The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County the voice of the Jewish community of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
West Palm Beach, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 11, no. 27 (Sept. 13, 1985)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Feb. 20, 1987 called no. 4 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Mar. 31, 1989 called no. 12 in masthead and no. 13 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44605643
lccn - sn 00229551
ocm44605643
System ID:
AA00014309:00123

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
THE VOICE OF
THE JEWISH
COMMUNITY OF
PALM BEACH
COUNTY
Jewish floridian
>^ W OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
Volume 15 Number 4
PALM BEACH, FLORIDA FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 1989
f~4
Price 40 Cents
Petite Luncheon Sets
Pace For Women's
Division Event
Setting the pace for the
Women's Division 1989 Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County/UJA Campaign will
once again be the annual $1200
to $4999 minimum gift Pace-
setter's Campaign Event. This
year, four involved women will
co-chair a Petite Luncheon, to
be held at the home of Mrs.
Robert Eigen, Wednesday,
Feb. 22 at 11 a.m. Tanya Zie-
man, a prominent former Rus-
sian Refusenik, will be the
guest speaker.
Sheila Engelstein, Women's
Division Campaign Chair, has
appointed Shirlee Blonder,
Sandra Goldberg, Sandra
Rosen and Adele Simon as
Co-Chairs of this year's Pace-
setter's Event.
Shirlee Blonder, Co-Chair
for her third consecutive year,
is currently a member of the
Women's Division Executive
Committee of the Jewish Fed-
eration and a member of the
Women's Division Campaign
Cabinet. She has also Chaired
the Women's Endowment
Committee of the Jewish Fed-
Continued on Page 15
CONGRESSIONAL MEDAL HONOREE. Former refusenik Natan Sharansky holds the
Congressional Gold Medal Honor that was presented to him by then President Ronald Rea-
gan as then President-elect George Bush looks on. Sharansky, now a citizen of Israel, was
cited for his leadership in the fight for human rights in the Soviet Union. (AP/Wide World
Photo) (Story on p. IS)
As a result of the over-
whelming success last year,
members of the High Ridge
campaign have again planned
Federation Day on Friday,
Feb. 17, in support of the 1989
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County/United Jewish
Appeal Campaign.
"There will be something for
every member 9-hole
events, 18-hole events, card
games, tennis or just socializ-
Cohen Chairs High Ridge Federation Day
ing," explained Jesse Cohen,
Chairman of the festivities.
Last year, the new day-long
format was approved by the
Board of Governors of High
Ridge Country Club, to
encourage more people to get
involved in the Campaign
which helps Jews locally and
around the world. In an effort
to broaden the base of support
members of the High Ridge
Campaign Committee repre-
sent every Northern country
club and will be reaching out to
their co-members. "We are
looking forward to 100 percent
participation from the mem-
bers," said Cohen.
Jesse Cohen is currently on
the Campaign Cabinet of the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County. A former Presi-
dent and Campaign Chairman
of the Jewish Federation of
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, he
also serves as a Senior Advisor
to the Pittsburgh Campaign.
In addition, Mr. Cohen
serves on the Boards of Ameri-
can Friends of Tel Aviv Uni-
versity and Rambam Hospital
in Haifa. He is also on the
Executive Committee of
AIPAC.
For more information, con-
tact Lynne Stolzer, Campaign
Director, Jewish Federation,
832-2120.
Pollard Defense Plays in S. Florida
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
AS soon as last Sabbath
ended, Philip Landa picked up
his phone messages at a mid-
Beach hotel and called his New
York office, the Justice For
the Pollards organization.
Anne Henderson Pollard had
been moved once again.
Landa, whose organization
has long maintained that Anne
Inside
JF&CS Starts Day
Care For Alzheimer's
Patients................Page 2
UJAB&P Women's
Council Plans Mission
To Nation's
Capital..................Pag* 3
QuayleToSpeakAt
ADL Opening
Dinner...................Page s
'BrochosFor
Breakfast".........Pageii
Sharansky Receives
U.S. Medal..........Pagei3
Pollard, 28, was not receiving
froper medical care, only
earned Monday that Pollard
had collapsed and was -report-
edly taken to Danbury General
Hospital suffering from malnu-
trition and internal bleeding.
Just last week, Landa said
he had called the Bureau of
Prisons in Washington, D.C.
relaying national and interna-
tional demands that Pollard be
given proper medical treat-
ment. By Monday, she had
been treated with medications
Landa says for the first time
since her sentence was handed
down in 1985 and trans-
ferred to a federal prison in
Rochester, Minn.
The call sent alarms to
Landa, who was in Miami
Beach to rally the public and
supporters of the Pollards in
one of the most controversial
cases of espionage in Ameri-
can history.
Landa, who says he met
Anne Pollard while he was a
teacher and she a student at
New York University, gave up
his job to work fulltime as
director of the international
organization that is working
on behalf of Jonathan and
Anne Pollard.
THE Justice For the Pol-
lards organization was started
in 1986 by Anne's father, Ber-
nard R. Henderson, and now
has 47 chapters nationwide.
(Kalman Beck, who died sud-
denly of aneurysm last month,
founded the Miami chapter.)
"The Pollards to myself are
a vehicle," Landa told The
Jewish Floridian, explaining
that his friendship with the
Pollards was not the primary
reason for taking the organiza-
Continued on Page 6
Jesse Cohen
Jonathan and Anne Pollard


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, January 27, 1989
Tasini Brings Expertise To Federation
When Tamara Tasini, for-
merly Tamara Klorfein, left
West Palm Beach after high
school, she went to college at
Emory University in Atlanta,
Ga. When she returned, seven
years later, she brought with
her a diverse professional
background in marketing,
advertising and public rela-
tions.
Tasini had exactly what the
Jewish Federation was looking
for to fill the Public Relations
Associate position in the P.R.
Department. Executive Direc-
tor Jeffrey Klein appointed
her in October.
Since then, Tasini has been
getting to know the Federa-
tion, producing invitations,
writing for the Jewish Florid-
ian and co-producing Mosaic,
the Federation's Sunday
morning television show.
The new P.R. Associate's
experience has been acquired
in a variety of positions. After
she completed her ti.A. in
English and Political Science
at Emory, Tasini moved to
Washington, D.C. where she
bagan her career in advertis-
Tamara Tasini
ing and marketing as an
Advertising Manager for
Metro Newspapers. While still
attending college, Tasini
worked three summers as an
Assignment Editor, Associate
Producer and Projectionist at
Channel 5 in West Palm
Beach. She also completed a
college internship in the news-
room of an Atlanta television
station.
In 1984, Tasini completed an
M.B.A. in Marketing at
George Washington Univer-
sity and worked for two cruise
lines as an Advertising Man-
ager and Marketing Manager.
In 1986 she took a position as a
Broadcast Coordinator in the
advertising department of a
major department store in
Washington.
Since moving to West Palm
Beach, last March, Tasini and
her husband Oren, of nine
months, joined the Federa-
tion's Leadership Develop-
ment series. Ms. Tasini is also
a member of Palm Beach
County's newest chapter of
ORT, Northern Nites, and a
member of Hadassah. In
Washington she was a member
of the Greater Washington
Jewish Federation and the
Jewish Community Center.
'We welcome Tammy to the
Jewish Federation and to the
community," said Jeffrey
Klein. "With her varied back-
ground and experience she will
contribute significantly to the
growth of the P.R. Depart-
ment as well as to the Jewish
Federation."
JF&CS Starts Day Care
For Alzheimer's Patients
Standing (l-r) Henry Metrick, V.P. Temple Israel, Rabbi Howard
Shapiro, Anne Epstein, Coordinator, JF & CS, Respite Pro-
m-am Joseph Cohen, President, Selma Rosen, Volunteer, Jenni
Frun\er, Asst. Dept. Dir. Geriatric Services.
L'Chaim Fountains' Cocktail Reception
By TAMARA TASINI
In a community where there
is a pressing need for day care
for the victims of Alzheimer's
disease and related disorders,
the Jewish Family and Child-
ren's Service, an agency of the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County can now provide
some relief. In cooperation
with Temple Israel of West
Palm Beach, the JF & CS has
formed a community-based
Respite Program which began
classes Monday, Jan. 16.
According to Anne Epstein,
Coordinator of the program,
the purpose is two-fold: To
provide activities that will be
responsive to changes in the
needs and interests of indivi-
dual participants and their
functional capacities; and to
provide a break for the care-
givers. "Taking care of these
people is an extremely stress-
ful task," said Ms. Epstein.
"Their days seem to last 36
hours and hopefully this pro-
gram will relieve some of the
stress."
Participants in the program
will meet twice weekly, on
Mondays and Wednesdays,
from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., at
Temple Israel, 1901 North
Flagler Drive, in West Palm
Beach. "The staff at Temple
Israel has been very coopera-
tive," explained Mrs. Epstein.
"Everyone involved with the
program is totally committed
to its success."
During the three-hour ses-
sions the group will be in-
volved in such activities as
discussions, exercise, bingo,
music, games, art expression,
reality orientation and a range
of other experiences. They will
also be served a hot lunch
provided by the Jewish Com-
munity Center.
Eligibility for the program is
based on assessments and ser-
vices currently received by
families. Currently sessions
are full but there is a waiting
list. Anyone interested in hav-
ing a name placed on the wait-
ing list or in volunteering their
time to the program should
contact Anne Epstein, Jewish
Family and Children's Service.
684-1991.
A special "Chai" cocktail reception was given on behalf of the major contributors to the 1989 Foun-
tains Campaign, Monday, January 16, at the home ofTita and Milton Kukoff. Featured guest
speaker was Dora Roth, a vibrant and optimistic Israeli whose experience and passion tell the
story of Israel. Sitting (l-r) Pauline Rose, Ben Silverman, Celia Silverman, Jerry Rose, Dora
Roth, Sylvia Kagan, Shirlee Rubin, Rochelle Zukerman. Standing (l-r) Victor Cohen, Herb
Krieger, Irving Rubin, Gloria Krieger.
Tita and Milton Kukoff.
Klevans and Sharons Head
Poinciana Place Campaign
Sitting (l-r) Irene Manning, Irving Manning, Anne Krautman, George Kagan, Adolph Bergstein.
Standing (l-r) Alex Gruber, Special Gifts Co-Chair, Jeanne Glasser, Victor Cohen, Irving
Anikstein, Herbert Speilman, Joseph Sacks, Milton Kukoff, Special Gifts Co-Chair, Harvey
Krautman, Tita Kukoff.
>ooooooi
Position Available
GERIATRIC COUNSELOR,
part-time, for exciting, chal-
lenging Employee Assist-
ance Program. M.S.W. or
Behavioral Degree pre-
ferred.
Call Jenni Frumer,
Jewish Family and
Children's Service
M4-1M1
MDA Aids in Organ Transplants
The transportation facilities
of the Magen David Adorn
recently provided the network
that made possible four organ
transplants in Israel.
With permission for the
transplant granted by the
family of David Oren, who was
near death due to an automo-
bile accident, MDA went on
alert. Receiving the go-ahead,
MDA rushed a Hadassah Hos-
pital surgery team to Tel
Aviv's Beilinson Hospital,
where the donor's heart was
removed and prepared for its
journey back to Jerusalem.
Five-and-one-half hours after
the original call, the heart was
successfully implanted into a
patient.
Two couples, Milton and
Miriam Sharon and Jules and
Shirley Klevan, were again
appointed as Chairs and Co-
Chairs, respectively, for the
Poinciana Place Campaign in
support of the Palm Beach
County Jewish Federation/
UJA Campaign, announced
Irving Mazer, General Cam-
paign Chair.
A luncheon on behalf of this
year's fundraising efforts will
be held for the residents of
Poinciana Place on Sunday
February 12, at 12:30 p.m. at
Temple Beth Sholom, 315
North "A" Street in Lake
Worth. Albert G. Effrat will be
the guest speaker.
The Klevans, the parents of
two children and five grand
children, moved to Lake
Worth over 11 years ago from
Bayside, Queens in New York
Mr. Klevan. a retired store
owner, was the Chair of tne
Poinciana Campaign from
1985-1987. For the pa^w
years he has been a Commit
of the affiliate campaign. He
also a board member and one-
time vice president of B na
B'rith and has been involved in
the Israel Bonds Drive .Mrs.
Klevan is a member of B n
B'rith, ORT and a life member
of Hadassah.
Previously from Philadel-
Continued on Paf* '


Friday, January 27, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 3
UJA B&P Women's Council Plans
Mission To Nation's Capital
Lifshitz To Chair YAD
Business Executives Breakfast
Empowering Jewish Women:
Traditional Wisdom and Mod-
ern Politics will be the theme
of the United Jewish Appeal's'
Business & Professional
Women's Council Mission to
Washington, D.C. March 12-
14. So far, four Palm Beach
County women have regis-
tered to attend the three-day
conference that is expected to
attract over 90 women from
Jewish communities across the
country.
"We're looking for at least
six more women from our Jew-
ish community to join us on
this mission," said Leslie
Adams-Blumenthal, the Palm
Beach County Delegation
Chair. "The combination of
study and political action, spe-
cifically related to Jewish
women, presents a rare oppor-
tunity for women in this com-
munity to get involved on a
national level."
In addition to Ms. Adams-
Blumenthal, three others who
have registered so far are
Ingrid Rosenthal, Dr. Norma
Schulman and Dr. Elizabeth
Shulman.
Dr. Isaiah Gafni of Hebrew
University, a visiting profes-
sor at Harvard University, will
deliver the mission's keynote
address on political power in
Jewish history and rabbinic
tradition. In addition, major
scholars will lecture and lead
discussions on texts relating to
the political power of the Jew-
ish community and Jewish
women in the Diaspora, and
explore how Jewish women
have historically achieved and
used communal leadership.
On the "day of action," mis-
sion participants will express
their solidarity with Soviet
Jews at a vigil in front of the
Soviet Embassy and hear lob-
byists from the American Bar
Association, the International
Ladies Garment Workers
Union and other organizations
discuss the methods and
impact of lobbying in govern-
mental system.
Participants will also meet
members of Congress and
attend briefings by the Ameri-
can Israel Public Affairs Com-
mittee (AIPAC) and Israeli
Embassy officials. Representa-
tives of the incoming Bush
Administration and of Jewish
community agencies which
lobby the Federal Government
will brief mission members on
domestic issues affecting the
Jewish community.
It was reported that the
Jewish Federation Executive
Committee voted recently to
help subsidize members of the
Palm Beach County B&P
Women's Group who are inter-
ested in attending the March
B&P Women's Council.
For more information, con-
tact Faye Nelson, Women's
Division Director, Jewish Fed-
eration, 832-2120.
Winter Is Fantasy For Young Adults
The reality of winter in most
of the country is short icy cold
days and long windy nights.
In Palm Beach, though, winter
is a fantasy, a Palm Beach
Winter Fantasy. As the theme
of their next social function,
the Young Adult Division of
the Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County will bring a win-
ter fantasy affair to the Brazil-
lian Court Hotel in Palm
Beach, Saturday, Feb. 18 at
8 p.m.
As Chair of the function,
Lynn Waltuch described the
evening as an elegant event
that will lend itself to dancing
and socializing amid wintery
decorations. There will be hors
d'oeuvres, cocktails and door
prizes. Reservations are lim-
ited to 150 people.
"The Brazilian Court is very
elegant," Ms. Waltuch
described. "Combined with a
great D.J. and excellent food,
we expect the Palm Beach
Winter Fantasy to attract a lot
of people."
Ms. Waltuch has been
involved with the Young Adult
Division for over two years.
She has served on the Social
Committee, the Membership
Committee and participated in
the YAD Mission to Israel in
June, 1988. This is her first
time as an event Chair.
Originally from New York,
Ms. Waltuch has lived in Palm
Beach County for eight years.
She teaches deaf children at
Lincoln Elementary School
Jewish adults in a relaxed and
elegant atmosphere," Ms.
Waltuch explained. "It's the
best introduction to the Jewish
Federation and a way for peo-
ple to become involved wit 1 us
and ultimately, the whole Jew-
ish people, both here and
around tlie world."
The Social Committee
Co-Chairs are Mindy Freeman
and Jack Schram. Committee
members include Paula
Barkowitz, David Bronstein,
Jeffrey Cohen, Linda Dia-
mond, Caryn Doniger, Amy
Genet, Lenny Gordon, Adam
Janklow, Lisa Jaynes, Howard
Kaslow, Mark Koenig, Ilene
Lampert, Victoria Lichtman,
Tern Lubin, Laurie Sulzer,
Mark Warner, Robin Warren.
For more information, con-
tact Mark Mendel, Director,
Young Adult Division, Jewisb
Federation, 832-2120.
and is a Sunday School and
Hebrew teacher at Temple
Judea in West Palm Beach and
a private tutor in a variety of
subjects, including special
speech and language for deaf
children.
"The social events that the
Young Adult Division sponsors
are a great way to meet and
socialize with other young
Grossberg and Bernstein Chair
Covered Bridge Breakfast
For the second consecutive
year, Anne Grossberg and
Goldie Bernstein will Co-Chair
the Covered Bridge Breakfast
on behalf of the 1989 Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County/United Jewish Appeal
Campaign. The breakfast will
take place on Sunday, Feb. 19,
9:30 a.m. at the Covered
Bridge Clubhouse. Featured
guest speaker will be Dora
Roth.
"We are very fortunate to
have Mrs. Roth speak at our
breakfast," stated Mrs. Gross-
berg. "She is a dynamic and
articulate speaker who's pas-
sion and experience eloquently
tell the story of Israel and
portrays the pride we have for
that country.
Anne Grossberg is active in
the Jewish Federation and has
been Chairman of the Covered
Bridge Committee for the past
eight years. In addition, she is
a Past President of Hadassah
and a Past President and Pro-
gram Chair of the Temple
B'nai Or Sisterhood in Morris-
town, New Jersey. Currently,
she is very active in the
Women's Division of United
Jewish Appeal and serves on
the Board of Directors of
Temple B'nai Or.
Goldie Bernstein has been
involved in volunteer work for
Embracing Every Life
many years. In her northern
community of Malveme, New
York, she is a Past President
of the Elan Chapter of Hadas-
sah and a Past Sisterhood
President. She was also active
in the Malveme Jewish Cen-
ter.
After moving to Florida,
Mrs. Goldstein served as the
first President of the Elan
Chapter of Hadassah. She is a
former Vice President of the
Florida Central Region of
Hadassah and currently serves
on the Florida Atlantic Region
Board of Directors.
For more information, con-
tact Dr. Lester Silverman, Dir-
ector of Leisure and Retire-
ment Communities, Jewish
Federation, 832-2120.
Michael Lifshitz
In order to introduce new
programs that will be interest-
ing to all young professionals,
the Young Adult Division
Business Executives Forum
has planned its first breakfast
meeting for Tuesday, Feb. 2,
7:45 a.m. at Toojay's in Palm
Beach. The featured guest
speaker will be Charles Leh-
mann, Executive Director,
Palm Beach County Tourist
Development Council.
According to Michael
Lifshitz, Chairman of the
Breakfast, "Many people in
the community expressed to us
the desire to have an event in
the morning. We thought a
breakfast would provide an
excellent opportunity for
many young professionals who
are not able to attend the
evening programs to meet and
network."
Another objective is to intro-
duce a variety of speakers and
topics. Members of the media
and spiritual and educational
leaders have addressed the
group but this will be the first
time anyone from the tourism
industry is featured, explained
Lifshitz.
"As community members we
should be aware of this service
and the growth which is such
an integral part of Palm Beach
County."
Michael Lifshitz has been
active in YAD for the past
several years. Currently, he
serves on the Board of YAD
and its Campaign Cabinet, and
is Program Co-Chair of the
Leadership Development Pro-
gram. Last summer, he partic-
ipated on the YAD mission to
Israel. He is also a member of
the Outreach Committee of
Human Resource Develop-
ment and is on the Program
Committee of the Jewish Com-
munity Center.
The cost of the program is
$10 which will include a deli-
cious breakfast of eggs,
blintzes, fresh fruits, bagels,
lox spread, toast, coffee, tea,
milk and fruit juices. Those
who attend will also have the
opportunity to learn about get-
ting their name in the Business
and Professional Directory
which lists over 200 local pro-
fessionals. Seating is limited
and reservations should be
made as soon as possible.
For more information, con-
tact Mark Mendel, Director,
Young Adult Division, Jewish
Federation, 832-2120.
New Navy Attache
TEL AVIV (JTA) The commander of Israel's navy,
Adm. Avraham Ben-Shoshan, is being switched to a shore
job in Washington.
Ben-Shoshan, 42, will become military attache at the
Israeli Embassy there shortly. He replaces Maj. Gen. Amos
Yaron, who is retiring.
Ben-Shoshan will be replaced as head of the navy by Brig.
Gen. Micha Ram.
^
rj^en Jubilee Vv/)
The *V
Jewish Federation
of Palm Beach County
requests the honor of your presence
at this season s premiere event
celebrating the
Fiftieth Anniversary
of the
United Jewish Appeal
Sunday, the twenty-ninth of January
Nineteen hundred and eighty-nine
Cocktails Half after six o'clock
Dinner Half after seven o'clock
The Breakers. Palm Beach
Music provided by Jerry Marshall Orchestra
Minimum Commitment $5,000 to the
1989 Jewish Federation of Palm Beach/
United Jewish Appeal Campaign
couvert $75 per person
Black tie


Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, January 27, 1989
Human Rights Conference
Human Rights Promise
The dilemma is as much about ethical attri-
butes as it is about logistics and location.
The Soviet Union has been approved as the
site for a human rights conference in 1991.
The locale has heretofore been in Vienna.
While those who tally counts and measure
substantiative changes in the human rights
arena acknowledge that the USSR has taken
strides to improve its record in those areas,
there are others who suggest that too little has
been done too late to merit such a conference
in the Soviet Union.
The flip side of the argument, of course, is
that since so much has been accomplished
under the current regime of Mikhail Gorba-
chev and his dual policies of perestroika and
glasnost, that the government is entitled to
something of a reward.
Hence, awarding the conference to Moscow.
The middle ground taken by third parties is
that the planned conference may act as a
further catalyst for even more advances in the
field of human rights.
Surely, the Soviet Union's president would
be excruciatingly embarrassed on the inter-
national stage should his nation not play out
its appropriate part given the venue of the
1991 stage.
So, there is little to lote.
President Reagan, in a well-worded caveat,
warned that the United States, for one, would
not be held hostage to a calendar date in the
Soviet Union if that republic did not make
good on the promise of its present thrust.
We concur with that position. It holds open
the window of opportunity without precluding
its closure should subsequent events warrant
doing so.
0
Unethical Research
West German university officials seem to
have missed the point with their denials that
no Jewish victims' remains are being used in
research when the state television station
reported that tissues and bones of Holocaust
victims were still being utilized for medical
investigation.
With no official denial of the practice, it
would seem that the mindset which allowed
experimentation on Hitler's hapless victims
lias not been expunged from the German
mentality.
That the bodies' identities are known
some apparently were prominent anti-Nazis
further compounds the insensitivity. even
after 45 years.
nJTA
By RABBI MARC H. TANENBAUM
For the Jewish community,
1988 was not the worst of
years, but, it was far from the
best of years.
Some good things happened,
among them the emigration of
some 19,000 Jews from the
Soviet Union and the passage
by Congress of the Genocide
Convention Implementation
Act.
But 1988 was haunted by the
"Who Is a Jew" controversy in
Israel, and the turmoil over
Middle East peace. While
Many Challenges for Change
dominate in the coming year.
Israel's new unity government
may have defused the "Who Is
a Jew" issue for the time
being, it would be naive to
pretend it has gone away.
1989 must see major efforts
by rabbis and lay leaders in
all Jewish religious groups
to find a procedure for conver-
sion to Judaism that could be
adopted by all. The future of
the Jewish people depends on
it.
The other burning issue a
trustworthy peace with the
Palestinians will continue to
In the wake of the tragic Pan
Am explosion, all Americans
as well as Jews are fiercely
against terrorism. But that
anger does not absolve Israel,
the Palestinians and the Arab
states from putting aside rhet-
oric and negativism and pursu-
ing actively realistic peace init-
iatives.
If 1989 is to be more peace-
ful than last year, it will
require nothing less than a set
change in attitude among
many people in many places.
Yasir Arafat successfully
silenced another Palestinian
Arab moderate and may
have driven the peace process
back a few steps as well. Beth-
lehem Mayor Elias Freij,
respected by Israelis and
Arabs alike as a moderate
voice, retracted a call for a halt
to the uprising after Arafat
threatened: "Any Palestinian
leader who proposes an end to
the intifada exposes himself to
the bullets of his own people
and endangers his life. The
PLO will know how to deal
with him."
Freij is no doubt aware of
the dozen Palestinian Arabs
who have been assassinated by
fellow Palestinian Arabs since
the uprising began. He do
doubt remembers the case of
71-year-old Hassan Tawil,
mayor of the West Bank town
of El-Bireh. who was stabbed
repeatedly outside his office m
June after refusing the upris-
ing leadership's demands to
resign his position.
the
Jewish floridian
Of Palm Beach County
USPS 089030 ISSN 875^5061
Combining "Our Voice and Federation Report*
FHEDK SHOCMET SUZANNE SHOCMET LOR1 SCMULMAN
Editor and Publisher Eiecutive Editor Aijut.nl Newt Coordinator
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Mining. Marvin S. Raaan. Mortimer Weiss Treaaurar. Haten G Hoffman. Assistant Treaaurer Mark
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rridaur. September eZ, lrS*.
J' Num.be'- 29
No Quick Fix
Arafat's threat demon-
strates once again that the
PLO and its sympathizers
have a different understanding
of the peace process than do
Israel and the United States.
To Arafat's supporters the
peace process means the rapid
relinquishment of Israeli-held
land to a Palestinian Arab
state. PLO spokesmen have
proposed that the terrorist
organization join in an interna-
tional conference sponsored by
the United Nations Security
Council with the power to
impose a solution on the partic-
ipants. They have also defined
their view of the future: A
Palestinian Arab state in the
West Bank and Gaza Strip
(with a narrow strip of land
cutting Israel in half and unit-
ing the two regions) whose
capital would be "Arab Jerusa-
lem." By the way. PLO spo-
kesmen have recently stated
that they would not agree to a
demilitarized state unless
Israel too were demilitarized.
There is another definition
"t the peace process, however
which does not offer hasty
solutions, imposed settlements
or unrealistic goals.
Recently, members of Israeli
Prime Minister Yitzhak Sha-
mir s Likud party have floated
preliminary ideas for a plan
which would be built upon the
success of the Camp David
Accords. They have reiterated
ongstanding calls for calm in
tne territories prior to a politi-
cal settlement. Following a
period.of quiet, elections would
be held in the territories to
elect Palestinian Arab repre-
sentatives to negotiations with
Israel. The objective would be
to grant the territories "full
autonomy" as outlined in the
Camp David Accords.
The Israeli proposal offers
several obvious advantages: It
halts the terrible bloodshed in
the territories. It provides for
a period for confidence build-
ing. It grants Palestinian
Arabs the ability to elect their
representatives. It puts these
representatives on an equal
footing with the Israeli gov
ernment in a negotiating con-
text. It builds upon the Camp
David Accords, a workable
treaty accepted by the broad
Israeli public and the world's
most populous Arab nation. As
noted before, autonomy Camp
David style would go a long
way toward meeting Palestin-
ian Arab demands. Finally, it
provides for Israel's legitimate
security concerns.
The Shamir plan does not
satisfy all the desires of PLO
followers. Rather, it realisti-
cally seeks to bridge the broad
gaps separating two bitterly
feuding communities.
Some Palestinian Arabs.
including Freij, have expre
ssed an interest in these Israeli
ideas and are examining them
closely. Such political maturity
should be reinforced ana
and
rewarded by Washington
other governments, especial')
in light of Arafat's recent
threat.
The Shamir ideas offer aj
sides an opportunity to declare
victory and to start, at las.
down the road to pecenu
coexistence. It would inaeeu
be a peace process not a riugimtmktorialureprtnUd**
permunon of Near East Report-


Friday, January 27, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 5
Sephardi To Head Vaad
By BEN KAYFETZ
m TORONTO (JTA) For the first time in Toronto, a
Sephardi has become president of a community-wide
Orthodox rabbinic organization.
Rabbi Amram Assayag, who was born in Tangier,
Morocco, has been chosen as the new president of the Vaad
Ha-Rabbonim of Toronto, replacing Rabbi Moshe Lowy,
who has presided since 1986.
Ordained in Israel, Assayag has been spiritual leader of
Congregation Petah Tikva Anshe Castilla in Toronto for
the past 10 years.
Assayag was instrumental in founding Or Ha'emet,
Toronto's only Sephardi day school, which has an enroll-
ment of 300.
Two To Share Wolf Prize
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Two American mathematicians will
share the $100,000 Wolf Foundation Prize in mathematics
for 1989, the foundation announced here this week.
The annual award will go to Professor Alberto Calderon,
68, of the University of Chicago and Professor John Milnor,
57, of Princeton University.
Calderon, who was born in Argentina, was cited for his
ground-breaking work on integrals and differentials, the
foundation said.
Milnor will receive the prize for original discoveries in
geometry.
The awards will be presented by Israeli President Chaim
Herzog in the Knesset in May.
The Wolf Foundation was established here in 1975 by the
late Dr. Ricardo Wolf.
Shultz To Receive Award
NEW YORK (JTA) Secretary of State George Shultz
will be presented the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith's Klinghoffer Award in June 1989 for his contribu-
tions in combatting terrorism.
The award is given by the ADL's Leon and Marilyn
Klinghoffer Memorial Foundation, which was organized
after the 1985 murder of Leon Klinghoffer aboard the
cruise ship Achille Lauro.
Klinghoffer's daughters, Ilsa and Lisa, cited Shultz's
decision earlier this month to deny PLO leader Yasir
Arafat a U.S. visa, which would have allowed him to
address the UN. General Assembly in New York.
Shamir's Response
Following is the text of Israel's Prime Minister Itzhak
Shamir Statement on a probability to hold peace talks
under the auspices of the United Nations:
"The only normal and acceptable way to a peace
agreement is through direct negotiations. Fortunately, we
are all witness, today, to progress in solving several
conflicts in various regions of the world by direct negotia-
tions between the parties directly concerned.
Such negotiations can be launched under the auspices of
the great powers, or the UN, providing they refrain from
any involvement in the substance of the talks.
In this regard we have had a positive experience with the
U.S. The American government played a useful role at
Camp David which was founded on the trust and credibility
that the U.S. enjoyed on the part of the two partners to the
negotiations.
16.1 Percent Inflation For 1988
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) The cost of living index rose a mere
0.5 percent in December, bringing the Israeli inflation rate
for 1988 to 16.4 percent.
That is slightly higher than the 1987 rate, which was 16.1
percent. The figures were released Sunday by the Central
Bureau of Statistics.
The government expects a sharp increase, probably 5
percent, in the January price index, which is to be
published Feb. 15.
The increase will reflect the devaluation of the shekel in
January and the reduction of price subsidies, measures
ordered by Finance Minister Shimon Peres soon after he
took office.
While inflation is on the rise again, it is small compared
to the 1985 rate of 185.1 percent.
KVB7CHI
TM
"Listen, kid, looks like you could use a
good lawyer. Here's my card."
j
) 1989 David S. Boxerman and Mark Saunders. All rights reserved.
Two Orthodox Shuls Vandalized
In Penn., Florida
By MARLENE GOLDMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) Syna-
gogue desecration struck
American communities in
Pennsylvania and Florida last
month, one of which resulted
in the arrest of a white power
skinhead youth.
At Kesher Israel in Harris-
burg, Pa., one of the Orthodox
congregants discovered anti-
Semitic graffiti and swastikas
spray-painted on the syna-
gogue walls, as he was driving
to the daily morning minyan
on Dec. 19.
Part of the $1,000 worth of
damage, according to Rabbi
Chaim Schertz of Kesher
Israel, included slogans "Jew-
ish Dogs," "Jews Out
Of U.S., "You Have Been
Warned," and "We Will Win."
Two weeks later, the police
arrested Chistopher Cook, a
19-year-old leader of a skin-
head group called the Up
Starts.
Cook, who is being held on
$100,000 bail, has been
charged with ethnic intimida-
tion, criminal mischief and
desecration of venerated
objects.
Cook had started a branch of
the Up Starts in the Harris-
burg area over the past few
months, and attracted about
nine members, according to
Lt. Peter Brooks of the Harris-
burg Police Bureau.
The Up Starts are a Califor-
nia-based white supremacist
skinhead group.
The police department is
now aware of the different
skinhead groups in the area,
Brooks told the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency, adding that
most of them do not support
white power hatred and in fact
denounced Cook's actions.
While charges against Cook
are only misdemeanors, the
high amount of bail assessed
against him reflects state laws
instituted in December which
upgrade the penalties of insti-
tutional vandalism.
Under the new Ethnic Intim-
idation Act, which was spon-
sored by state Sen. Jeanette
Reibman, desecration of
churches and synagogues as
well as other venerated objects
and institutions receive a
second-degree felony penalty
regardless of the amount of
monetary damage.
"The legislation was moti-
vated by a vandalism incident
at the senator's synagogue in
Easton several years ago, sim-
ilar to this latest incident in
Harrisburg," said Gary Grob-
man, director of the Pennsyl-
vania Jewish Coalition.
A rally was held at Kesher
Israel soon after the episode,
where between 1,200 and
1,500 Jewish and non-Jewish
members of the community
and government turned out,
according to Elliot Gershen-
son, executive director of the
United Jewish Federation of
Greater Harrisburg.
In a separate graffiti inci-
dent in South Miami Beach,
Fla., the Beth Tfilah Congre-
gation was desecrated with a
swastika and the spray-paint-
ed words "Nazi" and
"WASP'."
About six months ago, the
40-year-old Orthodox syna-
gogue was also the target of
vandalism as a dozen windows,
one of which was stained glass,
were shattered.
"It's just another series of
annoying harassments," Rabbi
Israel Tropper of Beth Tfilah
told the Jewish Floridian.
"We try to watch when we
can and we asked the police to
give a little more supervision if
they can," Tropper said.
There have been no known
arrests in either Florida case,
according to Rabbi Solomon
Schiff, executive vice presi-
dent of the Rabbinical Associa-
tion of Greater Miami.
Five Jailed For Election Fraud
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Three
yeshiva students and two
women from the Orthodox
township of Bnei Brak were
sentenced to prison by a Tel
Aviv magistrate for election
fraud.
They pleaded guilty to cast-
ing illegal ballots during the
Nov. 1 Knesset elections.
Sentenced to four months
were students Yitzhak Pinter,
36: Baruch Nissenbaum, 31;
and Yisrael Lerer. Sara
Kuperman, 45, and Haya Stei-
zenberg, 35, got three months
each.
The accused admitted they
borrowed each other's identity
cards in order to vote more
than once at different polling
stations.
Lerer insisted he acted out
of conscience when he
"loaned" his ID card to
another man without payment.
He said he could not bring
himself to participate in a
Zionist meaning secular
election.
Judge Eliezer Cohen sur-
prised the defendants' lawyers
when he refused to accept a
plea bargain they had
arranged with the district
attorney for suspended sen-
tences.
"The defendants' deeds
endangered the basis of
Israel's democratic system,"
the judge declared.


Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, January 27, 1989
Quayle To Speak At ADL Opening Dinner
Pollard Defense
PALM BEACH, FL In
what is scheduled to be his
first major address as Vice
President, Dan Quayle will be
the speaker at the opening
dinner Feb. 9 of the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith's three-day National
Executive Committee meeting
at the Breakers Hotel here.
Some 750 Jewish community
leaders are expected to attend.
ADL's National Executive
Committee is a policy-making
body whose members come
from all sections of the country
to participate in the meeting s
sessions on various issues of
Jewish concern.
The ADL meeting in Palm
Beach has traditionally been
addressed by prominent gov-
ernment figures. Among them
have been Gerald R. Ford, as
Vice President of the U.S.,
Secretary of State George P.
Shultz, Senators Robert Dole,
Edward M. Kennedy, Howell
Heflin, Dale Bumpers and
Jacob K. Javits, Congressman
Dante Fascell and Jeane J.
Kirkpatrick as U.S. Ambassa-
dor to the United Nations.
Dan Quayle
Israel Soliciting English Tutors
Volunteer teachers are needed to tutor English in Israel
during summer, 1989. Part-time assignments will be
available in ORT schools, WIZO centers and public schools
in Jerusalem, Haifa, Tel Aviv, Netanya and Ashkelon. The
program is coordinated by the New York-based TOVb
Organization on behalf of the Department of Education and
Culture of the World Zionist Organization, the Israeli
Ministry of Education and ORT, Israel.
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THE ENDOWMENT FUND
of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
The history of the Jewish people has been hard but heroic. But always
throughout persecution, famine and exile our faith and heritage have
been preserved. And passed from one generation to another.
Some have given of their material wealth to help perpetuate this great
heritage. Some have given their lives.
Throughout our annual campaign, Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
responds to the needs of Jewish men and women in our community, offering a
variety of life sustaining and life enriching services and programs.
Over the years, your commitment has helped to accomplish the modern
miracle of the return to Israel. Your generosity has aided troubled youth, cared
for the sick and elderly and helped to keep world Jewry strong. Now you have
another opportunity to help perpetuate the values and traditions for which so
many have sacrificed so much, through a gift to the Endowment Department of
our Federation.
The Endowment Department was established to help ensure the continuity of
vital Federation services, and through the Foundation, provide resources for
unexpected emergency situations, grants, research, and to be a service to the
donor.
Recognizing the community's changing needs and new demands, the
Endowment Fund can also provide "seed dollars" for certain innovative
programs and supports the search for creative, thoughtful solutions to
communal problems.
By creating an endowment or philanthropic fund with the Endowment
Department, you become one in spirit with past generations of Jews whose
generous gifts are today's legacy. And with future generations who will carry our
hopes, dreams and faith forward to endless tomorrows.
Give a gift that unites our heritage and our hopes.
The Endowment Fund
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
501 South Flagler Drive, Suite 305
West Palm Beach, FL 33401
(407) 832-2120
Edward Baker Morris Rombro
Endowment Director Endowment Associate
Continued from Page 1
lions' reins. "I am involved
because it gives me the oppor-
tunity in my discourse with
Washington to hold them
accountable for the injustice
that they have perpetrated on
the State of Israel and
Judaism."
The movement has picked up
momentum, according to
Landa, as facts are brought
out about the Pollard case,
including that of allegedly the
most severe prison sentences
imposed upon anyone caught
passing classified U.S. military
information to another govern-
ment and the mistreatment
that the organization charges
both Jonathan, 31, and for-
merly a civilian security ana-
lyst for the U.S. Navy's Intelli-
gence Service, and Anne Pol-
lard have been subjected to
since their imprisonment.
Landa produced letters
signed by Israeli Knesset
members, leaders of American
Jewish organizations, rabbis,
synagogue umbrella groups, as
well as from organizations
such as the National Coalition
of American Nuns.
SEVERAL of the groups
stated that they are not con-
doning Jonathan Pollard's
releasing secret U.S. intelli-
gence to Israel. But the groups
are increasingly clamoring
about Jonathan Pollard's life
imprisonment sentence and
the two five-year concurrent
sentences that were given to
his wife, who was charged as
an accessory in the case.
Landa said the organization
is primarily focusing on these
issues now and particularly
Anne Pollard's health. The
non-profit group raises more
than $250,000 annually. The
money, often in $18 and $36
checks as well as large dona-
tions, is channeled into two
main areas now: legal and
political, Landa said.
On the legal front, Harvard
law professor Alan Dershowitz
is leading a team of attorney*
who are preparing to file,
motion in the Pollard case
shortly, Landa reported. The
motion would be to vacate the
sentences imposed on the |3
lards based upon their plsi
agreements with the govern-
ment. Landa indicated that
Dershowitz will seek a regular
trial. Dershowitz is also plan
ning a legal appeal to ensure
that Anne Pollard receives
proper medical care for her
digestive ailment.
While Dershowitz is leading
a legal attack against the fed
eral government, Landa said
he is working the political
machinery, appealing to U.S
congressmen, organizations
and high-ranking Administra-
tion officials.
But with the health and max-
imum sentence issues taking
the forefront, there are other
issues that have not been for-
gotten. Landa said the Justice
For the Pollards organization
is seeking support on Capitol
Hill for a congressional investi-
gation into the case. One of the
key issues the organization
alleges is that Defense Depart-
ment officials were denying
Israel military information
about its Arab foes, data not
normally withheld from other
U.S. allies, according to
Landa.
LANDA, whose Miami
Beach visit was sponsored by
Abbey Berkowitz and Alex
Smilow, owners of the Crown
Hotel, said prior to Pollard's
life imprisonment without-
parole sentence, the largest
sentence ever handed down
for espionage on behalf of a
friendly nation was seven
years. The median sentence
has been two years, Landa
said, quoting Dershowitz and
his group of attorneys repre-
senting the Pollards.
"Jonathan ... found that it
was a one-way exchange
where Israel provided every-
thing but the United States
Continued on Page 12
Training The Trainers
About 20 bcol Jewish leaders met on Thursday, January tt,fra
training session that will enhance their worker training smut.
The workshop focused on pre-solicitation organization cm
improving solicitation techniques. Pictured above are ttoWjg
ers: Joel Leibowitz, incoming Chair of the United Jewish App*
National Training Center and Billie Feinman, also a mem
the National Training Center.
At right, Jeffrey Paine, Chair
of the Training The Trainers
Program.


Friday, January 27, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 7
Pearl Resnick To
Receive JTS Medal
Kramer Receives Honorary
Doctorate From Hebrew U.
Pearl Resnick
Weinstein
Installed As
Lake Worth
Jewish
Center
President
On Jan. 13th, Mr. William
M. Weinstein, formerly of
Temple Beth Sholem in Liv-
ingston, New Jersey, was
installed as President of the
Lake Worth Jewish Center.
As a registered pharmacist,
Weinstein owned and operated
his own pharmacy in Living-
ston, New Jersey. He has also
served as Assistant Professor
of Pharmacy at Columbia Col-
lege of Pharmaceutical
Sciences in New York City and
as Assistant Professor of
Pharmacy at Rutgers College
of Pharmacy.
In recent years, Weinstein
has been employed as Director
of a large nursing home facility
in West Palm Beach and is
currently employed as a prac-
ticing pharmacist in Lake
Worth.
Weinstein resides with his
wife, Eleanor and two children
in Lake Worth.
Early Judicial
Americana
The Jewish National Univer-
sity Library in Jerusalem has
acquired some rare items of
Judeo-Americana.
In the 18th and early 19th
century only about 3,000 Jews
lived in the United States, but
they produced some important
works, including a Hebrew
grammar (1735) and a prayer-
book (1826).
The Library purchased 200
such items from a New York
dealer in rare books, and
experts believe they should
help scholars considerably in
their researches into early
Jewish Life in America.
The Jewish Theological Semin-
ary will honor Mrs. Pearl
Resnick of Palm Beach and
New York at its SOth Annual
Palm Beach Luncheon on Sun-
day, Jan. 29, 12 noon. Mrs.
Resnick will be presented with
the prestigious Seminary
Medal which honors dedication
to the cause of public service
and idealism. Through an
unending display of devotion
and generosity she has helped
to enrich the lives of countless
Jews both here and in Israel.
Mrs. Elizabeth (Biddie)
Kramer, prominent commun-
ity leader, will receive an Hon-
orary Doctorate from the
Hebrew University of Jerusa-
lem at a National Convocation
Dinner, Sunday, Feb. 26. The
cocktail reception will begin at
6 p.m. followed by dinner at 7
p.m. at the Palm Hotel in West
Palm Beach.
Michael Feinstein, critically
acclaimed winner of both the
Drama Desk and Outer Critics
Circle awards, will be the
guest artist for the evening.
For nearly three decades,
Mrs. Kramer has been at the
very center of activities in the
United States on behalf of the
Hebrew University. She was a
pioneer in the establishment of
the Palm Beach Chapter of the
American Friends of the
Hebrew University and has
been involved in a wide variety
of activities on behalf of the
University here.
Mrs. Elizabeth
(Biddie) Kramer
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in Dade. Broward. Palm Beach, Martin, St. Lucie,
Indian River and Okeechobee Counties.


Page 6 The Jewish EToridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, January 27, 1989
Morse Women's Auxiliary Launches Membership Drive
Thirty-five women from
Eastpointe gathered at the
home of Ruth Besdine on Mon-
day, February 16, to enjoy
brunch and to learn about the
Joseph L. Morse Geriatric
Center and its Women's Auxil-
iary.
"The response was tremen-
dously gratifying," said Helen
Sodowick, Membership Vice-
President of the Auxiliary.
"Nearly every woman present
applied for membership."
Dorothy Ludwig, President-
Elect of the Morse Auxiliary,
added that 17 women who
were unable to attend the
brunch also requested applica-
tions.
The Center's Women's Auxi-
liary, which currently has
1,400 members, offers both
Annual and Life memberships.
Auxiliary members have two
meetings each year, with the
Board of Directors holding
monthly meetings from Octo-
ber through April. The Auxili-
ary holds two major fund-
raisers each season: an annual
Gala dinner/dance in Decem-
ber, and a luncheon/fashion
show in March. Both events
are staged at the Breakers
with attendance of over 500
guests.
Additional funds are gener-
ated through a highly success-
ful tribute program. The
Woman's Auxiliary's tribute
program received national
attention at last year's Annual
Leadership Symposium con-
ducted by the Associated Aux-
iliaries of Jewish Home for the
Aged in Cleveland.
Funds raised by the Auxili-
ary are earmarked for pay-
ment on the organization's
$500,000 pledge to the Morse
expansion, and to supply the
special needs of the Center's
residents. To date, the women
have paid half of their five-
year commitment to the
expansion.
Both Sodowick and Ludwig
spoke to the guests at the
brunch about the Center and
the Auxiliary. Guests also
viewed a short video and lis-
tened to Morse resident, Anita
Anton, describe how she and
other residents view the work
of the Women's Auxiliary at
the Center.
"Old age is childhood revisited"
"Our Women's Auxiliary
makes so many things availa-
ble for me and my peers,"
Anton said. "Many of us have
saved the Chanukah gifts you
gave us and the Mother's Day
presents...I cannot tell you
what joy we have from the
tennis bracelets, cosmetic
bags, pretty dusters and pic-
ture frames especially when
old age is childhood revisited
and gifts take on not only
current meaning, but what it
meant in receiving like Chanu-
kah gelt as a child."
The Auxiliary has also pro-
vided special geriatric chairs
for assisted and total care resi-
dents at Morse, a large awning
to shade residents using the
Madame Alexander Rose Gar-
den, and special occasion table
cloths. The Auxiliary shared
the expense of purchasing
electric Shabbot candles for
the residents' rooms with their
Morse counterpart, the Men's
Associates.
...The best in the country...
In concluding her talk,
Anton said, "If I had my way,
as the new building is erected,
in every brick I would have
your names like the great wall
in Jerusalem to show the ener-
gies, the responsibilities you
have taken on to make this
Center the best in the coun-
try."
Sodowick commented that
Left to right: Dorothy Ludwig, President-Elect of the Morse
Geriatric Center's Women's Auxiliary, Anita Anton, Morse
resident, Helen Sodowick, Membership Vice President for the
Auxiliary, Ruth Besdine, Auxiliary member and hostess of the
membership recruitment brunch.
1
Manischewitz
1989 PASSOVER RECIPE GUIDE
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Our new 1989 Passover Recipe Guide is more beautiful than ever! And we at
Manischewitz hope it will make your holiday celebration more beautiful than ever.
Our Guide features two menu suggestions plus special recipes for dishes like
Nippy Fish Canapes, Veal Concord and Peach Shalet
You'll also find a 25c coupon for any size Manischewitz Premium Gold Gefilte
Fish and a 25c coupon for any Manischewitz Cake Mix or Muffin Mix. Send for
your free copy now and have a very happy and Kosher Passover!
COUPONS EXPIRE APRIL 25. 1989
Mail coupon to: RECIPE GUIDE, P.O. BOX 484A. JERSEY CITY. N.J. 07303-0484
Please send the FREE 1989 Manischewitz Passover Recipe Guide to:
Name
Address.
City-
Slate
Zip,
the Eastpointe brunch is the
first of several similar recruit-
ment socials which will be held
in communities through-out
northern Palm Beach County.
"We are counting on won-
derful Auxiliary members like
Ruth Besdine to open their
homes for brunch, tea, or
whatever, so we share the
Morse Geriatric Center story
and let others know how much
deep satisfaction there is in
being a member of the Morse
Women's Auxiliary."
Women interested in learn-
ing more about membership in
the Morse Women's Auxiliary
should call the Center at 471-
5111.
Morse resident, Anita Anton, talks to the guests gathered for
the brunch and meeting.
Morse-Evans Featured In Health Expo
Morse-Evans Home Health
Care Agency is being featured
in the Health Exposition spon-
sored by WPBR radio at the
South Florida Fair Jan. 25
through Feb. 5.
Free blood pressure testing
will be offered by Morse-Evans
nurses and aides between 10
a.m. and 3 p.m. daily.
The exposition will also give
Morse-Evans an opportunity
to inform the public about its
broad range of services. These
include skilled nursing, thera-
peutic treatments and provid-
ing therapeutic equipment in
the patient's home.
Morse-Evans, a non-profit
agency of the Joseph L. Morse
Geriatric Center, also provides
Erivate duty nurses to nursing
ome residents and hospital
patients, as well as supplemen-
tal staff to hospitals.
One Recipe Guide Per Request Request will not be processed without up code *.e3f
Otter good while supply lasts Allow 3 to 5 weeks tor delivery
Labor Party
Official Quits
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Uzi
Baram resigned as secretary-
general of the Labor Party
recently citing "deep ideologi-
cal disagreements' with the
party's leadership.
But he denied there was a
"rupture" with the party com-
mand.
His announcement was
widely seen as the opening of a
campaign to replace party
leader Shimon Peres, who is
vice premier and finance min-
ister in the present govern-
ment.
Peres did not comment
immediately on Baram's move.
Baram, a dove and one of his
party's younger generation,
said his resignation was "an
inevitable outcome" of his
opposition to Labor's decision
last month to form a new
coalition government with
Likud.
He told a news conference
that he represents a "sizeable
part of the Labor Party that
believes the pursuit of peace is
the central issue at this time.
He criticized Peres for not
"at least welcoming the slight
chance that something good
might come" from the U.S.
decision to open talks with the
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion. Baram has been Labor
secretary-general since 1984.
Speculation is rife over who
will succeed him. Possible suc-
cessors include two women
former Health Minister Sho-
shana Arbeli-Almoslino and
Ora Namir, who were both
turned down for Cabinet posi-
tions.
Burton Tashman, National
Director, Heritage Develop-
ment ofB'nai B'rith of Wash-
ington, D.C., recently
addressed a local B'nai B'rith
chapter, Century Unit No.
5867. He discussed future plans
of the Heritage Foundation
and answered questions from
the audience. Trie chapter also
had the opportunity to view a
tragicomedy written and
directed by the Unit President.
Ben Rosenzweig.
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Friday, January 27, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 9
Kosher-Road-Not-Taken
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewitk Floridian Staff Writer
DON'T get Helen Nash
wrong there's nothing
wrong with chopped liver and
gefilte fish .. Jllf it's done
right and not all the time."
Nash, an Orthodox house-
wife with a formal cooking
education and above-average
talent in the kitchen, is revolu-
tionizing the art of kosher
cooking.
It's not that she's discarded
her collection of traditional
recipes; she hasn't. But in her
second book, "Helen Nash's
Kosher Kitchen," published in
November by Random House,
the New York-based Nash has
cut down on fats, oils and
deep-fried dishes and gone
nuts, lo-cal, and stir-fried.
She has dared to cook up
recipes that many traditional
Jewish grandmothers had not.
Part of it has to do with health
consciousness, part with the
increasing availability of items
such as sun-dried tomatoes
and shiitake mushrooms in
supermarkets. Creativity and
simply daring to be different,
keeping in mind the method of
attracting young Jews to keep
kashruth, are a large part of
Helen Nash's raison d'etra.
"I'm into updating cuisine
like you would update dresses
and thoughts," Nash told The
Jewish Floridian in an inter-
view from New York before
she was scheduled to arrive in
Miami last week to give a
cooking demonstration at the
annual Tu B'shevat luncheon
sponsored by the Rabbi Alex-
ander S. Gross Hebrew Acad-
emy P.T.A.
WHILE other kosher cook-
books focus on traditional Jew-
ish ethnic foods and holiday
recipes, Nash says her book
was based on a philosophy of
"eating kosher everyday, ima-
ginatively."
Just like applying make-up is
done with different degrees of
skills, the Polish-born Nash
says her recipes are relatively
easy to follow but success will
vary according to individual
skills and effort.
Following the major success
of her first book, "Kosher
Cuisine," which took 10 years
to write, Nash has written
hundreds of new recipes she
calls "healthful and nutri-
tious," and added sections on
wine and champagne selection
as well as menu planning
ideas.
The menus range from a
buffet brunch to casual and
elegant summer and winter
meals (don't forget, she lives in
New York!) to Sabbath,
Thanksgiving and New Year's
meals.
A Friday night dinner, for
example, would include recipes
for marinated salmon with
green peppercorns, beet con-
somme with dilled chicken or
beef piroshki, baked chicken
with soy sauce and ginger,
baked spaghetti squash, pears
in red wine, lemon pecan
squares, and French Vouvray.
BUT ingredients and pre-
paration style are the keys to
Nash's philosophy.
Nash didn't always cook like
this. For awhile, she admits,
she was following the cooking
traditions passed on to her by
her mother in her native Cra-
cow, and the Soviet Union and
Asia, where she spent the war
years.
But when she settled into
New York, she studied with
renowned cooks Michael Field,
Lydie Marshall and Millie
Chan. Keeping kosher herself,
Nash said she never ate the
Poinciana Place
Continued from Page 2
phia, Penn., Mr. and Mrs.
Sharon have lived in Lake
Worth for seven years. Mr.
Sharon was an active solicitor
for the Poinciana Campaign
before he became the Chair
one year ago. He is now serv-
ing his second year as Chair.
Mrs. Sharon is more involved
this year assisting with lunch-
eon reservations and solicita-
tions. At one time she was also
involved with Brandeis Univ-
ersity and served as Publicity
Chair for her Hadassah Chap-
ter in Philadelphia. Both Shar-
ons are tutors for the Adult
Learning Center at Lake
Worth High School.
Guest speaker Albert G.
Effrat is the Regional Director
for Florida, Puerto Rico and
the Virgin Islands of "the
American Israel Public Affairs
Committee (AIPAC). Mr.
Effrat has served the Ameri-
can Jewish community in a
variety of positions for more
than twenty years. He has
been the Executive Director of
the Binghamton, New York
Jewish Community Center;
the Jewish Federation of
Waterbury, Conn., and prior
to assuming his present posi-
tion, he served as the South-
east Regional Director for the
American Friends of the
Hebrew University of Jerusa-
lem.
For more information, con-
tact Dr. Lester Silverman,
Director of Leisure and Retire-
ment Communities, Jewish
Federation, 832-2120.
PLO Plays In Italy
By RUTH E. GRUBER
ROME (JTA) The
"national soccer team" of the
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion has started to play a series
of matches in Italy.
They are the first games the
Palestinians have played in a
non-Arab state, and Israel has
already protested.
"Every country that estab-
lishes sports relations with the
PLO should remember the
first sports event the PLO
took part in Munich in
1972," Foreign Ministery
spokesman Alon Liel said in
Jerusalem on Friday.
He was referring to the mas-
sacre of the Israeli athletes at
the Olympic games in Munich,
West Germany, in September
1972 by Palestinian terrorists.
Liel complained that the
PLO soccer tour was another
Italian gesture in support of
the independent Palestinian
state proclaimed by Yasir Ara-
fat in Algiers two months ago.
food she made in those cooking
classes, but stored in her mem-
ory the techniques, utensils
and recipes used by the chefs.
Coming from "an old line
Orthodox family" Nash said
she might not have traveled
the kosher-road-not-taken if
she hadn't married her hus-
band Jack, who was not
observant.
"I was introduced to other
social circles and had a chance
to observe what goes on in the
non-kosher world. Also, non-
observant people have the
experience of going to many
different ethnic restaurants.'
It is from such experiences
that Nash has taken the best of
international cuisine and
kashered it. The chapter on
Wine and Food by Stephen H.
Anchin, a Manhattan wine
merchant, also deals with
kosher drinks.
"Kashruth is a law, but I'm
trying to make it more inviting
rather than less inviting," says
Nash. "I'm trying to make it Helen Nash
more attractive for young peo-
ple, not more difficult."
If this is how FDR,
Walter Winchell, and the
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look into AmeriPlus 55."
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Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, January 27, 1989
Ad Blitz to Sell Israel
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
One of the largest Israeli
advertising blitzes will allocate
an estimated $1.5 million
nationwide beginning March
as the campaign "Israel,
See For Yourself peppers
the TV screens, newspapers
and Jewish media.
"We didn't do much last
year. We kept it low key as far
as advertisement, with all the
bad media that we got," said
Uzi Gafni, a second generation
Israeli who directs the Israel
Government Tourist Office,
southeast region, from his
Miami headquarters. "Now,
we feel we're no longer mak-
ing the front page; we're mak-
ing page six. So, now we feel is
the right time."
The advertising campaign is
being handled through the
Tourist Office's New York
headquarters and a private
New York City advertising
firm. Although he hasn't seen
the ads yet, Gafni said at least
the television ads will focus on
testimonials from the "John
Doe" who travels in Israel
with his family.
The campaign is expected to
pour $1.5 million in just the
two month period in targeted
areas including South Florida,
the northeast, Chicago, the
East coast and southern Cali-
fornia.
"Israel has something
for everyone," Gafni said,
"whether Jew or Christian,
history buff, sunworshipper .
. if you like the desert,
archeology. The scenery
attracts with some people
it's the holy sites; with some
people it's diving in the Red
Sea; with some people it's the
Dead Sea and a health spa.
With some people it's just
walking in Jerusalem or the
night life in Tel Aviv. Israel
has something for everyone."
Gafni said Israeli officials
are more optimistic about
tourism prospects this year,
but acknowledged that he
hopes the "Who Is a Jew"
issue involving Israel's Law of
Return will remain off the
political agenda.
The controversies and the
Palestinian uprising should not
detract from Israeli tourism,
however, Gafni said. The slo-
gan, "Israel, See For Your-
self" may be particularly
appreciated by Miami city offi-
cials whose years of planning
for the Super Bowl was
marred by the Overtown riots
on Monday evening. Gafni
drew a comparison to the
events that marred Israel's
major 40th anniversary cele-
bration.
"It is a fact. People didn't
come to Israel in the same
numbers," Gafni said. "And
here I see the mayor of Miami,
waiting for the Super Bowl,
expecting thousands of people,
and then they'll see in the
Midwest Miami's on Fire!"
Gafni said Israel is prepared
to lay out the welcome mat,
and noted that air fare and
hotel prices are especially low
through Passover and Easter
seasons in Israel.
"We need you. We need the
American traveler. It's good
for the Israeli morale. We need
to see you there, not only hear
from you in a letter or see your
donations coming."
Team Picked To conclude Taba Talks
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
Inner Cabinet appointed an
Israeli delegation to negotiate
unresolved issues with Egypt,
.vhich will soon take posses-
sion of the disputed Taba area
awarded it by international
arbitration last year.
The Israeli team will be
headed by Reuven Merhav,
director general of the Foreign
Ministry.
It will meet the Egyptians at
the Aviu Suaeuta Hotel in
Taba, the fate of which will be
one of the matters under dis-
cussion.
The luxury resort was built
by Israeli investors some years
ago. It will be sold to Egyptian
owners in compliance with
Egyptian law. But the Israelis
would like to retain a 49 per-
cent interest and continue to
manage the hotel.
The appointment of the
negotiating team wound up
the Inner Cabinet's discussion
of Taba.
The 10-member policy-
making group, evenly divided
between Likud and Labor min-
isters, rejected a proposal by
Industry and Trade Minister
Ariel Sharon to make the
return of Taba to Egypt condi-
tional on improved Egyptian
trade relations.
Meanwhile, the opposition
right-wing Tehiya party will
introduce a no-confidence
motion on the Taba issue in the
Knesset this week.
TODAY, DO SOMETHING NICE!
MAKE THE DWABEITER
DAY FOR SOMEONE!
It's within your power to help ease the pain of living for many of our
less fortunate neighbors by making available all the "things" you no
longer need or use. The clothes hanging unworn for years in the closets,
the old bed frames leaning against the wall in the garage, and even the
bicycle gathering dust in the shed, because your child has outgrown it.
Whatever it is that you have to give, please give.
WE NEED YOUR DONATIONS TODAYi"
FURNITURE BRIC-A-BRAC PICTURES
LAMPS DECORATIVE ACCESSORIES
HOUSEWARES CLOTHING LINENS
We'll even accept your old Cars and Boats.
THANK YOU FOR CARING!
Free Furniture Pick-Up
Free Appraisals Over $5,000
ALL PROCEEDS BENEFIT
THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
OF THE PALM BEACHES
A service ol the
Jewish Community Center
ol the Palm Beaches
THRIFT SHOP
Your Thrift Shop
O
COMWV
1331 N.MILITARY TRAIL (SOUTH OF 0KEECH0BEE BLVD. ACROSS FROM LURIAS) / 471-1077
A WINNING FIRST. Willie Sims, left, a member of Tel
Aviv's Maccabi team, passes the ball as an unidentified
member of the Soviet Red Army's CSKA team tries to block
him during a recent game in Moscow. The underdog Israelis
beat the Russians 97-92 in the first game an Israeli team has
played in Moscow since 197S. (APIWide World Photo)
B'nai B'rith Canada Protest
On Behalf Of Kashrut In Sweden
By BEN KAYFETZ
TORONTO (JTA) B'nai
B'rith Canada's Institute for
International Affairs has
expressed its concern to the
government of Sweden over
legislation making it impossi-
ble to perform the kosher
slaughtering of poultry in that
country.
On Oct. 1, Sweden passed an
amendment to its civil law
making the stunning of poultry
prior to slaughter mandatory
in all slaughter houses.
Sweden also prohibits the
importation of poultry, leaving
the country's Jews, who num-
ber around 15,000, without
any source of kosher fowl.
Chairman Ralph Snow and
Director Ellen Kachuk urged
Ola Ullsten, Sweden's ambas-
sador to Canada, to request an
amendment to. the law to per-
mit the kosher slaughtering of
poultry.
The B'nai B'rith Institute,
along with Toronto Rabbi
Moshe Stern, had previously
requested a meeting with
Ambassador Ullsten early in
December, which was not
granted them.
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SAKAL H GALLERIES


