The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County the voice of the Jewish community of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
West Palm Beach, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 11, no. 27 (Sept. 13, 1985)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Feb. 20, 1987 called no. 4 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Mar. 31, 1989 called no. 12 in masthead and no. 13 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44605643
lccn - sn 00229551
ocm44605643
System ID:
AA00014309:00120

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)


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Full Text
THE VOICE OP
THE JEWISH
COMMUNITY OF
PALM BEACH
COUNTY
"Jewish floridian
^ W OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
Volume 15 Number 1
PALM BEACH, FLORIDA FRIDAY, JANUARY 6, 1989
m
Price 40 Cents
I

" f
Ten Most Significant Events
For American Jews In 1988
William Safire To
Speak At Major Gifts
New York .. Five of the
ten events most significant to
American Jews in 1988 had to
do with Israel and the Middle
East, according to the annual
compilation prepared by the
Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith. They included the
intifada, the "Who is a Jew"
controversy, and the U.S. deci-
sion to talk to the Palestinian
Liberation Organization.
The remaining five issues
were the growing menace of
neo-Nazi Skinheads, increased
manifestations of anti-Semi-
tism, U.S. passage of the Gen-
ocide Treaty, the increase in
Soviet Jewish emigration, and
the widespread observances of
the 50th anniversary of Kris-
tallnacht.
Israel's 40th anniversary.
Even with the serious prob-
lems facing Israel, it was a
cause for celebration.
The intifada. The up-
rising, which began in Decem-
ber 1987, has had a major
impact on all the parties to the
conflict Israel, Jordan, the
Palestinians.
The U.S. denial of a visa
to Yasir Arafat. Secretary of
State George P. Shultz stood
on principal in opposing the
Arafat visit despite the world
outcry.
The U.S. decision to talk
to the PLO. The U.S., deciding
that Yasir Arafat had met its
set of minimal standards for
talking with the PLO, decided
to do so while maintaining
America's commitment to dir-
ect negotiations, support for
Israel's security, and opposi-
tion to an imposed solution and
Inside
Cohen, Kaufman &
Kirk Head RPB. p.ge 2
B&P women will learn
art of assertive
communication... Pace 3
The re-Judaization of
Christianity.........Page 4
Golden Jubilee
Cocktail Reception at
I/Hermitage......Page 10
Abuse hits (the Jewish)
home....................Page 15
an independent Palestinian
state. Whether the PLO will
match words with deeds
including renunciation of its
Covenant and truly ending ter-
rorism remains to be seen.
The increase in Soviet
Jewish emigration. Glasnost,
openness, and perestroika,
restructuring, have had a posi-
tive impact on Soviet Jews.
The number permitted to leave
in 1988 increased 40 percent.
The growing menace of
neo-Nazi Skinheads. This new
breed of young extremists,
shaven-headed, wearing Nazi
insignia, preaching violence
against blacks, Jews and other
minorities, continued to grow
and is now evident in all parts
of the U.S. Their targeting of
vulnerable youth and alliance
with other hate groups are
additionally worrisome.
Increased manifestations
of anti-Semitism. ADL's 1988
annual audit of anti-Semitic
incidents in the previous year
documented a rise for the first
time after a five year down-
ward trend.
The "Who is a Jew" con-
troversy.. Ultra-Orthodox
demands for changes in
Israel's Law of Return could
not only affect some converts
to Judaism seeking citizenship
but also put in question the
legitimacy of Conservative and
Reform Judaism in Israeli
eyes. The issue has stirred the
American Jewish community
like few before it and Ameri-
can Jewish representations to
Israeli leaders have had a sig-
nificant impact.
U.S. passage of the Geno-
cide Treaty. Passage by the
Senate after so many years of
trying was testimony to the
work of one man William
Proxmire.
The 50th anniversary of
Kristallnacht. The widespread
observances of the event
which heralded the beginning
of the Holocaust give hope that
Kristallnacht will continue to
serve as a moral symbol and
lesson.
William Safire
William Safire, a man of
many careers and distinctions
will be the featured guest
speaker at the $25,000 plus
Major Gifts Dinner, given on
behalf of the 1989 Jewish Fed-
eration of Palm Beach
County/United Jewish Appeal
Campaign, Monday, January
23, 7 p.m., in Palm Beach.
In announcing the program
for the evening, Myron Nick-
man, Major Gifts Chairman
said, "William Safire has been
very successful in many types
of roles. His experiences as a
reporter, a politician and an
historian will allow him to give
us insight and understanding
during these momentous days.
We are very honored to have
him as our guest."
During his career, Safire
wrote a column for the New
York Herald Tribune and later
served as a correspondent for
New York radio and television
stations. His political writing
led him to win the Pulitzer
Prize for distinguished com-
mentary. Today, he writes a
syndicated column that is
widely distributed.
In the 1950's Safire worked
on the Eisenhower Presiden-
tial campaign. Later, he
became a senior speechwriter
for former President Nixon.
After he left that position, he
documented those years in his
book "Before The Fall," a his-
tory of the pre-Watergate
White House.
Safire has also written sev-
eral novels including "Full Dis-
closure," a best seller about a
President under fire. His lat-
est novel, "Freedom," is about
Abraham Lincoln and the Civil
War.
For more information, con-
tact Douglas Kleiner, Associ-
ate Director, Jewish Federa-
tion, 832-2120.
