Event. The event
will be held at the Palm Beach
home of Mrs. Robert Eigen on
behalf of the 1989 Jewish Fed-
eration/United Jewish Appeal
Campaign.
Despite the obstacles Ms.
Zieman continually faced dur-
ing her childhood, she still
managed to finish her school-
ing with the best possible
results a rare achievement
especially for a Jewish girl.
The price she paid was her
health, but she was deter-
mined to attend the university.
As a result of sacrifice and
hard work, Ms. Zieman gra-
duated from the Moscow Peda-
gogical Institute in 1963 with a
"Red Diploma," again the
achivement for the highest
marks possible. She immedi-
ately began working as an
assistant professor of Lexico-
logy and Sylistics until 1977.
When she was forced toi quit
her position following her
application to leave the USSR,
she had achieved full profes-
sorship and completed a Mas-
ter's Degree in Linguistics.
During her years in refusal,
more than a decade, Ms. Zie-
man used her valuable lan-
guage skills working for the
refusenik community. Most of
Community Leadership
Begins 1989 Season
Tanya Zieman
her time, however, was
devoted to the art of survival,
keeping her family well and
helping friends in need.
She and her family were
finally granted exit visas last
August and arrived in Boston,
Mass. to begin their new lives.
This year's Pacesetters'
Event is being chaired by Shir-
lee Blonder, Sandra Goldberg,
Sandra Rosen and Adele
Simon.
For more information, con-
tact Faye Nelson, Women's
Division Director, Jewish Fed-
eration, 832-2120.
Super Sunday 1989
'This Call's For You' On April 2nd
That's the day when hun-
dreds of volunteers will make
the connection to thousands of
Jewish households in Palm
Beach County, asking them to
embrace the lives of Jews
locally, in Israel and around
the world. Throughout the day
volunteers will work in shifts
making phone calls from the
Palm Beach Airport Hilton to
reach more people and raise
more money in a single day
than ever before on behalf of
the 1989 Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County/United
Jewish Appeal Campaign.
This tremendous effort will
be headed by Morris and Alice
Zipkin and Steve Ellison. In
making the announcement,
aeronautical research scientist
to a series of technical man-
agement positions with such
companies as Goodyear Air-
craft Corp. and Pratt & Whit-
ney Aircraft. He left Pratt &
Whitney in 1984 to become a
Jet Engine Consultant.
Mr. Zipkin and his wife Alice
have been involved with the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County and Cincinnati,
Ohio for many years. Cur-
rently, Zipkin is a Member of
State of Israel Bonds in Cin-
cinnati, Ohio and received the
Israel Bonds "Woman of
Valor" award.
Steve Ellison has been on
the Executive Board and Cam-
paign Cabinet of the Young
Adult Division since its incep-
tion. Last year, he served as
Continued on Page 7
*
W-

A
Steve Ellison
By LORI SCHULMAN
The Meyer B. Siskin Memo-
rial Institute for Community
Leadership began its 1989 edu-
cation series for community
members, leaders and Jewish
Federation staff on Sunday
and Monday, Feb 5th and 6th,
announced Jeanne Levy, Pro-
gram Sub-Committee Chair.
"Jewish Power, Jewish Eth-
ics" and "Turning Points in
Jewish History" are the topics
of the two educational pro-
grams that have been sched-
uled this year through the
National Jewish Center for
Learning and Leadership
(CLAL). Under the direction
of the Human Resource Devel-
opment (HRD) Department of
the Jewish Federation, each
series will cover a total of five
sessions, offered simultane-
ously to different target
groups in the community,
which were created according
to the specific interests of each
group.
"Last year's CLAL program
was marvelous," said Jeffrey
Paine, Co-chair of HRD's Pro-
gram Sub-Committee. "Jewish
content is so important in Fed-
eration programming, no mat-
ter what level you're talking
about. Through educational
programming like CLAL we
can help our leaders make
good Jewish decisions, not just
decisions."
CLAL educates Jewish lead-
ers, teaching them the lessons
of leadership through the trea-
sures of Jewish history and
texts. These programs
strengthen Jewish unity,
create a deeper appreciation
for Jewish culture and reli-
gion, yield insights from our
tradition, and offer authentic
Jewish responses which can be
applied to private behavior and
communal policies.
Jim Kay, Program Sub-
Committee member, explained
that the CLAL programs he
attended last year focused his
Federation attention on Jew-
ish education instead of just
fundraising, solicitation and
allocations. "The programs
were mind-broadening. They
gave me the opportunity to
consider the relationship of my
Jewish heritage and Jewish
values to my community
involvement."
"When I attended 'The Eth-
ics of Jewish Power' last
year," said Jeanne Levy, Pro-
gram Sub-Committee Chair,
"my Jewish consciousness was
definitely reinforced." She
added that the final goal of
HRD is to get more people
involved in Jewish communal
life: whether it's the Day
School, other Federation agen-
cies, synagogues or Hadassah.
"Through the CLAL pro-
grams we will hopefully be
able to raise the consciousness
of Jews individually and create
a strong, cohesive and know-
ledgeable Jewish community."
Israel: The Zionist Vision
and Covenant: The Jewish
Dream Of A Perfect World
were the topics of the first
CLAL sessions that met last
week. The next sessions will
take place on Feb. 19-20 and
are entitled: The Dire Threat
Of Assimilation, a look at the
effect the Greek Hellenists had
on the Jewish culture of that
time, and This Land Is My
Land, a discussion of what a
Jewish leader should know as a
background to the Intifada.
The speaker for both sessions,
David M. Elcott, is the Pro-
gram Director of CLAL. He
received his M.A. and Ph.D.
from Columbia University and
specializes in the fields of Pol-
itical Psychology and Middle
East studies.
HRD works to broaden the
base of leadership within our
community by providing a
variety of programs and ex-
periences that will help culti-
vate, educate, place and retain
knowledgeable individuals for
leadership positions. These
programs will cover a wide
range of topics dealing with
Jewish knowledge, commit-
ment and leadership skills
development.
The education series, made
possible through a grant from
the Meyer B. Siskin Memorial
Fund, is part of HRD's Pro-
gram and Board Development
Sub-Committee, responsible
for establishing a variety of
Continued on Page 7
Morris Zipkin
Irving Mazer, General Cam-
paign Chairman of the 1989
Federation/UJA Campaign
noted that all three have been
involved with the Jewish Fed-
eration for several years.
"They have the experience and
ability to do a great job and I
am confident that under their
leadership this year's Super
Sunday will be an enourmous
success," stated Mr. Mazer.
Morris Zipkin has had an
impressive technical career in
which he advanced from an
Alice Zipkin
the Board of the Palm Beach
County Jewish Federation. He
is also Vice President of the
local chapter of the American
Society for Technion and a
strong supporter of Israel,
having visited that country
more than 40 times.
Alice Zipkin, a member of
the Women's Division Execu-
tive Board and Campaign Cab-
inet, was presented last sum-
mer with the coveted Judy
Waltzer Award for her out-
standing efforts. She has co-
chaired the WD Leadership
Development Program,
worked on WD Assembly pro-
grams and co-chaired the
Pacesetters Division for three
consecutive years. In addition,
she was a past Chair of the
Women's Division for The
WHY IS IT IMPORTANT FOR YOU TO VISIT ISRAEL NOW?
"Everyone we know who is going on the Palm Beach County Visit Israel
Now Trip is very excited about it. It's such a wonderful opportunity for
all of us to shoiv our solidarity with Israel, both individually and as a
large community. We, in particular, are looking forward to visiting old
friends and seeing all the changes that have taken
place there since our last visit, in 1976. The
opportunity for trip participants to create a
cohesive unit, both before and after the trip, will
contribute greatly to the expe-
rience and hopefully build a
stronger Jewish community
both here, in Palm Beach
County, and in Israel. Why
don't you join us?"
Robert and Cynnie List
Visit Israel Now Trip Participants
I


Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, February 10, 1989
mm
Anti-Semitism on the Rise
There is no glory in being first or near the
top in the recently published survey relating to
incidents of anti-Semitism in the United
States.
After a four-year decrease in the number of
anti-Semitic acts and harassments, the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai B'rith reported a
fifth-year high.
And Florida, together with New York and
California, led in such incidents.
m
The hostility measured over a 10-year period
offers no surcease of concern that, surely,
anti-Jewish bias and acting out on the
hatefilled belief system is very much a part
of the American scene.
Still.
That perpetrators of such acts pegged their
vandalism and attacks on the rationale of the
ongoing Arab uprising the intifada and the
50th anniversary of the Kristallnacht the
Night of Broken Glass in Germany and
Austria, serves no palliative purpose.
Excuses never are needed when bigotry
seeks its outlet.
These demonstrations, even when recorded
as grafitti and simple vandalism, should never
be dismissed. Too often, they are precursor to
arson and bombings and assaults.
As was the case in 1988.
With an increase of more than 18 percent in
vandalism and a 41 percent increase in per-
sonal threats and attacks, neither the ADL,
which monitors these trends, nor any Ameri-
can of good will should rest.
With anti-Semitism on the rise, every citizen
is threatened.
Political Debauchery
There is democratic sordidness at work
when the political process is bastardized by the
primary win of a former Grand Wizard of the
Knights of the Ku Klux Klan.
Is it possible that the good people of a
Louisiana congressional district dismissed the
possibility that even one vote counts? And,
that they did so collectively?
When David Duke won a spot in a runoff
after a special election last week, the agenda
of the National Association for the Advance-
ment of White People which he heads was
on the ballot.
It got a frightening 33 percent of the total
vote.
Jewish floridian
of Palm Beach County
USPS 060030 ISSN 8750-5061
Combining "Our Voice" and "Federation Reporter"
>JTA<>
Maligning the Establishment
By RABBI
MARC TANENBAUM
The recent conference of lib-
eral-to-left intellectuals organ-
ized by Tikkun magazine was
impressive in terms of the
numbers of participants who
attended, as well as the re-
ported quality of the discus-
sion.
From everything I could
read in the press, it was less
than impressive by virtue of its
knee-jerk bashing of "the Jew-
ish establishment" and Israel.
I have been involved as a
professional in several "Jew-
ish establishments" for some
37 years. During most of these
decades, I do not recall seeing
any of the Tikkun core leader-
ship manning the barricades to
save Jewish lives or solidify
Israel's security.
No human institution or per-
sonality, including the so-
called "Jewish establishment"
and Tikkun itself, are beyond
criticism.
But for the critique to be
taken seriously, it needs to be
truthful, balanced and fair.
That honesty requires ac-
knowledgment of certain basic
truths: It was the major Jew-
ish agencies that mobilized
American and world opinion
and political support that
resulted in the liberation of
several hundred thousand
Soviet Jews.
The same case can be made
for Ethiopian Jewry, our co-
religionists from Arab coun-
FRED K SHOCHET
Editor and Publisher
SUZANNE SHOCHET
Executive Editor
LORI SCHULMAN
Assistant News Coordinator
Published Weakly October through Mid May Bl-Weekly balance of year (42 issues)
Second Claaa Postage Paid at Weal Palm Beach
Additional Mailing Offices
PALM BEACH OFFICE
501 S. Flagler Or, West Palm Beach. FL 33401. Phone 832-2120
Main Office & Plant: 120 N.E. 6th St.. Miami, FL 33101. Phone: 1-373-4605
POSTMASTER: S*nd address changes to The Jewish Floridian,
P.O. Box 012973, Miami, Fla. 33101
Ad.ertlslng Director: Steel Lesser. Phone See 1SS2
Combined Jewish Appeal Jewish Federation of Pelm Beach County inc
Officers: President, Alec Engelalein, Vice Presidents. Barry S. Berg. Arnold L. Lampen, Gilbert S
Messing, Marvin S Rosen, Mortimer Weiss; Treasurer, Helen G Hoffmen, Assistent Treasurer, Mark
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Number 6
Friday, February 10,1989
Volume 15
The New President's
Commitment
In a piece entitled "George Bush: Promises
to Keep," The Washington Post compiled a list
of fully 161 campaign promises that Vice
President Bush made as he lobbied America
for his boss' job.
The areas covered range widely from educa-
tion and economic issues to crime and drug
abuse to energy, the environment and ethics.
There are sections dealing with health and
space and summits.
From our perspective, some of the most
trenchant commitments are in the areas of
civil rights and foreign policy.
Given the increase of hate crimes in this
country, given the desire by many to restrict
the rights of a few, there can be no more
important national direction to this new
administration than to truly make this land
the Constitutionally secure one it ought to be.
On the international landscape, President
Bush will be shadowed by his firm resolve not
to otter (sanction to the formation of a Pales-
tinian state. Given that he does, indeed
encourage Palestinian participation in a poten-
tial Mideast resolution, Bush must have Solo-
monic wisdom to determine the fine lines.
In recent days the administration's honey-
moon period has been reflected through a new
Uash.ngton mirror of ethics. Thai President
Bush is demanding only the best from his
appointees should put even greater Stress on
his own fulfiUmentV a^JSSZSZ
tries and defense of Jews in
South and Central America.
The Tikkun leadership, to
my knowledge, also has had
little to do with the historic
improvement in Jewish-
Christian relations in many
parts of the world.
The remarkable political and
economic support of Israel by
the United States is largely
attributable to the decades-
long mobilization by "the Jew-
ish establishment" of Ameri-
can public opinion.
With all the real problems
world Jewry faces, I shudder
to think of what might happen
if the maligned "Jewish estab-
lishment" did not exist, and all
we had to depend on were
Tikkun'8 polemics.
Quotas
Dismissed
NEW YORK (JTA) The
U.S. Supreme Court's rejec-
tion of the minority set-aside
plan in Richmond, Va., viewed
by civil rights activists as a
sharp blow to affirmative
action programs, has the full
support of the Anti-Defama-
tion League of B'nai B'rith.
The ADL disclosed that it
had filed a friend-of-the-court
brief last June in the case of
City of Richmond vs. J.A.
Croson Co.
The ADL brief opposed the
city's set-aside program,
which required construction
companies awarded city con-
tracts to subcontract at least
30 percent of the contracts
dollar value to minority busi-
ness enterprises.
The high court ruled 6-3
against the set asides. Justice
Sandra Day O'Connor wrote
the majority opinion. The
minority opinion was written
by Justice Thurgood Marshall.
Abraham Foxman, national
director of the ADL, praised
the decision. By invalidating
the Richmond ordinance, he
said, the court "has reaffirmed
that the ultimate goal of affir-
mative action should be to
ensure equality of opportunity.
regardless of someone's race.
He said O'Connor correctly
pointed out that classifications
based on race carry a danger
of "stigmatic harm."