Friday, January 27, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 11
Post Offers 'Brochos For Breakfast
By MARLENE GOLDMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) Kids
will soon be able to spell out
brachot with their Alpha-Bits
and fill their Honeycombs with
morning prayer.
The Post Cereal Division of
General Foods Corp. plans
before the end of January 1989
to fortify their cereals with
"Brochos for Breakfast," an
eight-page activity book
designed to teach brachot
using puzzles, riddles, quizzes
and other games.
The activity book will not be
found on the bottom of the
box, however. The primer,
which also includes a full-color
brachot chart, will be distri-
buted in Hebrew schools,
yeshivot and other Jewish
channels nationwide.
"The thrust of the book was
to come up with a supplement
to the education process,"
explained Sidney Slivko, one
of the coordinators of the pro-
ject at LUBICOM, a New
York-based advertising, public
relations and marketing firm,
which joined Post in creating
the idea early in 1988.
Their intended audience,
according to Slivko, is primar-
ily second- and third-graders,
though the aim is for "Brochos
for Breakfast" to be a family
activity.
"Although the book is tar-
geted at younger children, the
games and puzzles in this book
cover a wide range of skill
levels," said Yosi Heber. cate-
gory promotion manager for
General Foods, USA. "We're
hoping that everyone in the
family can get involved in the
education process."
In addition to Post Cereals,
General Foods produces a
wide variety of kosher pro-
ducts including Maxwell
House coffees, Kool Aid and
Entenmann's cakes and cook-
ies.
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Emphysema. And May Complicate Pregnancy.
-


Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, January 27, 1989
Head of Greek Jewish Community
Urges Boycott Of Greek Minister
The Hakn-Meitner Nuclear Research Institute in West Berlin
recently celebrated the 50th anniversary of the splitting of the
atom. In December 19S8, Otto Hahn, left, German nuclear
physicist and later Nobel laureate, carried out the first successful
experiment in nuclear fission, bombarding uranium with neu-
trons. OVer 100 nuclear power stations all over the world now
generate electric power, light and heat on this principle. His
long-time colleague Jewish physicist Lise Meitner, right, had
emigrated to Sweden from Nazi Germany earlier that year.
(DaD/AP Photo)
Shabbat Services For
Bush's Inaugural
By HOWARD ROSENBERG
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Shabbat services were con-
ducted at two Washington syn-
agogues for the inauguration
of George Bush as president,
the first time Jewish services
have been part of the official
inaugural program.
The services took place on
Jan. 21 the day after Bush
and Vice President-elect Dan
Quayle were inaugurated at
Washington's Conservative
Adas Israel Congregation and
Orthodox Beth Sholom Con-
gregation.
The services were arranged
through the 1989 Jewish Inau-
gural Advisory Committee.
Max Fisher, of Detroit, was
the honorary chairman of the
84-member advisory commit-
tee, and Gordon Zacks, of
Columbus, Ohio, was the
national chairman.
Committee members
included four former chairmen
of the Conference of Presi-
dents of Major American Jew-
ish Organizations Morris
Abram, Julius Berman, Ken-
neth Bialkin and Jacob Stein.
Seven rabbis were on the
committee, including Marvin
Hier, dean of the Simon Wie-
senthal Center; Wolfe Kelman,
executive vice president of the
Rabbinical Assembly of Amer-
ica; and Arthur Schneier, of
Park East Synagogue in New
York.
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) The
president of the Greek Jewish
community has called for
world ostracism of the Greek
justice minister because of his
decision to refuse Italy's
request to extradite a Palestin-
ian.
The Palestinian, Abdel
Osama al-Zomar, is believed
responsible for the October
1982 machine gun and grenade
attack on Rome's main syna-
gogue, which left a 3-year-old
Jewish boy dead and 35 wor-
shippers wounded.
Joseph Lovinger, on a visit
to New York, urged the World
Jewish Congress to support his
decision on Greek Justice Min-
ister Vassillis Rotis.
"So long as Rotis is still
justice minister, he should be
boycotted," Lovinger said.
The WJC resolved to
stronglv inform the govern-
ment of Greece that the move
to release Zomar to Libya last
month was a grave mistake
that will have serious conse-
quences in relations with both
Jews and the international
community.
On Dec. 5, Rotis said that
Zomar, 27, would not be
handed over to the Italian
authorities for trial, overturn-
ing an Oct. 1984 Greek
Supreme Court ruling that
Zomar be extradited.
Rotis exlained that Zomar,
who was released from prison
after serving 20 months of a
two-year sentence, had acted
as a "freedom-fighter." Zomar
is believed to have flown to
Libya following his release.
Lovinger, who is also vice
president of the European
Jewish Congress, presented to
the WJC-American Section a.
letter he wrote to a Greek
newspaper decrying Rotis'
decision as "a huge moral
crime."
A Gangster, Not A Patriot
Lovinger said that Zomar,
"who killed a 3-year-old boy, is
not a patriot, he is a gangs-
ter."
Elan Steinberg, WJC execu-
tive director, said the group's
American Section would
"authorize the WJCongress to
initiate contacts with Greek
authorities to seek proper
redress."
Further plans include:
Contacts with the U.S. Con-
gress with a view toward cut-
ting the aid level to Greece.
THE JEWISH COMMUNITY
OF THE PALM BEACHES IS
CREATING AN ENVIRONMENT
WHICH WILL ALLOW JEWISH
LIFE TO PROSPER AND GROW...
LAPLACE FOR US 99
WHERE YOUNG AND OLD WELL
SHARE THE EXPERIENCE AND
BEAUTY OF OUR HERITAGE.
Support the Jewish Community Campus Campaign.
Call 832-2120 for more information.
A d
JEWISH ^s
COMMUNITY^
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Initiating a tourist boycott
and advisory about travels to
Greece, via all channels.
Treating Rotis as a pariah in
the international community.
Initiating action to ensure
that a similar situation does
not develop with Mohammed
Rashid.
Rashid is a Palestinian being
held in a Greek prison while
the Greek Supreme Court
reviews a lower court's deci-
sion to allow the United States
to extradite Rashid.
The United States accuses
the 39-year-old Rashid of
planting a bomb on a Pan Am
747 flight from Tokyo to Hono-
lulu in 1982. It killed a Japan-
ese teen-ager and wounded 15
others aboard.
Critics File Charges
Against AIPAC
By HOWARD ROSENBERG
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Seven critics of Israel, backed
by an Arab lobbying group,
have filed legal charges with
the Federal Election Commis-
sion against the American
Israel Public Affairs Commit-
tee, 27 pro-Israel political
action committees and 26 of
their officers.
In a 100-page brief, released
to reporters recently, the com-
plainants allege that AIPAC
illegally coordinates the PACs'
contributions to various politi-
cal campaigns. This is the first
time charges have been filed
with the FEC against AIPAC,
the registered pro-Israel lob-
bying group in the United
States.
The effort is being spear-
headed by the American-Arab
Anti-Discrimination Commit-
tee. The seven complainants
include George Ball, under-
secretary of state from 1961 to
1966, and former Rep. Paul
Findley (R-IH.), who has attrib-
uted his 1982 defeat to pro-
Israel activists.
The basic charge against
AIPAC and the PACs is that
they engage in a "campaign of
collusion" by directing PACs
to contribute funds to particu-
lar congressional challengers
and incumbents.
As evidence of collusion, the
complainants cite similarities
in funding decisions by various
PACs, as well as a 1986 memo-
randum from AIPAC staffer
Elizabeth Schrayer that they
say suggests campaign contri-
butions by nine pro-Israel
PACs.
Responding to the allega-
tions, AIPAC spokesman Toby
Dershowitz said, "AIPAC
members proudly participate
in the American political pro-
cess and do so within the law."
She added that AIPAC is
"confident that the FEC will
expeditiously concur."
Once the FEC receives a
complaint, it has five days to
advise the target of the
charges to respond, according
to Fred Eiland, a commission
spokesman. AIPAC and the 27
PACs would have 15 days to
do so.
The six FEC commissioners
then vote on whether federal
election laws have possibly
been violated. Four of the six
must vote affirmatively to
spur an investigation, Eiland
said.
If the investigations finds
"probable cause" that election
law has been violated, the FEC
can negotiate a civil penalty
and pursue the case in the U.S.
court system, he said.
AIPAC could not be charged
with violating election laws
unless the complainants
proved that the lobby estab-
lished, maintained, controlled,
financed or administered more
than one of the PACs, said
David Ifshin, AIPAC's
counsel.
Pollard
Continued from Page 6
. was denying them infor-
mation," Landa charges.
CAROL Pollard, Jonathan's
sister, was in Israel last week
addressing Israeli Knesset
members and seeking a pledge
for more support.
The Justice For the Pollard
organization's position is that
"Jonathan's choices were diffi-
cult ones," Landa said. "But
faced with the security risks to
the State of Israel, he was
forced to compromise himself
on the case.
"When we speak to con-
gressmen, we seek a congres-
sional investigation to ascer-
tain why information the
Israeli government was enti-
tled to was denied."
("South Florida Speaks"
with hosts Howard Neu, mayor
of North Miami and Alex
Rosenfeld will air "The Pol-
lard Spy Case: Equal Protec-
tion Under the Law" with
guest Philip Landa, director of
the Justice For the Pollards.
The show will air 6 p.m. Sun-
day, Jan. 29 on WLRN, Chan-
nel 17).