In Celebration Of UJA's 50th, Abramsons, Wieners
and Honigs To Chair Golden Jubilee
In celebration of the fiftieth
anniversary of the United
Jewish Appeal, this season's
premiere event of the 1989
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County/UJA Campaign
is the Golden Jubilee Dinner
Dance, to be held Sunday, Jan.
29, at the Breakers Hotel in
Palm Beach. A minimum Cam-
paign commitment of $5,000 is
required to attend.
This inaugural evening was
conceived to help celebrate
UJA's Jubilee anniversary and
to reach out to the Palm Beach
community to include them in
Continued on Page 6
Ruth Abramson
Hermine Wiener
^^"^ "**
Stephen Abramson
Diane Honig
Morton Wiener



Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, January 6, 1989
Cohen, Kaufman and Berk Head
RPB Campaign For Third Year
A trio of Jewish community
leaders will head the 1989
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County/UJA Campaign
in Royal Palm Beach for their
third consecutive year.
Appointed by General Cam-
paign Chair Irving Mazer,
Samuel Cohen and Henry
Kaufman of Royal Palm Beach
will once again co-chair the
Campaign that they have been
successfully heading since
1986.
Joining once more with
Kaufman and Cohen to make
this year's Royal Palm Beach
Campaign the best one to date
is Special Gifts Chairman
Bernard Berk.
To kick off the 1989 fund-
raising season, Royal Palm
Beach residents who have con-
tributed a minimum gift of
$250 to the Federation/UJA
Campaign are invited to
attend a cocktail party, Tues-
day, January 24, 4 p.m. at the
Indian Trail Country Club. The
guest speaker will be Dora
Roth, whose dynamic life story
tells the story of Israel.
Samuel Cohen, originally
from Pittsburgh, Penn., has
lived in Royal Palm Beach for
the past seven years. He has
been a member of the RPB
Campaign Committee for
three years and has also been
involved with the Pittsburgh
Jewish Federation. Active in
local politics, Mr. Cohen is a
past President of the Chamber
of Commerce and the Indus-
trial Development Corporation
in Pittsburgh.
Henry Kaufman moved to
Royal Palm Beach eight years
ago from Philadelphia, Penn.
where he was in the kosher
catering business. A member
of the RPB Campaign Commit-
tee for the last six years, he
also was active in the Phila-
delphia Jewish Federation.
Mr. Kaufman is a member of
several local Jewish and gen-
eral community organizations.
Bernard Berk, originally
from Green Bay, Wisconsin
was a seasonal resident in the
Palm Beaches from 1973 until
1984 when he moved here full-
time. He began his involve-
ment with the RPB Campaign
Cabinet three years ago. He is
a former member of the Feder-
ation's Budget and Allocations
Committee and had the oppor-
tunity in 1972 to visit Israel
and learn firsthand of the
needs of the Jewish people
there.
Members of the Royal Palm
Beach Campaign Cabinet are
Thelma Alk, Leah Berk,
Mischa Davidson, William
Deutsch, Roz Freedman,
Dr. Joseph Goodfriend, Dan
Jatlow, Karl S. Kalman, Rabbi
Melvin Kieffer, Rose Landy,
Harry Lerner, Josephine
Lerner, Ben Lieber, Morris
Lipstein, Nathan Super,
Al Tolin, Herbert Woolf.
For more information,
contact Garret Saperstein,
Campaign Associate, at the
Jewish Federation, 832-2120.
Fountains Golf Tourney
A Popular Tradition
A day of fun and relaxation
is planned for this year's
annual golf tournament and
luncheon, Sunday, January 29,
at the Fountains. Now a popu-
lar tradition, the minimum
contribution event promotes
participation and interest in
the 1989 Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County/United
Jewish Appeal Campaign.
Campaign Chairman, Louis
Zuckerman, has announced
that Albert Schnitt will serve
as Chair of the event for the
second consecutive year. In
addition, Ben Silverman will
Chair the raffle which takes
place during the luncheon. Sil-
verman has been Chairman of
this drawing for valuable
prizes for the past five years.
Last year, the raffle under his
guidance raised over $35,000.
"We have had incredible suc-
cess with the tournament
MRS. MILES FITERMAN
Cordially invites you to
"THE LION CONNECTION"
in honor of
Lion of Judah Recipients
Wednesday, January 25, 1989
1:30 P.M.
101 Worth Avenue
Palm Beach
Guest Speaker
RENA BLUMBERG
Civic Activist
Noted Author. Television and Radio Personality
Minimum Commitment $5,000 to the
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County/United Jewish Appeal
Women's Division Campaign
RSVP by
January 20. 1989
832-2120
Ben Silverman
throughout the years, said
Schnitt. "This year we expect
to have the biggest turn-out
ever. It will be a banner year
for this event that supports a
tremendous cause."
_ Date Change
For B&P
Breakfast
The Men's B&P Break-
fast that was scheduled
for Tuesday, January 10
at 7:45 a.m. has been
changed to Monday, Jan-
uary 9, 7:45 a.m. at The
Palm Hotel. For more
information, contact
Sandy Grossman, Direc-
tor, B&P Men's Division,
Jewish Federation,
832-2120.
ooooooooooooooo
Poinciana Educational Meeting
Jerome Gleekel
The room was filled to capacity
for an Education Meeting,
Wednesday, December 21,
S p.m., at the Poinciana Coun-
try Club. Guest speaker was
Jerome Gleekel, an authority
on Israel and the Middle East.
He up-dated the group on the
situation in Israel and Arab
activities worldwide.
Update _------------------------------
JCCampus Fundraising Underway
Half the funds that are need-
ed to build the 33-acre $12.5
million Jewish Community
Campus in West Palm Beach
have already been raised,
according to Gilbert Messing,
Chairman of the Jewish
Campus Corp.