Historian Wins Dutch Prize
AMSTERDAM (JTA) Jewish historian Louis de Jong
won the Netherlands Publishers Association's "Golden
Quill" Award this month, on completion of his monumental
13-volume "History of the Kingdom of The Netherlands
Between 1940 and 1945."
The work, representing 33 years of labor, covers the Nazi
occupation of Holland and the Japanese occupation of
Dutch colonies in the East Indies.
De Jong had earlier turned down a prestigious royal
prize, saying he didn't want to be honored as a result of the
suffering of so many Dutchmen. But he has accepted the
"Golden Quill."
Aliyah Up Slightly For 1988
JERUSALEM (JTA) Immigration to Israel from the
Soviet Union was up slightly in 1988, but from the United
States it was down, according to figures published by the
Central Bureau of Statistics.
The total number of arrivals last year was 13,304,
compared to 12,985 in 1987. The figure included both
immigrants (58 percent) and potential immigrants (42
percent).
Soviet Jewish immigration in 1988 totaled 2,283, com-
pared to 2,0% in 1987. The increase is tiny, considering the
fact that total Soviet Jewish emigration jumped from 8,155
in 1987 to nearly 19,000 last year.
American Jewish olim numbered 1,551 last year, down
from 1,818 in 1987.
Soviet Soccer Team Beats Israel
TEL AVIV (JTA) In what was the first Soviet-Israeli
soccer game played in Israel in 33 years, the Soviet Union's
Dynamo Kiev soccer team trounced Israel 4-0 in Ramat
Gan Stadium.
The last previous game, on the same site in 1956, also
ended with a Kiev victory.
The Kiev team, which was given a warm welcome when
they arrrived at Ben-Gurion Airport Monday night, is the
pride of the Soviet Union. It won a gold medal in the 1988
Olympics last summer in Seoul, South Korea. It also was
runner-up in last summer's European Cup tournament.
Israelis can take some comfort in the fact that the
Maccabi Tel Aviv Basketball team defeated the champion-
ship CSKA Red Army team in a match played in Moscow
Jan. 12.
Court Rejects Hamadi Appeal
BONN (JTA) The high court in Karlsruhe rejected the
appeal of convicted Palestinian terrorist Abbas Hamadei.
Hamadei was sentenced by a Dusseldorf court last year
to 13 years' imprisonment for complicity in the kidnapping
of two West German businessmen in Beirut and illegal
possession of explosives.
The businessmen, subsequently freed, were taken hos-
tage to try to secure the release of the defendant's brother,
Mohammed Ali Hamadei, who is standing trial in Frank-
furt.
Mohammed Hamadei is charged with hijacking a TWA
airliner over the Mediterranean in June 1985 and for the
murder of one of its passengers, U.S. Navy diver Robert
Stethem.
The Bonn authorities refused to extradite him to the
United States.
Court Rejects Redgrave Appeal
WASHINGTON (JTA) The U.S. Supreme Court has
turned back an appeal by British actress Vanesa Redgrave,
refusing to hear her suit against the Boston Symphony
Orchestra.
Regrave, who is a strong supporter of the Palestine
Liberation Organization, sued the orchestra after it can-
celed her contract in 1982 to narrate Igor Stravinsky's
"Oedipus Rex" in Boston and New York.
The orchestra canceled her appearances after it received
threats that the performances would be disrupted by
opponents of her support of the PLO.
A federal appeals court in Boston ruled in August that
Redgrave could collect $27,000 for her contract plus
$12,000 in damages. But the court rejected her argument
that she was entitled to higher damages under a Massachu-
setts civil rights law.
IDF Chief Leans Left...
... And Angers Right
Friday, February 10, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 5
Shomron's deputy, Maj.
Ehud Barak, delivered a simi-
lar message in a question-and
answer session with the For-
eign Press Association.
Barak said plastic bullets
were being used as a last
resort and actually helped
reduce casualties.
When correspondents
pressed him to explain the kill-
ing of 47 Palestinians in the
past six months by supposedly
non-lethal plastic bullets,
Barak insisted that "overall
during this period we have
reduced the number of deaths
by one-third."
Quoting IDF figures, the
deputy chief of staff said 352
Palestinians have been killed
since the uprising started,
"289 from IDF fire and the
rest from other causes, includ-
ing 30 killed by other Palestin-
ians."
He said that 4,300 Palestin-
ians have been wounded and
5,600 confirmed to detention
camps, 1,100 of whom were
under administrative arrest.
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
chief of staff of the Israel
Defense Force, Lt. Gen. Dan
Shomron, believes that the
Palestinians have given up on
the idea of destroying Israel.
That is the price they paid
for the limited political success
of the uprising in the West
Bank and Gaza Strip, Shomron
said in an interview on Israel
Television.
In return for some recog-
nition of their cause, the Pales-
tinians "have, in effect, given
up the Palestinian Charter,"
which calls for the destruction
of Israel, he said.
Shomron outraged right-
wing politicians by telling
Knesset Foreign Affairs and
Defense Committee recently
that the uprising requires a
political solution because it
cannot be ended by military
means.
In his interview, he main-
tained that the political aspira-
tions of the Palestinians did
not begin and would not end
with the uprising, which they
call the intifada.
Much of Shomron's inter-
view was devoted to a vigorous
defense of the IDF's methods
used to quell the uprising, par-
ticularly the much criticized
use of plastic bullets.
He maintained that the IDF
has actually reduced casualties
and that it will succeed "in a
matter of time" to restore
relative calm in the adminis-
tered territories.

AN ALTERNATIVE BEN FRANKLIN
WOULD LOVE
"Nothing is sure but death and taxes." Ben Franklin
Jews have always been resourceful. We've beaten tyrany, rescued the
hopeless, and overcome prejudice. So, it should come as no great surprise that
even in the face of life's two greatest certainties, death and taxes, we've tried to
create an alternative.
Your gift to The Endowment Fund ensures that your good works will continue.
Turn the inevitable passage of time inter an asset. At the same time, your gift
helps ease the immediate burden of taxation. You can leave a mark on history,
and be remembered for having improved your community and your world.
The Endowment Fund offers a variety of ways to make a charitable investment
in the strength of our community. We pick up where the annual Federation
Campaign leaves off, ensuring a reserve for an innovative program, a special
event, an emergency.
So, consider The Endowment Fund as an alternative to the inevitable, and join
our roster of donors who have provided for tomorrow while receiving tax benefits
today.
Your personal participation in The Endowment Fund can begin when you
complete and return the following Letter of Intent.
This letter creates no legal obligation for you or your heirs. It is however, a
statement of your intention to make an everlasting gift which will help assure
the future of the Jewish people.
For more information, Call Edward Baker or Morris Rombro,
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County, (407) 832-2120.
THE ENDOWMENT FUND
of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
Letter of Intent
I want to do my share to aid future generations and to assure the continuity of community services through the
Endowment Fund of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County, therefore,
D I have made provision D I will make provision soon
to include the Endowment Fund of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County through a
O Bequest In my will D Philanthropic Fund D Gift of real estate, securities or other property
D Life Insurance policy n Trust Fund
This letter of Intent Is not a legal obligation and may be changed at my discretion at any time.
(Please print clearly)
Name.
Address
Date___
Phone
(Signature)
? I would like a representative of the Endowment Committee of the Federation to meet with me or my attorney. .
The Endowment Fund of the Jewish Federaiton of Palm Beach County
501 South Flagler Drive Suite 305 West Palm Beach, Florida 33401
Telephone: (407) 832-2120
The Federation appreciate* your participation and will tend th signer photocopy of this latter of intent for hit or hat personal file.
I


Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, February 10, 1989
Task Force On Jewish Education Begins Study
Continued from Page 1
force, under the leadership of
Dr. Elizabeth Shulman, has
been working with profes-
sional consultants from the
Jewish Education Service of
North America (JESNA) on
the design of a community-
wide study that will be under-
way for most of the next three
months.
In preparation for this pro-
ject, the task force has worked
to identify specific areas of
concern relating to Jewish
education; define a wide range
of quantitative data that will
be used to develop an accurate
profile of the Jewish educa-
tional services in the commun-
ity; and select a range of ques-
tions that will be used to
gather information on each of
the specific areas being stud-
ied.
The task force's efforts have
resulted in a study with an
ultimate goal of helping com-
munal Jewish educators do
effective long-range planning
for Jewish education through a
consensus-building process
involving all groups in the
community. The study hopes
to inspire community action
and support for an educational
system that will be sensitive to
both individual and institu-
tional needs and to develop
creative recommendations and
solutions to achieve its goals.
The objectives of the study
are to review the current scope
of Jewish education programs
all segments of the community
for collaboration in planning
and implementation of Jewish
educational services.
The study will focus on spe-
cific areas that are now cov-
ered by task force subcommit-
tees: education personnel; chil-
dren and their families; teens
and college-age youth and
education in this community.
In March, Rabbi David
Shluker, a JESNA consultant,
will visit Palm Beach County
to conduct individual inter-
views and meetings with key
lay and professional leaders.
Through the information col-
lected during these sessions,
JESNA will ultimately be able
to assess this community's
needs, goals and options.
Based on the community's per-
ceptions, JESNA will provide
a report which the task force
will be able to use as the basis
for recommendations on
future plans and new direc-
tions within Jewish education.
Before JESNA visits in
March, however, the commun-
ity will be acquainted with the
study as different groups and
Elizabeth Shulman
and services; to analyze com-
munal needs in Jewish educa-
tion; to explore possible new
directions and alternatives;
and to build consensus among
Rabbi David Shluker
their families and inter-
institutional cooperative
efforts. Special attention will
be given to assessing the need
for a central agency of Jewish
You' ve
Never Been
This Close To Israel
VISIT ISRAEL NOW TOUR"
THE PALM BEACH-ISRAEL CONNECTION
MARCH 29 APRIL 10,1989
An unbelievable $1199.()() per/person (based on double occupancy).
Effective February 17. 1989 the cost will be $1599.00 per/person
An exceptional travel opportunity limited to the first Sou reservations, offering S-Star
hotel accommodations throughout the tour. ..plus these outstanding features:
Round trip West Palm Beach-Tel Aviv
West Palm beach ON EL AL
Daily breakfasts, gala banquets and
Shabbai dinners
Five lull days sightseeing in deluxe
coaches
Private meeting with top Israeli leaders
Visit io ;i military base
Cruise on the Sea of Galilee
()ptional tours available
All baggage transfers and entry Ices
ABSOLUTELY NO SOLICITATION OF FUNDS
Your trip of a lifetime is available onh through Jewish Federation ol Ralm Beat h Count)
Reservations \\ ill be taken on a first come Rrsi served basis. Please call the Federation
office todav!
Please send me more informa-
tion on the Visit Israel Now; Palm
Beach/Israel Connection Trip.
Name
Address
Phone

JEWISH FEDERATION OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
832-2120
SOI South Flagkr Drive. Mute W5, West Palm Beach, Florida J340I W8H
key leadership will be con-
tacted by task force members
They will be distributing qUes!
tionnaires and surveys and
conducting small private dis-
cussions to gather information
and data that will be used bv
JESNA for the final on-site
study.
Finally, task force members
are most excited about the
community aspect of this
study. They hope to convey the
strong cooperative effort
behind the project as they
work to develop a solid consen-
sus among all participating
institutions. With the focus
primarily on local synagogues
and educational agencies
inter-institutional cooperation
is the key to the success of the
study as well as to the success-
ful achievement of this com-
munity's educational goals.
Police Face Challenge
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
intifada has imposed severe
new burdens on Israel's hard-
pressed police force, which
must deal not only with the
Palestinian uprising, but with
a rising crime rate as well.
But, unlike the Israel
Defense Force, the police need
no new methods or rules of
engagement to cope with these
problems, Police Commis-
sioner David Kraus told a news
conference here.
The police will not resort to
plastic bullets or issue new
operational orders, as is the
case with the IDF in the
administered territories,
Kraus said.
The police are responsible
for law and order in Israel
proper, which includes East
Jerusalem, annexed in 1967.
The intifada has spilled over
there, requiring a massive pol-
ice presence to deal with dis-
turbances.
Since the uprising began
more than a year ago, there
has been a three-fold increase
in police work-days and five-
fold increase in work hours to
deal with roadblocks alone,
Kraus said.
But the force cannot be
enlarged, because there has
been a $5.5 million cut in the
police budget.
Nevertheless, the police
made more than 3,000 inti-
fada-related arrests in 1988.
The Meyer B. Siskin Memorial Fund was established in
1987 to fund Human Resource Development programs
for community leadership. These programs have been
provided through the National Jewish Center for Learn-
ing and Leadership (CLAL). Contributions to the Fund
can be made through the Endowment Program of the
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County. For further
information, contact Edward Baker, Endowment Direc-
tor, the Jewish Federation, 832-2120.
?
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REMINDER
RESIDENTS OF COVERED BRIDGE
D0NT FORGET
YOU ARE CORDIALLY INVITED TO A
BREAKFAST
ON BEHALF OF THE
1989 Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
United Jewish Appeal Campaign
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19TH, 9:30 A.M.
At Covered Bridge Clubhouse
Guest Speaker
DORA ROTH
Honoree:
RABBI RICHARD ROCKLIN. Spiritual Leader
Lake Worth Jewish Center
f or more mformation. Call Dr Lester Silverman. Director of Leisure
l urement Community Jewish Federation. 832-2120
"???????????????,#, ?????????????????????????????

