The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County the voice of the Jewish community of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
West Palm Beach, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 11, no. 27 (Sept. 13, 1985)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Feb. 20, 1987 called no. 4 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Mar. 31, 1989 called no. 12 in masthead and no. 13 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44605643
lccn - sn 00229551
ocm44605643
System ID:
AA00014309:00124

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)


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Full Text
THE VOICE OF
THE JEWISH
COMMUNITY OF
PALM BEACH
COUNTY
thjewish floridian
^ W OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
Volume 15 Number 6
PALM BEACH, FLORIDA FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 1989
r~<
Price 40 Cents
Major Gifts Dinner Raises $3 Million
A total of $3 million was
announced in pledges to the
1989 Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County/United
Jewish Appeal Campaign dur-
ing the Major Gifts Dinner
held Jan. 23 at the Breakers in
Palm Beach. Myron Nickman,
Major Gifts Chairman, noted
that contributions by those in
attendance represented a 15
percent increase over the prior
year.
As a result of this event and
other successful fundraising
events which have helped to
kick-off the 1989 Campaign,
Irving Mazer, General Cam-
paign Chairman, indicated
that the pace of giving has
increased remarkably over last
year. Major donors and com-
munity leaders who have made
their commitments at this time
have responded generously to
the increased needs of the
Jewish community of the Palm
Beaches as well as to the on-
going needs of Israel and Jews
around the world. This re-
sponse is essential to set the
pace for the 1989 Campaign
and Mr. Mazer said it is his
hope that when every member
of the community hears the
message about the need to
raise allocations locally and for
UJA, they will respond gener-
ously.
The guest of honor at the
Major Gifts Dinner was noted
author and columnist, William
Safire who discussed the new
Bush administration and the
effects it will have on Israel.
William Safire with Eileen and Myron Nickman,
Major Gifts Chairman.
CHANGING OF THE GUARD American and Israeli leaders gathered in Jerusalem at a
dinner hosted by Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir, center. The dinner honored Morris B. Abram,
second from left, upon completion of his term as chairman of the Conference of Presidents of Major
American Jewish Organizations, and welcomed Seymour D. Reich, second from right, his
successor. At left is Shimon Peres, Israel's Finance Minister. Right, Malcolm Hoenlein, executive
director of the Presidents Conference.
FBI Investigation Into Super Bowl Slur
By TOM TUGEND
LOS ANGELES (JTA) -
The FBI has opened an investi-
gation to determine how pirate
broadcasters were able to dis-
rupt a cable telecast of the
Super Bowl with anti-Semitic
remarks.
Jim Nielson, in charge of
media investigations for the
FBI, said the agency's Los
Angeles office has an "inter-
ception of communication case
Inside
Women's Division
Pacesetter's
Committee...........Page 2
Old Port Cove Cocktail
Reception.............Pag 3
What's To Blame For
Jewish Substance
Abuse?..................Pre 4
Safire To Be guest on
"Mosaic"............Pag* 10
Major Gifts Dinner
Photo Spread.....Pai5
to determine whether a federal
violation has occurred in this
matter."
"We're not really sure how
this illegal transmission was
made," said Kyle Smith, gen-
eral manager of Century
Southwest Cable in Santa
Monica, Calif. "Whoever did it
used a sophisticated degree of
technology."
The audio break-in occurred
during the first half of the San
Francisco 49ers-Cincinnati
Bengals football game that
Century was picking up from
the NBC television network.
While the screen continued
to show the action on the field,
viewers first heard a few bars
of music and then two men
talking over the voices of the
NBC game announcers.
Smith said the first man
mentioned the name of Bill
Rosendahl, vice president of
the cable firm, who also has a
weekly interview show with
community leaders.
The man then continued,
"This is Century Southwest
Cable with Bill Rosendahl.
There are too many (obscenity
deleted) Jews in the entertain-
ment industry."
A second man then broke in,
saying "We have to cut you
off, Bill, because you can't say
those things on TV."
Rosendahl said he was "baf-
fled, shocked and outraged"
and that he knew of no motive
for the broadcast break-in,
which was followed by a tele-
phoned bomb threat against
the station. The building was
evacuated and searched, but
no bomb was found.
Officials at the cable station
said that the studio was vacant
all weekend and that they
found no evidence of tamper-
ing with the equipment.
Rosendahl said the piracy
probably came from a "trans-
mitter that beamed to our
antenna."
David Lehrer, regional
director of the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith, said that while pirate
broadcasters had popped up at
other stations across the coun-
try, to his knowledge this was
the first one to have an anti-
Semitic slant.
Lehrer noted that Century
cable regularly carries the pro-
grams of the local Jewish Tele-
vision network and that
Rosendahl had been helpful in
facilitating this arrangement.
The cable station has
100,000 subscribers, mainly in
the West Los Angeles area,
which has a large Jewish popu-
lation. Broadcasts to other
parts of the city apparently
were not interrupted.
Another U.S. PLO Meeting
WASHINGTON (JTA) Prior to leaving office, President
Reagan asked Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak to impress
upon the Palestine Liberation Organization that "it must match
moderate words with constructive deeds."
White House spokesman Marlin Fitzwater said that the
request was contained in a "paragraph reference" within a
two-and-a-half-page letter to Mubarak.
Fitzwater would not release the letter to reporters, but said it
also "expresses pride in the strengthening of the U.S.-Egyptian
partnership over the past eight years," and affirms U.S. support
for Egyptian economic reform.
Fitzwater denied reports that Reagan had sent a letter to the
Palestine Liberation Organization.
But he and State Department spokesman Charles Redman
confirmed that U.S. Ambassador to Tunisia Robert Pelletreau
Continued on Page 13



Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, February 3, 1989
Women's Division Pacesetters' Committee
Women's Division Pacesetters' Co-Chairs and Committee members met at the home of Shirlee
Blonder in Palm Beach to plan for the upcoming $1,200-$U,999 commitment event given on behalf of
the Women's Division 1989 Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County-United Jewish Appeal Cam-
paign. A "Petite Luncheon" will be held on Wednesday, February 22,11 a.m. at the home of Mrs.
Robert Eigen in Palm Beach. Guest speaker will be Tanya Zieman, a prominent former Russian
refusenik. Standing (l-r) Shirlee Blonder, Sandra Goldberg, Sandra Rosen, Pacesetters' Co-
Chairs, Carol Greenbaum, WD President, Sheila Engelstein, WD Campaign Chair, Adele Simon,
Pacesetters' Co-Chair.
Shirlee Blonder and Dorothy Blonder.
Standing (l-r) Alice Zipkin, Ronnie Roth, Jerry Freedman, Ruth Sherwood, Esther Molat, Janet
Showe.
Hold The Date
Women's Division
Of The Jewish Federation
Of Palm Beach County
Open Board Meeting
March 15,1989
9:30 a.m.
Palm Beach Airport Hilton
For more information, contact Faye Nelson,
Director, Women's Division, Jewish Federation.
832-2120
High Ridge Celebrates Federation Day.
High Ridge Country Club
will host "Federation Day," a
day-long celebration, Friday,
Feb. 17, in support of the 1989
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County/United Jewish
Appeal Campaign. For the
second year in a row, the tradi-
tional golf tournament and
luncheon has been expanded to
include something for every
member tennis matches,
High Ridge will host a day-long celebration on behalf of the 1989 Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County/United Jewish Appeal Campaign on Friday, February 17. This year's festivities will
include a continental breakfast, 9-hole golf tournament, 18-hole golf tournament, tennis, buffet
luncheon, card games, raffles, a cocktail party and dinner at which awards will be presented.
Chairman Jesse Cohen and the committee met recently to finalize plans for the event. Standing (l-r)
Bill Spitalny, Harold Wolfson, Albert Levine, William Weiss, Richard Bornstein. Seated, Jesse
Cohen, Chairman, Federation Day.
card games, 9-hole and 18-hole
golf tournaments, raffles and
socializing.
The festivities will begin
with a continental breakfast
followed by a 9-hole golf tour-
nament and tennis competi-
tion. A delicious luncheon will
also be served. In the after-
noon, members may choose to
participate in an 18-hole tour-
nament or card games for non-
golfers. The evening events
will include a cocktail party
and dinner with music, raffles
and the presentation of
awards. Raffle prizes include
color televisions and video cas-
sette recorders.
Jesse Cohen, Chairman of
the event, noted that the High
Ridge Country Club has gener-
ously donated all food and
drinks so all funds raised will
go directly to the Campaign.
He also emphasized that the
High Ridge Federation/UJA
Committee is dedicated to
making Federation Day the
highlight of the year for all
members.
Members of the committee
include Richard Bornstein,
Harriet Baime, Naomi Cohen,
Morris Fellner, Jordan Glass-
man, Leonard Granoff, Ethel
Halpern, Ben Kaganov, Mike
Klebanoff, Joyce Koslow,
Hilton Leibow, Albert Levine,
Sidney Levine, Terri May,
Philip Meshberg, Samuel
Patent, Sheldon Perlick, Mar-
tin Rosen, Howard Ruskin,
Vera Schiff, William Spitalny,
Joe Stein, Jack Sussman,
Jerome Usdan, Morty Weiss
and Harold Wolfson.
For more information, con-
tact Lynne Stolzer, Campaign
Director, Jewish Federation,
832-2120.
Standing (l-r) Shirley Leibow, Joseph Stein, Mori Weiss, Ben Kaganov. Sitting (l-r) Tim O'Neill,
golf pro, Richard Bornstein, Betty Chudnow, Joyce Koslow.
fESS ^vTJ^f' Jack s**m, Jerry Usdan, Eleanor
Fleischman. Seated, Ethel Halpern.


Old Port Cove
Cocktail Reception
Friday, February 3, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 3
Dora Roth Addresses Covered Bridge Breakfast
Over 100 people attended a Cocktail Reception at the Old Port
Cove Yacht Club, Monday, January 28, at 4 p.m. Featured guest
speaker was Dora Roth, a special Israeli UJA consultant, who
addressed many of the national and international issues facing
Israel today and. the critical need for continued support of Israel.
Standing (l-r) Joyce Yeckes, Helen Hauben, Honorary Chairman,
Barbara Brams.
Dora Roth, a special Israeli
UJA consultant, will be the
featured guest speaker at a
Breakfast for residents of Cov-
ered Bridge, Sunday, Feb. 19,
9:30 a.m., at the Covered
Bridge Country Club.
Mrs. Roth, who is in South
Florida as a Federation United
Jewish Appeal fundraiser, was
a victim of Nazi barbarism
during her teen years and
knows first-hand the vital
necessity of building a strong
Jewish state. Goldie Bern-
stein, Chair, and Anne Gross-
berg, Co-Chair of the event,
stated, "We are very honored
to have Mrs. Roth share her
varied experience as an Israeli
and Holocaust survivor with
us. She's a vibrant, optimistic
person, a dynamic and articu-
late speaker whose passion, elo-
quence and experiences tell
the story of Israel."
Dora Roth spent two years
in the ghetto in Vilna and four
years in Stuthof concentration
Standing (l-r) Lester Ram, Judith Tannenbaum, Herbert Tannenbaum, Ann Charles, Jean Ram,
Carl K. Nitzer.
Standing (l-r) Goldie Millstone, I.E. Millstone, Ellen Plone, Dr. Bernard Plone, Thelma
Silberberg, Betty Karlin.
Standing (l-r) Bernie Kaplan, Chairman, Dora Roth, Mary Davis, Manny Davis, Dr. William
Silberberg, Helen Hoffman, Associate Campaign Chair, Jack Rimmer, Arthur Yeckes, Vice
Chairman.
Dora Roth
camp. After the war, she
moved around various hospi-
tals recovering from bullet
wounds and the ravages of
brutality and deprivation. Ris-
ing above those severe years,
she became a registered nurse
and moved to Israel where she
married and raised two child-
ren.
At the University of Haifa in
Israel, Mrs. Roth studied pub-
lic relations and later served as
a liaison for Project Renewal
between depressed Israeli
neighborhoods and American
communities.
For more information, con-
tact Dr. Lester Silverman,
Campaign Associate, Jewish
Federation, 832-2120.
The Young Adult Division
of the
Jewish Federation ot Palm Beach County
cordially invites you
to join us for a
PALM BEACH WINTER FANTASY
at the
301 Australian Avenue. Palm Beach
Saturday, February 18, 1989
8:00 p.m.
Hor d'oeuvres and dancing
Standing (l-r) Charlotte Sherman, Rhea Passon, Nat Passon, Vivian Novikoff, Helen Sperling,
Esther Padnos, Seymour Padnos.
SAVE THE DATE
Thursday, March 2nd, 1989
Fourth Annual
Boynton Beach Happening Luncheon
at Hunter's Run
For the Residents of
Aberdeen
Banyan Springs
Bent Tree East
Bent Tree West
Brighton
Chanteclair
Fairmont
Green tree
Leisureville
Limetree
Village Royal
The Meadows
Mirror Lakes
Oakwood
Palm Chase
Palm Chase Lakes
Parkwalk
Pinetree
Rainbow Lakes
Estates of Silverlake
Sun Valley
On The Green
in support of the
1989 Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County/
United Jewish Appeal Camapign


Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, February 3, 1989
Austrian Lack of Commitment
It should be no surprise that Austria has yet
to behave in responsible fashion toward its
Holocaust survivors.
The issue was raised once again last week
when the government of Luxembourg was
lobbied for its leverage on behalf of those
victims. The motivation for Austria to offer
recompense would be its application for mem-
bership in the European Community.
The argument, made by the World Jewish
Congress, was that claims both moral and
monetary should be settled by Austria
before its acceptance into the E.C.
Several other European Jewish communi-
ties have made demands similar to those
considered by the Jews of Luxembourg and
passed onto the governmental level.
It is on a note of irony that the aforemen-
tioned meeting took place: it was in Luxem-
bourg that the original agreement among
Israel, West Germany and the Conference on
Jewish Material Claims was consumated in
1952.
Would that the last 37 years made a differ-
ence in the way the nation of Austria has
behaved towards its Jewish citizens. That the
Austrian chancellor has yet to respond to
requests for material claims, including the lack
of reparation payments, continue to bode ill
for any resolution to Austria's role during the
war years.
Apolitical Consensus
In a report of a recent poll which questioned
Americans on their religion and their politics,
significant enough numbers demonstrated a
preference for keeping the two separate.
Except for hardline evangelicals, most
Americans preferred that their house of wor-
ship be kept out of their precinct house. They
rejected as well any political lobbying by a
church related group.
Notwithstanding the admission that one in
five has voted for a candidate because of
personal religious views, Americans nonethe-
less make the distinction between private and
public beliefs and the role each should play in a
democratic society.
We endorse the philosophy of keeping the
public square "naked," that is free of the
cloak of religion. By keeping government
neutral, we keep society faithful to a doctrine
of fairness.
Jewish floridian
of Palm Beach County
USPS 069030- ISSN 8750 5061
Combining Our Voice and "Federation Reporter
FRED K SHOCMET SUZANNE SMOCMET LORI SCHULMAN
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Combined Jewish Appeal Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County. Inc .
Officeri President, Alec Engeltlein. Vice Presidents. Barry S Berg, Arnold L Lampert, Gilbert S
Messing. Marvin S Rosen, Mortimer Weiss, Treasurer. Helen G Hoffman. Anui.nl Treaaurer, Mark
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Friday, February 3,1989 28 SHEVAT 5749
Volume 15 Number 5
JTA
International Piracy
By RABBI MARC H. TANENBAUH
Did United States Navy
pilots act irresponsibly in
shooting down the two Libyan
MiG-23 planes that pursued
them? Is the American govern-
ment presuming to play police-
man by focusing world atten-
tion on Colonel Moammar Gad-
hafi's chemical warfare plant,
reportedly the largest in the
Middle East?
If you listen to some of our
European allies and other
nations, you would think this
entire issue is just another
Hollywood movie.
Well, history teaches us
some important lessons about
the need to reject that Euro-
pean dissembling and why it is
vital to support our govern-
ment's realistic policy toward
Rabbi Marc Tanenbaum
Gadhafi and other terrorists.
In the first centuries of this
era, the powerful Roman
Empire and China developed
extensive networks of commu-
nication and commerce along
the silk route. That free
exchange became the basis of
the enrichment of both Euro-
pean and Oriental cultures.
By the third century, some
third-rate powers supported
acts of continuous piracy
against this Red Sea com-
merce. Failure by Europe and
China to contain the epidemic
of those pirates led to a break-
down in their relations for
some 1200 years.
Modern Libya and its terror-
ist allies are contemporary
pirates who seek to blackmail
the international community.
Only vigorous responses by the
United States and the wiser
among our allies can prevent
such a repetition in the break-
down of civilized world com-
munity.
Hedonistic Culture To Blame For
Jewish Substance Abuse
By BEN GALLOB
NEW YORK (JTA) A
leading Conservative rabbi has
asserted that American Jews
are heavily involved in the
American "addictive culture,"
declaring that one of every ten
American Jews is "addicted to
some substance or other."
Rabbi Harold Schulweis of
Encino, California, made that
assertion in an article, "Why is
Ours an Addictive Culture?" in
the "Insight" section of the
Baltimore Jewish Times. He
elaborated on his analysis in an
interview with the Jewish Tel-
egraphic Agency.
In support of his evaluation,
Schulweis cited the views of
Professor Ben Zion Twerski, a
Philadelphia psychologist and
an Orthodox Jew, and data
from a study made in 1969
about drug use and abuse
among students in New York
area colleges and universities.
bcliuiweia, wnu uiu not cite
any sources for his 10 percent
figure, examined the issue in
the context of an analysis of
the conflict between hedonism,
which "whispers 'choose pleas-
ure,' and Judaism, which
calls on Jews to "choose life."
In his analysis, he indicated
his goal was to make it clear to
Jews "that the two (concepts)
are not synonymous."
Asserting that addiction
among Jews is non-denomina-
tional, the rabbi also quoted a
statement by Mitchell Wallick,
executive director of a 10-year-
old Jewish-sponsored program
in New York called Jewish
Alcoholics, Chemically Depen-
dent and Significant Others.
The official name of the
agency is the JACS Founda-
tion.
Wallick said that at the most
recent of the three-day re-
treats the foundation conducts
twice a year for addicted Jews,
40 percent of the 160 Jews
attending were practicing
Orthodox and ultra-Orthodox
Jews.
"... Jewish students
were overrepresented
in the drug culture."
Schulweis quoted Twerski as
declaring that "not only do
Jewish alcoholics exist, they
may have a greater susceptibil-
ity to cross-addiction," mean-
ing a "simultaneous abuse of
alcohol and other drugs."
The 1969 study of New
York-area college students
and drugs was made by a team
led by Dr. Samuel Pearlman,
then a faculty member at
Brooklyn College.
The principal conclusion of
that study was that Jewish
students were overrepre-
sented in the drug culture.
Schulweis noted that Pearl-
man directed the study at a
time when it was generally
believed that Jews rarely
became involved in alcohol and
other drugs.
Wallick told JTA that "there
is no reason to expect that
there is any difference in drug
use between the Jewish stu-
dent and other students in our
society."
He also said that "while
Pearlman's conclusions may
still be relevant today, I know
of no replication of this study
to either prove or refute its
conclusions. I can at least say
that as with the rest of Ameri-
can society, Jewish students
also have problems" with
drugs.
Wallick said the retreat to
which the rabbi referred was
one held two years ago, and
that at the most recent
retreat, held last November,
227 Jews attended, adding
that Orthodox and ultra-
Orthodox Jews again repre_
sented about 40 percent ot
those in attendance.
The retreats provide Jewish
Continued on Page 8


Friday, February 3, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 5
Preservation of a Secure State
By MORRIS J. AMITAY
WITH the principal foreign
policy players now in place in
the Bush Administration, what
kind of Middle East policies
are likely?
Some comfort can be taken
with the appointment of sea-
soned professionals like form-
er Gen. Brent Scowcroft as
national security adviser and
Lawrence Eagleburger as
deputy secretary of state.
Both have served in previous
administrations and bring with
them an appreciation of U.S.
Middle East policies and also,
hopefully, an appreciation of
what is, and what is not possi-
ble to achieve.
This kind of tempered judg-
ment will be needed if a new
Administration is not to suc-
cumb to the temptation of
attempting to impose a Middle
East settlement on Israel.
Given an innate American
desire to find compromise,
experienced hands will be
needed to steer a steady
course through dangerous
cross currents. It should be
clear to any but the most wish-
ful of thinkers or those with
animus toward Israel that
Yasir Arafat and Co. is not
remotely interested in arriving
at the kind of agreement Israel
could live with and that will
lead to peace.
Yasir Arafat is no Anwar
Sadat. On the contrary, both
he and other PLO spokesmen
have already offered ample
evidence since he uttered the
magic words which gave him
dialogue with our country, that
they will take what they can
get now, and try to get the rest
later. The rest would not only
include Israel but also Jor-
dan. Even if our policy-makers
see through Arafat's obfusca-
tions and recognize his ulti-
mate goal, the United States
will have to follow a lonely
course with scant support
from its "allies." Great Britain
and Germany might refrain
from criticism of any U.S. poli-
cies which might be supportive
of Israeli positions. However,
France and Italy can be ex-
pected to join the Third World
chorus calling for more and
more Israeli concessions. It is
not only a question of the
endemic dependence on Arab
oil fueling this pro-Arab tilt; it
is very much in keeping with
French and Italian policies of
surrender to terrorist black-
mail.
IT is an open secret that the
French and Italian security
services have played "footsie"
with various terrorist groups
for years in order to avoid the
commission of terrorist out-
rages on their national soil.
Whether it's the French re-
lease of terrorist Abu Daoud in
the 70s or the Italian rescue of
Achille Lauro terrorist Abul
Abbas (holding a U.S. Special
Forces team at gunpoint to do
so) Arab terrorists know
they can feel secure in transit-
ing France and Italy (not to
speak of Greece which has
sunk to unprecedented lows)
because of these arrange-
ments.
On the other hand, France,
our long-time "ally" denied
U.S. overflights of its territory
by U.S. aircraft carrying out
the raid on Libya in 1986.
Surely these countries should
have no influence on U.S. pol-
icy-makers. Nor does the
Soviet Union, which still has
no diplomatic relations with
Israel and continues to supply
its very latest weaponry and
military advisers to Syria, Iraq
and Libya, yet qualify as an
honest broker. But in the new
era of glasnost, Israel's role as
a strategic asset to the United
States diminishes in impor-
tance. The debate within our
own country as to the extent of
U.S. support for Israel's legiti-
CORRECTION
In last week's Floridian we inadvertently listed Goldie
Bernstein as Co-Chair of the Covered Bridge Breakfast.
She is the Chair of this year's event.
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mate security concerns will
become crucial to Israel's
future.
As in the past, Israel will
have to seek the understand-
ing of its friends in the U.S.
Congress to offset the institu-
tional bias in our foreign policy
establishment. Elitist and sure
of itself, the establishment
both in and out of government
will clamor for Israeli con-
cessions in order to encourage
"moderate" Arab leadership.
It will be difficult to sell the
idea to the public and the
media that there are times
when no solution is better than
a bad one. This will leave it up
to Israel's friends in the Con-
gress to focus common sense
and reality on the debate
just as it did in 1975 in stop-
ping the Ford-Kissinger "reas-
sessment" of U.S. policy to-
ward Israel in its tracks.
IT is the U.S. Congress
which is in the best position to
directly influence executive
branch decisions. Appeals by
American Jews directly to
foreign-policy makers and
bureaucrats in the Administra-
tion fall too easily on deaf ears.
While Israel must make its
case directly to our govern-
ment, American Jews and
other pro-Israel supporters
must continue to look to their
elected representatives to
impact on policy. The primary
address of the First Amend-
ment right to petition the gov-
ernment was, and still is, in
the U.S. Congress. Beyond the
power of the purse, Congress
exercises a strong influence on
foreign policy. When and
whether American Jews will
have to exercise this right in
the months ahead remains to
be seen. But we should be
prepared to do so vigorously in
the knowledge that the preser-
vation of a secure Israel is in
the best interests of the United
States.
Embassy Status Questioned
BONN (JTA) Heinz Galinski, leader of West Ger-
many's Jewish community, has protested sharply over the
designation of the Palestine Liberation Organization mis-
sion in East Berlin as "The Embassy of Palestine."
He said the East German move was all the more
deplorable because East Germany has no diplomatic
relations with Israel.
Galinski, who chairs the Central Council of Jews in West
Germany, warned that a German state should think twice
before taking action that could easily be seen as hostile to
Israel.
Ofek Re-Entry
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Ofek, Israel's first space satellite,
re-entered the atmosphere and disintegrated 118 days
after it was launched.
It had remained in orbit almost four times longer than
the one-month life expectancy calculated by the Israel
Space Agency and Israel Aircraft Industries, the prime
contractor in its construction.
Professor Yuval Ne'eman, chairman of the Space
Agency, attributed Ofek's longevity to the "perfect
accuracy" of its orbit.
All of its systems functioned perfectly, according to
scientists who monitored Ofek's transmissions. Among
other things, it transmitted data on the earth's magnetic
and gravitational fields, and on atmospheric conditions.
KGB-Mossad Cooperation?
TEL AVIV (JTA) The head of the KGB is interested in
cooperating with Mossad, Israel's secret service, in the war
against international terrorism, according to Israel television
and radio report.
The KGB chief mentioned cooperation with the CIA, British
intelligence and Mossad, Israel Radio reporter Michael Gurdus
said, quoting Moscow Radio.
According to the report, the KGB chief said that far from
supporting international terrorism, Moscow wanted to co-
operate with the American, British and Israeli intelligence
agencies to fight it.
THE JEWISH COMMUNITY
OF THE PALM BEACHES IS
CREATING AN ENVIRONMENT
WHICH WILL ALLOW JEWISH
LIFE TO PROSPER AND GROW...
66 A PLACE FOR US 99
WHERE YOUNG AND OLD WILL
SHARE THE EXPERIENCE AND
BEAUTY OF OUR HERITAGE.
Support the Jewish Community Campus Campaign.
Call 832-2120 for more information.
A A\
JEWISH &s
COMMUNITY^
CAMPUS


Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, February 3, 1989
Saf ire To Be Guest On Mosaic
Mazer Will Discuss Federation Campaign
William Safire, guest
speaker at the Major Gifts
Dinner on behalf of the 1989
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County/United Jewish
Appeal Campaign, will be fea-
tured this Sunday, Feb. 5, on
Mosaic, a weekly public service
television program produced
by the Jewish Federation. The
program airs at 11 a.m. on the
local NBC affiliate, Channel 5,
immediately following "Meet
The Press." In the past,
Mosaic has had such notable
guests as Ambassadors Benja-
Atrocity Witness Sought
Canadian authorities are undertaking investigations into
events in Slovakia (Czechoslovakia) between 1938-1944, when
the state was under the rule of the Hlinka Slovak People's Party
and a satellite of Germany. The Royal Canadian Mounted Police
are soliciting witnesses to the anti-Jewish legislation in Slovakia;
and the arrest or confinement, deportation and execution of
Jews from Bratislava, Bardejov, Banska Bystrica, Krupina and
Krennicka.
The U.S. Justice Department's Office of Special Investigations
(OSI) is seeking to identify and interview persons imprisoned at
the Auschwitz I concentration camp in Silesia between Nov.
1942 and Nov. 1944. OSI has been investigating an alleged
member of an SS ^ uard company assigned to the that camp.
Individuals with any information are asked to contact Bessy
Pupko, World Jewish Congress, 501 Madison Avenue, N.Y.
10022, (212) 755-5770.
min Netanyahu and Meir
Rosen, Zev Buffman, Robert
Klein and Senator Joseph
Biden.
During his interview with
host Barbara Gordon Green,
Mr. Safire will discuss such
important topics as the chemi-
cal plant in Libya and the role
West Germany played in its
development, the eight years
of the Reagan Presidency,
Mikhail Gorbachev and his pro-
gram of Peristroika and Yasir
Arafat's new public image. He
will also express his view about
the crucial role Israel plays as
a military ally to the United
States and the moral commit-
ment the United States has to
Israel.
William Safire, winner of the
Pulitzer Prize for distin-
guished commentary, cur-
rently writes a syndicated col-
umn that is distributed inter-
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JCC K0L RINA
TO MAKE DEBUT AT
WINTER WONDERLAND
FESTIVITIES
The newly formed Kol Rina (Voice of Joy) Choral Group of the JCC
of the Palm Beaches will sing publicly for the first time on Sunday,
February 5, at the JCC Winter Wonderland. The intergenerational
chorus is comprised of 30 people of all ages. The event will be held
at Camp Shalom, 7585 Belvedere Road (one mile west of the
turnpike). Admission is $5 for a family of 4 and $1.50 for each
additional member. The group is looking for people who like to
sing. For more information call Cantor Karen Blum at 689-7700.
JCC WINTER WONDERLAND
A TREAT FOR
THE ENTIRE FAMILY
om
ttcmi
On Sunday, February 5, between 1:00 and 5:00 PM, the Jewish
Community Center of the Palm Beaches presents its "Winter
Wonderland," an extravaganza for children of all ages. Entertain-
ment will be provided by the Palm Beach Ballet, Santaluces
Chiefettes, and Palm Beach Sports Academy. There will be clowns,
refreshments, and snow; tons of real snow. The event will be held at
Camp Shalom, 7585 Belvedere Road (one mile west of the
turnpike). Admission is $5 for a family of 4 and $1.50 for each
additional member. Bring the family, and don't forget your mittens.
For additional information call the JCC, 689-7700.
William Safire with host Barbara Gordon Green.
nationally. He has also written
several novels including "Full
Disclosure," a best seller about
a President under fire. His
latest novel, "Freedom," is
about Abraham Lincoln and
the Civil War.
Also appearing on the pro-
gram will be Irving Mazer,
General Campaign Chairman
of the Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County to discuss
the 1989 Federation/United
Jewish Appeal Campaign.
SAVE THE DATE
THURSDAY, MARCH23, 1989
Eastpointe Dinner Dance
For Residents of Eastpointe
In support of the
1989 Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County/ United Jewish Appeal Campaign
Meyer B. Siskin Memorial Fund
The Meyer B. Siskin Memorial Fund was established in
1987 to fund Human Resource Development programs
for community leadership. These programs have been
provided through the National Jewish Center for Learn-
ing and Leadership (CLAL). Contributions to the Fund
can be made through the Endowment Program of the
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County. For further
information, contact Edward Baker, Endowment Direc-
tor, the Jewish Federation, 832-2120.
You Are Cordially Invited
ToA
Luncheon
For The Residents Of
P0INCIANA PLACE
On Behalf of the
1989 Jewish Federation
of Palm Beach County
United Jewish Appeal Campaign
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 12:80 PM.
TEMPLE BETHSH0L0M
S15 North "A "Street Lake Worth
MINIMUM CONTRIBUTION
$250 Per Couple
$125 Per Single
Milt & Miriam Sharon 4SS-0296
Jules & Shirley Klevan 964-0797
Co-Chairs


Friday, February 3, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 7
*
Jeremy Berg
JEREMY BERG
Jeremy Berg, son of Barry
and Marjorie Berg of West
Palm Beach will be called to
the Torah on Saturday, Feb.
18 at Temple Beth El. Rabbi
Alan L. Cohen will officiate.
Jeremy is a 7th grade stu-
dent at the Jewish Community
Day School. He is a member of
Kadima and enjoys tennis,
golf, scuba diving and marine
biology.
Jeremy will be twinned with
Willie Landman of Chernoutsy
in the Ukraine, Soviet Union,
who was denied his freedom to
be called to the Torah as a Bar
Mitzvah.
U.S. Denies PLO
Helpful In
Investigation
By HOWARD ROSENBERG
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
The State Department denied
a press report that the Pales-
tine Liberation Organization
has been "exceedingly valu-
able" in the Pan American
World Airways Flight 103
crash investigation.
Dennis Harter, director of
the Office of Press Relations,
told reporters at the daily
briefing, "We would welcome
assistance from any legitimate
source in this investigation."
He added, "To our know-
ledge, however, the PLO has
not provided such assistance."
The Washington Post quoted
ABC News sources in the PLO
as saying "several dozen PLO
intelligence agents" have been
working with British and West
German investigators and
have delivered "exceedingly
valuable" information in the
case.
The United States believes
that a terrorist bomb caused
the plane to crash over Locker-
bie, Scotland, on Dec. 21.
In a separate development,
Harter and White House
spokesman Marlin Fitzwater
said that the United States has
not received any request from
PLO leader Yasir Arafat to
address the American-Arab
Anti-Discrimination Commit-
tee's annual convention
April 13.
Amy Schiller
AMY SCHILLER
Amy Nan Schiller, daughter
of Bruce and Karen Schiller of
West Palm Beach, will be call-
ed to the Torah as a Bat
Mitzvah on Saturday, Feb. 4 at
Temple Beth Torah. Rabbi
Steven Westman will officiate.
Amy is a 7th grade student
at Wellington Landings Mid-
dle School. She is involved in
the Temple Beth Torah Junior
Youth Group; SADD; Girl
Scouts; and Wellington Land-
ings Yearbook staff. She is
interested in journalism and
stamp collecting.
Amy is twinned with Vic-
toria Zhizhimskaya of
Kishinev, Russia, who was
denied her freedom to be cal-
led to the Torah as a Bat
Mitzvah.
AMY FOX
Amy Fox, daughter of Carol
and Martin Fox of Lake
Amy Fox
Worth, was called to the Torah
as a Bat Mitzvah on Jan. 27
and 28 at Temple Judea. Rabbi
Joel Levine officiated.
Amy is an 8th grade student
at Christa McAuliffe Junior
High School, where she is on
the Journalism staff and a
member of the yearbook staff.
She is a member of Midrasha
and is involved with the Tem-
ple's Youth Group. She enjoys
cheerleading, is a member of
the National Junior Honor
Society and is in the advanced
band. Amy was twinned with
Lina Vasurman of the
Ukraine, Soviet Union, who
was denied her freedom to be
called to the Torah for her Bat
Mitzvah.
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in Dade. Broward. Palm Beach. Martin. St. Lucie
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Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, February 3, 1989
64
An Evening of Communication & More
))
Local women got a chance to meet, socialize and network at "An Evening of Communication And
More," sponsored by the Women's Division Business and Professional Women's Group of the
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County. Meredith Kaplan, an Assertive Communications
Specialist, helped to facilitate networking among the women. Standing (l-r) Ingrid Rosenthal, Vice
President, WD B&P Women's Group, Eileen Zimkind, Co-Chair, Meredith Kaplan, Jeffrey Klein,
Executive Director, Jewish Federation, Elaine Weber, Co-Chair, Carol Greenbaum, WD
President.
Standing (l-r) Carol Shubs, Ellen Bovarnick, Felice Kommar,
Cheryl Silverman, Lynn Mandeau. Sitting (l-r) Janet Reiter,
Randee Seigel, Heather Mason.
Substance Abuse
Standing (l-r) Mim Levinson, Harriet Biblin, Norma Shulman, Debbie Telsey, Ilene Chebon. Sit-
ting (l-r) Robyn Kundin, Barbara Wolf-Levine, Julie Stopek, Sheree Syden, Dee Kasinec.
Continued from Page 4
addicts opportunities to
explore, with expert counsel-
ing, the value of Judaism as a
religion in helping them to
cope with their addictions.
He also said Schulweis'
information on a JACS retreat
BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY
is proud to announce
The 26th Annual Palm Beach Brunch
The Breakers, Sunday, February 12, 1989
honoring
RITA DEE AND HAROLD HASSENFELD
of Nashville, TN and Palm Beach, FL
with the University's
Bertha & Jacob Goldfarb Medal
In recognition of their civic and philanthropic leadership,
and for their belief in the spirit and promise
ofBrandeis University
KEYNOTE SPEAKER: AMBASSADOR JEANE J. KIRKPATRICK
former United States Representative to the United Nations
VVU_77,
Evelyn E. Handler
President
Leonard L. Farber
Chairman of the Board
for information: call (407) 835-9199

was incorrect in the descrip-
tion of it as the foundation's
most recent retreat.
He said retreat participants
were usually split between
men and women, and that
their ages ranged from 18 to
87 years old.
Wallick said the JACS Foun-
dation is a UJA-Federation
subvention agency, which
means it gets part of its budget
from the federation, part from
the United Way and part from
contributions.
Schulweis asserted in his
analysis that "addiction in its
multiple guises the compul-
sion to gamble, to drink, to
smoke, to take drugs, to over-
eat," could not be explained by
"individual idiosyncratic
behavior."
Schulweis contended that
"something deeper and wider"
than such a behavior category
was involved. That "some-
thing," he said, is hedonism.
He argued that Americans,
"including most American
Jews," are raised in "an en-
veloping hedonistic culture
that prepares the soul for
addiction."
He described hedonism as "a
mass culture rooted in an
unstated theology, a popular
system of belief more perva-
sive and more influential
among more people than any
of the established religions."
He said the presuppositions
of that culture "are summed
up in its two imperatives: pur-
sue pleasure and avoid pain."
Proponents of hedonism, the
rabbi said, contend that hedon-
ism "cuts to the bone of reality
and trims aside the moralism
and demands of traditional
faiths," including Judaism.
By the standards of
Judaism, hedonism couples
two ideas the pursuit of
pleasure and the avoidance of
pain which are contradic-
tory, the rabbi declared.
"Judaic wisdom knows that
spiritual, cultural, aesthetic,
creative pleasures cannot be
achieved without pain."