"Now we're focusing on the
major gifts since 90 percent of
the rest of the money is going
to be raised through major
gifts," Messing explained.
Over $6 million has already
been raised for the new Center
to be built at Military Trail and
12th Street. Groundbreaking
is scheduled for the summer or
fall of 1989.
The Campus Corp. is the
umbrella organization for the
three groups that will use the
Center: the Jewish Federa-
tion, Jewish Community
Center and the Jewish Family
& Children's Service.
Messing said "prominent
people" in the community will
be appealing for "serious
donations" for the campus. He
said that professional fund-
raisers would not be used.
"By the time we start build-
ing," Messing explained, "we
should have all our money
raised."
During a meeting this week
of the Campus Corp. it was
confirmed that campus offi-
cials are currently soliciting
major gifts between $250,000
and $2.5 million. Smaller gifts
will be solicited beginning in
April, following the close of
the general Federation
Campaign, which is currently
underway.
The JCCampus building
committee met with the Cen-
ter's architects Wolfberg
Alverez of Miami this week
to review the Center's pre-
liminary floor plans, which
have changed over the months.
The JCC will house approxi-
mately 90,000 square feet of
interior space, plus outdoor
recreational facilities.
Schnitt has been involved
with the tournament since its
inception many years ago,
and has been active in the
campaign for the past 10
years. He is also on the Board
of Associates at the Morse
Geriatric Center and is Co-
Chair of the State of Israel
Bonds drive at the Fountains.
Ben Silverman has been
actively involved with the Fed-
eration/UJA campaign since
he moved to Palm Beach
County ten years ago. Cur-
rently, he serves as Co-Chair
of the State of Israel Bonds
campaign at the Fountains. He
is also active in fund-raising
for the Anti-Defamation
League. In 1972, he received
the "Man Of The Year" award
in the photographic industry
from United Jewish Appeal.
For more information, con-
tact Ephraim Goldberg, Foun-
tains Campaign Associate,
Jewish Federation, 832-2120.
Meyer B. Siskin Memorial Fund
The Meyer B. Siskin Memorial Fund was established in
1987 to fund Human Resource Development programs
for community leadership. These programs have been
provided through the National Jewish Center for Learn-
ing and Leadership (CLAL). Contributions to the Fund
can be made through the Endowment Program of the
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County. For further
information, contact Edward Baker, Endowment Direc-
tor, the Jewish Federation, 832-2120.


Weiners Plan Hunters Run
Pacesetters Event
Friday, January 6, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 3
Boynton Beach Breakfast
In an increased effort to
reach out to an even greater
number of Hunters Run resi-
dents this year, another out-
standing Pacesetters Dinner/
Dance is being planned by Co-
Chairs Bernard and Rhoda
Weiner, in support of the 1989
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County/UJA Campaign.
For the third consecutive
year, the Weiners have been
appointed as Co-Chairs of the
$1950 minimum gift event, to
be held Thursday, January 26,
6:30 p.m. at the Clubhouse,
announced Hunters Run Cam-
paign Chair Fred Brenner.
With gracious hosts Linda
and Ben Frankel, who have
hosted this event since its
inception over eight years ago,
the Pacesetters Dinner Dance
has already inspired more
community involvement this
year and expects to exceed last
year's campaign totals, said
Rhoda Weiner. The Weiners,
with the support of Hunters
Run residents, are looking for-
ward to setting another
intense pace to achieve record
campaign totals in this Boyn-
ton Beach community.
Originally from Elkins Park,
Penn., the Weiners moved to
Boca Lago, Fla. 13 years ago
and later became residents of
Hunters Run. Together, they
have been active in the Gen-
eral and Women's Division
Campaigns, both here and in
South County. Mr. Weiner is
also involved in the Philadel-
phia Jewish community, where
he serves on the boards of the
Weizmann Institute and the
Jewish National Fund.
Mrs. Weiner is a member of
the Women's Division Cam-
paign Cabinet this year and a
long-time supporter of JNF.
She has been involved with
many Jewish organizations
including Brandeis National
Women s Committee and
Hadassah. In the general com-
munity, she serves as a docent
at the Museum of Art in Fort
Lauderdale. Both Weiners are
members of the Dinner/Dance
Committee of the premier Gol-
den Jubilee Event.
Linda and Ben Frankel have
been residents of South Flor-
ida for 13 years while still
maintaining a home in Phila-
delphia. They both have been
active in the Federation/UJA
drive at Hunters Run since it
was established in the late
1970s. Mr. Frankel developed
the communities of Boca Lago
and Hunters Run and is cur-
rently involved in Admirals
Cove in the north end of the
county.
Mrs. Frankel is active with
the Children's Hospital in Phi-
ladelphia and is a board mem-
ber of the Palm Beach County
Council of the Arts. Addition-
ally, she serves on the commit-
tee for Art in Public Places for
Hr
91 )
IMM. *4iVJ m
m 0W' A t r
Ir .. 4 ^^^^^H
1 J 1 W' im \0 Em H
Bernard and Rhoda Weiner
the Jupiter Chamber of Com-
merce.
"We are lucky to have com-
munity leaders like the Fran-
kels at Hunters Run, who have
taken such an ongoing, per-
sonal interest in the Cam-
paign," the Weiners both
agreed.