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?

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Friday, February 10, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 7
Rabin Modifies
Election Preconditions
Rapoports To Be Honored
At Israel Bonds Brunch
The Eastpointe Israel Bonds
Committee will sponsor a
Brunch Sunday, Feb. 19, 9:30
a.m. at which Morris and
Esther Rapoport will be hon-
ored and presented with the
prestigious Lion of Judah
Award. The brunch will be in
the home of Dr. and Mrs.
Milton Greenberg.
Both Rapoports are actively
involved with the Morse Geria-
tric Center. Esther is on the
Women's Auxiliary Board, has
served as co-chairperson of
Eastpointe's Jewish Federa-
tion Dinner-Dance, and is a
member of Hadassah, True
Sisters, Menorah Park, and
Women's American ORT.
Morris serves on the Morse
Geriatric Center Board, and is
Vice President of the Men's
Associates. He is also involved
actively with the Jewish Fed-
eration Campaign in East-
pointe.
Howard Stone, Middle East
expert, will be the guest
speaker.
Bat Mitzvah
DANIELLE ZWICK
Danielle Beth Zwick, daugh-
ter of Susan and Jeffrey Zwick
of Wellington, will become a
Bat Mitzvah on Friday, Feb.
10, at Temple Beth Zion. She
will be twinned with one of her
less fortunate brethren, Anna
Turbovsky, of the USSR.
Danielle is a seventh grader
at Wellington Landings Mid-
dle School where she takes
flute lessons and is on the
SADD Committee. She is also
a vice president for her
Kadima group at Temple.
Helping to share in Danielle's
becoming a Bat Mitzvah are:
sister, Randi; grandparents,
Anne and Norman Workman,
Kew Garden Hills, New York;
greatgrandmother, Doris Kap-
lan, Forest Hills, New York;
grandparents, Florence and
Louis Zwick, Woodhaven,
New York and Delray Beach.
By CATHRINE GERSON
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Defense Minister Yitzhak
Rabin has modified a key con-
dition of his offer of local elec-
tions to the Palestinians in the
West Bank and Gaza Strip.
Speaking on Army Radio
and at a meeting of the Labor
Party Knesset faction, Rabin
said he was ready to work
toward elections in the terri-
tories even if the Arabs do not
agree immediately to halt anti-
Israeli hostilities.
But once both sides agree to
hold elections, the Palestinian
uprising would have to be sus-
pended to ensure peaceful bal-
loting, the defense minister
said.
Rabin had insisted earlier
that the intifada must be
halted for three to six months
No Jackson- Vanik Waiver
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
The Bush administration
would require a "strong con-
sensus" of support before it
would consider a waiver of
Jackson-Vanik Amendment
penalties against the Soviet
Union, the State Department
said.
"The waiver of the Jackson-
Vanik Amendment in the
Soviet case would require a
strong consensus among the
American public, Congress
and the executive branch,"
State Department spokesman
Charles Redman said.
He added that it would also
Super Sunday
Continued from Page 3
Vice President of two YAD
Committee: Business Net-
working & Membership and
Administration.
A local attorney, Mr. Ellison
traveled to Israel last summer
on the YAD Summer Mission.
He also attended the Young
Leadership Conference in
Washington D.C. last March.
For more information, con-
tact Garrett Saperstein, Super
Sunday Coordinator, Jewish
Federation, 832-2120.
CLAL Programs
Continued from Page 3
training programs for all
aspects of the community.
Members of the Program
Sub-Committee are Jeanne
Levy, Chair, Jeffrey
Paine, Co-chair, Ruth Abram-
son, Dr. Asher Bar-Zev, Sheila
Engelstein, James Kay and
Eileen Nickman.
For more information, con-
tact Ronni Epstein, Assistant
Executive Director, Jewish
Federation, 832-2120.
require that "recent progress
on emigration from the Soviet
Union would be sustained."
The 1974 Jackson-Vanik
Amendment links most-favor-
ed-nation trade status for the
Soviet Union with increased
emigration. The president can
issue a waiver to the USSR if
he determines that emigration
has reached a substantial level.
While substantial has never
been officially defined, there is
a feeling within the Jewish
community that emigration
figures would have to reach
the high point of 51,320
achieved in 1979 for a waiver
to be justified.
The number of Jewish emi-
grants totaled nearly 19,000 in
1988 and is expected to be
double that this year.
Redman said his remarks
were aimed at disputing re-
ports that efforts are being
made to get Jewish support for
a waiver of the amendment in
return for Soviet agreement to
direct flights for Soviet Jews
to Israel.
"Jackson-Vanik has nothing
to do with the destination of
such emigrants," Redman
said. "The U.S. government
has consistently held that all
the Jews and all others emi-
grating from the Soviet Union
should have freedom of choice
as to their destination."
REMINDER
You Are Cordially Invited
ToA
Luncheon
For The Residents Of
P0INCIANA PLACE
On Behalf of the
1989 Jewish Federation
of Palm Beach County
United Jewish Appeal Campaign
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 12:30 P.M.
TEMPLE BETH SH0L0M
315North "A "Street Lake Worth
MINIMUM
CONTRIBUTION
$250 Per Couple
$125 Per Single
Milt & Miriam Sharon 433-0296
Jules & Shirley Klevan 9644797
CfrChairs
before elections could be con-
sidered.
"I am willing to talk now, to
reach agreement on the pro-
cess," Rabin said.
"When there's agreement
on the process, then a calm
period will have to begin,
because in my mind, if you
want free elections, they can-
not take place in an atmos-
phere of violence."
If elections are held in the
territories, they would be the
first there since 1976.
Rabin proposes that the
Palestinians elect local leaders
with whom Israel would then
negotiate.
His idea was rejected out-
right by the Palestine Libera-
tion Organization and greeted
with skepticism by fellow min-
isters.
Insider Favored For Mossad
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Prime
Minister Yitzhak Shamir is
expected to appoint a high-
ranking official of Mossad to
head Israel's top-secret intelli-
gence agency, according to
well-informed sources quoted
by Israeli newspapers.
The insider selected by
Shamir is one of two candi-
dates to replace the outgoing
head of Mossad, who is retir-
ing after six years.
The other is a senior Israel
Defense Force officer said to
be favored by Vice Premier
Shimon Peres, the Labor party
leader who also serves as
finance minister in the govern-
ment.
The head of Mossad reports
directly to the prime minister
and his nomination is the
prime minister's prerogative.
But under the Likud-Labor
coalition agreement, Peres has
to agree to the choice.
The identity of the Mossad
chief is a national secret, pro-
tected by law.
The High Court of Justice
ruled recently, however, that
the news media may criticize
his as long as it does not
violate the identification ban.
The issue arose when the
weekly Ha'ir appealed the
censor's refusal to pass an arti-
cle questioning the compet-
ence of the incumbent Mossad
chief.
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Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, February 10, 1989
Women's Division Lion Of Judah Recipients
,^c^^3s^^c^^^^^Kz^^S=^!gc^^&^a^ex
A spectacular reception in honor of Lion of Judah recipients vm
held Wednesday, Jan. 25, hosted by Mrs. Miles Fiterman at her
home in Palm Beach. Special guest speaker was Rena Blumberg,
a distinguished broadcaster, author, lecturer and civic activist.
Pictured at left, are Eileen Nickman, Chair, Ruby Lion of Judah]
Sheila Engelstein, WD Campaign Chair, Dorothy Adler, Co-
Chair, Lion of Judah, Rena Blumberg, Shirley Fiterman, Zelda
Mason, Co-Chair, Lion of Judah.
Ellen Block, UJA National WD Board & National Campaign Cabinet Member.
Ida Rapoport, Virginia Weiss, Helen Yulman, Susanne Kornreich.
Nancy Dickson, Marilyn Lampert, Lenore Abrams, Gladys Kaufman. Sitting
(Ur) Dr. Daisy Merey, Faye Cooper, Claire Rosenblatt.
Shirley Leibow, Lillian Koffler, Janet Showe, Irene Greenbaum, Selma Dan Ma
Standing (l-r) Sara Grandberg, Pauline Rose, Marilyn Winer, Bea Shore, Mindi slZS? rw/" Belsky. Sitting (l-r) Peppy Silverstein, Pauline Diamond, Jeanne Glasser. ScheVteV' KoePPel. Sitting (l-r) Sally Pinter, Sara Bienstock, Vivian


Friday, February 10, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 9
Honored At Palm Beach Reception
-f>
i 1 & 1 1 m i b3 If Mr.
J?ia Blumberg, Helene Gordon, Carol Greenbaum, Irving Mazer, General Campaign Chair-
WD President. man and Lee Mazer Irene Bernstein, Jeanne Levy, Fran Newman.
&jft
/
M-J HUB. / JB* r# ^_*
//iWo Salmanson, Marion Copellman, Ruth Wilensky, Ruth Bernstein, Florence May Z. LeVine, Rochelle Zuckerman, Esther Gruber, Norma Rosenthal, Esther
Robbins. Molat.
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Anita Rosen, Marva Perrin, Dorothy Segel, Judy Messing.
Louise Stein, Sheryl Davidoff, Mildred Hecht Wohlgemuth, Linda Frankel, Carol Goodman,
Beverly Wagner, Jewell Morris.
Standing (l-r) Beulah Levine, Rita Dee Hassenfeld, Jeanne Fogel, Hermine Wiener, Cynnie List, Grace Hokin, Berenice Rogers, Jeanette Weisman, Tubby Stayman,
Jacqueline Eder. Sitting (l-r) Harriet Miller, Ceil Rosen.


Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, February 10, 1989
WPB Students Support Soviet Jewry
1989 Schimmel HIAS
Scholarships Announced
To help dramatize the plight of Soviet Jewry, students from the Jewish Community Day School
and the Louis Barrish Religious School of Temple Beth El recently took part in a poster contest.
Under the direction of liana Burgess, a member of the faculty of both schools, the students were
asked to make posters which demonstrated the plight of Russian Jews as well as their cry for
freedom. The posters were hung first at Temple Bern El for the December Soviet Jewry Rally and
then later at the Mercaz of the Jewish Community Day School. The winners, which were chosen by
a panel of judges were presented with Jewish music tapes. Pictured above are winners Lisa
Gordon, Samantha Kates, Nathan Burgess, Jason May and Chad Delierson, with Rabbi Alan L.
Cohen of Temple Beth El. Not pictured are Darren Sherman and Joe Liebman.
NEW YORK, NY HIAS,
the Hebrew Immigrant Aid
Society, is inviting applica-
tions for 1989 Norbert Schim-
mel HIAS Scholarships. The
Scholarships will be presented
at HIAS" 109th Annual Meet-
ing scheduled for June 12,
1989.
In announcing the 1989 scho-
larships, Dr. Arline Bronzaft,
Chair of the HIAS Scholarship
Committee and President of
the migration agency's
Women's Division, described
those eligible as HIAS-
sponsored refugees who have
come to this country since
1977, or their children, who
are disabled or handicapped
and who are currently pursu-
ing (or have been officially
accepted into) a course of post-
secondary education.
The Norbert Schimmel
HIAS Scholarships were
established last year through a
$100,000 grant from the
Schimmel Foundation. The
awards, ranging from $500-
$2,500, are the first educa-
tional scholarships especially
intended for disabled or handi-
capped former refugees.
Applications for the Schim-
mel Scholarships will be con-
sidered on a separate basis to
those submitted in relation to
the agency's eleven other edu-
cational scholarships currently
in place. Dr. Bronzaft pointed
out, however, that in all
instances, the HIAS Scholar-
ship Committee would con-
sider such factors as academic
achievement, participation in
extracurricular or community
activities, future potential and
financial need.
Applications and further
information may be obtained
by writing to Norbert Schim-
mel HIAS Scholarship
Awards, 200 Park Avenue
South, New York, NY 10003.
No phone calls please. Com-
pleted applications should be
returned to HIAS, postmarked
no later than April 15, 1989.
A-AAbot Answerfone offers:
TELEPHONE ANSWERING SERVICE
|| BEEPER PAGING SERVICE
PRIVATE LINE SERVICE
MONITORING SERVICE
WAKE UP SERVICE MAIL SERVICE
and
"person to person service"
24 hours a day
Demographers Plan Worldwide Survey
A-AAbot Answerfone (407)586-7400
213 N. Dixie Highway Lake Worth, FL 33460
The basic outline of methods
to be used in conducting a
world-wide Jewish population
survey was agreed upon at a
meeting of demographic ex-
perts held recently at the
Hebrew University of Jeru-
salem.
The survey is expected to
yield information considered
vital for those planning and
providing Jewish communal
services. Data to be collected
includes the number of Jewish
households, age distribution,
migration patterns, family
size, economic status, occupa-
tions, Jewish affiliation and
activity, education, and pat-
terns of intermarriage/assimi-
lation.
The Institute of Contem-
porary Jewry of the Hebrew
University is among the bodies
involved in planning the sur-
vey. Others are the World
Zionist Organization and Jew-
ish Agency, the Israeli Minis-
try of Labor and Social Affairs
and the World Jewish Con-
gress. Prof. Sidney Goldstein
of Brown University and
Hebrew University Prof.
Emeritus Roberto Bachi are
co-chairman of the scientific
advisory committee.
The American survey of
some 2,500 households, spon-
sored by the Council of Jewish
Federations (CJF), is set to be
conducted in May-June 1990.
With some modifications, the
questions to be used will serve
as a model for surveys in the
other countries. In the U.S.,
for example, Jewish Federa-
tion leaders will want an
updated picture of how fast
the percentage of the aged is
growing in order to plan for
their needs in coming years.
They also will be interested to
see if there is firm basis for a
perceived trend of Jews mov-
ing to small towns far from
central population cores.
In Israel, it is hoped that a
national census will be con-
ducted in the early 1990s.
Planning already has begun
for a Jewish population survey
in South Africa, and it is hoped
that more countries will fol-
low.
TODAY, DO SOMETHING NICE!
MAKETHEDWABEITER
MV FOR SOMEONE!
It's within your power to help ease the pain of living for many of our
less fortunate neighbors by making available all the "things" you no
longer need or use. The clothes hanging unworn for years in the closets,
the old bed frames leaning against the wall in the garage, and even the
bicycle gathering dust in the shed, because your child has outgrown it.
Whatever it is that you have to give, please give.
WE NEED YOUR DONATIONS TODAY?
FURNITURE BRIC-A-BRAC PICTURES
LAMPS DECORATIVE ACCESSORIES
H0USEWARES CLOTHING LINENS
We'll even accept your old Cars and Boats.
THANK YOU FOR CARING!
Free Furniture Pick-Up
Free Appraisals Over $5,000
ALL PROCEEDS BENEFIT
THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
OF THE PALM BEACHES
A service of Ihe
Jewish Community Center
of the Palm Beaches
Q
MOKVICM
On
THRIFT SHOP
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JEWISH CAMPING AT ITS BESTSINCE 1919
A complete camping experience rich In Jewish
cultural activities that will be long remembered.
A truly, wonderful Bar/Bas Mitzvah Present.
Located in Port Jervis, NY. Children enjoy all sports, swimming, boating, canoeing, trips,
overnights, music, dance, dramatics (fully equipped theater), arts & crafts, photography,
woodshop, nature, day trips, ratting, computer program and a full array of social artd cultural
activities with a mature and experienced staff.
Kosher CuisineOn site Doctors and NursesSynagogueCo-ed Ages 6-16
Full Season S2295; Half season $1350; CIT $1550 (Special DiicoMt lor FlorMa RuMtats)
Brochure: Mark Fraier, Director, Cejwin Camps, 15 East 26th Street. New York 10010 (212) 696-1024
Florida Rep: Lynn Mills (305) 319-4942
We Need You!
Volunteers are needed for our Alzheimers Res-
pite Day Care Program. You will find the work
both gratifying and rewarding. If you can
spare a 3 hour block of time per week and are
eager to help people, please contact:
Anne Epstein
Jewish Family and Children's Service
(407) 684-1991
We will train!
Wanted
Geriatric Counselor. Full-time. Responsibilities to
include Care Coordination, individual therapy
and groups. Exciting, challenging opportunity
with growth oriented agency. Experienced in
working with the elderly: MSW or equivalent
behavioral degree required.
Call Susan Fleischer
at (407) 684-1991


Friday, February 10, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 11
Open Flow Of Broadcasts
From Israel To Soviet Union
Libyan Links Revealed
By MARLENE GOLDMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) In the
wake of glasnost, the two-year
Soviet cork on shortwave radio
transmission of Jewish history
and culture from Israel has
been popped, allowing an open
flow of broadcasts.
Since December 1986, the
Academy of the Air for Jewish
Studies, a U.S.-based group,
has spent $200,000 transmit-
ting half-hour programs to the
Soviet Union from Israel
Radio, the Israel Broadcast
Authority.
Until this past October, the
Soviet government had jam-
med the radio frequencies so
that only four cities Mos-
cow, Leningrad, Odessa and
Kiev could tune in.
With the Soviet govern-
ment's lift of the ban, the
academy can now reach all
Jews in the Soviet Union dur-
ing its three broadcasts per
week.
The broadcasts address a
variety of Jewish educational
subjects, but avoid political
issues for fear of another ban.
"The lectures are tailored
for a very specific audience,"
said David Geller, coordinator
of the academy and director of
European affairs for the
American Jewish Committee.
"We're trying to build a pos-
itive self image of the Jew,"
Geller said.
AJCommittee initiated the
project in 1983 in response to
appeals from Soviet Jews who
met with their delegation to
Moscow.
"Many, many refuseniks and
activists were saying 'return
to us our roots,' said Abra-
ham Silverstein, an AJCom-
mittee member and part of the
delegation. "They requested
kinship with the Diaspora
throughout the world," he
said.
In just over two years, some
250 tapes have been prepared
and 150 half-hour programs
have been broadcast. About
$450,000 will be required to
complete the contracted ser-
ies.
To prepare the broadcasts,
the academy employs authorit-
ies in literature, religion, his-
tory and philosophy for lec-
tures and discussions on such
subjects as the history of Rus-
sian and Polish Jewry, Jewish
philosophy and ethics, Torah,
and the period of the Second
Temple, which was the acad-
emy's first broadcast.
Though the exact tally of
listeners is still unknown,
pending further study, esti-
mates run to the tens of thou-
sands, while teaching Hebrew
in the Soviet Union only
reaches the hundreds.
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Klinghoffer
Award to
Shultz
NEW YORK (JTA) Secre-
tary of State George Shultz
will be presented the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith's Klinghoffer Award in
June 1989 for his contributions
in combatting terrorism.
The award is given by the
ADL's Leon and Marilyn
Klinghoffer Memorial Founda-
tion, which was organized
after the 1985 murder of Leon
Klinghoffer aboard the cruise
ship Achille Lauro.
YOUR CAR IN ISRAEL
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) Juergen
Hippenstiel-Imhausen, head of
a chemical factory in southern
Germany that bears his name,
has admitted after weeks of
denials that his firm did in fact
help Libya build a chemical
plant suspected of manufactur-
ing poison gas.
Imhausen Chemie, a com-
pany based in the town of
Lahr, is under investigation by
the government for possible
illegal export of material and
equipment to the Libyans.
Until a few weeks ago, Hip-
penstiel-Imhausen, when ques-
tioned on the matter, claimed
he did not even know where
Libya is.
Now he has admitted his
company's involvement, the
weekly Stem reported. It cited
BONN (JTA) The Bonn
government acknowledged
that it is supporting a $200
million loan to finance Jor-
dan's purchase of eight ad-
vanced Tornado jet fighter-
bombers.
Government spokesman
Friedhelm Ost said the govern-
ment had no reservations
about making West German
credits available for the pur-
pose.
Bonn had taken the position
earlier that tb ioan was a
normal comr. rcial transac-
tion with which it was power-
less to interfere.
The credit is being supplied
by the Munich-based Bayer-
ische Landesbank and is guar-
anteed by the federal state of
Bavaria.
The prime minister of
Bavaria, Max Streibl, had a
series of discussions about the
prosecution and intelligence
sources.
Moreover, he has implicated
another West German firm,
Salzgiter Industriebau, which
has strong ties with important
political figures, Stern said.
The authorities in Bonn only
recently began to investigate
allegations that West German
companies were helping Libya
manufacture chemical warfare
weapons.
They acted on the basis of
American intelligence evi-
dence that the Germans had
originally dismissed as inade-
quate.
American and Israeli leaders
are concerned that the chemi-
cal weapons produced by the
Libyan plant could wind up in
the hands of terrorists, since
Libya funds and trains terror-
ist groups.
matter with Chancellor Hel-
mut Kohl and other top offi-
cials in Bonn.
The federal government had
originally planned to under-
write the loan, but abandoned
the project because of vigorous
objections by friends of Israel
and others.
The Tornado, one of the
most sophisticated aircraft in
the western arsenal, is pro-
duced jointly by West Ger-
many, Britain and Italy.
Bavarian plants manufac-
ture about 40 percent of its
components, but the plane is
marketed primarily by the
British.
Ost did not deny reports that
Prime Minister Margaret
Thatcher had been urging
Kohl to finance the deal.
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Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, February 10, 1989
It Was Golden At The Mike A Jewish Federa
tf
'*.**.# .iflw
i i i V** i
1 r i f. 1 rl
^l ^^ ^^^H^H ^^^^^^^^^^^W
Morton & Hermine Wiener, Stephen & Ruth Abramson, Alec & Sheila Engelstein, Diane
& Daniel Honig (The Wieners, Abramsons & Honigs were Co-Chairs of the Golden
Jubilee event.)
Peggy & Dean Vegosen, Ellen & Alan Gordon
Arthur Bellis, Carolyn & Paul Shapiro
Neil & Susy Merin, Marianiu
Frances & Alvin Newman, Eileen & Melvin Ludwig
Gold and glitter decorations lit up the room during the $5,000 mil
Sunday, January 29. Over 250 people attended the premiere event o\
Jewish Appeal Campaign. In celebration of UJA 's fiftieth annix
dancing and guest speaker Rabbi Haskel Looks
event. Golden Jubilee guests signed ple\
Sonia & Robert Woldow, Rose Schrayer, Irving & Lee Mazer
Milton & Elma Gilbert, Beth & Warren Hyman
Diane & Albert Shapiro, Sandy & Harris Hollin, Rita Dee & Harold Hassenfeld Arlene & Morton Simon
Barbara & Bernard Green, Simon & No


Friday, February 10, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 13
ition Of Palm Beach County Premiere Event
Sidney & Nancy Marks, Thelma & Joseph Linsey Elsie & Marvin Dekelboum, Jerry & Moe Rosenblatt Rhoda & Bernard Weiner
Marvin & Sandra Rosen, Marjorie & Barry Berg
ti imum Golden Jubilee Event at the Breakers Hotel in Palm Beach,
o % behalf of the 1989 Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County/United
itersary, guests enjoyed cocktails, hors d'oeuvres, a gourmet meal,
s \ein, who flew in from New York to address the
ledge cards that totaled over $2,000,000.
Alec& Miriam Flamm. Sara & Arnold Grandberg
( vfl
^B ^B^l ^^H

W^M
'*'.
Ronald & Eileen Gold, Amy & Michael Jonas
Leonard & Gloria Phillips, Ruth Abramson, Shirlee & Erwin H. Blonder
lorman Goldblum Albert & Celia Levine, Roberta & Jack Sussman Harold & Adeline Kramer, Helen & Arnold J. Hoffman, Sheila & David Jacobson
-*>


Page 14 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, February 10, 1989
Jewish Federation Day At The Fountains
Recipients of the Lion ofJudah pin. Standing (l-r) Jeanne Glasser, Thelma Plotnick, Ruth Lorber,
Pauline Rose, Natalie Hartman, Irene Kaplan, Pappy SUverstein. Sitting (l-r) Norma Rosenthal,
Shirley Schauber, Esther Gruber, Thelma Glantz. (Not pictured: Tita Kukoff, Lucile
Levenson and Rochelle Zuckerman.)
The annual Fountains golf tournament, now a popular tradition,
was held Sunday, January 29, on behalf of the 1989 Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach County/United Jewish Appeal Cam-
paign. The day began with hundreds of golfers teeing off in the
morning, followed by a fund raising luncheon, awards ceremony
and distribution of raffle prizes. Featured guest speaker was Al
Effrat, Fla. Regional Director of AZPAC. Standing (l-r) Irving
Horowitz, Publicity Chairman, Al Schnitt, Golf Tournament
Chairman, Al Effrat, guest speaker, Jerry Lorber, Honorary
Chairman, Ben Silverman, Raffle Chairman. Not pictured:
Louis Zuckerman, Fountains Campaign Chairman and Milton
Kukoff, Special Gifts Co-Chairman.
Jerry Lorber accepts award from Al Schnitt for his seven years of
devoted service as Fountains Campaign Chairman.
Standing (l-r) Irving Kaplan, Jerry Lorber, Jerry SUverstein. Ed Glantz, Al Schnitt. Sitting (l-r)
Arthur Rosenthal, Alex Gruber, Jerry Rose.
if
THE JEWISH COMMUNITY
OF THE PALM BEACHES IS
CREATING AN ENVIRONMENT
WHICH WILL ALLOW JEWISH
LIFE TO PROSPER AND GROW...
66 A PLACE FOR US 99
WHERE YOUNG AND OLD WILL
SHARE THE EXPERIENCE AND
BEAUTY OF OUR HERITAGE.
Support the Jewish Community Campus Campaign.
Call 832-2120 for more information.
A -I'
JEWISH <&s
COMMUMTY ^
CAMPUS
Al Schnitt gives award to Ben Silverman to show appreciation
for his remarkable success as Raffle Chair.
Rose Uchill accepts award on behalf of her husband David, from
Alex Gruber, Special Gifts Co-Chair, for his many years of
dedicated service.