Friday, February 3, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 9
Weizmann Dinner Honors Rep. Frankel
More than 200 supporters
from the Palm Beach County
Region of the American Com-
mittee for the Weizmann Insti-
tute of Science filled the
ornate dining room of the Fla-
gler Museum to capacity Sun-
day evening to honor Rep. Lois
J. Frankel of Palm Beach
County.
The second annual Dinner
Dance, sponsored by the
Region since it opened an
office in Palm Beach County
two years ago, was highlighted
by the premiere appearance
here of the nationally-
acclaimed company, "Le Mas-
querade," who make fantasies
come to life with a unique
blend of tantalizing music,
elaborate costumes and special
effects.
An overview of recent scien-
tific activities and achieve-
ments at the Weizmann Insti-
tute, one of the world's
renowned scientific research
institutions, was presented by
guest speaker Professor David
Samuel, a leading scientist for
more than 40 years at the
Institute and Sherman Profes-
sor of Physical Chemistry.
Professor Samuel reported
on progress at the Institute in
research in such fields of study
as immunology, the neuro-
sciences, aging, multiple scler-
osis, solar energy and hydro-
logy, among the 700 projects
now ongoing at the Institute.
A Director of the Institute's
center for Neurosciences and
Behavioral Research, Profes-
sor Samuel is the grandson of
the late Viscount Herbert
Samuel, Britain's first High
Commissioner of Palestine,
and is himself the Third Vis-
count of Mt. Carmel in Israel
and Toxteth in Liverpool, Eng-
land.
Chairpersons for the event
were Dorothy and Irving Rom
of Breakers West. The Roms
are longtime supporters of the
Institute and are founders of a
Post-Doctoral Fellowship in
perpetuity at the Institute. Mr.
Rom also serves as chairman
of the Weizmann Palm Beach
County Region.
The Weizmann Institute of
Science, located in the town of
Rehovot, 14 miles south of Tel
Aviv and 35 miles west of
Jerusalem, was founded in
1934 by Dr. Chaim Weizmann,
the distinguished scientist and
first President of Israel. It is
devoted to research and teach-
ing in the natural sciences.
Mb ,J 1 1 '
t* $ %
1 r
T .?*&
v?lE|w^a
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Doris Zagayski & Rowland Standing (l-r) Norman Cohen, Judy Cohen, Sylvia Schaefer,
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i m^ 1
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Schaefer, Dorothy Rom, Irving Rom, Lois Frankel.
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Standing (l-r), Prof. David Samuel, Rep. Lois Frankel and
Robert Montgomery.
How to drive to the Northeast
with your eyes closed.
Just put your car onto Amtrak's Auto Train. Then sit back and relax.
If you want, you can sightsee in our Dome Car. Meet new friends
over cocktails. Even take in a free movie. The Auto Train IS| leaves each
afternoon from just outside Orlando and drops you off the \m next morning
near Washington, D.C. You and your car can travel at a special fare between Feb. 21
and June 19* Included is a delicious full-course buffet dinner ^j | ar)d a tasty continental breakfast. Kosher
meals are available if you let us know in advance. Private jjQ I sleeping accommodations
are also available. The best fares go to those who make their reservations early. So call your travel
agent or call Wl I Amtrak at 1-800-USA-RAIL Amtrak's Auto Train. It'll open your eyes to the
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Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, February 3, 1989
Major Gifts Dinnei
Arthur and Sydelle Meyer Lee and Irving Mazer
Jeanne and H. Irwin Levy
Elizabeth and Alan
Nancy and Sidney Marks Shulman
Stacey and Mark Levy
Standing (l-r) Murray and Norma Grabler, William Safire, Barbara
Wainscott and David Berger
Julie and Peter Cummings Stanley and Marilyn Katz Elinor and Norman Belfer
Standing (Ur) Elizabeth Newman, Faye Cooper and Margaret Kramer
LaZtn9 Not pictured: M/M Albert Finkelstei*. MlK


Friday, February 3, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 11
Raises $3 Million
Leonard Greenberg and Alan Shulman
Matthew and Susanne Robert and Eleanor
Komreich Balgley
Sara and Arnold
Grandberg
Regina Kotchin and
Sheila and Alec Engelstein Bernard KUbanow
Simone and Norman
Golblum
Standing (l-r) Sydney and Jeanne Fogel, William Safire
William Safire and Abe
Gelb
Mr. and Mrs. William Stephen and Ruth
Safire Abramson
Standing (l-r) Sidney and Dorothy Kohl and Barbara and Bernard
Green
fiSSrt^ (l'V) ^^ and Helen HaUben' MildTed and ^ Sidney Standing (l-r) William Safire, Irene Greenbaum and Charles Smith
k/Af Emanuel Davis, MIM A Ian Miller.


Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Frtday, February 3, 1989
Lakes Of Sherbrooke Breakfast
A Breakfast for residents of the Lakes of Sherbrooke was held, Sunday morning, January 22, at
the Lakes of Sherbrooke Clubhouse. Jay Epstein, Director of Planning and Budgeting, spoke to the
group about our fast growing Jewish community and explained the local programs and services
provided by the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County. Standing (l-r) Murray Milrod, Jay
Epstein, Sol Rosen, Chairman, Paul Brown. Sitting (l-r) Bob Cwirn, Syndelle Bankalter, Hy
Chekofsky.

You' ve
Never Been
This Close To Israel
VISIT ISRAEL NOW TOUR"
THE PALM BEACH-ISRAEL CONNECTION
MARCH 29 APRIL 10,1989
An unbelievable SU99.00 per/person (based on double occupancy).
Effective February 17. 1989 the cost will be $1599 00 per/person
An exceptional travel opportunity limited to the first 500 reservations, offering 5-Star'
hotel accommodations throughout the tour...plus these outstanding features:
Round-trip West Palm Beach-'lel Aviv-
West Palm Beach ONELAL
Daily breakfasts, gala banquets and
Shabbai dinners
Five full days sightseeing in deluxe
coaches
Private meeting with top Israeli leaders
Visit to a military base
Cruise on the Sea of Galilee
Optional tours available
All baggage transfers and entry fees
ABSOLUTELY NO SOUCITAnON OF FUNDS
Your trip of a lifetime is available only through Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County.
Reservations will be taken on a first come/first served basis. Please call the federation
office todav!
Please send me more informa-
tion on the Visit Israel Now; Palm
Beach/Israel Connection Trip.
Name
Address
Phone
JEWISH FEDERATION OF PALM BEACH COl'NTY
832-2120
SlU South Flagler Drive. Suite JlK. Wi-M Kilm Heath. Florida \\4)\ WHH

Standing (l-r) Sol Rosen, Percival AlpertGilda Rosenblatt Wil-
liam Rosenblatt. Sitting (l-r) Arnold Weisman, EiUen Rosen,
Rose Alpert.
Standing (l-r) Betty Gerber, Irving Goldstein, Evelyn Helpert,
Ann Goldstein. Sitting (l-r) MoUie Fitterman, General Commu-
nities Chair, Bob Fitterman, Phil Klein, Alice Klein.
Moscow-Tel Aviv Air Link?
TEL AVIV (JTA) Direct
flights between Israel and
Moscow may be a step closer.
Senior officials of El Al,
Israel's national airline, were
discussing the issue with offi-
cials of the Soviet airline, Aer-
oflot, in Vienna.
Both sides have agreed to
examine the possibility of a
Moscow-Tel Aviv air link.
Transport Minister Moshe
Katsav disclosed that Israel
asked for the talks two months
ago, but the Soviet response
came only recently.
El Al is represented in
Vienna by its president, Rafi
Har-Lev and Amram Blum,
the government-appointed
receiver for the air carrier.
The Israelis are proposing
direct flights to Moscow, not-
ing that some 25,000 people
travel between Israel and the
USSR each year.
It is not known whether
Aeroflot would establish
flights to Israel if a commer-
cial aviation agreement is
reached or whether El Al
would merely be given landing
rights in Moscow.
Missile Co-Production
TEL AVIV (JTA) Israel Aircraft Industries and the
Lockheed Aircraft Corp. in the United States have joined forces
to produce the Arrow, an Israeli-designed anti-missile.
The Israeli company received a $158 million grant from the
United States last year to develop the weapon. IAI and
Lockheed signed a contract for its joint production.
Berlin Memorial
Berlin is planning to build a
Holocaust museum, which will
both celebrate the history of
the city's Jews and depict the
horrors of the Holocaust. It is
expected to cost about $43
million and to be completed by
1994.
The foundation of the
museum's collection will be
paintings, photographs and
documents which are housed
at present in West Berlin's
Gropius Bau museum.
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Friday, February 3, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 13
Eastpointe Visits Agencies At Work Geneva Conference:
PLO Signs in as Palestine
By TAMAR LEVY
GENEVA (JTA) The
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion for the first time at an
international conference
was registered as the delega-
tion of "Palestine."
The delegation was part of
the 10-day International Con-
ference on Education here.
Organized by UNESCO, the
United Nations Economic,
Scientific and Cultural Organi-
zation, it was the first interna-
tional conclave at which the
PLO was recognized as an
equal among 600 delegates
from 121 participating coun-
tries.
The Arab states failed, how-
ever, to politicize the discus-
sions, which dealt with higher
education.
Israel was represented by
Doron Mor of the Education
Ministry, and Simcha Landau,
president of the Committee for
Higher Education.
The Palestinian delegation
was headed by Abdel Razak
Yania, head of the Department
of Higher Education of Pales-
tine, and Hannan Nasir, presi-
dent of Bir Zeit University in
the West Bank.
RestdeTUsofEastpointe recently participated in a mini mission sponsored by the Jewish Federa-
twn of Palm. Beach County. The purpose of the trip was to allow participants to visit each agency
supported by the Federation and to see first-hand how their donations help the local community.
Green To Chair Morse's Annual Meeting
Bernard R. Green will serve
as chairman for the Joseph L.
Morse Geriatric Center's
Seventh Annual Meeting. The
meeting will be held at the
Center Sunday, Feb. 12, and
will start at 10 a.m.
Green is a vice president on
the Morse board, and serves
on the Center's Executive and
Finance Committees.
Following messages and
reports from Bennett M. Ber-
man, president of the Morse
board, and E. Drew Gacken
heimer, Executive Director of
the Center, an election and
installation of officers and
board members will take place.
Herman Stall, another
Morse vice president will pre-
sent the report of the Nomin-
ating Committee and conduct
the election of the officers and
board members.
The installation of officers
and board members will be
officiated by Morse Board
member, Alec Englestein.
A reception and tours of
a model room in the Center's
expansion will follow the
meeting.
A-AAbot Answerfone offers:
TELEPHONE ANSWERING SERVICE
|| BEEPER PAGING SERVICE
PRIVATE UNE SERVICE
MONITORING SERVICE
WAKE UP SERVICE MAIL SERVICE
and
"person to person service"
24 hours a day
A-AAbot Answerfone (407)586-7400
213 N. Dixie Highway Lake Worth, FL 33460
Bernard Green
PLO
Meeting
Continued from Page 1
met again last week with a
PLO official.
Pelletreau, the only author-
ized U.S. channel to communi-
cate with the group, met with
Hakam Balaoui, the PLO's
representative in Tunis, a
State Department source said.
Neither Redman nor the
source would describe the con-
tent of the meeting, although
Redman described it as an
"informal contact."
Pelletreau had met Balaoui
three weeks before, and the
State Department source indi-
cated future meetings were
possible.
Last week, in the final days
of the Reagan administration,
the State Department voiced
concern about a comment PLO
leader Yasir Arafat made on
Jan. 1.
Redman said that a transla-
tion of a tape recording of the
remarks quoted the PLO chair-
man as saying: "Whoever
thinks of stopping the intifada
before it achieves its goals, I
will give him 10 bullets in the
chest."
Redman said "this threat is
inconsistent with Arafat's
renunciation of terrorism."
But Arafat has denied that he
threatened anyone.
It's a special time of the week when families
gather, traditions are renewed and there's
plenty of time to relax and enjoy the rich,
delicious taste of Maxwell House* Coffee.
Maxwell House* Coffee. Always