Serving on the Pacesetters
Dinner/Dance Committee are
Marilyn and Stu Adelkoff,
Marian and Will Adler, Marcia
and Milton Birnbaum, Lois
and Albert Brodsky, Marilyn
and Marty Evenchik, Eileen
and Fred Gattegno, Shirl and
Larry Gilbert, Doris and Her-
Ben and Linda Frankel
bert Golinsky, Shirley and Mic-
key Horowitz, Shirley and
Lefty Klein, Phyllis and Nor-
man Lipsett, Roz and Al Mish-
kin, Marilyn and Larry Prigo-
zen, Ellen and Murray Rosen-
zweig, Betty and Lou Rubin-
off, Harriet and Ted Sail, Syl-
via and Burt Sarles, Nancy
and Art Schlesinger, Jr., Cor-
rine and Lou Steinbach, Bar-
bara and Irv Wax, Leona
Wolf, Zelda and Joe Zeger.
For more information, con-
tact Debbie Hammer, Direc-
tor, Boynton Beach Office of
the Jewish Federation, 737-
0746.
The Boynton Beach Council, standing (Ur): Judge Louis Flaum,
Co-Chair of Village Royale on the Green, Sidney Tushin, Fair-
mont, Edie Tevelin, Chair of Mirror Lakes, Miriam & Herbert
Weiss, Chairs of Palm Chase, Sylvia & Andy Cohen, Co-Chairs of
Boynton Springs, Jay Ossen, Chair of Aberdeen, Ida & Joe Lin-
senberg, Chair of Palm Chase Lakes, Lillian & Nick Lenovits,
Chair of LeisureviUe, Al Moskowitz, Co-Chair of Village Royale;
sitting: Sarita & Benjamin Ettinger, Chairs ofGreentree, Rabbi
Joel Chazin, Congregation Beth Kodesh, Jessica Bernstein, Chair
ofLimetree. Not pictured is Jerry Gross, Chair of Boynton Beach
Council and Bent Tree, Mildred & Paul Kellner, Co-Chairs of
Banyan Springs and Alice Wise, Co-Chair of Banyan Springs.
Assertive Communication Topic of
B&P Women's Forum
One of the community's fore-
most specialists in assertive
communication will be the fea-
tured speaker at the Women's
Division Business and Profes-
sional Networking Forum,
Wednesday, January 18,
7 p.m., at the Palm Beach
Airport Hilton, 150 Australian
Avenue, West Palm Beach.
Meredith Kaplan, M.S., will
facilitate networking among
the women and focus on the
areas of self-esteem and confi-
dence building.
According to Eileen Zimkind
and Elaine Weber, Co-Chairs
of this month's event, Mere-
dith Kaplan will highlight how
business and professional
women can project a positive
self-image and enhance self-
esteem as well as share their
strengths, skills and talents to
build a support system which
will increase their business
potential. The evening will
provide local women a chance
to meet, socialize and network.
Ms. Kaplan is a licensed
mental health counselor and
has a psycho-therapy practice
in Palm Beach Gardens. Her
speciality is in the area of
building women's self-esteem
through assertive communica-
tion training. She is well-
known and respected for her
assertive communication
training workshops.
She also serves on the Exec-
utive Board of the Education
and Training Committee of
Planned Parenthood and is a
member of Executive Women
of the Palm Beaches and the
Business and Professional
Women's Group of the Jewish
Federation.
For more information, con-
tact Faye Nelson, Director,
Women's Division, Jewish
Federation, 832-2120.
The Boynton Beach Council, standing (Ur): Judge Louis Flaum,
Co-Chair of Village Royale on the Green, Sidney Tushin, Fair-
mont, Edie Tevelin, Chair of Mirror Lakes, Miriam & Herbert
Weiss, Chairs of Palm Chase, Sylvia & Andy Cohen, Co-chairs of
Boynton Springs, Jay Ossen, Chair of Aberdeen, Ida & Joe Lin-
senberg, Chair of Palm Chase Lakes, Lillian & Nick Lenovits,
Chair of LeisureviUe, Al Moskowitz, Co-Chair of Village Royale;
sitting: Sarita & Benjamin Ettinger, Chairs ofGreentree, Rabbi
Joel Chazin, Congregation Beth Kodesh, Jessica Bernstein, Chair
ofLimetree. Not pictured is Jerry Gross, Chair of Boynton Beach
Council and Bent Tree, Mildred & Paul Kellner, Co-Chairs of
Banyan Springs and Alice Wise, Co-Chair of Banyan Springs.
NEW!-------------------------------------
SINGLE PARENT PROGRAM
at The JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
Do you want to share the experience ot Jewish tingle
parenting? Are you looking tor enriching activities e.g.
a parenting support group. Shaboat dinners and holi-
day celebrations, educational seminars, cultural and
recreational family outings?
____________CALL RUTH_________________
For additional information
689-7700 of th,
PAIM IMCHfS
700 SPENCER DRIVE. WEST PALM BEACH. FL 33409________________
"VISIT ISRAEL NOW TOUR"
THE PALM BEACH-ISRAEL CONNECTION
MARCH 29 APRIL 10, 1989
An unbelievable $1499.00 per/person (based on double occupancy)
The Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County/Israel Connection
Tentative Day-By-Day Itinerary
SAT. 4-1-89
After optional synagogue attendance, walk to the
Jaffa gate. Visit the Jewish Quarter. See the Cardo, the
recently discovered Roman heart of Jerusalem. Visit
the Burnt House, a remnant of the Roman destruction
of Jerusalem, which happened in the year 70 C.E.
Explore the Sephardic Synagogues and the recently
discovered Archaeological sites. Afternoon at leisure.