Friday, February 10, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 15
Residents Of Royal Palm Cocktail Party
Residents of Royal Palm Beach enjoyed a Cocktail Party on behalf of this year's fund raising
drive, Thursday, January 24, at the Indian Trail Country Club. Special UJA consultant Dora
Roth, spoke to the group about her experiences as a survivor of the Holocaust and the problems that
face Israel today. Standing (l-r) Samuel Cohen, Co-Chair, Dora Roth, Henry Kaufman, Co-Chair,
Neil Newstein, Director JF&CS, who was also a guest speaker.
Reminder
Members of High Ridge Country Club
are cordially invited to
FEDERATION DAY
in support of the
1989 Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
United Jewish Appeal Campaign
Friday. February 17, 1989
High Ridge Country Club
For more information, contact Lynne Stolzer. Campaign Director
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County. 832-2120
Standing (l-r) Lou Silberhartz, Sylvia Ditkoff, Barney Ditkoff, Joseph Surry, Roz Freedman.
Sitting (l-r) Edith Boehm, Mildred Lieber, Ben Lieber, Member, Campaign Cabinet, Mary Surry.
Some members of the Royal Palm Beach Campaign Cabinet. Standing (l-r) Herb Woolf, Bernard
Berk, Special Gifts Chairman, Harry Lerner, William Deutsch, Dan Jatlow, Karl Kalman,
Joseph Goodfriend, Nathan Super. Sitting (l-r) Josephine Lerner, Thelma Alk, Roz Freedman.
Not pictured: Mischa Davidson, Rabbi Melvin Kieffer, Morris Lipstein, Al Tolin, Leah Berk, Rose
Landy.
Jewish Reunion In China
Set For Passover
Reminder
The Young Adult Division
of the
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
cordially invites you
to join us for a
PALM BEACH WINTER FANTASY
at me
$tfrui^ (7tH 301 Australian Avenue. Palm Beach
Saturday, February 18, 1989
8:00 p.m.
Hor d'oeuvres and dancing
For more information, call Mark Mendel, Director, YAD,
Jewish Federation, 832-2120.
NEW YORK (JTA) The
seder table in Shanghai this
Pesach will trigger sweet and
sour memories, both for Jews
that found refuge in China
during the Holocaust and
those with deeper roots in the
Chinese culture.
Members of the China Jew-
ish community, Jewish leaders
and Jews from around the
world will unite at the Interna-
tional Assembly of Jews in
China, to be held April 18 to
30.
The story of Jews in China
predates Marco Polo, but the
first modern Jewish settle-
ment was established in
Shanghai in the 19th century
by Sephardic Jews who were
primarily from Iraq.
While the United States and
other Western nations refused
entry to Jewish refugees dur-
ing World War II, Shanghai
practiced an open-door policy
The effect was that some
30,000 Jews lived in China
during the war. When Japan
gained control of the city, Jew-
ish refugees were forced to
live in Shanghai's Hongkew
slum area, where they were
subjected to numerous restric-
tions.
Nevertheless, the Jews man-
aged to create cultural and
communal institutions
newspapers, synagogues,
schools, theaters and cafes.
Since the end of World War
II, though, the Jewish com-
munity has increasingly dis-
persed, and today the sites of
Jewish institutions have been
converted to other purposes
without any reminder of their
origins.
To remember that cultural
life, the assembly will place
appropriate signs on all exist-
ing buildings that were import-
ant to the Shanghai Jewish
community.
Among the highlights of the
tour will be a speecn by Yosef
Tekoah, chancellor of Ben-
Gurion University of the
Negev and a former resident
of Shanghai.
Along with the recent forma-
tion of the Shanghai Judaic
Studies Association, the Inter-
national Assembly of Jews in
China reflects a thaw in Chi-
nese-Israeli relations.
For further information, call
Shelly Wax, (213) 392-8541.
"VISIT ISRAEL NOW TOUR"
THE PALM BEACH-ISRAEL CONNECTION
MARCH 29 APRIL 10, 1989
An unbelievable $1499.00 per/person (based on double occupancy)
Effective February 17. 1989 the cost will be $1599.00 per/person
The Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County/Israel Connection
Tentative Day-By-Day Itinerary
THURS.
4-6-89
At leisure. Optional tour to Ashdod, Ashkelon, Yad Morde-
chai and the Bedouin Market in BeerSheba. Overnight at the
Carlton Hotel in Tel Aviv.
In the coming issues of the Jewish Floridian, we tvill highlight another day of this
exciting itinerary to give you the opportunity to see what is being planned for this
"chance of a lifetime" trip.
FOR MORE INFORMATION. PLEASE CONTACT STACEY GARBER.
JEWISH FEDERATION. 832-2120.


Page 16 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, February 10, 1989
Feud Sparked in Election Fraud
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
conviction of five Jews for
election fraud has worsened
the feud between two ultra-
Orthodox parties in the religi-
ous township of Bnei Brak,
north of Tel Aviv.
The Agudat Yisrael party,
by implication, has accused the
smaller Degel HaTorah party,
an Agudah breakaway, of
"informing" on the three mid-
dle-aged yeshiva students and
two Orthodox women sen-
tenced to prison by a Tel Aviv
magistrate.
They had confessed to using
other people's identity cards to
vote more than once in the
Knesset elections.
Agudat Yisrael is calling for
a "day of prayers and re-
pentance" and protest against
"those who informed to the
police."
Degel HaTorah spokesman
said the appeal was a ploy to
win support in the upcoming
municipal elections in Bnai
Brak.
Agudah rabbis and spokes-
men insisted that it was almost
a crime itself to inform the
police against any Jew who
commits a civil or criminal
offense.
They said it was the duty of
Jews to prevent crime, but if it
occurs, it must be tried
"within the family, by a Bet
Din" (rabbinical court).
Observers at nearby Bar-
Ilan University, which is
Orthodox-sponsored, said the
aversion to "informing" was a
carry-over from the traditional
ghetto attitude in the 19th
century Eastern Europe that a
Jew must not hand over
another Jew to the gentile
authorities.
What the Agudah people
overlooked, they said, is that
the "authority" here is Jewish,
albeit secular. Bar-Ilan faculty
attribute the Agudah-Degel
feud to their rivalry over fund-
ing for their respective yeshi-
vot.
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Friday, February 10, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 17
Super Sunday 1989
Coming April 2nd
President George Bush receives Rabbi Abraham Shemtov, national
director of American Friends of Lubavitch, who brought him
greetings from the Lubavitcher Rebbe, Rabbi Menachem Mendel
Schneerson, who expresses his wishes for the president 's success,
especially his efforts to become the "education president."
Who Is A Jew?
Continued from Page 1
a new policy when he took
office as interior minister. But
when an official has doubts
about a document, he can
refuse to accept it, Ya'ari said.
The legal adviser pointed out
that the former interior minis-
ter, Rabbi Yitzhak Peretz also
of the Shas party, had told the
Knesset and the High Court
that non-Orthodox converts
were allowed to enter Israel
under the Law of Return, even
though he was unwilling to
register them as Jews.
Ya'ari replied that "virtually
all" of those converts were
spouses of Jews who were
automatically covered by the
Law of Return.
He maintained that Sho-
shana Miller, an unmarried
American woman converted
by a Reform rabbi, was never
given immigrant status and
remained a temporary resi-
dent as long as she was in
Israel.
The Miller case was the first
in which the Interior Ministry
refused to abide by a court
order to register a convert as a
Jew. Peretz, who was minister
at the time, resigned rather
than comply.
But Rabbi Uri Regev, direc-
tor of the Reform movement's
Religious Action Center here,
stated flatly that Miller "was
given an Aleph/1 (immigrant)
visa at the Israeli Consulate in
San Francisco and given a
teudat oleh" (immigrant's cer-
tificate) when she arrived at
Ben-Gurion Airport.
He added that another
Reform convert, Alicia Oren,
was given a visa under the
Propaganda Blamed for Tourist Decrease
... But Numbers Now Up
JERUSALEM (JTA) Dis-
mayed hotel owners who com-
plain that the Palestinian
uprising is playing havoc with
Israel's tourist industry got a
lecture on national unity from
Prime Minister Yitzhak Sha-
mir.
The prime minister blamed a
sophisticated propaganda cam-
paign that depicts Israel as an
aggressor. Israel's image in
Law of Return by the Israeli
Consulate in Argentina as the
wife of a Jew. Following a
protest, however, she was
given an immigrant's visa as a
Jew, Regev said.
"There has never been any
question in the past concern-
ing immigrants' visas for non-
Orthodox converts," Regev
said.
The High Court is presently
considering petititons for and
against the registration of sev-
eral non-Orthodox converts as
Jews.
Ya'ari's explanation of
Deri's remarks did not appear
to comfort the editors of the
Jerusalem Post. In an edito-
rial, they attacked the "bra-
zenness" of the interior minis-
ter's statement.
"At one fell administrative
swoop, the interior minister,
true not to his duty to observe
the law but to his religious
convictions, has seemingly
achieved what the religious
parties have for years failed to
secure by means of orderly
legislation," the paper said.
world public opinion has
changed from "David facing
Goliath" to Israel as Goliath,
he said.
But despite their pro-
paganda success, the Arabs
have not deviated from their
original intention to "throw
the Jews into the sea," Shamir
insisted.
He claimed that the Arab's
new negotiating stances are
attempts to cover up their evil
design. Therefore, only a
steadfast, united stand by the
people will enable Israel to
cope with the problem, he said.
Shamir attended the annual
hoteliers convention, where he
was told that after a dismal
tourist season last summer,
tourism has decreased by 30
percent in the past few
months.
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Page 18 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, February 10, 1989
">
-I -
Yiddish Theater Goes Public As New Musical Stages Rebirth
By ELL1 WOHLGELERNTER
NEW YORK
Jewish Telegraphic Agency
Yosef Papirofsky is a very
smart guy. He didn't get
to be the most influential the-
atrical producer in America
today just following trends.
This is a man who sets them.
For years now, Yiddish thea-
ter has been relegated to small
neighborhood stages showing
old chestnuts typically from
the pen of Sholom Aleichem
and I.L. Peretz, with one piano
tinkling in the background.
Papirofsky saw those shows,
and loved them. If only there
were a way to make them
speak to a new generation of
theatergoers, one weaned on
some of his most innovative
shows, like his long-running
mega-hit, "A Chorus Line."
You never heard of Yossi
Papirofsky? Perhaps you know
him better by his stage name:
Joe Papp. He's the producer
who brings inexpensive thea-
ter to the public at his Public
Theater, and who presents
free Shakespeare every sum-
mer in Central Park as the
director of the New York
Shakespeare Festival.
The innovative Papp looked
around and saw that the
signs were unmistakable: Yid-
dish is happening, from bulg-
ing classes at universities to
Jackie Mason, the Yiddish-
inflected comic who just fin-
ished a triumphant two-year
run on Broadway.
"There seems to be so much
interest in it," Papp said.
"Those who have a marginal
knowledge of Yiddish, who
number in the thousands, and
then those who speak it
older people, Holocaust survi-
vors, and their children.
'A Feeling of Yiddishkeit'
"There's a curiosity about
the language itself, even from
those who have no experience
with it. It's a feeling of Yid-
dishkeit, of roots."
Papp knew something was in
the air. "There are energies
that I feel are around us," he
said.
A year ago, Miriam Hoff-
man, a child survivor of the
Holocaust and a writer for the
Jewish Forward, and Rena
Berkowicz Borow, a child of
survivors and a Yiddish trans-
lator who has worked with I.B.
Singer, approached Papp with
the idea for a Yiddish acting
troupe.
When they asked him if he
would lend his name to the
project, he knew he was hear-
ing an idea whose time had
come.
"We need a home," Hoff-
man told Papp. "And you can
do it."
Papp was moved by the
request, and more than
happy to put his imprimatur on
the project, hoping that his
sponsorship would enable it to
fet off the ground. Thus, the
oseph Papp Yiddish Theater
was born.
"It is the greatest feeling in
the world," Papp said, "put-
ting my name and Yiddish
together. It's the mama
loshen."
It's what he knew best. "I
was raised Orthodox, and
spoke only Yiddish till I went
to school." Even today, he
said, both his sisters are Ortho-
dox.
Papp is proud of his heri-
tage. "I had my name in the
Brooklyn Botanic Gardens'
celebrity walk, for people born
in Brooklyn. They had my
name as Papp. I had it
replaced with Papirofsky."
He said that for many pro-
fessionals, "especially in cer-
tain circles, it's considered
prust to say you're Jewish.
You don't necessarily have to
mention it, but I always make
a point of it."
Not surprising then, that the
first production of Papp's Yid-
dish Theater is a hilarious con-
temporary musical based on
the book of Genesis.
"Sons of Paradise" is co-
authored by Hoffman and
Borow, and based on the work
of poet Itsik Manager.
It has Adam sunning himself
in a beach chair. Cain as a
6-year-old brat running around
with a toy machine gun, Esau
as a Yiddish Marlon Brando
sporting a motorcycle helmet
and bargaining over lentil
soup, and a boxing match
between Rachel and Leah as
they fight over who
gets Ya'acov.
All this, mind you, is told to
the tune of rock 'n' roll,
doo-wop, jazz, blues and
gospel, as well as a hand-
clapping Yiddish minstrel
number. The buoyant and daz-
zling songs were written by
Rosalie Gerut, who also stars
in the five-member cast.
Matches High Standards
"Songs" first opened at the
Riverdale (New York) Y.
When Papp went to see it, he
was shocked at how profes-
sional it was.
"When it started, I didn't
know how good it was going to
be," Papp said this week. "But
there's a lot of talent, a good
ensemble of people. I decided
to bring it into my own house
because it matches our stan-
dards."
At the opening night party
Monday night, Papp got up
and read the review in Tues-
day's New York Times.lt was
all thumbs up. Originally
scheduled to run for three
weeks, "Songs" has now been
extended to two months. For
Papp, it was a commercial,
artistic and personal success.
Once upon a time, there
were 20 Yiddish theaters that
lined Second Avenue. Now, all
that's left is the Folksbiene
Playhouse which has moved
uptown where you can cur-
rently catch a production of
Aleichem's "The Big Winner,"
starring Zypora Spaisman and
David Rogow. It, too, has
enjoyed an extended run.
Papp has no illusions that
"Songs" will trigger a rebirth
of the old Yiddish theater.
"The mashiach isn't coming
with this production," he said.
Nevertheless, he doesn't
feel that Yiddish theater is
just "limited to small reviews,
as a side show. It can make it
in the mainstream, too."
Preserving The Language
What's most important, he
said, is that "the language not
disappear. That's paramount
in my mind. But it's something
that can only be addressed by
young people. It's hard to pre-
serve the language when peo-
ple who speak it are dying
out."
Still, Papp fervently believes
that this show, and other Yid-
dish productions, can survive.
"The numbers (who come to
see "Songs") will increase the
people who are interested in
Continued on Page 19