Page 14 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, February 3, 1989
HOLD THE DATE
Women's Division
Business and Professional Women's
Group
PROGRAM MEETING
"LIFELINE TO HEALTH"
MARCH 1,1989
Palm Hotel
7:00 p.m.
For more information contact Faye Nelson,
Director, Women's Division, Jewish Federation
832-2120
Mosaic: Jewish Life In Florida
Mini-Exhibit Opens At Temple Israel
A mini-preview of the
exhibit "Mosaic: Jewish Life in
Florida" will open at Temple
Israel in West Palm Beach on
February 5, at 10 a.m. Seven
panels of photos of early Flor-
ida pioneers will be on display.
Dr. Henry Green, project
director and chair of the
Judaic Department Studies
Program of the University of
Miami, will address the gather-
ing. All are welcome.
The mini exhibit, which has
been on display in the U.S.
Senate building in Washing-
ton, and in Tallahassee, serves
to inform the public and legis-
lators about the larger exhibit
in preparation.
"The Mosaic project is the
first comprehensive study of
Florida Jewish history, and of
Are you Single and Jewish?
JOIN RABBI LEONID FELDMAN
AND OTHER SINGLES (20-40)
FROM GREATER PALM BEACH COUNTY
FOR FRIDAY NIGHT CATERED SHABBAT
DINNER FOLLOWED BY SERVICES
AND ONEG SHABBAT
Dinner: Singing: New Friendships
and Intellectual Stimulations
Friday February 10, 6 pm
TEMPLE EMANU-EL OF PALM BEACH
190 N. COUNTY RD. PALM BEACH 832-0804
ADVANCE RESERVATIONS ONLY $20.00 Dinner Seating Limited
"VISIT ISRAEL NOW TOUR"
THE PALM BEACH-ISRAEL CONNECTION
MARCH 29 APRIL 10, 1989
An unbelievable $1499.00 per/person (based on double occupancy)
Effective February 17. 1989 the cost will be $1599.00 per/person
The Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County/Israel Connection
Tentative Day-By-Day Itinerary
WED.
4-5-89
Begin the day with a community visit to Hod Hasharon
which is Palm Beach's Project Renewal community. See the
miracles that have been achieved through the dynamic
partnership between Palm Beach County and its twin city in
Israel. Drive to Tel Aviv for a city tour. Tel Aviv was
established in 1909 on sand dunes north of Jaffa. Today, Tel
Aviv is the second largest populated city in Israel. Have
lunch with a guest speaker who will lecture on "Who is a
Jew." Visit Beit Hatfutsoth, the Museum of the Diaspora.
Proceed to Jaffa, a 5,000 year old city in which biblical
events happened. Jaffa has always been the seaport for the
capital of the country, Jerusalem and has many interesting
shops. On to the Carlton Hotel for dinner with a guest
speaker from the Jewish Agency. Overnight at the Carlton
Hotel.
In the coming issues of the Jewish Floridian, we will highlight another day of this
exciting itinerary to give you the opportunity to see what is being planned for this
"chance of a lifetime" trip.
FOR MORE INFORMATION. PLEASE CONTACT STACEY GARBER.
JEWISH FEDERATION. 832-2120.
the contributions of Jews to
Florida's development," Dr.
Green said recently. The major
exhibit, scheduled to open in
September 1990 in Miami, will
focus on Florida's Jewish pion-
eers, family life, and Jewish
interaction with the larger
community.
The local Mosaic Task Force
committee is headed by Dr.
Ilene Gerber and Mrs. Ceceil
Tishman, a former president
of Temple Israel whose family
is among the pioneers in the
area. The committee has been
documenting local history for
the state-wide exhibit since
October 1988. Over 130 items,
including photographs and
memorabilia of early residents
have been recorded. Many of
these items will be selected for
the larger exhibit which will
arrive in this area in 1992 and
be on display at the Henry
Morrison Flagler Museum in
Palm Beach.
The mini-exhibit hopefully
will capture the imagination of
the community, and we hope
anyone with items related to
earlier times will come for-
ward," said Mrs. Tishman.
When it is ready, the full
Mosaic exhibit is expected to
cost close to one million dol-
lars. Films, oral histories,
recreated family scenes, and
educational materials are to be
part of the travelling exhibit.
Mosaic is a collaborative
effort of Soref Jewish Com-
munity Center of Fort Lauder-
dale, the Central Agency for
Jewish Education and the
Judaic Studies Program of the
University of Miami.
The mini-exhibit, at Temple
Israel, 1901 N. Flagler Drive,
West Palm Beach is open to
the public on Sundays, Wed-
nesdays and Fridays, Feb. 5-26
on the following schedule only:
Sundays 10 a.m. to noon; Wed-
nesdays, 6:30-8:30 p.m.; Fri-
days, 7:30-10:30 p.m. Each
Sunday morning viewing will
be hosted by a different Jewish
community organization.
Hosts are: Feb. 5, the Joseph
L. Morse Geriatric Center;
Feb. 12, the Jewish Commun-
ity Day School of Palm Beach
County; Feb. 19, the Jewish
Community Center of the
Palm Beaches and the Jewish
Family and Children's Service.
Since the Sunday showings
include brunch, reservations
are required. Please call the
Jewish Arts Foundation at
659-5312 for reservations and
information.
Chemical Arms Threat
Favored PLO Dialogue
By HOWARD ROSENBERG
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Secretary of State George
Shultz decided to open talks
with the Palestine Liberation
Organization in part to reduce
the danger of chemical and
biological warfare, Rep. Wil-
liam Lehman suggested.
In a telephone interview,
Lehman said that Shultz, at an
informal dinner at the Wash-
ington home of Rep. James
Scheuer (D-N.Y.), did not
make that comment directly,
but said that message was
"intuitive" from what Shultz
said.
He said Shultz harped on the
need to control the spread of
such weapons in the Middle
East.
Shultz "kept saying there's
this horror of the situation in
Iraq," where chemical wea-
pons have been deployed in the
recent war with Iran, "and
how it can spread to other
parts of the Middle East,"
Lehman said.
Libya has since garnered
world attention because
of U.S. assertions that it has
built a chemical weapons
plant, which Libyan strong-
man Moammar Gadhafi calls a
pharmaceutical factory.
Shultz went on to defend his
decision to deny PLO leader
Yasir Arafat a visa to speak at
the United Nations. But, he
added, "not withstanding the
fact that I was right. some-
thing has got to be done about
this impasse in the Middle
East." Lehman said.
"The overriding reason is
the situation in regard to the
accumulation of chemical and
biological warfare. That could
lead to a catastrophe," Leh-
man quoted Shultz as saying.
A State Department official
said Shultz's purported com-
ments did not "sound inconsis-
tent" with U.S. policy.
PALM BEACH PROSTHODONTIC ASSOCIATES
DRS. KAY, KEOUGH & BLAKE, P.A.
HOWARD B. KAY, D D.S.
BERNARD E. KEOUGH, D.M.D.
ROY C. BLAKE, III, D.D.S., M.S.D.
PROSTHODONTISTS
FIXED, REMOVABLE, MAXILLOFACIAL AND IMPLANT PfiOSTHETICS
ARE PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE THE ASSOCIATION OF
MIGUEL J. SANTAMARINA, D.M.D.
FOR THE PRACTICE OF
GENERAL DENTISTRY
2521 NORTH FLAGLER DRIVE TELEPHONE
WEST PALM BEACH, FLORIDA 33407 (407)833-6676


Alumni Reunion At JCDS
Friday, February 3, 1989/The Jewiah Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 15
Standing: (l-r), Craig Dober, Michael Gordon, Seth Virshup;
seated: Shona Paston, Elissa Lord, Beryl Cohen, Mickey Wall,
Dana Brass, Jillian Rosenbach
Over the winter break, the
Jewish Community Day School
held their Second Annual
Alumni Reunion. Thirty-two
alumni attended the Sunday
evening pizza party at the
school. Alumni from as long
ago as 1979 and as recently as
last year met each other, soci-
alized and compared their high
school and college experiences.
The JCDS has graduated
over 130 students since their
first graduation in 1977.
wM \1 1 1 I 1 1 [i hi
Gregg Tartakow, Tamara Virshup, Elizabeth Lerner, Bree
Dellerson
Kohl Commits to Ending Complicity
BONN (JTA) Chancellor
Helmut Kohl deplored the role
played by West German com-
panies in building a chemical
weapons factory in Libya and
promised Israeli Vice Premier
Shimon Peres that he would
put an end to it.
Peres, who is also finance
minister, was received by Kohl
in the chancellor's office.
Kohl's government came
under fierce attack in the
Bundestag for ignoring persis-
tent reports, from its own
intelligence sources, of Ger-
man participation in building a
Libyan poison gas factory.
The government conceded
that it knew of such suspicions
as early as August 1987.
Wolfgang Schauble, a minis-
ter in the chancellor's office,
told the Bundestag, however,
that the government had no
evidence it could present in
court until Jan. 4 of this year.
Feres told reporters after
his meeting with Kohl that he
was impressed by the serious-
ness with which the chancellor
regarded the Libyan matter.
"He brought up the issue
right at the beginning, and he
promised to do all he could to
put an end to the German help
in building the Libyan fac-
tory," Peres said.
"He was fully aware of the
danger to Israel and of the
historic dimensions of this
matter," the vice premier
added.
In Jerusalem meanwhile,
Foreign Minister Moshe Arens
summoned the West German
ambassador, Wilhelm Haas, to
the Foreign Ministry.
He expressed Israel's "deep
concern" over reports that
German firms have equipped
Libya with the materials and
technology to manufacture
chemical weapons.
The envoy was asked for
clarification from Bonn of
reports that German firms
may have helped Syria and
Iraq build chemical weapons
facilities, as weU.
Israel also wants to know if
Germany has provided the Lib-
yan air force with in-flight
refueling capabilities. This
would enable Libyan jets for
the first time to strike targets
in Israel.
In the course of the Bundes-
tag debate, Schauble admitted
that German intelligence
reports on the Libyan plant
were confirmed by fresh infor-
mation from the United States
last August.
The Americans pinpointed
the plant at Rabta, about 40
miles south of the Libyan capi-
tal of Tripoli.
But Schauble continued to
argue tha there was no justifi-
cation at the time to inform
the public on the basis of any-
thing less than solid evidence.
He admitted, however, that
the government now accepts
the American assertions that
Libya has been building a
chemical weapons plant, that
West German companies were
substantially involved in its
design and construction, and
that they supplied it with
equipment and material.
WE'RE *1
OUR STRENGTH
IS YOUR SECURITY
FLORIDA BANK EQUITY |
Equity-to-assets percentages for the 11 largest bank holding companies operating in Florida.
Although not exactly the same as capital-to-assets ratios measured by federal regulators, bank
analysts said they are roughly comparable:
EQUITY/ASSET RATIO
BANKS AS OF DEC. 1988
JEFFERSON BANCORP, INC. 11.19%
Citizens & Southern Corp. 7.77%
First Florida Banks, Inc. 7.50%
Seacoast Banking Corp. of FL 6.84%
First Union Corp. 6.77%
Suntrust Banks Inc. 6.48%
NCNBCorp. 6.48%
Florida National Banks Inc. 6.10%
Bamett Banks Inc. 5.92%
Flagler Bank Corp. 5.84%
Southeast Banking Corp. 4.80%
AVERAGE 6.88%
SOURCE: J.B.I. RESEARCH
In the recent analysis of equity-to-assets percentages for the 11 largest bank hold-
ing companies operating in Florida shown above, our parent, Jefferson Bancorp.
Inc., rated 1st with 11.19%.
That's 44% more than the second place company, almost double some of the
largest banking concerns doing business in the state and over 60% more than
the average of all of them!
We hope the security of your funds keeps you resting easy and the advantages of
our Gold Account Service please you as much.
JEFFERSON
BANKS
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Dade: 532-6451
Broward 739-3400 Palm Beach: 366-6900
Subsidiary ol Jeltorson Bancorp. Inc Members: FDIC 8t Federal Reserve System