NJCRAC Urges Increases In
U.S. Ceiling For Refugees
(New York) In response to
the action of the State Depart-
ment in increasing the quota
for Soviet refugees, the
National Jewish Community
Relations Advisory Council
recently issued a statement
asserting "the Jewish com-
munity's support for a gener-
ous refugee policy without
preference to any one group at
the expense of another."
The NJCRAC expressed its
concern for Soviet Jews, but it
also emphasized that the Jew-
ish community was deeply
troubled by the plight of the
Indo-Chinese.
To respond to the crisis of
the growing numbers of refu-
gees the NJCRAC called upon
the new Bush Administration
and Congress to increase the
ceiling and funding for all refu-
gees within a comprehensive
solution.
NJCRAC is the national co-
ordinating, advisory and plan-
ning body for the field of Jew-
ish commuinty relations and is
comprised of 13 national and
114 community agenices.
Friday, January 27, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 13
Jewish Leaders Cancel
Anti-Semitism Confere ce
Sharansky Receives U.S. Medal
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Natan Sharansky, the former
Soviet prisoner of conscience,
warned recently that the Rea-
gan administration's decision
to attend a human rights con-
ference in Moscow in 1991
could result in a maior public
relations coup for the Soviet
Union.
"With all those nice changes
that are taking place, the
Soviet Union is still very far
from those norms of civilized
societies," Sharansky told
reporters at the White House,
after a meeting with President
Reagan.
He said that during the next
two years, the West must
press the Soviet Union for
increased improvements in
human rights and to ensure
that the Moscow conference is
open to human rights groups.
At a brief Oval Office meet-
ing, attended by President-
elect George Bush and Secret-
ary of State George Shultz,
Reagan presented Sharansky
with identical congressional
gold medals for himself and his
wife, A vital.
Sharansky said his wife
remained home in Jerusalem
to take care of their two
daughters, 1-month-old Chana
and 2-year-old Rachel.
He was accompanied to the
White House by his mother,
Ida Milgrom, and his brother,
Leonid, now an engineer in
Des Moines, Iowa.
The medals, which contain
the words "Let My People
Go," in Hebrew and English,
and feature a picture of the
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Jewish and Catholic leaders
have called off a conference on
anti-Semitism that was sched-
uled to take place in Zurich in
February because there has
been no definite commitment
to remove a Carmelite convent
from the site of the Auschwitz
death camp.
The conference, originally
scheduled for Feb. 20-24, was
contingent on a request made
by the International Jewish
Committee for Interreligious
Consultation that the Aus-
chwitz convent be removed to
a site outside the camp before
the meeting.
Cardinal Johannes Wille-
brands, president of the Vati-
can Commission for Religious
Relations with the Jews, sent a
letter Dec. 28 to IJCIC sug-
gesting that if the conditions
to remove the Carmelite con-
vent are met, a conference
could take place after Pass-
over 1989.
Jewish officials were wary
when Willebrands failed to
appear at a meeting in Paris
on Dec. 20. That conclave was
attended by Roman Catholic
cardinals from several Euro-
pean cities, who said they had
tried to convince the nine nuns
living in the convent to vacate
the camp.
The cardinals admitted,
however, that they were pow-
erless to .convince the nuns to
obey.
Catholic leader had express-
ed a desire to meet with the
Jews and begin work on joint
document on the Church and
anti-Semitism.
A group of European car-
dinals and Vatican officials
signed a written agreement in
February 1987 stipulating that
the convent would be removed
by Feb. 20, 1989. An alternate
site for the convent has been
found outside the camp's peri-
meter.
A group of French Jewish
teachers and Holocaust survi-
vors who visited Auschwitz
recently made a video of the
camp, shown at the Paris
meeting, in which there were
clear indications the convent
grounds were actually being
improved.
Western Wall, were author-
ized by Congress on May 13,
1986, three months after Shar-
ansky was allowed to leave the
USSR in an East-West prison-
ser exchange. He had served
nearly nine years in Soviet
prisons and labor camps.
Sharansky said that Reagan
told him that his struggle for
human rights and A vital Shar-
ansky's effort to free him were
"important as a symbol of the
struggle of the people of the
world for human rights."
On other issues, Sharansky
said he did not think now was
the appropriate time for the
United States to consider a
"VISIT ISRAEL NOW TOUR"
THE PALM BEACH-ISRAEL CONNECTION
MARCH 29 APRIL 10, 1989
An unbelievable $1499.00 per/person (based on double occupancy)
'Effective February 17. 1989 the cost will be $1599.00 per/person.
The Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County/Israel Connection
TUES.
4-4-89
Tentative Day-By-Day Itinerary
Today we will visit a Youth Aliyah village at Kiryat Tiveon
and a rural settlement in the Galilee. Continue to Haifa, built
on the western slopes of Mount Carmel. Haifa is the most
famous port city of Israel. We will visit the Bahai Gardens
and Temple and stop at Panorama Street for a view of Haifa
Bay. Proceed to Caesarea where you will visit the Roman
Theater, the remnants of the Crusader city and the Herodian
water aqueduct. Continue to Tel Aviv to the Carlton Hotel for
overnight.
In the coming issues of the Jewish Floridian, we will highlight another day of this
exciting itinerary to give you the opportunity to see what is being planned for this
"chance of a lifetime' trip.
FOR MORE INFORMATION. PLEASE CONTACT STACEY GARBER.
JEWISH FEDERATION. 832-2120
waiver of the 1974 Jackson-
Vanik amendment, which
denies the Soviet Union most-
favored-nation trade privi-
leges until it makes substantial
progress on increasing Jewish
emigration.
But he added, "I think we
can start talking about chang-
ing the Stevenson amendment
as the first step." That amend-
ment requires increased emi-
gration in order for the Soviets
to get trade credits.
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atw


.... I
Page 14 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, January 27, 1989
You' ve
Never Been
This Close To Israel
VISIT ISRAEL NOW TOUR'
THE PALM BEACH-ISRAEL CONNECTION
MARCH 29 APRIL 10, 1989
An unbelievable $1499.00 per/person (based on double occupancy).
An exceptional travel opportunity limited to the first 500 reservations, offering 5-Star
hotel accommodations throughout the tour...plus these outstanding features:
Round-trip West Palm Beach-Tel Aviv-
West Palm Beach ON EL AL
Daily breakfasts, gala banquets and
Shabbat dinners
Five full days sightseeing in deluxe
coaches
Private meeting with top Israeli leaders
Visit to a military base
Cruise on the Sea of Galilee
Optional tours available
All baggage transfers and entry fees
ABSOLUTELY NO SOUClMION OF FUNDS
Your trip of a lifetime is available only through Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County.
Reservations will be taken on a first come/first served basis. Please call the Federation
office today!
Please send me more informa-
tion on the Visit Israel Now; Palm
Beach/Israel Connection Trip.
Name
Address
Phone _
JEWISH FEDERATION OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
832-2120
501 South Flagler Drive, Suite 305. West Palm Beach, Florida 33401-5988


Friday, January 27, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 15
Petite Luncheon Sets Pace For Women's Division Event
Continued from Page 1
eration for two years. As a
member of the Community
Relations Council since 1982,
she serves on the Local Con-
cerns Task Force, Methodist
Jewish Dialogue Committee
and the Israel Mid-East Task
Force. Mrs. Blonder is also a
Board Member of the Ameri-
can Jewish Committee and the
Anti-Defamation League and
is a life member of the
Women's Auxiliary of the
Joseph L. Morse Geriatric
Center.
Jewish Federation in Mass. In
addition to being the Chair of
the Soviet Jewry Task Force
of the Community Relations
Council in Palm Beach County,
Mrs. Goldberg is a member of
the Angel of Mercy Executive
Committee of Hadassah here
and a past Hadassah Chapter
President and Regional V.P. in
Mass. This year, Mrs. Gold-
berg is a member of the Board
of Governor's of the National
Conference on Soviet Jewry.
Sandra Rosen has lived in
this community for four years
ber of the Golden Jubilee Din-
ner Dance. Mrs. Rosen is also
involved with the Jewish Com-
munity Day School, where she
is Fundraising Vice President
and was a Co-Chair of their
1988 Dinner Dance and Ad
Journal. She is a past Board
Member of the Jewish Com-
munity Center and a life mem-
ber of Hadassah.
Adele Simon, serving her
second year as a Pacesetter's
Co-Chair, has been active in
Women's Division for the last
nine years, during which she
Board of Directors and the
Campaign Cabinet. Mrs.
Simon is also a member of the
Board of Directors of the Jew-
ish Federation and the Central
Planning and Allocations Com-
mittee. This year, Mrs. Simon
is the Chair of the Communica-
tions Committee. She is also a
member of the Board of Direc-
tors of the Jewish Community
Day School and a former mem-
ber of the Board of Directors
of the Jewish Community Cen-
ter. Mrs. Simon is also a life
member of Hadassah and a
Marion Axelrod, Eleanor Balg-
ley, Mindi Belsky, Leah Berk,
Dorothy Blonder, Sheryl Davi-
doff, Elsie Dekelboum, Shirley
Dellerson, Sylvia Farber, Mol-
lie Fitterman, Geraldine
Freedman, Irene Greenbaum,
Rose Ladge, Elsie Leviton,
Stacey Levy, Lee Mazer,
Nancy Marks, Esther Molat,
Baylie Rosenberg.
Additional committee mem-
bers include Ingrid Rosenthal.
Ronnie Roth, Deborah K.
Schwarzberg, Ruth Sherwood,
Janet Showe, Barbara Tanen,
Robin Weinberger, Anne
Weiss, Alice Zipkin.
For more information con-
tact Faye Nelson, Women's
Division Director, Jewish Fed-
eration, 832-2120.
Shir lee Blonder
Best known for her active
commitment to the plight of
Soviet Jewry, Sandra Gold-
berg is also involved in the
Women's Division of the Jew-
ish Federation, both in Palm
Beach County and her summer
residence, Marblehead, Mass.,
where she is on the Women's
Division Board of Directors.
She is also a former Board
Member of the North Shore
Sandra Goldberg
and was an active member of
the Detroit, Mich. Jewish com-
munity before coming to Palm
Beach County. In 1987, Mrs.
Rosen was Outreach Vice
President for Women's Divi-
sion and has served on their
Board for three years. This
year she is WD Education Vice
President, a member of the
Federation's Education Task
Force and a committee mem-
Adele Simon
has held numerous leadership member of the Angel of Mercy
positions. She is a member of Luncheon Committee,
the Women's Division Execu- Members of the Pacesetter's
tive Committee, the WD Committee are Jeanne Ablon,
Wallenberg Exhibit
At Gov't. Center
Raoul Wallenberg
A Tribute to Raoul Wallen-
berg will be the subject of a
documentary exhibit to be
displayed at the Palm Beach
County Governmental Center
Lobby, Feb. 14 March 13. The
Raoul Wallenberg Committee
of the United States in cooper-
ation with the Raoul Wallen-
berg Committee of Great Brit-
ain will present the exhibit
that is being sponsored here by
the Jewish Arts Foundation of
Palm Beach.
The exhibit marks the for-
tieth year of Raoul Wallen-
berg's imprisonment in the
Soviet Union. On Oct. 14,
1982, Prime Minister Mar-
garet Thatcher opened the
exhibit at the Church of Saint
Martin in the Fields in Lon-
don. During the past four
years, the exhibit has toured
Great Britain. An updated ver-
sion opened at the New York
Public Library in New York
City, March 1985, and has
been traveling in the United
States since then.
The exhibit of twenty-three
(23) panels chronicals the life
of Raoul Wallenberg. It con-
centrates on his heroic and
repeated acts of courage in
Budapest during the Second
World War. Wallenberg's
story is placed in its historical
context and is brought up to
Jan. 17,1985, the day marking
the fortieth anniversary of his
arrest and disappearance.
The exhibit will be on display
Feb. 14 March 13, Monday
through Friday, 9 a.m. 4 p.m.
at 301 North Olive Avenue,
West Palm Beach.
During the exhibit, the Jew-
ish Arts Foundation will also
feature a special film, Facing
Evil, that highlights testimo-
nies of prominent men and
women about the nature of
evil.
Recorded during a three-day
symposium held at the Insti-
tute for the Humanities in
Salado, Texas, the film fea-
tures poet Maya Angelou,
Holocaust scholar Raul Hill-
berg, dancers, choreographers
and author Chung-Siung Al
Huang, former U.S. Congress-
woman Barbara Jordan, philo-
sopher Philip Paul Hallie and
Dr. Samuel D. Proctor, pastor
of the Abyssinian Baptist
Church, New York City.
For film times and reserva-
tions, contact Toby Drucker,
Executive Director, Jewish
Arts Foundation, 659-5312.
YOUR FEDERATION WANTS TO
PUT YOUR TEENAGER IN THESE PICTURES
And give him/her the experience of a lifetime
We will help pay for your child to
SEE the Jewish homeland
LEARN about our Heritage and
DO the things that make Israel so special
like:
Visiting ancient historical sites
Floating on the salty Dead Sea
Discovering the desert on camel-back
Meeting Israeli and Arab officials
AND MORE
Through the Teenage Israel Incentive Program generous subsidies
are available for any Palm Beach high school student (regardless
of financial need) to participate in an Israel study program:
High School in Israel USY Pilgrimages
Masada Programs WZO Programs Hadassah Programs
These are just some of the exciting options available
for your teenager's Israel experience.
LET US SEND YOUR CHILD TO ISRAEL
For information on these and other programs, contact Dr. Elliot
Schwartz, Director of Jewish Education, Jewish Federation, 832-2120.


Page 16 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, January 27, 1989
Senior News
FROM THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
The Comprehensive Senior Service Center, through a
Federal Grant Title III of the Older Americans Act,
provides a variety of services to persons 60 years or
older, along with interesting and entertaining, educa-
tional and recreational programs. All senior activities
are conducted in compliance with Title VI of the Civil
Rights Act and Section 504 of the Vocational Rehabilita-
tion Act of 1973.
The Jewish Community Center, 700 Spencer Drive, in
West Palm Beach, is an active place for all Seniors. Hot
kosher meals are served every day and programs and
activities will be scheduled throughout the year.
KOSHER MEALS
Kosher lunches are served
Monday through Friday at
11:15. The three locations are:
JCC in West Palm Beach, 700
Spencer Drive; JCC in Boyn-
ton Beach, 501 N.E. 26th Ave-
nue; and JCC in Delray Beach,
16189 Carter Road.
Meet new friends while
enjoying delicious, nutritious
food along with planned activi-
ties everyday. Volunteers are
always needed. No fee is
required but contributions are
requested. Reservations re-
quired. Call Carol in West
Palm Beach at 689-7700, Julia
in Boynton Beach at 582-7360,
or Nancy in Delray Beach at
495-0806. For transportation
call Department of Senior Ser-
vices 627-5765.
HIGHLIGHTS OF
KOSHER LUNCH
CONNECTION FOR
JAN-FEB.
IN WEST PALM BEACH
Friday, Jan. 27 Rabbi
Stefan Weinberg, Temple
Beth Zion Sabbath Services
Monday, Jan. 30 Fred
Bauman Bingo
Tuesday, Jan. 31 Dr.
Stuart Wanuck "Sex After
60"
Wednesday, Feb. 1 -
Robert Neier Home Health
Services
Thursday, Feb. 2 Helen
Nussbaum, Book Review
Friday, Feb. 3 Dr. Perry
Bard Chiropractic Services;
plus Sabbath Services
KOSHER HOME
DELIVERED MEALS
Are you homebound? Is your
neighbor homebound? Are you
unable to cook for yourself?
Have you just come home from
the hospital and have no way
to maintain your daily nutri-
tional requirements? The Jew-
ish Community Center's
Kosher Home Delivered Meals
Service is just for you!!!
This is a most essential ongo-
ing or short term service for
the homebound. No fee, but
contributions requested. For
Boynton Beach, Lake Worth
or West Palm Beach call Carol
at 689-7700. In Delray Beach,
call Nancy at 495-0806.
JCC
TRANSPORTATION
SERVICE
The Jewish Community Cen-
ter is providing transporation
for persons who wish to visit
loved ones in nursing homes,
hospitals or have to go to Day
Care Centers. Tickets are
required for each one-way trip
and may be obtained from the
driver. Each one-way trip don-
ation is $1 and persons pur-
chasing blocks of ten will
receive two free. Reservations
are required. Call Libby at
689-7700 between 9:30 and
1:30. For medical and meal
site transportation, call the
division of senior services at
627-5765.
CLASSES AND
ACTIVITIES
Adult Education Courses
The Jewish Community Cen-
ter is proud to offer classes
provided by Palm Beach Com-
munity College and Palm
Beach County School Board
Adult Education. Fees are
required for these classes
along with registration. Call
Louise at 689-7700 for infor-
mation.
PALM BEACH COUNTY
ADULT EDUCATION,
SCHOOL BOARD
JCC Writers' Workshop
"Writing For Fun and Pleas-
ure" with Instructor Ruth
Graham. Would you like to
learn to paint a word picture?
Do you want to enrich your
writing for self discovery?
Learn to exercise your right
brain potential for hearing,
seeing and living more crea-
tively. Join our eight week
course that began Friday, Jan.
20th at 10 a.m. to 12. Fee: $3.
Call Louise for information
and registration at 689-7700.
PALM BEACH
COMMUNITY COLLEGE
ADULT EDUCATION
Repeated by Popular
Demand "Exploring Your
Needs." Learn through practi-
cal skills and techniques how
to identify your present needs.
Reclaim your right to have
feelings, be yourself, have a
satisfactory life, and grow.
Classes at JCC. Instructor:
Faye Schecter. Date: Wednes-
days at 10 a.m. starting Feb.
15. Fee: $2. Pre-registration
required to guarantee space.
Call Louise at 689-7700.
OTHER CLASSES
AND ACTIVITIES
Joys of Yiddish Join the
many who enjoy a bit of yid-
dishkait and humor every
Monday morning at 10 a.m. at
the JCC. Jan. 30th Leader:
Pauline Cohen. Presenters:
Leo Treem, David Sandier,
Pauline Cohen, Dori Dasher
and others. Co-Group Coordin-
ators are Pauline Cohen &
David Sandier.
Timely Topics: Ongoing
Mondays, following lunch at
JCC. Time: Lunch at 1:15 -
Program at 2. A stimulating
group discussing an exciting
variety of topics including cur-
rent events. Those interested
in lunch, please call for reser-
vations at 689-7700. Ask for
Rita, Senior Department.
NEW CLASS
The World of Drama -
Learn all the facets of Stage
and TV drama including the
technique of broadcasting
commercials for all media.
Director: Carl Martin, actor,
newscaster, TV moderator.
Dates: Tuesdays at 1:30 to
3:30 beginning February 7th
for eight sessions. Fee: $10.
Call Louise at 689-7700 for
reservations.
Intermediate Bridge with
Al Parsont Basic bidding
and play on Wednesdays, at
1:30 p.m. at the JCC. Fee: JCC
member $2.50 per session,
non-member $3 per session.
Call Louise at 689-7700.
Speakers Club Ongoing
Thursdays at 10 a.m. at JCC.
For persons who wish to prac-
tice the art of public speaking
a great group.
Prime Time Singles A
special music program is
planned for the February
meeting to be held at the Jew-
ish Community Center on
Thursday afternoon, February
9th at 1:30 p.m. All Singles are
invited to this active and excit-
ing Singles Group. Call Sally
at 478-9397 or Evelyn at 686-
6724.
JCC CULTURAL CLUB NEWS
BY SONDRA WERBEL
CHAIRPERSON
VISCAYA HOUSE
& GARDENS
DOCENT TOUR
Enjoy a great afternoon at
fabulous Viscaya in Miami.
Bring a sandwich or snack. We
will picnic lunch on the
grounds. Drinks can be pur-
chased. Bus leaves Carteret
Bank at W.P.B. Century Vil-
lage at 9:15 a.m. on Thursday,
February 9, 1989. Fee: $11 for
members, $12 for non-
members. Call Louise at 689-
7700. Your check is your res-
ervation!
AT YOUR SERVICE
The Jewish Community Cen-
ter provides by appointment:
Health Insurance Assistance
with Edie Reiter; Legal Aid by
Palm Beach County Legal Aid
Society; Home Financial Man-
agement with Herb Kirsh. Call
Louise for information at 689-
7700.
VOLUNTEER NEWS
"Hi-Neighbor" the very
special JCC Mitzvah Corps is a
group of persons reaching out
keeping in touch with our
homebound and others in
need. Join this dedicated
group of persons who enioy
doing Mitzvahs. Call Ellie
Newcorn at 689-7700.
Volunteers Needed: Tele-
phone receptionists. Grand-
mas and Grandpas wanted
pre-school classroom aides for
2 to 4 year olds. Creativity
Crafts assistant for pre-school.
Yiddish instructor. Call Ellen
at 689-7700.
NEIGHBOR HELPING
NEIGHBOR
A consortium program with
Jewish Family and Children's
Service. Persons interested in
being trained to work in a new
Alzheimer's program a few
hours a week at $4 per hour.
Call Barbara at JFCS 684-
1991.
CLASSES IN
BOYNTON BEACH
The JCC will be providing a
variety of classes and pro-
grams at Congregation Beth
Kodesh along with the daily
hot Kosher lunch program.
YOUNG SINGLES (20S & 30S)
Saturday, Jan. 28,6:30 p.m. Get together in the parking
lot of the JCC to carpool to the So. Florida Fair for an
evening of fun and excitement. All are welcome to join.
Tuesday, Jan. 31, 7 p.m. Meet at a member's home to
stir fry the evening away. Hostess Beverly will provide the
chicken and beverage you provide uncooked vegetables
and a sense of humor. Cost: $3.
GOURMET SUPPER CLUB
Sunday, Jan. 29, 6:30 p.m. Singles ages 20s-40s will
enjoy a Japanese food adventure at the Sagami Restaurant
(871 Village Blvd., WPB). Join us for those exotic Oriental
delicacies you've always wanted to try but didn't dare to.
Friday, Jan. 27 Federation, Women's Division, Exec-
utive Committee Meeting, 10 a.m. Yiddish Culture
Group Century Village, board, 10 a.m. Jewish
Community Center, No School Program Free Sons of
Israel, 12:30 p.m. Temple Emanu-El "Scholar In
Residence" through 1/29 Federation Shabbat
Saturday, Jan. 28 Federation, Leadership Develop-
ment Program, 8 p.m. Temple Beth El, Family Fun
Night, 6 p.m.
Sunday, Jan. 29 Jewish Theological Seminary, Lunch-
eon Federation, "Golden Jubilee" ($5,000 Event) at
the Breakers, 7 p.m. Congregation Aitz Chaim, 9:30
a.m. Federation, Fountains Golf Tournament
Monday, Jan. 30 Federation, Eastpointe, Mini-
Mission, 9 a.m. Na'Amat USA Palm Beach Council,
Scholarship Luncheon, noon Federation, Phon-A-
Thon, 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday, Jan. 31 Temple Beth David, Executive Board,
8 p.m. Hadassah Florida-Atlantic Region, Educa-
tion Day Yiddish Culture Group, 10 a.m. Temple
Beth El, Study Group, noon Federation, Human
Resource Development Executive Committee, 8 p.m.
Federation, Jewish Education Committee, 7:30 p.m.
FEBRUARY 1989
Wednesday, Feb. 1 Federation, Women's Division,
Business & Professional Steering Committee Meet-
ing, 7 p.m. Lake Worth Jewish Center, board, 9:30
a.m. National Council of Jewish Women Palm
Beach, board, 9:30 a.m. Congregation Aitz Chaim
Sisterhood, 1 p.m. B'nai B'rith Palm Beach Council,
12:30 p.m. Hadassah Rishona, Card Party/Luncheon
B'nai B'rith Women Olam, Breakfast, 10:30 a.m.
Na'Amat USA Golda Meir, board, 1 p.m. Holocaust
Survivors of the Palm Beaches, 9:30 a.m. Jewish
Community Center, board, 8 p.m.
Thursday, Feb. 2 Federation, Women's Division,
Super Sunday Meeting, 10 a.m. Labor Zionist
Alliance, 1 p.m. Temple Torah of West Boynton
Sisterhood, board, 7:30 p.m. Na'Amat USA Theo-
dore Herzl, 1 p.m. B'nai B'rith Century, board, 1
p.m. Hadassah Bat Gurion, board, 9 p.m. National
Council of Jewish Women Flagler evening, board, 7
p.m. Federation, Young Adult Division, Business-
Executive Forum, at Toojays, 7:45 a.m. Federation,
$1,200 committee cocktail reception at Club L, 5 p.m.
For more information call the Jewish Federation 832-
2120.
II
II
A-AAbot Answerfone offers'.
TELEPHONE ANSWERING SERVICE
BEEPER PAGING SERVICE
PRIVATE LINE SERVICE
MONITORING SERVICE
WAKE UP SERVICE MAIL SERVICE
and
"person to person service"
24 hours a day
A-AAbot Answerfone (407)686-7400
213 N. Dixie Highway Lake Worth, FL 33460