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Anti-Semitic Incidents
Reach Five-Year Peak
Friday, February 10, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 19
NEW YORK, NY Anti-
Semitic incidents in 1988
reached their highest levels in
more than five years, accord-
ing to the annual nationwide
audit conducted by the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith. The audit revealed an
increase of 18.5 percent in
anti-Jewish vandalism, includ-
ing arson, bombings and swas-
tika daubings, and a 41 per-
cent increase in harassment,
threats and assaults against
Jews, Jewish institutions or
property over the figures for
1987.
The audit reflects incidents
reported in 40 states, the Dis-
trict of Columbia and Puerto
Rico, as gathered in the two
separate categories by the
League's regional offices and
by law enforcement officials.
The results showed:
823 vandalism incidents in
1988 as against 694 the year
before, making this the second
year in a row that vandalism
went up sharply after a four-
year downward trend. In 1987,
vandalism incidents rose 17
percent over 1986. The highest
vandalism total was 974
recorded in 1981.
458 incidents in the harass-
ment category compared to
324 reported in 1987. The pre-
vious highest total was 593
incidents reported in 1982.
More than twice the num-
ber of serious crimes from
12 in 1987 to 28 in 1988, the
highest total in the last five
years. The 28 included seven
cases of arson, seven of at-
tempted arson, one bombing
and 13 cemetery desecrations.
During 1987, the serious
crimes included five arsons,
three arson attempts, two
bombings and two cemetery
desecrations.
A sharp jump in the num-
ber of college campuses on
which anti-Jewish incidents
ranging from vandalism to
harassment occurred 38
campuses compared to 14 in
1987.
The audit revealed that the
highest number of anti-Semitic
incidents occurred in New
York State with 208 in the
vandalism category and 115 in
the harassment, threats and
assaults category. California
was next with 121 vandalisms
and 49 harassments, followed
by Florida with 89 vandalisms
and 40 harassments and New
Jersey with 67 vandalisms and
30 harassments. The figures
for each of the four states
were an increase over the year
before, with the exception of
California where the total in
the vandalism category was
down by 16 from the 137 re-
corded in 1987.
The report noted "increas-
ingly effective police action"
as evidenced by the arrests of
124 persons in connection with
57 incidents in 19 states, as
opposed to 78 in connection
with 58 of the incidents in
1987, and 57 arrests in connec-
tion with 33 incidents in 1986.
As in previous years, the vast
majority of those arrested in
1988 were teenagers 111, or
approximately 90 percent,
were under 21 years of age.
Following are major factors
in the 1988 upsurge in the
numbers of anti-Semitic inci-
dents:
Skinheads. Responsibility
for 41 anti-Semitic incidents in
at least 15 states were claimed
by or attributed to the young
members of neo-Nazi Skinhead
gangs whose violent activities
continued to spread across the
country. According to the
most recent ADL report on the
movement, "Young and
Violent," more than 2,000
Skinheads are active in 21
states.
The Palestinian uprising in
the West Bank and Gaza. A
total of 117 incidents were
linked by their perpetrators to
the intifada accounting for
almost one out of 10 of the
anti-Semitic incidents in 1988.
The 50th anniversary of
Kristallnacht. More than 60
anti-Semitic incidents involv-
ing anti-Jewish graffiti and
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threats were reported during
the week of Nov. 6-13 from all
parts of the country in connec-
tion with observances of the
anniversary of the Nazi
destruction of synagogues and
Jewish property in Germany
and Austria. This compares
with about 15 such incidents a
week during most of the year.
An unusually large number
of incidents in the South. For
example, in addition to the
increase in Florida, vandalism
in Texas was up from seven
incidents in 1987 to 23 in 1988;
in Georgia, the number jumped
from 15 in 1987 to 22 in 1988
and in the harassment cate-
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1988; Alabama and Tennessee,
which had no incidents of van-
dalism in 1987, had eight each
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Yiddish Theater
Continued from Page 18
Yiddish. It doesn't take many
people to make it effective,"
Papp said.
In the future, he'd would like
to "commission first-class
American Jewish playwrights
or Jewish American play-
wrights, whichever you prefer
like David Mamet, to write a
play for this group.
"I'd work with Duvid'l. He
can write an original play and
we'd have it translated into
Yiddish."
What next for the Joe Papp
Yiddish Theater? A Miten
Zumerdiker Nachts Cholem,
eppes?
ADL AUDIT OF ANTI-SEMITIC EPISODES
VANDALISM
HARASSMENTS, THREATS AND ASSAULTS
YEAR-BY-YEAR
NATIONAL TOTALS
377
197
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<{
Page 20 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, February 10, 1989
Senior News
FROM THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
-r
I

The Comprehensive Senior Service Center, through a
Federal Grant Title III of the Older Americans Act,
provides a variety of services to persons 60 years or
older, along with interesting and entertaining, educa-
tional and recreational programs. All senior activities
are conducted in compliance with Title VI of the Civil
Rights Act and Section 504 of the Vocational Rehabilita-
tion Act of 1973.
The Jewish Community Center, 700 Spencer Drive, in
West Palm Beach, is an active place for all Seniors. Hot
kosher meals are served every day and programs and
activities will be scheduled throughout the year.
1

KOSHER MEALS
Kosher lunches are served
Monday through Friday at
11:15. The three locations are:
JCC in West Palm Beach, 700
Spencer Drive; JCC in Boyn-
ton Beach, 501 N.E. 26th Ave-
nue; and JCC in Delray Beach,
16189 Carter Road.
Meet new friends while
enjoying delicious, nutritious
food along with planned activi-
ties everyday. Volunteers are
always needed. No fee is
required but contributions are
requested. Reservations re-
quired. Call Carol in West
Palm Beach at 689-7700, Julia
in Boynton Beach at 582-7360,
or Nancy in Delray Beach at
495-0806. For transportation
call Department of Senior Ser-
vices 627-5765.
HIGHLIGHTS OF
KOSHER LUNCH
CONNECTION IN
WEST PALM BEACH
FOR FEBRUARY
Friday, Feb. 10 Sabbath
Services with Rabbi Morris
Pickholz of Temple B'nai
Jacob
Monday, Feb. 13 Fred
Bauman, Bingo
Tuesday, Feb. 14 To be
announced
Wednesday, Feb. 15 -
Helen Gold Nutritionist
Thursday, Feb. 16 Gerry
Fieldstone Israeli Sing-A-
Long on Electric Keyboard
Friday, Feb. 17 Sabbath
Services with Cantor Nat
Stein
KOSHER HOME
DELIVERED MEALS
Are you homebound? Is your
neighbor homebound? Are you
unable to cook for yourself?
Have you just come home from
the hospital and have no way
to maintain your daily nutri-
tional requirements? The Jew-
ish Community Center's
Kosher Home Delivered Meals
Service is just for you!!!
This is a most essential ongo-
ing or short term service for
the homebound. No fee, but
contributions requested. For
Boynton Beach, Lake Worth
or West Palm Beach call Carol
at 689-7700. In Delray Beach,
call Nancy at 495-0806.
JCC
TRANSPORTATION
SERVICE
The Jewish Community Cen-
ter is providing transportation
for persons who wish to visit
loved ones in nursing homes,
hospitals or have to go to Day
Care Centers. Tickets are
required for each one-way trip
and may be obtained from the
driver. Each one-way trip don-
ation is $1 and persons pur-
chasing blocks of ten will
receive two free. Reservations
are required. Call Libby at
689-7700 between 9:30 and
1:30. For medical and meal
site transportation, call the
division of senior services at
627-5765.
CLASSES AND
ACTIVITIES
Adult Education Courses
The Jewish Community Cen-
ter is proud to offer classes
provided by Palm Beach Com-
munity College and Palm
Beach County School Board
Adult Education. Fees are
required for these classes
along with registration. Call
Louise at 689-7700 for infor-
mation.
PALM BEACH COUNTY
ADULT EDUCATION,
SCHOOL BOARD
JCC Writers' Workshop
"Writing For Fun and Pleas-
ure" with Instructor Ruth
Graham. Would you like to
learn to paint a word picture?
Do you want to enrich your
writing for self discovery?
Learn to exercise your right
brain potential for hearing,
seeing and living more crea-
tively. Join our eight week
course that began Friday, Jan.
20th at 10 am. to 12. Fee: $3.
Call Louise for information
and registration at 689-7700.
PALM BEACH
COMMUNITY COLLEGE
ADULT EDUCATION
"Do You Feel Misunder-
stood? Do you often feel
misunderstood and find your-
self "putting up with it,"
"shutting up about it," or
"giving up?" This course will
zero in on how people bury
their feelings and often say
"I've done so well. Why do I
feel so bad?" You will be
taught how to communicate
your feelings, learn to be bet-
ter listeners, and become com-
fortable with making your own
decisions. Pre-registration a
must! Instructor: Faye Schec-
ter of P.B.C.C. for six weeks
starting on Wednesdays Feb.
15, 22, Mar. 1, 8, 15 and 22 at
10 a.m. at the JCC. Fee: $2.
Limited registration. Call
Louise at 689-7700.
Wisdom of the Body, Part
11 Are you responsible for
your own health? Become
aware of the pace of "Preven-
tion" and the quality of life you
want. Instructor, Gert Fried-
man of P.B.C.C. Adult Educa-
tion for 4 weeks starting
Thursday, Feb. 2, 9, 16 & 23 at
1:30 p.m. at the J.C.C. Fee
$3.00. Call Louise 689-7700 for
further information.
OTHER CLASSES
AND ACTIVITIES
Joys of Yiddish Join the
many who enjoy a bit of yid-
dishkait and humor every
Monday morning at 10 a.m. at
the JCC. Presenters: Leo
Treem, David Sandier, Pauline
Cohen, Dori Dasher and
others. Co-Group Coordinators
are Pauline Cohen & David
Sandier.
Timely Topics: Ongoing
Mondays, following lunch at
JCC. Time: Lunch at 1:15 -
Program at 2. A stimulating
group discussing an exciting
variety of topics including cur-
rent events. Those interested
in lunch, please call for reser-
vations at 689-7700. Ask for
Rita, Senior Department.
NEW CLASSES
The World of Drama -
Learn all the facets of Stage
and TV drama including the
technique of broadcasting
commercials for all media.
Director: Carl Martin, actor,
newscaster, TV moderator.
Dates: Tuesdays at 1:30 to
3:30 beginning February 7th
for eight sessions. Fee: $10.
Call Louise at 689-7700 for
reservations.
Intermediate Bridge with
Al Parsont Basic bidding
and play on Wednesdays, at
1:30 p.m. at the JCC. Fee: JCC
member $2.50 per session,
non-member $3 per session.
Call Louise at 689-7700.
Speakers Club Ongoing
Thursdays at 10 a.m. at JCC.
For persons who wish to prac-
tice the art of public speaking
a great group.
Prime Time Singles A
special music program is
planned for the February
meeting to be held at the Jew-
ish Community Center on
Thursday afternoon, February
9th at 1:30 p.m. All Singles are
invited to this active and excit-
ing Singles Group. Call Sally
at 478-9397 or Evelyn at 686-
6724 for reservations and
information.
PRIME TIME SHOWTIME
Famous Rappaports in Hal-
landale for lunch and show.
Yiddish and English "Vos is
Bashert is Bashert." Sun-
day, March 5th. Meet at Car-
teret Bank, Century Village,
W.P.B. at 12:30 p.m.
Join us for "Amadeus" on
April 16th at the Actors Rep-
ertory Theatre. Meet at Car-
teret Bank, Century Village,
W.P.B. at 1 p.m. Early Reser-
vations a Must!! Call Sally or
Evelyn for shows.
Sharpen Your Wits! The
JCC "Senior Smarts" group is
practicing for Thursday, Feb.
23rd final competition. Mem-
bers of the group who will
compete for a place on the P.B.
County team are: Lucy
Cooper, Miriam Dunst, Ruth
Kaplan, Shirley Weiss, Jerome
Coleman, Robert Fisher and
Irving Silverstein. Volunteer
staff working along with the
competitors are Carl Martin,
Moderator, Herman Birn-
baum, Co-Chair & Time-
keeper; Judges: Sophie & Joe
Russin; and Scorers Elaine
Ellis and Bea Cohen. The com-
petition will be held at the Mae
Volen Senior Center in Boca
Raton and is open to the pub-
lic. For more information call
Ellie at 689-7700.
Twilight Dining & Dancing
Enjoy an early evening
kosher dinner followed by
music and dancing before and
afterwards, coordinated by
our own JCC Disc Jockey, Izzie
Goldberg on Thursday, Feb.
16, at 4:30. No fee, contribu-
tion requested. Pre-
registration a must! Call
Louise at 689-7700.
YOUNG SINGLES (20s-40s)
Saturday, Feb. 11, 9 p.m. Saturday Night "Sweet-
heart Dance" Singles are invited by their Boca
counterparts to the annual Sweetheart Dance at the
Holiday Inn at Highland Beach. D.J., cash bar and hot and
cold hors d'oeuvres gentlemen, please wear jackets.
Cost: $8 for JCC members with card, $9 non members.
Tuesday, Feb. 14, 7:30 p.m. You are invited to the
JCC for an evening of chocolate delights. Be tempted and
tantalized by heavenly choices and indulge yourself! Come
one, come all, but please RSVP by Feb. 13th. Cost: $5 per
person.
SINGLE PURSUITS (40-59)
Sunday, Feb. 12, 2-5 p.m. The Single Pursuits (40-59)
Culture Club will meet at the "Society Of The Four Arts"
in Palm Beach to view the current exhibit. Afterward we'll
tour the lovely Japanese Garden and library next door.
Cost: Donation of your choice. Join us for this delightful
day.
SINGLE PURSUITS (40-59)
Sunday, Feb. 12, 2-5 p.m. The Single Pursuits (40-59)
Culture Club will meet at the "Society Of The 4 Arts" in
Palm Beach to view the current exhibit. Afterward we'll
tour the lovely Japanese Garden and library next door.
Cost: Donation of your choice. Join us for this delightful
day.
Tuesday, Feb. 14, 5 p.m. Meet for hors d'oeuvres and
drinks at the Crazy Horse Tavern on Northlake Blvd.
(opposite the Twin City Mall). Join us for an early mid week
break.
Wednesday, Feb. 15, 7:30 p.m. View a dress
rehearsal of "Getting Along Famously" at the Duncan
Watson Theatre at Palm Beach Community College in
Lake Worth.
Thursday, Feb. 16, 7:30 p.m. The Culture Club will
meet at a member's home. Join us with your thoughts and
ideas for future events. Refreshments will be served. Cost:
$2
* For more information, call the JCC, 689-7700.
JCC CULTURAL CLUB NEWS
BY SONDRA WERBEL
CHAIRPERSON
VIZCAYA HOUSE
& GARDENS
DOCENT TOUR
Enjoy a great afternoon at
fabulous Vizcaya in Miami.
Bring a sandwich or snack. We
will picnic lunch on the
grounds. Drinks can be pur-
chased. Bus leaves Carte ret
Bank at W.P.B. Century Vil-
lage at 9:15 a.m. on Thursday,
Feb. 9, 1989. Fee: $11 for
members, $12 for non-
members. Call Louise at 689-
7700. Your check is your res-
ervation!
END OF MONTH TOUR
MUSUEM OF
MODERN ART,
FT. LAUDERDALE
Docent tour of unusual
exhibit of young expressionist
artists from Israel plus a new
exhibit by Leon Kroll as well
as permanent collection.
Transportation included. Bus
leaves Carteret Bank
at W.P.B. at Century Village
at noon on Thursday, Feb.
23rd. Bring your own snack.
Fee: $8 for members, $10 for
non-members. Your check to
J.C.C. is your reservation. Fee
must be paid by Feb. 20th. Call
Louise at 689-7700 for further
information.
AT YOUR SERVICE
The Jewish Community Cen-
ter provides by appointment:
Health Insurance Assistance
with Edie Reiter; Legal Aid by
Palm Beach County Legal Aid
Society; Home Financial Man-
agement with Herb Kirsh. Call
Louise for information at 689-
7700.
VOLUNTEER NEWS
"Hi-Neighbor" the very
special JCC Mitzvah Corps is a
group of persons reaching out
keeping in touch with our
homebound and others in
need. Join this dedicated
group of persons who enioy
doing Mitzvahs. Call Ellie
Newcorn at 689-7700.
Volunteers Needed: Tele-
phone receptionists. Grand-
mas and Grandpas wanted
pre-school classroom aides for
2 to 4 year olds. Creativity
Crafts assistant for pre-school.
Yiddish instructor. Call Ellen
at 689-7700.
NEIGHBOR HELPING
NEIGHBOR
A consortium program with
Jewish Family and Children's
Services. Persons interested in
being trained to work in a new
Alzheimer's program a few
hours a week at $4 per hour.
Call Barbara at JFCS 684-
1991.
CLASSES IN
BOYNTON BEACH
The JCC will be providing a
variety of classes and pro-
grams at Congregation Beth
Kodesh along with the daily
hot Kosher lunch program.
"Planning Strategy for
Quality Health Care" Mak-
ing informed decisions for
affordable, accessible, quality
health care. Instructor: Gert
Friedman of P.B.C.C, Adult
Education. Starts Monday
February 6th at 9:30 a.m. Fee:
$3. Call Julia at 582-7360 for
reservations.