Page 16 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, February 3, 1989
Senior News
FROM THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
The Comprehensive Senior Service Center, through a
Federal Grant Title III of the Older Americana Act,
provides a variety of services to persons 60 years or
older, along with interesting and entertaining, educa-
tional and recreational programs. All senior activities
are conducted in compliance with Title VI of the Civil
Rights Act and Section 504 of the Vocational Rehabilita-
tion Act of 1973.
The Jewish Community Center, 700 Spencer Drive, in
West Palm Beach, is an active place for all Seniors. Hot
kosher meals are served every day and programs and
activities will be scheduled throughout the year.
KOSHER MEALS
Kosher lunches are served
Monday through Friday at
11:15. The three locations are
JCC in West Palm Beach, 700
Spencer Drive; JCC in Boyn
ton Beach, 501 N.E. 26th Ave
nue; and JCC in Delray Beach
16189 Carter Road.
Meet new friends while
enjoying delicious, nutritious
food along with planned activi-
ties everyday. Volunteers are
always needed. No fee is
required but contributions are
requested. Reservations re-
quired. Call Carol in West
Palm Beach at 689-7700, Julia
in Boynton Beach at 582-7360,
or Nancy in Delray Beach at
495-0806. For transportation
call Department of Senior Ser-
vices 627-5765.
HIGHLIGHTS OF
KOSHER LUNCH
CONNECTION FOR
FEBRUARY
IN WEST PALM BEACH
Friday, Feb. 3 Dr. Perry
Bard Chiropractic Services;
plus Sabbath Services
Monday, Feb. 6 Fred
Bauman, Bingo
Tuesday, Feb. 7 F.P.& L.
- Sally Seher "Watt Coun-
ter Lecture"
Wednesday, Feb. 8 Jes-
sica Deuschle "Consumer
Budgeting for Seniors"
Thursday, Feb. 9 Mr.
Murray Levine "Harmonica
Virtuoso"
Friday, Feb. 10 Sabbath
Services with Rabbi Morris
Pickholz of Temple B'nai
Jacob
KOSHER HOME
DELIVERED MEALS
Are you homebound? Is your
neighbor homebound? Are you
unable to cook for yourself?
Have you just come home from
the hospital and have no way
to maintain your daily nutri-
tional requirements? The Jew-
ish Community Center's
Kosher Home Delivered Meals
Service is just for you!!!
This is a most essential ongo-
ing or short term service For
the homebound. No fee, but
contributions requested. For
Boynton Beach, Lake Worth
or West Palm Beach call Carol
at 689-7700. In Delray Beach,
call Nancy at 495-0806.
JCC
TRANSPORTATION
SERVICE
The Jewish Community Cen-
ter is providing transportation
for persons who wish to visit
loved ones in nursing homes,
hospitals or have to go to Day
Care Centers. Tickets are
required for each one-way trip
and may be obtained from the
driver. Each one-way trip don-
ation is $1 and persons pur-
chasing blocks of ten will
receive two free. Reservations
are required. Call Libby at
689-7700 between 9:30 and
1:30. For medical and meal
site transportation, call the
division of senior services at
627-5765.
OTHER CLASSES
AND ACTIVITIES
Joys of Yiddish Join the
many who enjoy a bit of yid-
dishkait and humor every
Monday morning at 10 a.m. at
the JCC. Presenters: Leo
Treem, David Sandier, Pauline
Cohen, Dori Dasher and
others. Co-Group Coordinators
are Pauline Cohen & David
Sandier.
Timely Topics: Ongoing
Mondays, following lunch at
JCC. Time: Lunch at 1:15 -
Program at 2. A stimulating
group discussing an exciting
variety of topics including cur-
rent events. Those interested
in lunch, please call for reser-
vations at 689-7700. Ask for
Rita, Senior Department.
NEW CLASSES
The World of Drama -
Learn all the facets of Stage
and TV drama including the
technique of broadcasting
commercials for all media.
Director: Carl Martin, actor,
newscaster, TV moderator.
Dates: Tuesdays at 1:30 to
3:30 beginning February 7th
for eight sessions. Fee: $10.
Call Louise at 689-7700 for
reservations.
Intermediate Bridge with
Al Parsont Basic bidding
and play on Wednesdays, at
1:30 p.m. at the JCC. Fee: JCC
member $2.50 per session,
non-member $3 per session.
Call Louise at 689-7700.
Speakers Club Ongoing
Thursdays at 10 a.m. at JCC.
For persons who wish to prac-
tice the art of public speaking
a great group.
Prime Time Singles A
special music program is
planned for the February
meeting to be held at the Jew-
ish Community Center on
Thursday afternoon, February
9th at 1:30 p.m. All Singles are
invited to this active and excit-
ing Singles Group. Call Sally
at 478-9397 or Evelyn at 686-
6724 for reservations and
information.
PRIME TIME SHOWTIME
Famous Rappaports in Hal-
lendale for lunch and show.
Yiddish and English "Vos is
Bashert is Bashert." Sun-
day, March 5th. Meet at Car-
teret Bank, Century Village,
W.P.B. at 12:30 p.m.
Join us for "Amadeus" on
April 16th at the Actors Rep-
ertory Theatre. Meet at Car-
teret Bank, Century Village,
W.P.B. at 1 p.m. Early Reser-
vations a Must!! Call Sally or
Evelyn.
Sharpen Your Wits! The
JCC "Senior Smarts" group is
practicing for Thursday, Feb.
23rd final competition. Mem-
bers of the group who will
compete for a place on the P.B.
County team are: Lucy
Cooper, Miriam Dunst, Ruth
Kaplan, Shirley Weiss, Jerome
Coleman, Robert Fisher and
Irving Silverstein. Volunteer
staff working along with the
competitors are Carl Martin,
Moderator, Herman Birn-
baum, Co-Chair & Time-
keeper; Judges: Sophie & Joe
Russin; and Scorers Elaine
Ellis and Bea Cohen. The com-
petition will be held at the Mae
Volen Senior Center in Boca
Raton and is open to the pub-
lic. For more information call
Ellie at 689-7700.
Twilight Dining & Dancing
Enjoy an early evening
kosher dinner followed by
music and dancing before and
afterwards, coordinated by
our own JCC Disc Jockey, Izzie
Goldberg on Thursday, Feb.
16, at 4:30. No fee, contribu-
tion requested. Pre-
registration a must! Call
Louise at 689-7700.
CLASSES AND
ACTIVITIES
Adult Education Courses
The Jewish Community Cen-
ter is proud to offer classes
provided by Palm Beach Com-
munity College and Palm
Beach County School Board
Adult Education. Fees are
required for these classes
along with registration. Call
Louise at 689-7700 for infor-
mation.
PALM BEACH COUNTY
ADULT EDUCATION,
SCHOOL BOARD
JCC Writers' Workshop
"Writing For Fun and Pleas-
ure" with Instructor Ruth
Graham. Would you like to
learn to paint a word picture?
Do you want to enrich your
writing for self discovery?
Learn to exercise your right
brain potential for hearing,
seeing and living more crea-
tively. Join our eight week
course that began Friday, Jan.
20th at 10 a.m. to 12. Fee: $3.
Call Louise for information
and registration at 689-7700.
PALM BEACH
COMMUNITY COLLEGE
ADULT EDUCATION
"Do You Feel Misunder-
stood? Do you often feel
misunderstood and find your-
self "putting up with it,"
"shutting up about it," or
"giving up?" This course will
zero in on how people bury
their feelings and often say
"I've done so well. Why do I
feel so bad?" You will be
taught how to communicate
your feelings, learn to be bet-
ter listeners, and become com-
fortable with making your own
decisions. Pre-registration a
must! Instructor: Faye Schec-
ter of P.B.C.C. for six weeks
starting on Wednesdays Feb.
15, 22, Mar. 1, 8, 15 and 22 at
10 a.m. at the JCC. Fee: $2.
Limited registration. Call
Louise at 689-7700.
JCC CULTURAL CLUB NEWS
BY SONDRA WERBEL
CHAIRPERSON
VIZCAYA HOUSE
& GARDENS
DOCENT TOUR
Enioy a great afternoon at
fabulous Vizcaya in Miami.
Bring a sandwich or snack. We
will picnic lunch on the
grounds. Drinks can be pur-
chased. Bus leaves Carteret
YOUNG SINGLES (20S & 30S)
Thursday, Feb. 9th at 7 p.m. Get together at the Center
for an exciting evening with Psychic, Victoria Mattews.
Learn what's in store for you. Short individual sessions for
all participants. Refreshments will be served. Cost: JCC
members $6, non-members $8. Reservations are a must as
space is limited.
Tues., Feb. 7th at 7 p.m. Get together to enjoy dinner at
TGIF (Okeechobee west to Village Blvd., 1/2 mi. on right).
Join us at this favorite spot for great food, drinks and great
times.
SINGLE PURSUITS (40-59)
Sunday, Feb. 5th from 2-6 p.m. Join them at the "Key
West" on Singer Island for an afternoon of art exhibits and
a beautiful sunset at this marina. Meet at the Sailfish
Restaurant at 2 p.m.
Wednesday, Feb. 8th from 5:30-7 p.m. Happy Hour at
Bobby Rubino's (Sheraton Hotel on Palm Beach Lakes
Blvd.). Cost. $1 for tip plus your own fare.
SINGLE PARENTS
Mon., Feb. 6th at 7:45 p.m. Meet at the Center for a
stimulating discussion entitled "Parenting, Are You On
The Right Track," led by Ann Colavecchio. Cost: $2 per
person. Babysitting is available for an additional $2 per
child reservations are necessary for babysitting.
Sunday, Feb. 5 from 1-5 p.m. Bring your children and
join us at Camp Shalom (Belvedere Rd., approx. 1 mi. west
of the turnpike) for an afternoon of winter wonderland.
Tons of snow to play in, games, entertainment and lots of
fun for all. Cost: $5 per family of four. Each additional
family member $1.50.
For more information contact the JCC 689-7700.
MOSAIC Sunday, February 5, 11 a.m. WPTV
Channel 5, with host Barbara Gordon Green. Interview
with William Safire, noted author and columnist.
L'CHAYIM Sunday, February 5, 7:30 a.m. Radio
Station WPBR AM with host Rabbi Mark S. Golub
The Jewish Listener's Digest, a radio magazine.
THE RABBI LEON FINK SHOW Sunday, February 5,
2 p.m.-5 p.m. Radio Station WPBR AM, with host Rabbi
Leon Fink. A Jewish talk show that features weekly guests
and call-in discussions.
TRADITION TIME Sunday, February 5, 11 p.m.
Monday-Wednesday, February 6-8, WCVG 1080 AM -
This two-hour Jewish entertainment show features Jewish
music, comedy, and news.
Sponsored by the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County.
Bank at W.P.B. Century Vil-
lage at 9:15 a.m. on Thursday,
Feb. 9, 1989. Fee: $11 for
members, $12 for non-
members. Call Louise at 689-
7700. Your check is your res-
ervation!
AT YOUR SERVICE
The Jewish Community Cen-
ter provides by appointment:
Health Insurance Assistance
with Edie Reiter; Legal Aid by
Palm Beach County Legal Aid
Society; Home Financial Man-
agement with Herb Kirsh. Call
Louise for information at 689-
7700.
VOLUNTEER NEWS
"Hi-Neighbor" the very
special JCC Mitzvah Corps is a
group of persons reaching out
keeping in touch with our
homebound and others in
need. Join this dedicated
group of persons who enjoy
doing Mitzvahs. Call Ellie
Newcorn at 689-7700.
Volunteers Needed: Tele-
phone receptionists. Grand-
mas and Grandpas wanted
pre-school classroom aides for
2 to 4 year olds. Creativity
Crafts assistant for pre-school.
Yiddish instructor. Call Ellen
at 689-7700.
NEIGHBOR HELPING
NEIGHBOR
A consortium program with
Jewish Family and Children's
Services. Persons interested in
being trained to work in a new
Alzheimer's program a few
hours a week at $4 per hour.
Call Barbara at JFCS 684-
1991.
CLASSES IN
BOYNTON BEACH
The JCC will be providing a
variety of classes and pro-
grams at Congregation Beth
Kodesh along with the daily
hot Kosher lunch program.
"Planning Strategy for
Quality Health Care" Mak-
ing informed decisions for
affordable, accessible, quality
health care. Instructor: Gert
Friedman of P.B.C.C, Adult
Education. Starts Monday
February 6th at 9:30 a.m. Fee:
$3. Call Julia at 582-7360 for
reservations.
'_