Overnight at the Laromme Hotel.
In the coming issues of the Jewish Floridian, we will highlight another day of this
exciting itinerary to give you the opportunity to see what is being planned for this
"chance of a lifetime' trip.
FOR MORE INFORMATION. PLEASE CONTACT STACEY GARBER.
JEWISH FEDERATION. 832-2120.
I


Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, January 6, 1989
Peace Initiatives
In spite of the plethora of negative news
emanating from the Middle East as we near
the secular year's end, it is worthwhile to note
that, at least, there are glimmers of light at
the end of the proverbial tunnel normally
studded with potholes of terrorism and anti-
Zionist invective.
In the wake of the refusal of an Arafat visa
subsequently followed by U.S. recognition of
the Palestine Liberation Organization and the
resumption of contact with that umbrella
group after a 13 year hiatus; after a tragic
airplane crash which was confirmed to be the
work of terrorists, some too quick to claim
responsibility; after the perceived isolation of
Israel as the world's nations hurried to wel-
come PLO Chairman Arafat draped in his own
version of the emperor's new clothes; after
another annual round of anti-Israel resolutions
voted upon by the United Nations. .
Finally...
In an attempt at Camp David deja vu,
Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak has indi-
cated that there is a standing offer to go up to
Jerusalem. That Mubarak would consider the
very move that ultimately cost his predeces-
sor's life is, in itself, reason for positive
expectation. This, despite his later "clarifica-
tion" that he would visit Israel if it is ready to
begin a dialogue with the PLO.
Apparently, Mubarak and his advisors feel
sufficiently confident that the fundamentalists
who ended the life of Anwar el-Sadat are
tolerably in control for the current president
to venture such a bold move as going to Israel
in search of furthering the peace process.
Given that Gaza is closest to Egypt, it
served as a faint suggestion that peace may
indeed be furthered if Mubarak's fundamen-
talists are reasonably in hand. Politics, often-
times, is a game of practicality. If Arab
radicals' purposes coincide, one faction could
hint at the bent of another.
That said, the possibility of a Mubarak
mission could prove nearly as historic as that
of the late President Sadat.
Final Solution For Hitler's Pleasure Craft
Miami Beach Vice Mayor Abe Resnick said he and a group of
Holocaust survivors are negotiating with a Jacksonville marina
owner to obtain Adolf Hitler's pleasure craft, the Ostvind
(eastern wind). If purchased, the boat will be blown up and sunk
for use as an artificial reef off Miami Beach.
"This is the final solution for Hitler's 1,000 year reign," said
Resnick, paraphrasing Hitler's statement that his rule would last
for at least a millenium. "We're saying now that his reign is
down at the bottom of the ocean after 50 years," Resnick said.
"We would like (the owner) to donate the boat, but it's going to
include a charge to bring it to Miami on a barge, because the boat
is not in floating condition," Resnick said, adding that a decision
should be reached within 30 days.
Asked why he chose a reef as the final resting place for the
boat once used by the Nazi leader and his fiancee Eva Braun,
Resnick said, "We want to turn the negative into the positive.
And the only (positive) purpose it can serve is as a reef on the
bottom of the sea."
the
Jewish floridian
ot Palm Beach County
USPS 060030 ISSN 8750 5061
Combining Our Voice and Federation Reporter
FRED K SHOCMET SUZANNE SMOCMET LOW SCMULMAN
Editor and Publisher Executive Editor Assistant News Coordinator
Published Weakly October through Mid May Bi Weekly balance ol year
Second Class Postage Paid at West Palm Beach
Additional Mailing Offices
PALM BEACH OFFICE
SOI S Fiagler Or West Palm Beach Fla 33401 Phone 832 2120
Mam Ollice a Plant 120 NE 6th St Miami Fl 33101 Phone i 373 4606
POSTMASTER: Ssnd address changes to Ths Jewish Floridian,
P.O. Box 012973, Miami. Fla. 33101
Advertising Director Steel Lester Phone St* 1*52
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Friday, December 30,1988 22 TE VET 5749
Volume 14 Number 43
Trying hard,but Will it W*sh?
>vJT7\
Re-Judaization of Christianity
And Affirming the Covenant
By HOWARD ROSENBERG
A prominent Catholic
scholar has called on Christian
denominations to end their tra-
ditional refusal to incorporate
Jewish values from the Old
Testament in their theology
and religious practice.
The theologian, the Rev.
John Pawlikowski, professor
of social ethics at the Catholic
Theological Union in Chicago,
said he believes that "Christi-
anity has gotten too de-
Judaized."
However, he said that Chris-
tians are increasingly adopting
Jewish values, such as the
importance of building a
strong community.
Despite this welcome devel-
opment, Pawlikowski said fun-
damental differences will
likely remain between Christi-
anity and Judaism on the mod-
ern State of Israel's biblical
claim to its homeland.
Pawlikowski, a member of
the U.S. Holocaust Memorial
Council, spoke at the home of
Israeli Ambassador Moshe
Arad recently on "The Jewish
Covenant: Its Continuing
Challenge for Christian
Faith."
His talk was sponsored by
the Israel Colloquium, which
hopes to improve relations
between the Christian com-
munity and Israel.
Pawlikowski spoke about the
Second Vatican Council, con-
vened by Pope John XXIII
from 1962 to 1965, and how it
tried to restore a community
orientation to Christianity.
The council recognized that
because of Christianity's tradi-
tional emphasis on personal
salvation, "The world for
Christians frequently became
a place they longed to escape,
rather than a place they were
called to transform."