Friday, February 10, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 21
AMIT WOMEN
Rishona Chapter will meet
on Wednesday, Feb. 22 at 1
p.m. at the American Savings
and Loan Bank, West Gate of
Century Village.
HADASSAH
A viva Chapter will hold its
general meeting on Monday,
Feb. 13, noon at the First
Methodist Church, Jog and
Dillman Roads. The program
will be "Yiddish is Alive and
Well in Florida." The program
will include songs from the
"Pinafore" sung in Yiddish.
Refreshments will be served.
The chapter will attend a
Matinee Luncheon at the Al
Hirschfield Theatre, Miami
Beach on Sunday, Feb. 26.
Nanette Fabray will appear in
The Prince of Central Park."
Henrietta Szold Chapter
will have a general member-
Teacher Seminar
Continued from Page 2
Using the facilities of the new
Teacher Center, seminar par-
ticipants will create instruc-
tional aids, use role playing
activities and learn now to
integrate audio-visual materi-
als for teaching Jewish history
at different age levels.
Dr. Chanover is general edi-
tor of Home Start, and author
of When A Jew Celebrates,
When A Jew Prays and When
A Jew Seeks Wisdom, among
many others. A part-time resi-
dent in Palm Beach County,
Dr. Chanover is also nationally
recognized as an exciting lec-
turer and teacher par excel-
lence.
For more information on
this seminar or other Teacher
Center activities, call Dr.
Elliot Schwartz, Education
Director, Jewish Federation,
832-2120, or Ruth Levow at
the Teacher Center, 588-9610.
Obituaries
HERMAN, Dorothy, 85, of West Palm
Beach. Riverside Guardian Funeral
Home, West Palm Beach.
KAYE, Harry, of Boynton Beach.
Levitt Weinstein Guaranteed
Security Plan Chapel, West Palm
Beach.
KEITZ, Frances, 72, of West Palm
Beach. Riverside Guardian Funeral
Home, West Palm Beach.
KLEIN, Sheila, 75, of Lake Worth.
Riverside Guardian Funeral Home,
West Palm Beach.
LASKIN, Seymour I., 32, of Lake
Worth. Beth-Israel Rubin Family
Protection Plan Chapel, Delray
Beach.
LIPPMAN, Murray M., 70, of Boynton
Beach. Beth-Israel Rubin Family
Protection Plan Chapel.
MILLER, Dr. Morris M of West
Palm Beach, died Sunday. Levitt-
Weinstein Memorial Chapel, West
Palm Beach.
PASS, Robert, 81, of West Palm
Beach. Levitt-Weinstein Guar-
anteed Security Plan Chapel, West
Palm Beach.
POLESIR, Allen, 77, of Boynton
Beach. Levitt-Weinstein Guar-
anteed Security Plan Chapel, West
Palm Beach.
SAKOWITZ, Phillip, 70, of Lake
Worth. Riverside Guardian Funeral
Home, West Palm Beach.
SCHIMMEL, Abraham, 88, of West
Palm Beach. Menorah Gardens &
Funeral Chapels, West Palm Beach.
STROW, Joseph, 74, of West Palm
Beach. Levitt-Weinstein Guar-
anteed Security Plan Chapel, West
Palm Beach.
ship meeting on Tuesday, Feb.
21 at 1 p.m. at Lakeside Vil-
lage, Palm Springs. Students
from the Midrasha Judaica
High School will speak on their
experiences on visiting concen-
tration camps in Eastern
Europe, followed by a visit to
Israel.
The Lee Vassil Chapter is
planning a trip on the S.S.
Discovery, on Thursday, Feb.
16. The trip originates from
Nassau Square on Lake Worth
Road from 7:30 a.m. to 5:30
p.m. Join the fun, 2 meals,
casino, entertainment, and
many other activities.
Tikvah special events.
March 12 Bat Mitzvah celebra-
tion, Sunday afternoon at the
Palm Hotel, kosher dinner, the
Sam Lewis orchestra.
March 16 Regency Spa, 4
days, 3 nights with 3 meals a
day, messages and entertain-
ment.
March 26 Card Party and
Brunch in the Party Room.
PARENTS OF
NORTH AMERICAN
ISRAELIS
The group will meet at
1 p.m., Sunday, Feb. 19 at the
Royal Palm Club House, Boyn-
ton Beach.
Guest speaker will be
Michael C. Hutt, associate di-
rector for the Florida region
American Israel Public Affairs
Committee (A.I.P.A.C.). His
topic will be "American-Israeli
Relations"
WOMEN'S AMERICAN
ORT
PGA Chapter is having a
luncheon and card party on
Feb. 20 at noon at Tanglewood
Clubhouse, Palm Beach Gar-
dens.
MOSAIC Sunday, February 12, 11 a.m. WPTV
Channel 5, with host Barbara Gordon Green. Interview
with Neil Gabler, author of "An Empire Of Their Own,
How The Jews Invented Hollywood."
L'CHAYIM Sunday, February 12, 7:30 a.m. WPBR
1340 AM with host Rabbi Mark S. Golub The Jewish
Listener's Digest, a radio magazine.
PAGE ONE Sunday, Feb. 12, 8 a.m. WPBR 1340
AM A weekly review of news and issues pertinent to the
Jewish community, sponsored by the Simon Wiesenthal
Center with host Richard Trank.
THE RABBI LEON FINK SHOW Sunday, February
12,2 p.m.-5 p.m. WPBR AM, with host Rabbi Leon Fink.
A Jewish talk show that features weekly guests and call-in
discussions.
TRADITION TIME Sunday, February 12, 11 p.m.
Monday-Wednesday, February 13-15, WCVG 1080 AM -
This two-hour Jewish entertainment show features Jewish
music, comedy, and news.
Sponsored by the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County.
Friday, Feb. 10 Einstein Col ege of Medicine Board of
Overseers Meeting at the Palm Beach Country
Club, 10 a.m. Free Sons of Israel, board, 10 a.m.
Federation, Leadership Development "Shab-
bat Dinner," at the Airport Hilton, 6 p.m.
Federation, Endowment Meeting, 8 a.m.
Saturday, Feb. 11 Brandeis University, Palm Beach
Reception at the Flagler Museum, 5:30 p.m.
B'nai B'rith Yachad, Ladies Luncheon Temple
Beth Torah Sisterhood, Casino Night Temple
Beth El, Auction.
Saturday, Feb. 12 Einstein College of Medicine, Dinner
at the Breakers, 6 p.m. Brandeis University,
Brunch at the Breakers, 11 a.m. Congregation
Aitz Chaim Sisterhood, Mini Lunch/Card Party,
10:30 a.m. Jewish Community Center, Children's
Performing Arts Series, 2 p.m. Morse Geriatric
Center, 7th Annual Meeting of the Board of
Trustees, at the Center, 10 a.m. Federation,
Poinciana Place Luncheon at Temple Beth Sho-
lom, 12:30 p.m.
Monday, Feb. 13 Federation Executive Committee,
4:30 p.m. Women's American ORT Fountains,
House Tour Week Women's American ORT
Palm Beach, board, 9:30 a.m. Hadassah "Angel
of Mercy" Luncheon at the Breakers Federa-
tion, Super Sunday Committee Meeting, 7:30
p.m. Federation, Jewish Community Campus
Building Committee, 4:30 p.m.
Tuesday, Feb. 14 Federation, Leadership Develop-
ment Committee, 7:30 p.m. Hadassah Hen-
rietta Szold, board, 1 p.m. Temple Beth Torah
Sisterhood, 8 p.m. Yiddish Culture Group
Century Village, 10 a.m. American Jewish
Congress, board, 1 p.m. Temple Beth El, Study
Group, noon Na'Amit USA Theodore Herzl,
board, 10 a.m. Women's American ORT West
Palm Beach, 12:30 p.m. B'nai B'rith Century,
7:30 p.m. Temple Beth Zion, Executive Board, 8
p.m. Hadassah Lee Vassil, board Jewish Arts
Foundation, Raoul Wallenberg: Acts of Courage
A documentary exhibit, 2/14-3/13 at the Palm
Beach County Government Center, West Palm
Beach.
Wednesday, Feb. 15 Lake Worth Jewish Center
Sisterhood, Luncheon, noon B'nai B'rith No.
3016, 7:30 p.m. Hadassah-Shalom, 12:30 p.m.
B'nai B'rith Women Olam, board, 10 a.m.
Na'Amat USA Golda Meir, 12:30 p.m. Federa-
tion, Young Adult Division Campaign Cabinet
Meeting, 7 p.m. Federation, Human Resource
Development, Sub-Committee on Outreach, 5:15
p.m. Federation, Women's Division, Executive
Committee, 10 a.m. Federation, Mini-Mission,
Land of the Presidents, 9 a.m. Federation,
Women's Division, Phon-A-Thon, 5:30 p.m.
Thursday, Feb. 16 B'nai B'rith Palm Beach Council,
board, 10 a.m. Hadassah-Z'Hava, 1 p.m. New
York-UJA Federation Palm Beach Dinner at the
Breakers Federation, Maimonides (Physicians)
Steering Committee, 5:30 p.m.
For further information call the Jewish Federation SSt-lltO.
A wedge ol Jarbivig makes a simple Sunday
one of life's special pleasures. Mild, all natural
Jarlsberg imported from Norwaybelongs
in your life It's all natural, high in calcium
and protein Don't let another Sunday slip by
without great tasong Jarlsberg
Jarlsberg
makes it special
mr