Friday, February 3, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 17
AMERICAN
JEWISH CONGRESS
The group will meet Thurs-
day, Feb. 9, 12:30 p.m. at the
American Savings Bank. Bou-
tique and refreshments.
Guest: Rabbi Oscar Werner
of Congregation Aitz Chaim of
West Palm Palm Beach. His
topic is "Who Is A Jew: Why It
Matters."
Sunday, March 5, rummage
sale in front of Fidelity Fed-
eral Savings Bank; hours, 9
a.m. to 3 p.m.
B'NAI B'RITH
Century Unit #5367 meets
Tuesday, Feb. 7 at 7:30 p.m. at
Congregation Anshei Sholom.
Guest speaker: Eugene L.
Sugarman, past president Dis-
trict #1; past treasurer
of B'nai B'rith International;
and past chairman of the New
York Regional Board of ADL.
Spouses and friends invited.
Refreshments. Coming event:
March 20-23, annual gala
spring holiday at the Saxony
Hotel, Miami Beach.
B'NAI B'RITH
The next meeting of the
Royal Palm Beach Lodge
#3046 will be held on Wed-
nesday, Feb. 8 at 8 p.m. in the
Village Hall. The featured
speaker will be Rabbi Leonid
Feldman of Temple Emanu-
El in Palm Beach, the first
Soviet born Conservative
Rabbi. His topic will be
"From Marx to Moses" a
personal odyssey experience.
Guest are invited, and a colla-
tion will follow.
B'NAI B'RITH WOMEN
Menorah will meet Tuesday,
Feb. 14 at noon at Congrega-
tion Aitz Chaim. Jeffrey
Steiner, attorney at law, will
speak on Florida Estate Plan-
ning. Boutique and refresh-
ments. Coming events:
Feb. 8, "Gigi" at Royal Palm
Dinner Theater.
Feb. 12, A day at Gulfstream
Race Track, lunch included.
Feb. 22, Jewish Israeli Folk
Ensemble at Miami Perf. Arts
Theatre.
March 19, "Miami Ice Fol-
lies" at Marco Polo Hotel, din-
ner.
March 26-29, Lido Spa.
March 31, Donor lunch at
Royce Hotel.
Bus leaves for games at
Seminole Village every week.
BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY
NATIONAL
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Boynton Beach Chapter
Coming Events:
Feb. 20, 12:30 p.m. at the
Royal Palm Club House. The
guest speaker will be Dr.
Roger Rolinson, Jr., Profes-
sor of Education and Social
Sciences at Palm Beach Com-
munity College.
March 5 Dinner Show at
the Holiday Inn, A1A, Delray
Beach.
HADASSAH
Chai Chapter will hold its
general membership meeting
in the social hall of the Challen-
ger Country Club at 12 noon,
Thursday, Feb. 23. Strada
Boutique will have a fashion
show.
Shalom W. Palm Beach will
hold its annual pledge lunch-
eon for Hadassah Medical
Organization on Wednesday,
Feb. 9, noon, at The Breakers.
Proceeds will support Israel's
important medical programs.
Feb. 12, Flea Market and
Bazaar, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., at
Publix parking lot, Century
Corners.
The group will meet on Wed-
nesday, Feb. 15, noon, at Con-
gregation Anshei Sholom,
Century Village. The program
will be Dr. John Brandt who
will discuss Visual Health.
Refreshments will be served.
All are welcome.
Feb. 26, luncheon and inter-
national revue at Renzi's Cafe,
Miami; transportation
included.
Yovel Chapter events for
February:
Feb. 15: One-day trip to the
Everglades, Flamingo Gar-
dens, air boat ride, lunch and
much more.
Feb. 16: Membership meet-
ing at noon at Congregation
Anshei Sholom. Program: Pre-
senting Hadassah Medical
Organization (HMO).
Feb. 19: Annual Youth
Aliyah luncheon (kosher
chicken) at the Airport Hilton
Hotel at noon. Entertainment:
Pop Concert.
JEWISH WAR VETERANS
The Ladies Auxiliary Post
No. 520 will hold its general
meeting on Monday, Feb. 13,
at 9:30 a.m. at the American
Savings Bank, West Gate of
Century Village. The speaker
will be Jan Grayson, the Vol-
unteer Services Specialist and
Public Relations Representa-
tive at the Riviera Beach Out
Patient Clinic.
"Come join us for break-
fast."
NA'AMAT USA
Ezrat Club will hold a gen-
eral meeting on Tuesday, Feb.
14, at noon, at the Beach
Bank, Gun Club Road, and
Military Trail.
The yearly auction will be
conducted by Ruth Turk.
All members, friends and
guest are urged to attend and
bring new or nearly new sal-
able items. Refreshments will
be served.
WOMEN'S
AMERICAN ORT
Royal Chapter will offer a
"Sweetheart Luncheon and
Fashion Show" on Feb 13, at
noon, at the Royce Hotel. The
Cricket Shop will conduct the
fashion show. The charge for
the luncheon and fashion is
$18. Myne Hootkin will be
arranging table seating and
reservations.
"Who canpossibly lake
care of Mom aswellaslcan?"
\AZp rnti WeYe not sayin,? we <,;UI
V VC l*UJL love her as much as
you. No one could ever do that.
But we can offer her kinds of care she^
cant get at home. What's more, for our Jewish
residents, weVe created the Beth Tikvah wing.
With its own sanctuary, dining room, kosher
meals.special activities and holiday observances.
We can also give your mother the therapy
she needs. Plus well-balanced meals and
24-hour medical attention. Above all, we can
offer 25 years of caring for people just like
your Mom. Come visit or call today.
I Please send me more information
. on your Beth Tikvah Wing.
I Name------.-------------------------------------- '
Address--------------_----------------,------------ i
I City----------------State------------------------I
Zip____________Phone----------------------- i
MANOR CARE
Nursinc; Center
[_JFpMIV2*_3_
- ri > IMT NiMr HfalM'ar ('-
ll
3001 S. Congress Boynton Beach, FL 33426 407-737-5600
Friday, Feb. 3 Israel Bonds, National Palm Beach
Lunch Meeting Hadassah Florida-Atlantic
Region, board.
Saturday, Feb. 4 American Technion Society, Cocktail/
Reception, 6 p.m. Temple Beth David, Social
Event Temple Judea, Casino Night, 8 p.m.
Sunday, Feb. 5 Jewish Community Center, Family Day
Trip Congregation Aitz Chaim Sisterhood, Din-
ner, 4:30 p.m. Temple Beth El, Concert, 7 p.m.
Federation, CLAL Program, 4-6 p.m.; 7:30-9:30
p.m. Mosaic Jewish Life in Florida, photo-
graphic preview exhibit, February 5-26 at Temple
Israel, West Palm Beach.
Monday, Feb. 6 Federation, Women's Division,
Nominating Committee Meeting, 10 a.m. B'nai
B'rith No. 3016, board, 3 p.m. Jewish Community
Day School, board, 7:45 p.m. Congregation
Anshei Sholom Sisterhood, board, 9:45 a.m.
Temple Beth El Sisterhood, Education Day, 9 a.m.
Federation, Affiliate Council Meeting, at the
Sodowick Home, 4 p.m. Federation, CLAL
Program, 8-10 a.m.; 12-2 p.m.; 4-6 p.m.; 7:30-9:30
p.m. Federation, Young Adult Dvision Com-
mittee, Phon-A-Thon, 6:30 p.m.
Tuesday, Feb. 7 Temple Beth David, board, 8 p.m.
B'nai B'rith Women, Shalom, board, 9:30 a.m.
Yiddish Culture Group Century Village, 10 a.m.
Temple Beth El, Study Group, noon Temple
Beth El, board, 7:30 p.m. B'nai B'rith Women -
Masada, board, 6:45 p.m. Federation, Central
Planning & Allocations Committee, 5:30 p.m.
Hadassah Mt. Scopus Boynton Beach, 7:30 p.m.
Federation, Holocaust Committee, noon.
Wednesday, Feb. 8 Lake Worth Jewish Center Sister-
hood, 12:30 p.m. B'nai B'rith Yachad, 7:30
&m. National Council of Jewish Women Palm
each, "Annual Support Luncheon" at the Break-
ers, noon Hadassah Shalom, board, 1 p.m.
Holocaust Survivors of the Palm Beaches, 2:30
p.m.
Thursday, Feb. 9 Anti-Defamation League, Palm Beach
Dinner, at the Breakers Federation, Women's
Division, Super Sunday Meeting, 10 a.m.
American Jewish Congress, 12:30 p.m. Temple
Beth David Sisterhood, board, 8 p.m. Temple
Beth El, Widows and Widowers Support Group,
12:30 p.m. Na'Amat USA Palm Beach Council,
10 a.m. Morse Geriatric Center Women's
Auxiliary, Executive Committee, 10:30 a.m. and
Board 1:30 p.m. Federation, Human Resource
Development, Volunteer Placement, Tracking
and Retention Committee Meeting, 7:30 p.m.
Federation, Phon-A-Thon, 7:30 p.m.
For more information call the Jewish Federation, 832-11 to.
NIGHTS OF MUSIC
1988 89
presents
CANTOR
NORMAN BR0DY
Sunday, February 5th, 7 p.m.
An accomplished Broadway performer, The Man
With The Golden Voice will deliver a memorable
medley of popular Broadway hits, folk songs and
Jewish and Chassidic melodies.
TICKETS:$12.50 Adults
$5.00 Students
Coming on Sun. 3/26/89
"The Ron Eliran Show"
Seen in Las Vegas with Cher and on TV with
Johnny Carson, Ron joins with a comic and
musical trio in an evening of music, comedy and
pure joy!
FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL
833-0339
Third Annual Cultural Series
Sponsored by Temple Beth El
2815 N. Flagler Drive
W. Palm Beach, FL 33407
A not-for-profit organization


Page 18 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, February 3, 1989
\
Religious Directory
CONSERVATIVE
BOYNTON BEACH JEWISH CENTER-BETH KODESH: 501
NE 26 Avenue, Boynton Beach 33435. Phone 586-9428. Rabbi
Joel Chazin. Cantor Abraham Koster. Daily, 8:30 a.m. Sabbath
services, Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.
CONGREGATION ANSHEI SHOLOM: 5348 Grove Street,
West Palm Beach 33417. Phone 684-3212. Office hours 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. Rabbi Isaac Vander Walde. Cantor Mordecai Spektor. Daily
services 8:30 a.m. and 5 p.m. Friday night 5 p.m. and 8:15 p.m.
Saturday 9 a.m. and 5:30 p.m.
GOLDEN LAKES TEMPLE: 1470 Golden Lakes Boulevard,
West Palm Beach 33411. Phone 689-9430. Rabbi Joseph Speiser.
Daily services 8 a.m. Sabbath services Friday 8:15 p.m. Saturday
9 a.m. For times of evening services please call the Temple office.
LAKE WORTH JEWISH CENTER: 4550 Jog Road, Lake
Worth. Phone 967-3600. Rabbi Richard K. Rocklin. Cantor
Abraham Mehler. Services Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID: 4657 Hood Road, Palm Beach Gardens
33418. Phone 694-2350. Rabbi Randall J. Konigsburg. Cantor
Earl J. Rackoff. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m., Saturday 9:30
a.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 2815 No. Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach
33407. Phone 833-0339. Rabbi Alan L. Cohen. Cantor Norman
Brody. Sabbath services Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9:30 a.m.
Daily Minyan 8:15 a.m., Sunday and legal holidays 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 315 No. "A" Street, Lake Worth
33460. Phone 585-5020. Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg. Cantor
Howard Dardashti. Services Monday and Thursday, 8:15 a.m.
Friday evening, 8:15 p.m., Saturday, 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 224 NW Avenue G, Belle Glade
33430. Phone 996-3886. Services: Second Wednesday of every
month, 7:30 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH ZION: 129 Sparrow Drive, Royal Palm Beach,
FL 33411. Phone 798-8888. Sabbath services Friday 8 p.m.,
Saturday 9 a.m. Rabbi Stefan J. Weinberg.
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB: 2177 So. Congress Ave., West Palm
Beach 33406. Phone 433-5957. Sabbath services Friday 8 p.m.,
Saturday and holidays 9 a.m., Monday through Friday 9 a.m.
Rabbi Morris Pickholz. Cantor Andrew E. Beck.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL: 190 North County Road, Palm Beach
33480. Phone 832-0804. Rabbi Leonid Feldman. Cantor David
Feuer. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m.; Saturday 9:30 a.m. Daily
8:15 a.m. *
TEMPLE TORAH: Lions Club, 3615 West Boynton Beach
Boulevard, Boynton Beach 33437. Mailing address: 9851D Mili-
tary Trail, Box 360091, Boynton Beach 33436. Phone 736-7687.
Cantor Alex Chapin. Sabbath Services Friday evening 8 p.m.;
Saturday 9 a.m.
TREASURE COAST JEWISH CENTER CONGREGATION
BETH ABRAHAM: 3998 SW Leighton Farms Road, Palm City
33490. Mailing address: P.O. Box 2996, Stuart 33495. Phone
287-8833. Services Friday evenings 8 p.m. and Saturday 10 a.m.
ORTHODOX
CHABAD HOUSE LUBAVITCH: 4623 Forest Hill Blvd.,
West Palm Beach, 108-3, 33415. Phone 641-6167. Rabbi Shlomo
Ezagui. Sabbath Services, Saturday, 10 a.m.
CONGREGATION AITZ CHAIM: 2518 N. Haverhill Road, West
Palm Beach 33417. Phone 686-5055. Sabbath services 8:45 a.m.
and 7:30 p.m. Daily services 8:15 a.m. and 6:15 p.m. Rabbi Oscar
Werner.
REFORM
CONGREGATION BETH ISRAEL: 1390 SW Dorchester
Street, P.O. Box 857146, Port St. Lucie, FL 33452. Phone
335-7620. Friday night services 8 p.m., Saturday morning 10:30
a.m.
TEMPLE BETH AM: 759 Parkway Street, Jupiter. Phone
747-1109. Services Friday 7:45 p.m.
Student Rabbi Peter Schaktman.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 4600 Oleander Avenue, Fort Pierce, FL
34982. Phone 461-7428. Sabbath Services Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM: St. Helen's Parish Hall, 20th
Avenue and Victory Boulevard, Vero Beach 32960. Mailing
address: P.O. Box 2113, Vero Beach, FL 32961-2113. Rabbi Jay
R. Davis. Phone 1-569-4700.
TEMPLE BETH TORAH: 900 Big Blue Trace, West Palm
Beach, FL 33414. Phone 793-2700. Friday services 8:15 p.m.,
Saturday morning 10 a.m. Rabbi Steven R. Westman. Cantor
Elliot Rosenbaum.
TEMPLE ISRAEL: 1901 No. Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach
33407. Phone 833-8421. Rabbi Howard Shapiro. Cantor Stuart
Pittle. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE JUDEA: 100 Chillingworth Drive, West Palm Beach,
FL 33409. Rabbi Joel L. Levine. Cantor Anne Newman. Phone
471-1526.
Tokayer On
Jews In
The Orient
Rabbi Marvin Tokayer, a rec-
ognized authority on the Jew-
ish experience and history in
the Orient, will discuss his
book "The Fugu Plan: The
Untold Story of the Japanese
and Jews during World War
II." Rabbi Tokayer is the guest
speaker at the Adult Education
Friday Evening Series at Tem-
ple Emanu-El, February 17 at
8 p.m. Some of his achieve-
ments include locating the lost
Jewish cemetery in Nagasaki,
Japan; visiting professor of
classical Hebrew at Wasada
Tokyo University and locating
the last Chinese Jew.
Cantor Brody
To Perform
At Beth El
Cantor Norman Brody
On Sunday, Feb. 5 at 7 p.m.,
the Cultural Series of Temple
Beth El, presents Cantor Nor-
man Brody in concert. The
Cantor, who is an accom-
plished Broadway performer,
will render an all new selection
of favorite show tunes, folk
songs, and Jewish and Chas-
sidic melodies. The Cantor will
be accompanied by the Epstein
Brothers orchestra.
For additional information
and to purchase tickets, call
the Temple Beth El office.
Synagogue News
BOYNTON BEACH
JEWISH CENTER
BETH KODESH
The following new officers
were recently installed for
1989 and a tribute was paid to
outgoing President, Irving
Kantrowitz.
1989 Officers
and Board Members
President
Isadore Weissman
1st Vice-president
Arthur Berman
2nd Vice-President
Bud Filer
Secretary
Julia Gruber
Treasurer
Ben Katz
Financial Secretary
Aaron Golden
Corresponding Secretary
Sally Reiser
Sisterhood announces that
the March meeting will be on
Monday, March 6 instead of
the usual Tuesday date.
There will be a book review
of "Children of Our Children"
by co-authors, Augusta Feller,
Ruth Roth and Helene Daniel.
A rummage sale is planned
for Sunday, March 12. Bring
clean rummage to the Temple
in boxes during the hours of 9
a.m. to 1 p.m. from March 1 to
March 10.
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL
On Friday evening February
3, at 8 p.m. Shabbat service
will be conducted by Rabbi
Howard Shapiro. Temple will
celebrate family night with
participation of the seventh
graders. Cantor Stuart Pittle
will lead the congregation in
songs. Everyone is invited.
Candle Lighting Time
Feb. 3 5:48 p.m.
Feb. 10 5:53 p.m.
W. Germans Reject
Neo-Nazi Mail
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) The West
German public is resisting a
neo-Nazi junk mail campaign
in such volume that the post
office is now destroying the
rejected mailings instead of
returning them.
Millions of citizens were
reported to have sent back
unopened the propaganda
material mailed to them by
Gerhard Frey of Munich,
leader of the German Peoples
Union, the largest neo-Nazi
group in West Germany.
Frey sent out 28 million let-
ters at a cost of $1.7 million
urging people to join his
party and asking questions
about how to deal with "the
infiltration of foreigners" into
the country.
Recipients in Duesseldorf
are returning Frey's mailings
by the hundreds each day, the
local post office reported. In
Hamburg, the rate of returns
is 1,500 a day.
The postal workers union
has advised people to return
the unwanted mail without a
stamp, marked "acceptance
refused."
The Bonn Ministry of Posts
and Telecommunications
insists there is no legal way to
stop Frey's junk mail cam-
paign. The ministry said it
cannot become a censor and
decide which mail should not
be delivered.
Synopsis Of
The Weekly Torah Portion
. "And he took the book of the covenant, and read
in the hearing of the people; and they said; 'All that
the Lord hath spoken will we do, and obey' "
(Exod. 24.7).
MISHPATIM
MISHPATIM The laws that Moses submitted to
the children of Israel after they had heard the Ten
Commandments dealt with the following subjects:
The Hebrew servant; murder, filial aggression
and blasphemy; kidnapping; criminal assault;
maiming of a servant; the butting
bull; accidents and damages; theft; property damage; watchmen;
seduction; proselytes, the orphaned and the widowed; lending and
borrowing; the sanctification of God and man; relations with the
enemy; the Sabbatical year; the Sabbath; the three pilgrim
festivals; idolatry.
This portion concludes with the renewal of the covenant with
God. The children of Israel accepted the covenant with the words:
"All that the Lord hath spoken will we do, and obey" (Exodus
24.7). Moses then ascended Mount Sinai to receive the tablets of
the Law.
(The recounting of the Weekly Portion of the Law Is extracted and
based upon "The Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage," edited by
P. Wollman Tsamir, published by Shengold. The volume Is available
at 45 West 45 Street, New York, NY 10036 (212) 246-6911.)