Friday, January 27, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 17
B'NAI B'RITH
Boynton Beach Yachad
Unit will hold its 6th Annual
Charitable Luncheon and
Fashion Show on Thursday,
Feb. 9, 12 noon, at the Polo
Club of Boca Raton. The show
will feature fashions by
"Cache."
Lucerne Lodge No. 3132
announces a program on
"Brotherhood" on Sunday,
Feb. 5, at the Mid County
Senior Citizen's Center, Lake
Worth. The meeting begins at
9:30 a.m. for bagels, cream
cheese, etc.
The program will include
Ruth Turk, author, lecturer
and columnist, presenting an
original dramatic monologue
"The Masks of Brotherhood."
The second part of the pro-
gram will feature Brother Joe
Ranieri of the Lord's Place
(Shelters for the Homeless)
and Rabbi Sam Silver, Spiri-
tual Leader of Temple Sinai,
Delray Beach. Their topic will
be "An Ecumenical Discus-
sion."
B'NAI B'RITH WOMEN
Olam Chapter will hold an
Annual Brotherhood Break-
fast on Wednesday, Feb. 1, at
10 a.m. at the Poinciana
Country Club Social Hall, Lake
Worth. The guest speakers are
Tom Kelly, Editorial Board,
Sun Sentinel and Rabbi Joel
Levine, Temple Judea. Their
topic is "1990 and beyond."
Join us for a stimulating dis-
cussion with question and
answer period, following a
Continental breakfast. Guests
welcome. Reservations are
required.
BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY
NATIONAL WOMEN'S
COMMITTEE
Palm Beach East Chapter
will present its third annual
Twilight Concert, Sunday,
Feb. 26, 4 p.m. at the Golf and
Racquet Club at Eastpointe,
Palm Beach Gardens. This
event, so successful in the
past, will have a new group of
performers. Dr. Jack Jones
and his singers will provide a
program of nostalgic music
from the era of the bif* bands.
It will be followed by a light
supper. Donation $20 per per-
son.
Chapter West Coming
Events: Thursday, Feb. 16,
Luncheon at the Royce Hotel
at 12 noon. Sunday, February
19, 2 p.m. matinee. Ballet
Florida. Tuesday, Feb. 28,
Everglades Trip, including
lunch. Sunday, March 5,
2 p.m., Poinciana Playhouse,
Gilbert & Sullivan's "Mikado."
HADASSAH
Cypress Lakes I eisurev-
ille Chapter, will hold its
membership meeting uesday,
Feb. 7,12:30 p.m. at / merican
Savings & Loan, West Gate,
Century Village. The program
will feature guest speaker Bar-
bra Kaplan whose subject will
be "Cults, Missionaries and
Messianics." Collation will be
hosted by Libby Benoff in
honor of her 50th wedding
anniversary.
Rishona Palm Beach Chap-
ter will hold its 13th annual
HMO Luncheon-Card Party on
Wednesday, Feb. 1 at 12 noon
in the Newcomb Hall of the
Riviera Recreation Center. In
addition to lunch and an after-
noon of card playing, there will
be door prizes, raffles and a
boutique. The cost of admis-
sion is a $6 tax deductible
donation to Hadassah. Reser-
vations are required.
Shalom W. Palm Beach
Chapter will hold its annual
Pledge luncheon for Hadassah
Medical Organization on Wed.,
Feb. 9,12 noon, at The Break-
ers. Proceeds will benefit
Israel's important medical pro-
grams.
Feb. 12, Sunday, Flea Mar-
ket and Bazaar, 9 a.m. to 2
p.m., at Publix parking lot,
Century Corners, Okeechobee
Blvd. and Haverhill Road, W.
Palm Beach.
Tikvah Chapter will meet
Feb. 20 at Anshei Sholom at
12:30 p.m. Coffee and cake will
be served. Guest speaker will
be Gary Tuckman of Channel
12.
Coming Events: Feb. 8, all
day trip, boatride to the
Everglades. Feb. 14, Hadas-
sah at Yiddish Culture. March
5, Education Day at John I.
Leonard High School. March
12, Tikvah Bar Mitzvah.
March 16, Regency Spa.
Yoval Chapter will attend
the Royal Palm Dinner Thea-
tre on Feb. 8 to see "Gigi."
HOLOCAUST SURVIVORS
OF THE PALM BEACHES
A regular membership meet-
ing will be held on Wednesday,
Feb. 1, at 9:30 a.m. at the
American Savings Bank at the
West Gate of Century Village
on Okeechobee Boulevard.
Guest speaker will be Mr.
Jeffrey Klein, Executive Dir-
ector of the Jewish Federation
of Palm Beach County. The
topic will be current issues
facing Israel and Palm Beach
County.
Refreshments will be served.
FRIENDS OF AKIM U.S.A.
Akim, an organization for
the habitation of the Mentally
Handicapped in Israel, was
established in 1951. Palm
Beach is the most recent addi-
tion to its chapters in many
major cities throughout the
United States.
Akim maintains day care
centers, offers assistance to
the families of the handi-
capped, gives guidance in the
many sheltered workshops,
hostels and summer camps. It
also sponsors a program of
sports training including spe-
cial Olympics.
To celebrate the first event
of the season a Brazilian Ball
will be held at the Breakers,
Feb. 20, 7 p.m. under the
patronage of His Excellency
Rahamin Timor, former Israeli
Ambassador to Brazil, Consul
General of Israel in Florida.
The guest of honor will be His
Excellency Asdrubal Pinto De
Ulissea, Brazilian Ambassador
to Israel.
NATIONAL COUNCIL
OF JEWISH WOMEN
Okeechobee Section will
meet Thursday, Feb. 16, 12:30
p.m. at the American Bank,
Westgate. The speaker will be
Thomas Silverman, attorney.
His topic will be "The Needs of
Older Citizens."
Coming Events: Feb. 23,
Annual Support Luncheon and
Card Party. March 6, 7, 8,
Epcot.
WOMEN'S AMERICAN
ORT
West Palm Chapter will
meet Tuesday, Feb. 14, noon
at Cong. Anshei Sholom. Wal-
ter Schanzer playwright and
lyricist will present his own
songs and stories. All are wel-
come.
Coming Events: Feb. 18
Sat. lunch and show at the
Royal Palm Theatre see
"Gigi." March 15 Wed.
Annual Donor Luncheon at the
Airport Hilton. March 6-7-8,
Mon. through Wed. 3 full
days trip to Epcot and Disney
World.
Hadassah Doctors Return To Israel From Armenia
JERUSALEM A team of
five Hadassah doctors has
returned to Israel from the
Soviet Union after setting up
an emergency care facility that
treated more than 2,400 vic-
tims of the Armenian earth-
quake in a two-week period.
The doctors, from the
Hadassah-University Hospital
on Mount Scopus and the
Hadassah-Hebrew University
Medical Center at Ein Karem,
worked around the clock in a
makeshift field hospital set up
in a sports stadium in the city
of Kirovakan, 120 kilometers
north of Yerevan, the Arme-
nian capital.
Temperatures in the stad-
ium, which was covered but
only partially heated, ranged
from zero to 10 above (centi-
grade) as the team, led by Dr.
Yoel Donchin, head of the
Medical Center's trauma unit,
treated a flow of patients that
grew from 80 on the first day
of operation to 300 to 400 by
the time the Israeli team
turned the facility over to
Armenian doctors before head-
ing home.
Dr. Donchin said the Israeli
physicians had to rely on the
medical supplies and equip-
ment they brought from the
Hadassah hospitals and their
ingenuity to meet the varied
and often complex demands of
their enormous caseload.
"When we arrived about
one-tenth of Kirovakan was in
rubble," Dr. Donchin said.
"The city's medical center had
collapsed. Survivors were liv-
ing in tents and the children
had been evacuated. We were
faced with virtually every kind
of trauma known to medicine,
from broken bones to heart
attacks."
Near the end of their stay,
the team was joined by a group
of Armenian doctors, one of
whom, a Jew, spoke Hebrew.
There was no barrier, how-
ever, to the warm feelings of
gratitude and shared victory in
the battle to save lives that
flowed from the people o_f
Kirovakan and Soviet officials.
"Officials of the Soviet Min-
istry of Health, the Minister of
Housing for Lithuania and a
high-ranking Soviet General
were among the officials who
came to thank us," Dr. Don-
chin said. 'But I think what
Continued on Page 19
MOSAIC Sunday, January 29, 11 a.m. WPTV
Channel 5, with host Barbara Gordon. Interview with
Howard Stone, Vice President of Operation Independence,
a private enterprise initiation aimed at strengthening
Israel's economy.
LCHAYIM Sunday, January 29, 7:30 a.m. WPBR
1340 AM with host Rabbi Mark S. Golub The Jewish
Listener's Digest, a radio magazine.
THE RABBI LEON FINK SHOW Sunday, January 29,
2 p.m.-5 p.m. WPBR 1340 AM, with host Rabbi Leon
Fink. A Jewish talk show that features weekly guests and
call-in discussions.
TRADITION TIME Sunday, January 29, 11 p.m.
Monday-Wednesday, January 30-February 1, WCVG 1080
AM This two-hour Jewish entertainment show features
Jewish music, comedy, and news.
Sponsored by the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County.
''Who canpossibly take
care of Mom as well as lean?''
\Afc CZ\t\ wp,re not saying we can
w iv vClll* love her as much as
you. No one could ever do that.
But we can offer her kinds of care she
cant get at home. What's more, for our Jewish
residents, we've created the Beth Tikvah wing.
With its own sanctuary, dining room, kosher
meals, special activities and holiday observances.
We can also give your mother the therapy
she needs. Plus well balanced meals and
24-hour medical attention. Above all, we can
offer 25 years of caring for people just like
your Mom. Come visit or call today.
Please send me more information *w*is#]
on your Beth Tikvah Wing.
Name_____________________________
Address-----------------------------------------
City___________State_______________
Zip____________Phone______________
MANORCARE
Nursing Center
L
A until 1 U X- H/mmCur" f.
IJ7 Maar HnttCw Cw .
3001S. Congress Boynton Beach, FL 33426 407737 5600