Page 22 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, February 10, 1989

II
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Religious Directory
CONSERVATIVE
BOYNTON BEACH JEWISH CENTER-BETH KODESH: 501
NE 26 Avenue, Boynton Beach 33435. Phone 586-9428. Rabbi
Joel Chazin. Cantor Abraham Koster. Daily, 8:30 a.m. Sabbath
services, Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.
CONGREGATION ANSHEI SHOLOM: 5348 Grove Street
West Palm Beach 33417. Phone 684-3212. Office hours 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. Rabbi Isaac Vander Walde. Cantor Mordecai Spektor. Daily
services 8:30 a.m. and 5 p.m. Friday night 5 p.m. and 8:15 p.m.
Saturday 9 a.m. and 5:30 p.m.
GOLDEN LAKES TEMPLE: 1470 Golden Lakes Boulevard
West Palm Beach 33411. Phone 689-9430. Rabbi Joseph Speiser!
Daily services 8 a.m. Sabbath services Friday 8:15 p.m. Saturday
9 a.m. For times of evening services please call the Temple office.
LAKE WORTH JEWISH CENTER: 4550 Jog Road, Lake
Worth. Phone 967-3600. Rabbi Richard K. Rocklin. Cantor
Abraham Mehler. Services Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID: 4657 Hood Road, Palm Beach Gardens
33418. Phone 694-2350. Rabbi Randall J. Konigsburg. Cantor
Earl J. Rackoff. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m., Saturday 9:30
a.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 2815 No. Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach
33407. Phone 833-0339. Rabbi Alan L. Cohen. Cantor Norman
Brody. Sabbath services Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9:30 a.m.
Daily Minyan 8:15 a.m., Sunday and legal holidays 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 315 No. "A" Street, Lake Worth
33460. Phone 585-5020. Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg. Cantor
Howard Dardashti. Services Monday and Thursday, 8:15 a.m.
Friday evening, 8:15 p.m., Saturday, 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 224 NW Avenue G, Belle Glade
33430. Phone 996-3886. Services: Second Wednesday of every
month, 7:30 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH ZION: 129 Sparrow Drive, Royal Palm Beach,
FL 33411. Phone 798-8888. Sabbath services Friday 8 p.m.,
Saturday 9 a.m. Rabbi Stefan J. Weinberg.
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB: 2177 So. Congress Ave., West Palm
Beach 33406. Phone 433-5957. Sabbath services Friday 8 p.m.,
Saturday and holidays 9 a.m., Monday through Friday 9 a.m.
Rabbi Morris Pickholz. Cantor Andrew E. Beck.
TEMPLE EMANUEL: 190 North County Road, Palm Beach
33480. Phone 832-0804. Rabbi Leonid Feldman. Cantor David
Feuer. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m.; Saturday 9:30 a.m. Daily
8:15 a.m.
TEMPLE TORAH: Lions Club, 3615 West Boynton Beach
Boulevard, Boynton Beach 33437. Mailing address: 9851D Mili-
tary Trail, Box 360091, Boynton Beach 33436. Phone 736-7687.
Cantor Alex Chapin. Sabbath Services Friday evening 8 p.m.;
Saturday 9 a.m.
TREASURE COAST JEWISH CENTER CONGREGATION
BETH ABRAHAM: 3998 SW Leighton Farms Road, Palm City
33490. Mailing address: P.O. Box 2996, Stuart 33495. Phone
287-8833. Services Friday evenings 8 p.m. and Saturday 10 a.m.
ORTHODOX
CHABAD HOUSE LUBAVITCH: 4623 Forest Hill Blvd.,
West Palm Beach, 108-3, 33415. Phone 641-6167. Rabbi Shlomo
Ezagui. Sabbath Services, Saturday, 10 a.m.
CONGREGATION AITZ CHAIM: 2518 N. Haverhill Road, West
Palm Beach 33417. Phone 686-5055. Sabbath services 8:45 a.m.
and 7:30 p.m. Daily services 8:15 a.m. and 6:15 p.m. Rabbi Oscar
Werner.
REFORM
CONGREGATION BETH ISRAEL: 1390 SW Dorchester
Street, P.O. Box 857146, Port St. Lucie, FL 33452. Phone
335-7620. Friday night services 8 p.m., Saturday morning 10:30
a.m.
TEMPLE BETH AM: 759 Parkway Street, Jupiter. Phone
747-1109. Services Friday 7:45 p.m.
Student Rabbi Peter Schaktman.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 4600 Oleander Avenue, Fort Pierce, FL
34982. Phone 461-7428. Sabbath Services Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM: St. Helen's Parish Hall 20th
Avenue and Victory Boulevard, Vero Beach 32960 Mailing
address: P.O. Box 2113, Vero Beach, FL 32961-2113. Rabbi Jay
R. Davis. Phone 1-569-4700.
TEMPLE BETH TORAH: 900 Big Blue Trace, West Palm
Beach, FL 33414. Phone 793-2700. Friday services 8:15 p.m.
Saturday morning 10 a.m. Rabbi Steven R. Westman. Cantor
Elliot Rosenbaum.
TEMPLE ISRAEL: 1901 No. Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach
33407. Phone 833-8421. Rabbi Howard Shapiro. Cantor Muart
Pittle. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE JUDEA: 100 Chillingworth Drive, West Palm Beach
FL 33409. Rabbi Joel L. Levine. Cantor Anne Newman. Phone
471-1526.
Friday, February 10, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 23
Synagogue News
BOYNTON BEACH
JEWISH CENTER
BETH KODESH
The Temple has program-
med an interesting speaker for
Friday, Feb. 10, at 8:15 p.m.,
designated "Federation Sab-
bath." Neil P. Newstein, Exec-
utive Director of Jewish Fam-
ily and Children's Service of
Palm Beach County, will speak
on "Outreach of Jewish Fam-
ily and Children's Service to
the Jewish community." The
public is invited to attend and
enjoy the Oneg Shabbat fol-
lowing.
An Adult Education pro-
gram of eight sessions will
begin on Thursday, Feb. 16,
9:30 a.m. and run on succes-
sive Thursdays to April 6.
The initial program will be
Introductory Hebrew, con-
ducted by Dr. Harry Hasel-
korn.
At 10:30 a.m. Rabbi Joel
Chazin will discuss Contem-
porary History and his subject
will be "The Jew Meets the
Modem Age." As part of the
Adult Education Program, on
Feb. 23 at 10 a.m., special
guest lecturer, Professor Joel
Roth of the Jewish Theological
Seminary, will speak on "Land
For Peace in the Perspective
of Jewish Law."
The Yiddish Cultural Circle
meets on the first Wednesday
of each month at 10 a.m. All
are invited.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID
Dr. Joel Roth will appear as
Scholar-in-Residence on Feb.
17 and 18 in conjunction with
the Jewish Theological Semin-
ary United Synagogue of
America, Southeast Region.
Dr. Roth is chairman of the
Law and Standards Commit-
tee of the Rabbinical Assem-
bly. He is the former Dean of
the Rabbinical School at the
Jewish Theological Seminary,
where he serves as a Professor
of Talmud and Rabbinics.
The program for the week-
end will commence at Sabbath
services Friday evening, Feb.
17 at 8 p.m. with a lecture by
Dr. Roth entitled "Jewish Law
and the Conservative Move-
ment, an Overview." At Satur-
day morning, Feb. 18 services,
which will begin at 9:30 a.m.,
Dr. Roth will discuss "How
Ancient Laws Can Change to
Fit the Modern World." Mem-
bers of the community are
invited to attend both services.
A special patrons reception
will be held at 7 p.m., Saturday
evening, Feb. 18. For a fee of
$25, patrons of the weekend
will be entitled to attend this
cocktail reception with Dr.
Roth. He will talk about "The
Law Committee, Jewish Law
in Operation."
For further information,
contact the Temple office.
TEMPLE ISRAEL
On Friday evening Feb. 10,
at 8 p.m. Temple Shabbat ser-
vice will be conducted by Rabbi
Howard Shapiro. His sermon
will be: "A Sneak Preview of a
Scholar in Residence." Cantor
Stuart Pittle and the congre-
gational choir will lead the
congregation in songs. Every-
one is invited.
TEMPLE JUDEA
Temple's second Experien-
tial Shabbat is scheduled for
Friday, Feb. 10 at 7 p.m. in
Meyer Hall. Families are
requested to bring a picnic
Shabbat dinner, candles, wine,
and challah. Students from
Joseph Komins' fifth grade
class will conduct a Kabbalat
Shabbat ceremony prior to din-
ner. Following dinner, Sandy
Lerman, Temple Judea's art
specialist, will lead everyone in
an experiential craft project.
The Shabbat experience will
conclude with a play entitled
"Oh God, My God" presented
by the Temple's fifth graders.
Childcare will be available
beginning at 7:30 p.m. in order
to encourage even the young-
est tots to partake in part of
the evening.
For worshippers desiring a
formal Shabbat service, Dave
Silverman will conduct Ser-
vices at 8 p.m. in the Bakst
Family Chapel. An Oneg Shab-
bat will follow the service
sponsored by Sisterhood.
TEMPLE BETH ZION
A joint Men's Club/Sister-
hood breakfast meeting on
Sunday, Feb. 12 at 9:30 a.m.
will feature Jack Streiner who
will describe his recent trip to
Alaska.
We just cut the cost of a funeral
service to under $40 a month
Lode what under $40 a month covers!
Chapel services, solid hardwood casket,
limousine, professional funeral director,
shivah benches, acknowledgement cards
...and more.
Todaywhile there is time, call the
i Guaranteed Security Plan from Levitt-
Weinstein. VNfe will hold the cost of a
' funeral service to under $40 a month
... if you act now. Then, when your
family needs us most, we
complete all of your
prearrangements.
Shouldn't you
cut out these
numbers and
call today?
'Based on a nominal downpayment
and 50 monthly interest-free 'pay-
ments of $39.95. Ask for detail-
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407-689-8700
Levitt$Weinstein
MEMORIAL CHAPELS
... because the grief is enough
to handle later.
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Page 24 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, February 10, 1989
{'
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RICH TASTE AT V2 THE TAR
SURGEON GENERAL'S WARNING: Smoking
Causes Lung Cancer, Heart Disease,
Emphysema, And May Complicate Pregnancy.
5 mg. "tar". 0.5 mg. nicotine av. per cigarette by FTC method
c tfJ XtYNOlOS TOBACCO CO
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Friday, February 10, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 9
Honored At Palm Beach Reception
Rena Blumberg, Helene Gordon, Carol Greenbaum, Irving Mazer, General Campaign Chair-
WD President. man and Lee Mazer Irene Bernstein, Jeanne Levy, Fran Newman.


Hilda Salmanson, Marion Copellman, Ruth Wilensky, Ruth Bernstein, Florence May Z. LeVine, Rochelle Zuckerman, Esther Gruber, Norma Rosenthal, Esther
Robbins.
Molat.
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Anita flosen, Jlfarva Perrin, Dorothy Segel, Judy Messing.
Louise Stein, Sheryl Davidoff, Mildred Hecht Wohlgemuth, Linda Frankel, Carol Goodman,
Beverly Wagner, Jewell Morris.
Standing (l-r) Beulah Levine, Rita Dee Hassenfeld, Jeanne Fogel, Hermine Wiener, Cynnie List, Grace Hokin, Berenice Rogers, Jeanette Weisman, Tubby Stayman,
Jacqueline Eder. Sitting (l-r) Harriet Miller, Ceil Rosen.


Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, February 10, 1989
Women's Division Lion Of Judah Recipients
A spectacular reception in honor of Lion of Judah recipients was
held Wednesday, Jan. 25, hosted by Mrs. Miles Fiterman at her
home in Palm Beach. Special guest speaker was Rena Blumberg,
a distinguished broadcaster, author, lecturer and civic activist.
Pictured at left are Eileen Nickman, Chair, Ruby Lion of Judah,
Sheila Engelstein, WD Campaign Chair, Dorothy Adler, Co-
Chair, Lion of Judah, Rena Blumberg, Shirley Fiterman, Zelda
Mason, Co-Chair, Lion of Judah.
Ellen Block, UJA National WD Board & National Campaign Cabinet Member,
Ida Rapoport, Virginia Weiss, Helen Yulman, Susanne Kornreich.
Nancy Dickson, Marilyn Lampert, Lenore Abrams, Gladys Kaufman. Sitting
(W) Dr. Daisy Merey, Faye Cooper, Claire Rosenblatt.
Shirley Leibow, Lillian Kofjhr, Janet Showe, Irene Greenbaum, Selma Daniels.
Standing (l-r) Sara Grandberg, Pauline Rose, Marilyn Winer, Bea Shore, Mindi foTowZk ^Zl^^^TJ^^^^0^' Diane Shapiro, HeU*
Belsky. Sitting (l-r) Peppy Silverstein, Pauline Diamond, Jeanne Glasser. ScZ?u!r KoeWel- Sitting (l-r) Sally Pinter, Sara Bxenstock, Vivian