Palestinian Jihad
The Holy War for Palestine
Friday, February 3, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 19
By MITCHELL BARD
-WASHINGTON
THE Palestinian National
Congress conference in
Algiers was called the meeting
of the intifada, but ironically,
the people who were respon-
sible for stimulating the upris-
ing not only refused to attend,
hut called strikes to denounce
the same resolutions that
others are hailing as revolu-
tionary.
Rather than focus on the
equivocations of the PLO,
attention should be focused on
the Islamic fundamentalists
who started the uprising.
They have made it clear that
the conflict with Israel cannot
be solved by the PLO's politi-
cal nostrums because the basis
for the dispute is religious.
The Islamic fundamentalists
in the occupied territories
state quite clearly, however,
that they are engaged in a
jihad, a holy war against the
.lews.
Sheik Khalil Quqa, one of
the deported Gazan leaders of
Hamas, the Islamic Resistance
Movement, told a Kuwaiti
newspaper: "From a Koranac,
Islamic standpoint, the conflict
is ideological and religious ...
it is illegal to make peace with
Israel and to approve granting
it Arab and Islamic land."
Many of the Palestinian fun-
damentalists are members of
the Muslim Brotherhood, an
organization founded in Egypt
which emphasizes Islam over
nationalism.
The West Bank Brotherhood
asserts that God prefers Pales-
tine to any other Arab state
and that the liberation of
Palestine is the first step tow-
ard the establishment of a
large Islamic state.
The Brotherhood's charter
says that Palestinian land is
sacred and belongs to Muslims
forever. The liberation of Jeru-
salem is viewed as a personal
obligation for all Muslims.
Unlike the PLO, the Islamic
groups display no reluctance
to state their positions unequi-
vocally.
The latter's objective is the
establishment of an Islamic
state in all of Palestine. "To
our people and to the world we
declare our stand on peace,"
one Hamas leaflet said. 'No'
to peace with the Zionist entity
. Where is there justice with
them still possessing one inch
on the coast of Haifa and
Acre?"
THE Islamic groups are also
blatantly anti-Jewish. The
charter of the Muslim Brother-
hood, for example, refers to all
Jews as Nazis and blames
them for the French Revolu-
tion, the Communist Revolu-
tion and World War I.
"No war breaks out any-
where without their involve-
ment in it," it says on the
charter.
Quqa says Jews create econ-
omic problems, "are the epi-
tome of wickedness in the
world, the epitome of plotting
in the East and West, and the
epitome of the longstanding
historic conflict among nations
and the times of prophets and
messengers."
He makes no artificial dis-
tinctions between Jews and
Zionists: "We are against the
Jews only. We have no ene-
mies other than the Jews."
In the past two years, the
PLO has gradually moved to-
ward Islamization in an effort
to co-opt religious Palestin-
ians.
This has been necessary to
retain the allegiance of the
occupied population and pre-
vent the religious organiza-
tions from challenging the
PLO's claim to be the sole
legitimate representatives of
the Palestinians.
The fundamentalists, mean-
while, have embarked on their
own campaign of Islamization.
According to a Catholic News
Agency report, they are pres-
suring Arab Christians to
leave the country. Christians
are being offered three times
Syria Denies Extradition
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) The Syrian
government, continuing to
insist it has no knowledge of
the whereabouts of wanted
Nazi war criminal Alois Brun-
ner, turned down the extradi-
tion request made by France in
a formal submission to Damas-
cus.
Brunner, known to have
lived in Syria for more than 30
years, was sentenced to death
in absentia in France in 1954
for war crimes.
The Nazi, a top aide to Adolf
Eichmann, was responsible for
the wartime deportations of
tens of thousands of Jews from
France, Germany, Austria and
new documents produced by
Nazi-hunter Serge Klarsfeld,
the French lawyer responsible
for the trial and conviction of
Klaus Barbie, who was known
as the "Butcher of Lyon."
The Syrian minister of infor-
mation, Mohammad Salman,
was quoted by Le Monde as
saying of Brunner, "We have
never heard about this man."
The minister added, "We are
surprised that France has
asked for his extradition after
we told the West German
authorities a few years ago
that this man is not in Damas-
cus or in Syria."
Le Monde said that Brunner
may have left Damascus last
Greece to death camps in East- October after President Kurt
t'rn Europe Waldheim of Austria visited
T, ,*~ there and renewed Austria s
lhe latest extradi extradition request.
request charges Brunner, 76,
with crimes against humanity
which, unlike war crimes, are
not subject to a statute of
limitations.
The charges are based on
Austria had asked for his
extradition in 1961 and West
Germany in 1984. Both
requests were turned down
with the same disclaimer.
the value of their property to
emigrate. If they refuse to
leave, they are threatened and
intimidated.
The PLO now calls for an
international conference, but
the fundamentalists regard
this as "capitulation."
"God has assembled the
Jews in Palestine not to have
them enjoy it as a homeland,
but to make it a graveyard for
them so the world at large will
be saved from their filth,"
Quqa said.
HE and his followers also
oppose the creation of a Pales-
tinian state. "God forbid, if
there is a recognition of
Israel," Quqa said.
"Will the Palestinian state
become a security belt pre-
venting the Islamists from
pursuing jihad against the
Israeli presence on the soil of
Palestine? Will the leaders of
this state confront the Islam-
ists if they try to liberate their
homeland and seek martyr-
dom?"
It is apparent from the re-
action of the fundamentalists
to the PNC resolutions that
the PLO does not speak for a
large number of Palestinians,
particularly the half million liv-
ing in the Gaza Strip, where
the Islamic organizations'
influence predominates.
This' reinforces Israeli con-
victions that Yasir Arafat
could never deliver on any
deal, even if he were an accept-
able negotiating partner.
Instead of looking for
obscure evidence of modera-
tion in the statements of the
PLO, Americans should be lis-
tening to the explicit, uncom-
promising remarks of the peo-
ple who live in the occupied
territories and are responsible
for the current unrest.
If there is to be a political
solution to the conflict, it will
have to assuage Israel's con-
cerns about Arabs still
engaged in a religious crusade.
Ignoring the fundamental-
ists in the vain hope that PLO
moderation will lead to pro-
gress toward peace is a con-
venient way to avoid the most
intractable aspects of the
Arab-Israeli conflict. The ques-
tion that needs to be asked is:
how do you end a holy war?
Mitchell Bard is a foreign policy
analyst living in Washington.
m
Hibel Donated To Beth David
Edna Hibel has donated the above lithograph entitled "Nancy &
Megan," to Temple Beth David. The signed lithograph, valued at
$1,700 will be raffled by the Temple on March 18 at a dinner dance
which will be held at the Airport Hilton. Admission to the dance
is $65 per person. Contact the Temple office for information.
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MEMORIAL CHAPELS
... because the grief is enough
to handle later.


Page 20 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, February 3, 1989
By HENRIETTA BOAS
AMSTERDAM (JTA) -
Telling interviewers it is time
to lift the taboo on the discus-
sion of anti-Semitism, director
Johan Doesburg has staged a
controversial play about
Hitler, "Mein Kampf," which
will be performed in Amster-
Controversy Center-Stage
dam for several weeks and
then tour the provinces. It had
its Dutch-language premiere
here this month.
Doesburg, 34, a graduate of
the Amsterdam theatrical
academy, was thwarted in his
attempts to stage a pur-
portedly anti-Semitic play last
year, Rainer Werner Fassbin-
der's "Garbage, the City and
Death."
The premiere performance
of Fassbinder's play in Rotter-
dam had to be canceled at
curtain time, to avoid violent
protests by Jews and others.
Doesburg says his production
of "Mein Kampf," written by
Georg Tabori, proves his
motives in presenting the
Fassbinder play were "pure
and correct.'
"Mein Kampf features an
apocryphal meeting between
young Hitler and an elderly
Jew, Shlomo Herzl, in a poor
Viennese boarding house.
The German-language ver-
sion of the play opened to
widespread publicity at the
Wiener Burg Theater last
June, as part of the Holland
Festival. Doesburg has pre-
sented a more sober version
that has been well received by
the theater critics here.
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