Pawlikowski said that a
recent movement within
Christianity, liberation theol-
ogy, which calls for freedom to
people living under oppressive
governments worldwide, is an
outgrowth of "Judaism's com-
munal historical sense."
BUT some theologians in
that movement do not view the
Israelites' "exodus-cove-
nantal" tradition positively,
Pawlikowski said, adding that
some have "introduced the
notion of Jewish responsibility
for (Jesus') death, that seems
to return us to the unfortunate
days prior to the Second Vati-
can Council."
Pawlikowski also spoke of
Judaism's "more positive view
of the human person than
Christianity," and how
increased contacts with
Judaism "may help restore the
far more positive outlook on
sexuality as an avenue for
experiencing the divine pleas-
ure," he said.
On the Jews' historic claim
to the land of Israel, Pawli-
kowski said many Christians
maintain that the Jews' bibli-
cal claim to the land "automat-
ically breeds injustice."
Moshe Aumann, consul gen-
eral at the Israeli Embassy
here, commented that some
mainline churches have moved
"dramatically toward a
greater understanding and
rapprochement with
Judaism," but have stopped
short of "closing the circle
with regard to Israel."
Conversely, Aumann said
Christian fundamentalists and
evangelicals "have been the
most positive in their (political)
attitude toward Israel," but
view it theologically as a pre-
cursor to Jesus' return to
earth after Armageddon, the
final battle between God and
his enemies described in the
New Testament Book of Reve-
lation.
While the mainline churches
generally do not espouse that
viewpoint, to many conserva-
tive Christians, "the chances
of a Jew sharing in that final
... glory is still rather proble-
matic, to put it mildly," Pawli-
kowski said.
ROBERT St. John, the 86-
year-old journalist who
endowed the annual lecture,
concluded by asking Pawli-
kowski's reaction to the
Columbia University Encyclo-
pedia of Religion's definition
of the word "covenant."
"The great covenant
between God and Israel in
Christian theology is called the
old covenant because Jesus is
believed to have come to fulfill
it and set up a new and better
covenant," he read.
"That obviously reflects
what was certainly the abso-
lutely prevailing theological
perspective in all forms of
Christianity for a very long
time and even into the present
day," Pawlikowski responded.
"I think it is only beginning
to change. Theologians and
now certainly some texts, and
even official texts at the high-
est levels, are beginning to
speak in a new way."
Pawlikowski noted that
some arch-conservative
Catholics, such as French
Archbishop Marcel Lefebvre,
have criticized Pope John Paul
II for the "re-Judaization of
Christianity and this whole
positive affirmation of the con-
tinuing validity in the Jewish
covenant." Lefebvre was
excommunicated this past
summer.
"One of the accusations of
... Lefebvre and his followers
against the pope is that he is a
Zionist," Pawlikowski said. "I
am not sure that the ambassa-
dor would necessarily agree
with that," he said, turning to
Arad.
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
mainstream Shiite Amal
militia rescued three Irish
soldiers and a Red Cross
worker in southern Lebanon,
24 hours after they were
kidnapped by pro-Iranian
Islamic extremists.
The kidnapping was said to
have been precipitated by an
Amal Rescued UNIFIL Troops
Israel Defense Force
crackdown on members of a
Shiite fundamentalist group
called Believers Resistance.
The kidnapped soldiers were
members of the Irish battalion
of the United Nations Interim
Force in Lebanon. They were
snatched by armed gunmen
while on duty at a UNIFIL
checkpoint near Tibnin village,
just north of the security zone.
They were returned
unharmed to their battalion
headquarters in Tibnin. Amal
found them in the vicinity of
Tyre on the southern Lebanon
coast, less than 10 miles from
where they were kidnapped.


Domestic Violence:
Jewish Community's
Best Kept Secret
Friday, January 6, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 5
Domestic violence occurs in
15 to 19 percent of Jewish
homes, reports a story in the
latest issue of Women's World,
the national publication
of B'nai B'rith Women.
For years, the Jewish com-
munity kept silent about fam-
ily violence, perpetuating the
myth that a Jewish husband
would never harm his wife. If a
battered Jewish woman dared
to confide in someone, her
story was usually met with
disbelief. Even rabbis, doctors
and lawyers preferred to hide
behind the reassuring stance
that "it doesn't happen in Jew-
ish families." The denial inten-
sified the feeling of guilt,
shame and helplessness of the
victim and kept her from leav-
ing the abusive relationship.
This conspiracy of silence kept
battered Jewish women iso-
lated for years.
But lately, the almost daily
assault of grim headlines
forced us to listen. We listened
when Elizabeth Steinberg, a
six-year-old Manhattan girl
was beaten to death by her
adoptive parents, both Jewish,
professional and affluent. The
brutal murder and the stories
disclosing that the mother,
too, had been a frequent victim
of the father's abuse, sent
shock waves throughout the
Jewish community. Convinced
finally that nobody is immune
to domestic violence, several
Jewish communities have
begun mobilizing to identify
and help victims of abuse.
The Women's World article,
"Breaking the Silence: Reach-
ing Out to Battered Jewish
Women." explores the most
recent efforts to create and
develop special help lines for
battered women and their
children within the Jewish
community.
By offering a temporary
shelter equipped with a kosher
kitchen, the Transition Center
in New York City became the
first program to offer obser-
vant Jewish women a way to
leave a battering relationship
without compromising their
religious beliefs. Similar shel-
ters for Jewish women have
since opened in Chicago, Los
Angeles, and Toronto. Many of
these innovative programs
also offer counseling and legal
aid to the victims of abuse, as
well as outreach and education
to rabbis and other community
leaders.