Page 18 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, January 27, 1989
V
Religious Directory
CONSERVATIVE
BOYNTON BEACH JEWISH CENTER-BETH KODESH: 501
NE 26 Avenue, Boynton Beach 33435. Phone 586-9428. Rabbi
Joel Chazin. Cantor Abraham Koster. Daily, 8:30 a.m. Sabbath
services, Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.
CONGREGATION ANSHEI SHOLOM: 5348 Grove Street
West Palm Beach 33417. Phone 684-3212. Office hours 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. Rabbi Isaac Vander Walde. Cantor Mordecai Spektor. Daily
services 8:30 a.m. and 5 p.m. Friday night 5 p.m. and 8:15 p.m.
Saturday 9 a.m. and 5:30 p.m.
GOLDEN LAKES TEMPLE: 1470 Golden Lakes Boulevard
West Palm Beach 33411. Phone 689-9430. Rabbi Joseph Speiser.
Daily services 8 a.m. Sabbath services Friday 8:15 p.m. Saturday
9 a.m. For times of evening services please call the Temple office.
LAKE WORTH JEWISH CENTER: 4550 Jog Road, Lake
Worth. Phone 967-3600. Rabbi Richard K. Rocklin. Cantor
Abraham Mehler. Services Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID: 4657 Hood Road, Palm Beach Gardens
33418. Phone 694-2350. Rabbi Randall J. Konigsburg. Cantor
Earl J. Rackoff. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m., Saturday 9:30
a.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 2815 No. Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach
33407. Phone 833-0339. Rabbi Alan L. Cohen. Cantor Norman
Brody. Sabbath services Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9:30 a.m.
Daily Minyan 8:15 a.m., Sunday and legal holidays 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 315 No. "A" Street, Lake Worth
33460. Phone 585-5020. Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg. Cantor
Howard Dardashti. Services Monday and Thursday, 8:15 a.m.
Friday evening, 8:15 p.m., Saturday, 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 224 NW Avenue G, Belle Glade
33430. Phone 996-3886. Services: Second Wednesday of every
month, 7:30 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH ZION: 129 Sparrow Drive, Royal Palm Beach,
FL 33411. Phone 798-8888. Sabbath services Friday 8 p.m.,
Saturday 9 a.m. Rabbi Stefan J. Weinberg.
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB: 2177 So. Congress Ave., West Palm
Beach 33406. Phone 433-5957. Sabbath services Friday 8 p.m.,
Saturday and holidays 9 a.m., Monday through Friday 9 a.m.
Rabbi Morris Pickholz. Cantor Andrew E. Beck.
TEMPLE EMANUEL: 190 North County Road, Palm Beach
33480. Phone 832-0804. Rabbi Leonid Feldman. Cantor David
Feuer. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m.; Saturday 9:30 a.m. Dailv
8:15 a.m.
TEMPLE TORAH: Lions Club, 3615 West Boynton Beach
Boulevard, Boynton Beach 33437. Mailing address: 9851D Mili-
tary Trail, Box 360091, Boynton Beach 33436. Phone 736-7687.
Cantor Alex Chapin. Sabbath Services Friday evening 8 p.m.;
Saturday 9 a.m.
TREASURE COAST JEWISH CENTER CONGREGATION
BETH ABRAHAM: 3998 SW Leighton Farms Road, Palm City
33490. Mailing address: P.O. Box 2996, Stuart 33495. Phone
287-8833. Services Friday evenings 8 p.m. and Saturday 10 a.m.
ORTHODOX
CHABAD HOUSE LUBAVITCH: 4623 Forest Hill Blvd.,
West Palm Beach, 108-3, 33415. Phone 641-6167. Rabbi Shlomo
Ezagui. Sabbath Services, Saturday, 10 a.m.
CONGREGATION AITZ CHAIM: 2518 N. Haverhill Road, West
Palm Beach 33417. Phone 686-5055. Sabbath services 8:45 a.m.
and 7:30 p.m. Daily services 8:15 a.m. and 6:15 p.m. Rabbi Oscar
Werner.
REFORM
CONGREGATION BETH ISRAEL: 1390 SW Dorchester
Street, P.O. Box 857146, Port St. Lucie, FL 33452. Phone
335-7620. Friday night services 8 p.m., Saturday morning 10:30
a.m.
TEMPLE BETH AM: 759 Parkway Street, Jupiter. Phone
747-1109. Services Friday 7:45 p.m.
Student Rabbi Peter Schaktman.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 4600 Oleander Avenue, Fort Pierce, FL
34982. Phone 461-7428. Sabbath Services Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM: St. Helen's Parish Hall, 20th
Avenue and Victory Boulevard, Vero Beach 32960. Mailing
address: P.O. Box 2113, Vero Beach, FL 32961-2113. Rabbi Jay
R. Davis. Phone 1-569-4700.
TEMPLE BETH TORAH: 900 Big Blue Trace, West Palm
Beach, FL 33414. Phone 793-2700. Friday services 8:15 p.m.,
Saturday morning 10 a.m. Rabbi Steven R. Westman. Cantor
Elliot Rosenbaum.
TEMPLE ISRAEL: 1901 No. Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach
33407. Phone 833-8421. Rabbi Howard Shapiro. Cantor Stuart
Pittle. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE JUDEA: 100 Chillingworth Drive, West Palm Beach,
FL 33409. Rabbi Joel L. Levine. Cantor Anne Newman. Phone
471-1526.
Synagogue News
CONGREGATION
ANSHEI SHOLOM
Sisterhood will hold its board
meeting on Monday, Feb. 6, at
9:45 a.m., and its regular
meeting on Tuesday, Feb. 21
at 1 p.m., when the noted
orthopedic surgeon, Dr.
Michael S. Zeide, will address
them.
GOLDEN LAKES TEMPLE
On Sunday morning, Feb.
12, at 9:30 a.m. Temple will
hold a Testimonial Breakfast
for Joseph and Frances Low.
They will be the recipients of
the Israel Tower of David
Award, from the State of
Israel Bond organization.
Both Joe and Frances are
active within the Jewish com-
munity, both in the Temple
and other organizations.
Frances, a Life member of
Sisterhood, served as its treas-
urer for six years; now is on
the Board; and also is Presi-
dent of Golden Lakes Chapter
of ORT.
Joe has been membership
chairman of the Temple for
seven years.
A program will feature Mort
Freeman, star of stage and
screen.
TEMPLE BETH TORAH
Temple is excited to bring
you its professionally operated
Second Annual Casino Nite on
Saturday, February 11, at
8 p.m. A $15 donation per per-
son will entitle you to a non-al-
coholic drink, coffee and des-
sert, playing chips and a ter-
rific time!
For more information call
the Temple.
TEMPLE EMANUEL
Plan on attending Jewish
Singles Night, Friday, Feb. 10
at 6 p.m. Join other singles
ages 20-40 for dinner, singing,
new friendships and intellec-
tual stimulation. Call the Tem-
ple to make reservations.
TEMPLE ISRAEL
On Friday evening Jan. 27,
at 8 p.m. Shabbat service will
be conducted by Rabbi Howard
Shapiro. His sermon will be:
"Bearing Falso Witness."
Cantor Stuart Pittle will lead
the congregation in songs.
Everyone is welcome.
During the evening service
child care will be provided.
TEMPLE JUDEA
Come to a Casino Night and
Chinese Auction on Saturday
evening, Feb. 4, 8 p.m. at the
Temple. Advance Reserva-
tions are requested. $18 per
person and at the door $25.
$25 worth of chips are
included.
Hadassah Plans Hunger Strike
NEW YORK Members of
Hadassah, the Women's Zion-
ist Organization of America,
will join Jewish women refuse-
niks of the Soviet Union in a
hunger strike in March to pro-
test Soviet emigration and
human rights policies.
Hadassah National Presi-
dent Carmela Efros Kalman-
son said the nationwide hun-
ger strike on March 8, Inter-
national Women's Day, is the
Doctors
Continued front Page 17
meant the most to us was the
people we helped. This experi-
ence has given us an under-
standing and appreciation of
one another that makes our
differences seem insignifi-
cant."
Hadassah is accepting con-
tributions to help offset the
cost of the rescue mission,
which was carried out with the
civil defense unit of the Israel
Defense Forces. Contributions
may be mailed to Hadassah at
50 West 58th Street, New
York, N.Y. 10019.
Obituaries
ARONOWTTZ. Jake, 89, of West Palm
Beach. Riverside Guardian Funeral
Home, West Palm Beach
ARONOWITZ, Morris, 86, of West
Palm Beach. Menorah Gardens &
Funeral Chapels, West Palm Beach.
BESELER, Miriam, 81, of West Palm
Beach. Riverside Guardian Funeral
Home, West Palm Beach.
COHEN, Norman M of West Palm
Beach. Levitt-Weinstein Guaran-
teed Security Plan Chapel, West
Palm Beach.
FTNKELMAN, Fannie, 91, of Boyn-
ton Beach. Menorah Gardens &
Funeral Chapels, West Palm Beach.
FRANK, Sylvia, 69, of West Palm
Beach. Levitt-Weinstein Guar-
anteed Security Plan Chapel, West
Palm Beach.
GOMEL, Maurice, of Lake Worth.
Riverside Guardian Funeral Home,
West Palm Beach.
MARTELL, Pauline, 98, of West Palm
Beach. Menorah Gardens & Funeral
Chapels, West Palm Beach.
SUFFIS, Abe, 84, of West Palm
Beach. Riverside Guardian Chapel,
West Palm Beach.
TAYLOR, Theodore I., 78, of Palm
Beach. Riverside Guardian Funeral
Home, West Palm Beach.
fulfillment of a promise made
to the Soviet women by a
group of Hadassah leaders
during a visit last Spring to
Moscow, Leningrad and Kiev.
"None of us who were there
will ever forget meeting with
the protesting women refuse-
niks in a tiny, crowded apart-
ment in Moscow last March,"
Mrs. Kalmanson said. "We
promised that we would do all
that we could to focus world
attention on their enormous
courage and commitment to
Jewish life-in the face of Soviet
repression.
"This action is a symbol of
our solidarity with the
hundreds of thousands of
Soviet Jews who hunger for
freedom and justice," she
added. "We call on all women
of America to join with us in
protesting the continued plight
of Soviet Jewry."
In addition, Hadassah is urg-
ing its chapters to plan com-
munity events focusing on the
problems confronting Soviet
Jewry despite the Soviet gov-
ernment's movement toward
greater religious and cultural
openness, the National Presi-
dent stated.
Additional information
about the Hadassah hunger
strike and ways local commu-
nities can participate is avail-
able from Hadassah National
Service Committee Chairman
Linda Fleishman or National
Soviet Jewry Chairman Hor-
tense S. Zabriskie at 50 W.
58th Street, New York, N.Y.
10019.
Candle lighting Time
Jan. 20 5:37 p.m.
Jan. 27 5:43 p.m.
Synopsis Of
The Weekly Torah Portion
. "And it came to pass on the third day, when it
was morning, that there were thunders and lightn-
ings and a thick cloud upon the mount, and the
voice of a horn exceeding loud
(Exod. 19.16).
YITRO
YITRO Word reached Jethro, Moses' father-in-
law, and a priest of Midian, of what God had done
for the Israelites. He went to meet Moses in the
desert. Jethro advised Moses to appoint judges, in
order to ease the burden of his sole leadership;
Moses should confine himself to the most difficult questions.
In the third month, the children of Israel heard the Ten
commandments at Mount Sinai: God's voice declared: "I am the
Lord thy God Thou shalt have no other gods before Me. Thou
shalt not make unto thee a graven image.. Thou shalt not take
the name of the Lord thy God in vain___Remember the sabbath
day, to keep it holy. Honor thy father and thy mother____
Thou shalt not murder. Thou shalt not steal. .. Thou shalt
not bear false witness against thy neighbor____Thou shalt not
covet thy neighbor's house. wife ... nor anything that is thy
neighbor's (Exodus tO.t-U).
(The recounting 01 the Weekly Portion of the Law Is extracted and
based upon The Graphic History ol the Jewish Heritage." edited by
P. Wollman-Taamlr, published by ShengoW. The volume Is available
at 75 Maiden Lane, New York, N.Y. 10038.)


Friday, January 27, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 19
1 Who Is A Jew' Just Tip Of Iceberg, American Warns At Hebrew U. Parlay
JERUSALEM (JTA) The months after a Likud-led gov-
"WhoIsaJew issue that ernment that included the
angered the American Jewish religious and extreme ritrht-
community las : year was wing parties took office
Israel, according to American prTinf lS^ ^ 1**
and Israeli speakers at a two- ?n!^L^ l'Ifbor ?oallt,on
day conference sponsored by ^n hTgh Pa88,nS
the Hebrew University's Insti-
tute of Contemporary Jewry.
Leonard Fein, former editor
of Moment magazine, said the
wrath was "only a surrogate"
for the disappointment felt by
American Jews about Israel,
and that more such protests
can be expected on other
issues.
The conference, titled "Who
Is a Jew? History, Politics,
Peoplehood," was organized to
examine the strong reaction by
the American Jewish commun-
ity against a measure that
would deny automatic Israeli
citizenship to converts to
Judaism converted by any but
Orthodox rabbis.
Prime Minister Yitzhak Sha-
mir promised the ultra-
Orthodox parties that the
measure would be passed by
the Knesset within two
A distance has been opened
up between the Jewish com-
munities (in Israel and the
United States) that will be
difficult to bridge," Fein said.
Professor Seymour Martin
Lipset of Stanford University
said it is only now becoming
clear to American Jews that
the Orthodox establishment in
Israel does not consider Con-
servative and Reform Jewry
as Jews but rather as "Kar-
aites," members of a different
religion and this angers
them.
He agreed with Fein that
criticism of Israel on this issue
will spill over to others.
Professor Menahem Fried-
convert, and even more specif-
ically, who is a rabbi.
The Knesset, in effect, was
being asked to rule on a dis-
pute between one church and
another, he said.
Rabbi Shlomo Riskin of
Efrat said there was sufficient
agreement between the differ-
ent streams of Judaism on the
minimal conversion require-
ments to allow for a solution of
this issue.
He proposed establishment
of a commission in Israel con-
sisting of Orthodox, Conserva-
tive and Reform rabbis that
would pass on all conversions
by unanimous consent.
Shlomo Avineri, a professor
of political science at the
Hebrew University, criticized
American Conservative and
Reform Jews for taking the
more convenient step of apply-
ing pressure on the Israeli
political system instead of
against the Lubavitcher rebbe
in Brooklyn, who was the prin-
signer of Israel's Declaration
of Independence and a veteran
Knesset member of the Poale
Agudat Israel party, express-
ed the Orthodox viewpoint. He
said the "Who Is a Jew" issue
deals with the essence of Jew-
ish peoplehood and existence.
Kahana said the halachic
definition of a Jew cannot be
changed by the Knesset, and
that such change can only lead
to deep divisions within the
nation.
France Formally Asks Syria
To Extradite Nazi
i wiCTBur raenanem rnea- -------j-, ....., .,. Fui-
man of Bar-Ilan University cipaJ "p pushing for pas-
said the "Who Is a Jew" ques- sage of the '"Who a Jew"
tion should be more correctly measure-
viewed in terms of who is a Rabbi Kalman Kahana, a
Jewish Cultural Center To
open Next Month In Moscow
NEW YORK (JTA) The
Solomon Mikhoels Center, the
Soviet Union's first officially
sanctioned Jewish cultural
center in more than a half
century, will open in Moscow
on Feb. 12, Edgar Bronfman,
president of the World Jewish
Congress announced recently.
It will offer books and films
on Jewish history and culture,
an art gallery of Jewish art-
ists, lecturers, concerts, spe-
cial exhibitions, seminars and
Hebrew classes.
The opening is part of a
"Festival of Jewish Culture"
in the Soviet capital to run
from Feb. 12 to 22.
Bronfman stressed the his-
toric significance of the event.
"The Soviet government has
given official recognition to
the right of Jews to participate
in their cultural heritage, he
said.
The new center is named for
Solomon (Shlomo) Mikhoels,
the Jewish actor and cultural
leader murdered at the orders
of Josef Stalin in 1948. It is
housed in what was formerly
the Yiddish State Theater of
which Mikhoels was the direc-
tor.
The Mikhoels Center was
established with the approval
of the Soviet Ministry of Cul-
Soviet policy toward its Jewish
community was given to
Bronfman during his meetings
in November with Foreign
Minister Eduard Shevard-
nadze and other senior officials
in Moscow.
Bronfman, speaking
recently in Columbus, Ohio,
said, "This new development
offers a great window of
opportunity that Jews in the
Diaspora and in Israel must
take advantage of now, for no
one can tell how long the win-
dow will remain open."
He noted there "are new
opportunities to practice the
Jewish faith and express Jew-
ish culture that the Soviet
regime has recently made
possible."
Exhibit On The Holocaust
Bronfman will be joined by
Nobel Peace Prize winner Elie
Wiesel, who will deliver the
major address at the official
opening ceremonies for the
center next month.
Another participant will be
the prominent Israeli poet,
Yehuda Amichai.
Mikhoel's daughter and
granddaughter will come from
Israel to attend as "testimony
to the government rehabilita-
tion of Soviet Jewish martyrs
killed during the Stalinist
ish institution to be officially
shown in the USSR.
It is titled "Courage to
Remember" and is in the Rus-
sian language.
Jewish singers from Israel,
the United States and Austra-
lia will join Soviet Jewish per-
formers in an opening concert
that will include traditional
and modern Hebrew songs.
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) France has
asked Syria for the extradition
of Alois B runner, one of the
last major Nazi war criminals
known to be alive.
The French ambassador to
Syria, Alain Grenier, pre-
sented the formal request to
the Syrian authorities in
Damascus on Dec. 27, Nazi-
hunter Serge Klarsfeld dis-
closed here Wednesday.
Syria has stubbornly denied
for years any knowledge of
Brunner's whereabouts, con-
trary to all evidence, including
an interview Brunner gave to
a Chicago Tribune reporter in
Damascus last year.
Now France is exerting the
full force of its diplomatic
weight to bring him to justice,
Klarsfeld said.
The French extradition
request is based on new docu-
ments Klarsfeld filed with the
Ministry of Justice in 1987.
The new file charges Brun-
ner with crimes against
humanity, which according to
French law, are not covered by
the statute of limitations, as
are war crimes.
Klarsfeld used a similar com-
plaint to obtain the trial and
1986 conviction of Klaus Bar-
bie, the "Butcher of Lyon"
who is now serving a life sent-
ence in Lyon's Saint Joseph
prison.
Brunner, 76, one of Adolf
Eichmann's top aides, has
been hiding out in Syria since
the early 1950s.
A French court convicted
him in absentia of war crimes
in 1954 and -sentenced him to
death.
Brunner is held responsible
for deporting over 100,000
Jews from Austria, Berlin,
France and Greece to death
camps in Eastern Europe.
West Germany asked Syria
for Brunner's extradition in
1984.
The Syrians claim that they
know of no such person living
in Syria.
But only last year, Brunner
freely admitted to the Tribune
reporter that he is the wanted
Nazi.
Klarsfeld said that if Brun-
ner is extradited, he could be
tried in either France, West
Germany or Greece since he is
wanted in all of those coun-
tries.
Klarsfeld said that the three
countries, with Israel's partici-
pation, could also set up an
international court to try him.
i funeral
month
i*

ture following negotiations black years," the WJC said
with U/IP v: r___:j-_* t_: __ .
with WJC Vice President Isi
Leibler on Oct. 21. Leibler is
head of the Australian Jewish
community in Melbourne.
Confirmation of a liberalized
The Los Angeles-based
Simon Wiesenthal Center will
present the Moscow center
with the first exhibit on the
Holocaust produced by a Jew-
Look what under $40 a month covers!
Chapel services, solid hardwood casket,
limousine, professional funeral director,
shivah benches, acknowledgement cards
...and more.
Todaywhile there is time, call the
Guaranteed Security Plan from Levitt-
Wfeinstein. VSfe will hold the cost of a
funeral service to under $40 a month
... if you act now. Then, when your
family needs us most, we
complete all of your
prearrangements.
7GI!AR/W1,EED
]UR!TY PLAN
Israeli Satellite Ends Orbit
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Ofek, Israel's first space satellite,
re-entered the atmosphere and disintegrated 118 days
after it was launched on Sept. 19.
It had remained in orbit almost four times longer than
the one-month life expectancy calculated by the Israel
Space Agency and Israel Aircraft Industries, the prime
contractor in its construction.
Israel expects to launch its second space satellite, Ofek-2,
within 18 to 24 months.
Shouldn't you
cut out these
numbers and
call today?
'Based on a nominal down payment
and 50 monthly interest-free pay-
ments of $39 95 Ask for details.
r
i
i
i
i
i
i
305-427-6500
407-689-8700
LevittoWeinstein
MEMORIAL CHAPELS
... because the grief is enough
to handle later.
I
I
I
I
I
I
I