The Family Violence Project
in Los Angeles is the most
comprehensive intervention
and prevention program to be
sponsored by a Jewish Family
Service agency in the United
States. With staff devoted
solely to family violence cases,
offering therapy groups for
both the victims and t le ab-
users, the program has helped
over 500 families since it
opened its doors in 1983.
Caring private individuals
and Jewish women's organiza-
tions have also offered help to
victims of abuse. B'nai B'rith
Women of Canada has launch-
ed an intensive campaign
against domestic violence
which culminated with the
opening last June of the first
Toronto apartment for abused
Jewish women.
Legislation and education
are critical in the battle
against domestic violence.
Women often stay in a batter-
ing relationship because they
don't know where or how to
get help. Teaching teenagers
about violence is another pri-
ority, since the incidence of
violence among teens and col-
lege students is soaring.
B'nai B'rith Women has
compiled a Family Violence
Resource List, which includes
shelters and special services for
Jewish victims of domestic vio-
lence as well as a list of publi-
cations on the subject. To
obtain a copy of the list write
to: Women'* World,
B'nai B'rith Women, 1640
Rhode Island Avenue, NW,
Washington, D.C. 20036.
Join Us On EL AL, Tour Leaders Say
Due to a significant number of inquiries the Jewish Federation
has received recently concerning the airline that is being booked
for the Palm Beach/Israel Connection, March 29-April 10, we
would like to reassure anyone interested in joining the trip that
we will be flying EL AL round trip. As Israel's only official air-
line, EL AL is completely dedicated to maintaining the highest
security standards of any airline in the industry, and besides,
they serve bagels and cream cheese for breakfast.
We hope you'll join us on the "trip of a lifetime" and visit
Israel now with Palm Beach County. For more information, con-
tact Stacey Garber, Campaign Associate, Jewish Federation,
832-2120.
WE NEED SINGERS!
KOL RINA the JCC's very own INTERGENERATIONAL slug
laf art performing troupe meets ted practices EVERY
MONDAY evening from 7:00 1:31 p.m. at 700 Spencer Drive.
All Ages Wanted Good Voice Not Necessary
We WIN Train Yen
JOIN NOW CALL CANTOR KAREN BLUM
For additional Intotmatlon
689-7700

SPENCER DRIVE. W
EST PALM BEACH f, 3*0,
TMI
MMMIS
YOUR FEDERATION WANTS TO
PUT YOUR TEENAGER IN THESE PICTURES
And give him/her the experience of a lifetime
We will help pay for your child to
SEE the Jewish homeland
LEARN about our Heritage and
DO the things that make Israel so special
like:
Visiting ancient historical sites
Floating on the salty Dead Sea
Discovering the desert on camel-back
Meeting Israeli and Arab officials
AND MORE
Through the Teenage Israel Incentive Program generous subsidies
are available for any Palm Beach high school student (regardless
of financial need) to participate in an Israel study program:
High School in Israel USY Pilgrimages
Masada Programs WZ0 Programs Hadassah Programs
These are just some of the exciting options available
for your teenager's Israel experience.
LET US SEND YOUR CHILD TO ISRAEL
For information on these and other programs, contact Dr. Elliot
Schwartz, Director of Jewish Education, Jewish Federation, 832-2120.
THE JEWISH COMMUNITY
OF THE PALM BEACHES IS
CREATING AN ENVIRONMENT
WHICH WELL ALLOW JEWISH
LIFE TO PROSPER AND GROW...
66 A PLACE FOR US 99
WHERE YOUNG AND OLD WILL
SHARE THE EXPERIENCE AND
BEAUTY OF OUR HERITAGE.
Support the Jewish Community Campus Campaign.
Call 832-2120 for more information.
A < JEWISH ^s
COMMUNITY^
CAMPUS


Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, January 6, 1989
In Celebration Of UJA's 50th, Abramsons, Wieners and Honigs To Chair Golden Jubilee
Continued from Page 1
the Jewish Federation family.
General Campaign Chair
Irving Mazer has appointed
three couples to chair this
year's premiere Golden Jubilee
Dinner Dance: Ruth and
Stephen Abramson, Diane and
Daniel Honig and Hermine and
Morton Wiener.
Although all three couples
will make their debut in the
Palm Beach County Jewish
Federation as chairs of this
event, Diane and Daniel Honig
both grew up in Miami and
established their first resi-
dence together in Lake Worth
in 1957. They returned to the
community six years ago from
Washington, D.C., where they
both had successful careers.
As a lawyer, the president of
Claire Corp., a hotel and real
estate development company
and the president of National
Property Law Digests, Mr.
Honig was also very active in
the Jewish Federation in
Washington, D.C. As a young
adult, he was active in the
National Young Leadership
Committee and later sat on the
Executive Committee and
Budget Committee of the D.C.
Federation. He was also on the
Executive Committee of the
Anti Defamation League.
Mrs. Honig was formerly a
senior executive in a D.C. hotel
company. Like her husband,
she was active in the Washing-
ton Jewish community as
Chair of the Advanced Gifts
Event, a member of the board
of the JCC and an active mem-
ber of Hadassah, among other
involvements.
Originally from Montreal,
Canada, Hermine and Morton
Wiener have lived in Palm
Beach for over ten years.
Although both are somewhat
active in the Jewish commun-
ity here, this will be their first
active involvement with the
Jewish Federation.