Page 20 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, January 27, 1989
STEVEN SHAPIRO
President
Jewish Community Center
of the Pilm Beaches
While the current Middle-East Crisis remains the uppermost problem
in the minds of America's 5,800,000 Jews, it is imperative that all of
us who care take a closer look at the very real changing patterns of Jew-
ish life in America. Based upon the conclusions of a recent study by two
Jewish scholars, the survival of American Judaism is in question.
The study shows that many factors have altered the face of American
Jewry. Some mirror basic changes to the overall American society. Oth-
ers, such as assimilation by mixed marriage, are of more relevance to
Jews and other minorities. The statistics reveal that 35-40% of Jewish
marriages today are to non-Jews and that only 30% of the non-Jewish
partners will convert to Judaism.
Marriages have been delayed by careers. Often, career and child-rearing
are combined, resulting in increased demand for quality childcare,
a service crucial to the single parent. In addition, growing up in a trans-
ient society, the lower birth rate, the natural reduction in the number
of older religious Jews, the increased time spent by Jewish business-
men on business issues tothe neglect of Jewish issues, all of these fac-
tors have fueled the trend away from our Jewish roots and taken their
toll on the American Jewish family.
What does it all mean? It means that we American Jews aren't as se-
cure as we think we are. Like our people in Israel, we are surrounded
and outmjmbered. And just like a piece of wood can be mercilessly whit-
tled by the blade, if we aren't vigilant and energetic in our response,
we as a distinct people will be slowly whittled away by life in America.
Jewish Community Centers have responded to the upheaval in Amer-
ican life. JCC Preschool Programs have blossomed across the nation
to help reduce the emotional pressures suffered by Jewish working par-
ents. Increasingly, JCCs are aiding synagogues and Jewish Day Schools
to teach Jewish values and culture.
But like everything else in the world of humans, it takes money to do
the things that need doing.
Need I say more? Please support your JCC and Jewish survival.
THIS IS
ONLY A
PARTIAL
LISTING
OF JCC
MONTHLY
NEWS
FOR
MORE
DETAILS
OR
FACTS
ABOUT
THE
PALM
BEACH
JEWISH
COMMUNITY
CALL
689-7700
FOR A COMPLETE LISTING OF JCC PROGRAMS SEND FOR OUR MONTHLY UPDATE,
SENIOR UPDATE, SINGLES CONNECTION OR MR. & MRS1ETTER
OF THE
PALM BEACHES
EARLY CHILDHOOD
SUMMER PROGRAMS
Early Childhood Summer Programs will be
split between our Camp Shalom and our
45th Street Center. Hanoi, a full camping
program, especially geared toward pre-
schoolers who are 3 and 4 years old, is led
by Ruth Shlossman, our Early Childhood
Assistant Executive Director.
Klon-Ton, a complete summer camping
experience for children entering kinder-
garten will be led by Ashlyn Nason. Klon-
Ton. offers a wide range of camping ac-
tivites and special programs, dwelling on
the particular needs of the individual
developing in the Jewish group.
Gail Kressal and Ann Freedman will direct
programs at 45th Street. These programs
for 12 month olds to 4 year olds, are geared
toward the development of skills in a cam-
py/early childhood environment.
TEENS
It's time to think of your summer plans. We
need Junior and Senior Counselors, Crafts
Assistants, and Water Safety Instructors.
Call the JCC lor applications
CAMP DATES
June 19-August 11, 1989
Camp Wish List:
Large refrigerator for juice storage
Single unit air conditioners
Tennis balls & racquets
Ping Pong equipment
Early childhood toys
VCR
Children's video tapes
Crafts, tools
Picnic tables
REGISTER FOR SUMMER CAMP
NOW AND SAVE
Call Jack Rosenbaum at 689-7700
\
4
.
w.
,'v>
?
* --
i

Karen Blum with some ol the members ol the
budding JCC intergenerationai choir. New
voices are now being sought!
BOYS J.V. AND
VARSITY BASKETBALL
Boys Varsity and Jr. Varsity teams play
each Sunday in the South Florida Maccabi
Association. Our team is coached by Tom
Marion and Jack Rosenbaum who look for-
ward to playing in the February tournament
to be held at the Michael Ann Russel JCC
in No. Miami Beach.
CO-ED TOT SOCCER
TOT-SOC league begins on Wednesday,
February 8, 1989. Children learn basic
rules and skills. We meet at 5:30 PM at
Camp Shalom and play until it gets dark.
There's still room for a few more players.
Join us.
Call Jack R at 689-7700
MEN'S BASKETBALL
Out of the 10 teams which played in our Fall
'88 league, the 8th place White team and
the 9th place Light Green team wound up
in the finals of the playoffs. The Light Green
team won 47 37 to win the league cham-
pionship. Members of the team included
Joe Lazow, Mitch Rubin, Marc Flamer,
Steve Schwarzberg, Mike Jacobson, Ed
Meyer and Allen Tarpell.
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE VICTORS
WINTER
WONDERLAND
A TREAT FOR THE FAMILY
SUNDAY FEBRUARY 5, 1989
1:00 5:00 P.M.
AT CAMP SHALOM
ADMISSION $5.00 for a family of four
$1.50 for each additional family member
Join us for tons of fun with tons of snow.
REAL SNOW!
Entertainment includes Palm Beach Ballet,
Santaluces Chiefettes, Clowns, Palm
Beach Sports Academy and more.
Food available for everyone...
from soup to nuts
BRING THE WHOLE FAMILY AND
DON'T FORGET YOUR MITTENS
DADDY & ME DAY
February 19, 1989 from 10:00 a.m. to 12
noon at both preschool facilities. Come for
food, music and fun.
BIRTHDAY PARTY FUN
AT THE JCC PRESCHOOL
Where are you having your pre-schoolers's
birthday party?
At the JCC preschool, of course!
We offer a fun, professionally run party to
delight you and your child.
For details call Ann at 689-7700
PARENTING CENTER NEWS
PRE SEXUAUTIES
Learn how to approach sexuality before
"the birds and the bees" Led by Barbara
Garden of Planned Parenthood. February
2, 1989 from 7:30-9:00 P.M..
FEE: $5.00 members; $7.00 non members
CHAVERIM SHABBAT DINNER
On Friday evening, February 3.1989, Big
and Little Friends and their families will be
celebrating SHABBAT under the stars at
Camp Shalom Family Par*. Be part of a
wonderful program BECOME A BIG
FRIEND or recommend a family in need.
KOLRINA
WE NEED SINGERS
The JCCs very own Intergenerationai Sing- J
mg and Performing Troupe meets and
practices every Monday evening from 7:00
to 8:30 PM at the JCC.
ALL AGES WANTED
Children, teens, adults
Love of Singing Necessary
We Will Train You
Join Now I Call Cantor Karen Blum
at 689-7700
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED
Community-wide Celebration
Israel Independence Day
Sunday, May 14th
Call Ellen Elbaz, 689-7700
Tlw December 24th JCC Winter warm Up at Me
Airport Hilton was enjoyed by all who
participated Special thanks to Michael & Sandy
Litshrtz lor hosting.
FAMILY SHABBAT DINNER
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 24th
at CAMP SHALOM
Bring a Kosher style picnic dinner we will
supply the challah, wine, beverages,
dessert and surprise entertainment. Join us
for a delightful evening with family and
friends.
For more information and registration call
Harreen at the JCC.
culture Foundation Z
Presents its
fSo/Zim ZveeAroni,
_alcofiy $15
THE CALL IS OUT FOR
"BROADWAY BABIES"
The JCC is starting workshops for talented
individuals who are interested in acting.
Workshops for children and teens begins
February and runs for 14 weeks A learn-
ing experience ending in a showcase
presentation.
NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY
Acting skills, monologues, scene study, im-
provisation, vocal & physical warm-ups and
stage direction.
"TheTlTce
p FOR PEOPLE m W4M mm
Join the JGG
OF THE PALM BEACHES
For 8-11 year olds
Sundays, 1:00 2:30 P.M., At the JCC
700 Spencer Dr., West Palm Beach
For 12 -16 year olds
Sundays, 2:30 4:00 P.M., At The JCC
700 Spencer Dr., West Palm Beach
FEE: $65 for members
$80 for non members
JCC ADULT ACTING WORKSHOP
For individuals who wish to study acting -
no experience necessary.
The workshops include the above skills on
a more sophisticated level. The Objective
is to form a JCC Performing Group.
Wednesday from 7:30 9:30 P.M.
At the JCC, 700 Spencer Dr., W.P.B.
Monthly charge:
$25 for JCC members
$35 for non members
Limited registration
All workshops are led by Sara Premisler,
a graduate of the American Academy of
Dramatic Arts in New York and a profes-
sional actress, director and coach
TbowNTfb-^JHD-
Y0UR SOCIAL LIFE?
Ir'iurfcrbottheJCC.Theac-
ItheJCC
Meet the Staff
Ann Freedman has
been with the JCC
for many years and
jT % has performed
many different
V i functions. And
V m- she's performed
them well. But her
real interest and
real love is
children, so it's not
Ann Freedman "*** 1 find
that Ann is
now Head Teacher of the. JCC Early
Childhood Program. Ann is a graduate of
Barry University and brings to our JCC
experience as a teaching supervisor of an
infant research nursery, and as a
consultant for child care centers.
m
UNHID W
MtWftewv
o
AGIMCV
NTOnSM
FEKPUNO*
0* PAIM MACH
COUKIV
Nam*_____
Address___
Horns No
Business No.
checks payable to the Jewish Community Center of the Pslm Beeches he
snd mas' to 700 Spencer Drive, West Palm Beach, a 33409
/ wish to join the JCC
0 Family $200 n Single Parent Family $115
i Adult Couple $100 n Single Adult $75
1 Single Senior $50
D I would like to volunteer my services to the JCC
w
BAR WIT7WAH YEAR JCC
I
HCMI


Full Text
Page 20 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, January 27, 1989
Shalom from Shapiro
:ast Crisis remains the uppermost problem men on business issues tothe neglect of Ji
STEVEN SHAPIRO
President
Jewish Community Center
of the Pilm Beaches
While the current Middle-East Crisis remains the uppermost problem
in the minds of America's 5,800,000 Jews, it is imperative that all of
us who care take a closer look at the very real changing patterns of Jew-
ish life in America. Based upon the conclusions of a recent study by two
Jewish scholars, the survival of American Judaism is in question.
The study shows that many factors have altered the face of American
Jewry. Some mirror basic changes to the overall American society. Oth-
ers, such as assimilation by mixed marriage, are of more relevance to
Jews and other minorities. The statistics reveal that 35-40% of Jewish
marriages today are to non-Jews and that only 30% of the non-Jewish
partners will convert to Judaism.
Marriages have been delayed by careers. Often, career and child-rearing
are combined, resulting in increased demand for quality childcare,
a service crucial to the single parent. In addition, growing up in a trans-
ient society, the lower birth rate, the natural reduction in the number
of older religious Jews, the increased time spent by Jewish business-
neglect of Jewish issues, all of these fac-
tors have fueled the trend away from our Jewish roots and taken their
toll on the American Jewish family.
What does it all mean? It means that we American Jews aren't as se-
cure as we think we are. Like our people in Israel, we are surrounded
and outnumbered. And just like a piece of wood can be mercilessly whit-
tled by the blade, if we aren't vigilant and energetic in our response,
we as a distinct people will be slowly whittled away by life in America.
Jewish Community Centers have responded to the upheaval in Amer-
ican life. JCC Preschool Programs have blossomed across the nation
to help reduce the emotional pressures suffered by Jewish working par-
ents. Increasingly, JCCs are aiding synagogues and Jewish Day Schools
to teach Jewish values and culture.
But like everything else in the world of humans, it takes money to do
the things that need doing.
Need I say more? Please support your JCC and Jewish survival.
OF THE
PALM BEACHES
THIS IS
ONLY A
PARTIAL
LISTING
OF JCC
MONTHLY
NEWS
FOR
MORE
DETAILS
OR
FACTS
ABOUT
THE
PALM
BEACH
JEWISH
COMMUNITY
CALL
689-7700
FOR A COMPLETE LISTING OF JCC PROGRAMS SEND FOR OUR MONTHLY UPDATE
SENIOR UPDATE, SINGLES CONNECTION OR MR. & MRS.LETTER
EARLY CHILDHOOD
SUMMER PROGRAMS
Early Childhood Summer Programs will be
split between our Camp Shalom and our
45th Street Center. Ilanot, a full camping
program, especially geared toward pre-
schoolers who are 3 and 4 years old, is led
by Ruth Shlossman, our Early Childhood
Assistant Executive Director
Kton-Ton. a complete summer camping
experience tor children entering kinder-
garten will be led by Ashlyn Nason. Kton-
Ton. offers a wide range of camping ac-
tivites and special programs, dwelling on
the particular needs of the individual
developing in the Jewish group.
Gail Kressal and Ann Freedman will direct
programs at 45th Street. These programs
for 12 month olds to 4 year olds, are geared
toward the development of skills in a cam-
py/early childhood environment.
TEENS
It's time to think of your summer plans. We
need Junior and Senior Counselors, Crafts
Assistants, and Water Safety Instructors.
Call the JCC tor applications
CAMP DATES
June 19-August 11, 1989
Camp Wish List:
Large refrigerator for juice storage
Single unit air conditioners
Tennis balls & racquets
Ping Pong equipment
Early childhood toys
VCR
Children's video tapes
Crafts, tools
Picnic tables
REGISTER FOR SUMMER CAMP
NOW AND SAVE
Call Jack Rosenbaum at 689-7700.

.
_,
i
Hji
IO,
Karen Blum with some of the members ol the
"budding" JCC intergenerationai choir. Now
voices an now being sought!
BOYS J.V. AND
VARSITY BASKETBALL
Boys Varsity and Jr. Varsity teams play
each Sunday in the South Florida Maccabi
Association Our team is coached by Tom
Marion and Jack Rosenbaum who look for-
ward to playing in the February tournament
to be held at the Michael Ann Russel JCC
in No Miami Beach.
COED TOT SOCCER
TOT-SOC league begins on Wednesday,
February 8.1989. Children learn basic
rules and skills. We meet at 5:30 PM at
Camp Shalom and play until it gets dark.
There's still room for a few more players.
Join us.
Call Jack R. at 689-7700
MEN'S BASKETBALL
Out of the 10 teams which played in our Fall
'88 league, the 8th place White team and
the 9th place Light Green team wound up
in the finals of the playoffs. The Light Green
team won 47 37 to win the league cham-
pionship. Members of the team included
Joe Lazow, Mitch Rubin, Marc Flamer,
Steve Schwarzberg, Mike Jacobson, Ed
Meyer and Allen Tarpell.
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE VICTORS
WINTER
WONDERLAND
A TREAT FOR THE FAMILY
SUNDAY FEBRUARY 5, 1989
1:00 5.00 P.M.
AT CAMP SHALOM
ADMISSION $5.00 for a family of four
$1.50 for each additional family member
Join us for tons of fun with tons of snow
REAL SNOW!
Entertainment includes Palm Beach Ballet,
Santaluces Chiefettes, Clowns, Palm
Beach Sports Academy and more.
Food available for everyone...
from soup to nuts
BRING THE WHOLE FAMILY AND
DON'T FORGET YOUR MITTENS
DADDY & ME DAY
February 19, 1989 from 10:00 a.m. to 12
noon at both pre-school facilities. Come for
food, music and fun.
BIRTHDAY PARTY FUN
AT THE JCC PRESCHOOL
Where are you having your pre-schoolers's
birthday party?
At the JCC pre-school, of course!
We offer a fun, professionally run party to
delight you and your child.
For details call Ann at 689-7700
PARENTING CENTER NEWS
PRE SEXUALITIES
Learn how to approach sexuality before
"the birds and the bees". Led by Barbara
Garden of Planned Parenthood. February
2, 1989 from 7:30 9:00 P.M..
FEE: $5.00 members; $7.00 non members
CHAVERIM SHABBAT DINNER
On Friday evening, February 3,1989, Big
and Little Friends and their families will be
celebrating SHABBAT under the stars at
Camp Shalom Family Park. Be part of a
wonderful program BECOME A BIG
FRIEND or recommend a family in need.
KOLRINA
WE NEED SINGERS
The JCCs very own Intergenerationai Sing-
ing and Performing Troupe meets and
practices every Monday evening from 7:00
to 8:30 PM at the JCC
ALL AGES WANTED
Children, teens, adults
Love of Singing Necessary
We Will Train You
Join Now I Call Cantor Karen Blum
at 689-7700
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED
Community-wide Celebration
Israel Independence Day
Sunday, May 14th
Call Ellen Elbaz, 689-7700
The December 24th JCC Winter warm Up at the
Airport Hilton was en|oyed by ill who
participated Special thanks to Michael & Sandy
Lihthitz for hosting.
FAMILY SHABBAT DINNER
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 24th
at CAMP SHALOM
Bring a Kosher style picnic dinner we will
supply the challah, wine, beverages,
dessert and surprise entertainment. Join us
for a delightful evening with family and
friends.
For more information and registration call
Harreen at the JCC.
Dav,d Bagle, ***
JSolZim Aatn /veeAron,
[ Ticket, can b. ?2 Ben*>ussan I
Balcony Sis
THE CALL IS OUT FOR
"BROADWAY BABIES"
The JCC is starting workshops for talented
individuals who are interested in acting.
Workshops for children and teens begins
February and runs for 14 weeks A learn-
ing experience ending in a showcase
presentation.
NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY
Acting skills, monologues, scene study, im-
provisation, vocal & physical warm-ups and
stage direction.
For 8-11 year olds
Sundays, 1:00 2:30 P.M., At the JCC
700 Spencer Dr., West Palm Beach
For 12- 16 year olds
Sundays, 2:30 4:00 P.M., At The JCC
700 Spencer Dr., West Palm Beach
FEE: $65 for members
$80 for non members
JCC ADULT ACTING WORKSHOP
For individuals who wish to study acting -
no experience necessary.
The workshops include the above skills on
a more sophisticated level. The Objective
is to form a JCC Performing Group.
Wednesday from 7:30 9:30 P.M.
At the JCC, 700 Spencer Dr., W.P.B.
Monthly charge:
$25 for JCC members
$35 for non members
Limited registration
All workshops are led by Sara Premisler,
a graduate of the American Academy of
Dramatic Arts in New York and a profes-
sional actress, director and coach.
TbOKlr^O-B^AND'
YOUR SOCIAL LIFE?
^M^CrbonScCTheac-
\Mr. Wr. CWdo nw
l^^SSrSSr coup**, is,
[celebrating l J_er/oance at the
[February wrth_ ^0rth. In April,
Meet the Staff
Ann Freedman has
been with the JCC
for many years and
has performed
many different
functions. And
she's performed
them well. But her
real interest and
real love is
children, so it's not
Ann Freedman ***** ,ind
that Ann is
now Head Teacher of the. JCC Early
Childhood Program. Ann is a graduate of
Barry University and brings to our JCC
experience as a teaching supervisor of an
infant research nursery, and as a
consultant for child care centers.
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FEDERATION
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Name______
Address
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Business No
Make clucks payable to the Jewish Community Center of the Palm Beaches he
and mad to 700 Spencer Drive. West Palm Beach, Fl 33409
/ tWsA to loin the JCC
D Family $200 ? Single Parent Family $115
I i Adult Couple $100 D Single Adult $75
Single Senior $50
I I I would like to volunteer my services to the JCC
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BAR MIRWAH YEAR JCC

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