Mrs. Wiener is now serving
her first term as a Palm Beach
Councilwoman. She also sits
on the Board of B'nai B'rith
and the Jewish Guild for the
Blind Committee. Outside of
the Jewish community, Mrs.
Wiener is the Executive Vice
President of the Greater Palm
Beach Symphony and the V.P.
of Graham-Eckes Palm Beach
Academy.
Mr. Wiener owns several
fast-food and finer restaurants
in Montreal and has been
mainly involved as a board
member of Technion Univer-
sity, Israel's institute of tech-
nology in Haifa. Wiener was
also active in the Montreal
Jewish community before mov-
ing to Palm Beach County.
Between Ruth and Stephen
Abramson, they belong to
almost every Jewish organiza-
tion in the county. Originally
from Baltimore, MD., the
Abramsons have lived in the
Palm Beaches for 30 years.
Mrs. Abramson is a Lion of
Judah and a member of the
Human Resource Develop-
ment Committee. She was the
founder of the Palm Beach
Brandeis Chapter and Tamar,
one of the first Hadassah chap-
ters. She has been a member of
the Jewish Federation Budget
and Allocations Committee
and was involved in the
Temple Israel Sisterhood.
The owner of a building and
developing company, Mr.
Abramson is the Chair of the
Building Committee of the
Morse Geriatric Center. He
was also active in the renova-
tion of Camp Shalom and
served on the Board of Temple
Israel. Among his varied activ-
ities in the general community,
Abramson was past president
of the local and state chapters
of the Fla. Home Builders
Association. The Abramsons
also participated in the recent
UJA Jubilee Mission to Roma-
nia and Israel.
The committee members of
the Golden Jubilee Dinner
Dance include:
Dorothy & Herbert Adler
Arthur Bellis
Mindi & Robert Belsky
Marjorie & Barry S. Berg
Robin & Richard Bernstein
Bea & Gilbert Bloch
Shirlee & Erwin H. Blonder
Dorothy & Jerome Blonder
Lois & Albert Brodsky
Michael C. Burrows
Naomi & Jesse Cohen
Elsie & Marvin Dekelboum
Jacqueline Eder
Joan & Robert Eigen
Sheila & Alec Engelstein
Ann & Albert Finkelstein
Linda & Benjamin Frankel
Florence & Benjamin Free
Beulah & Jacob Friedman
Eileen & Ronald Gold
Carol & Robert Goodman
Ellen & Alan D. Gordon
Sara & Arnold Grandberg
Elizabeth & Robert Green
Carol & Lionel Greenbaum
Florence & Erwin Greenberg
Marianne & Marshall Hess
Helen & Arnold J. Hoffman
Amy & Michael Jonas
Beatrice & Alan Reiser
Carole Koeppel
Joel Koeppel
Susan Lehrman
Celia & Albert I. Levine
Stacev & Mark Levy
Rita & Burton Lifson
Cynnie & Robert E. List
Zelda & Alan Mason
Lee & Irving Mazer
Judy & Gilbert S. Messing
Harriet & Alan Miller
Frances & Alvin Newman
Eileen & Myron Nickman
Sylvia Olnick
Gloria & Leonard J. Phillips
Sally & Ernest Pinter
Rima & Samuel Robinson
Sandra & Marvin Rosen
Ellen & Dean J. Rosenbach
Dorothy & Floyd Segel
Carolyn & Paul Shapiro
Bea & Albert Shore
Helen & Lester Sodowick
Lotty & Joseph Stein
Rita & Henry Taca
Evelyn Toll
Rhoda & Bernard Weiner
Anne & Mortimer Weiss
Ruth & Alvin Wilensky
Babbette & William M. Wolff
Estelle & Harold Wolfson
Rochelle & Louis Zuckerman
This premiere evening
will begin with cocktails
at 6:30 p.m., followed by
dinner, entertainment by the
Jerry Marshall Orchestra and
a short address by eminent
guest speaker, Rabbi Haskell
Look stein.
For more information,
please contact Sandy Gross-
man, Campaign Associate,
Jewish Federation offices
832-2120.
Shamir Calls Arafat Plan 'Satanic'
JERUSALEM (JTA) Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir,
speaking at the opening of the First International Jerusalem
Conference of Children of Holocaust Survivors, said that
Palestine Liberation Organization chief Yasir Arafat has not
altered "his satanic intent and plan."
Shamir told the gathering of some 300 participants that
history is trying to repeat itself, with the PLO "attempting to
lead the cultured nations of the world astray."
He called the current political peace developments "a world-
wide spectacle of deception, in which the entire civilized world
... worships those bearing the banner of hatred for Israel."
s Jr'" \* If Afll ill* % ftftV* l 11 1 1
1 i r
>*^** VAf^flD't
~&?l ,.
.
1
1 f / A i r
Available at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
RAISIN
PUMPERNICKEL
BREAD......... IS $139
Available at All Publix Stores and
Fresh Danish Bakeries, Date Nut
Coffee Cake
Available at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only. Blueberry or Cheese
Crumb Cakes ....6
Available at All Publix Stores and
Fresh Danish Bakeries, Delicious
Apple Bran
Muffins..............6 for H59
Available at All Publix Stores and
Fresh Danish Bakeries. Powdered Sue
Mini Cake Donuts..pkt 99*
Available at All Publix Stores and
Fresh Danish Bakeries. Topped with Whipped Cream
----------------------, v^i^u watas miippcu v-icai
Supreme Slices.... 2 for $1
where shoppng n a pleasure
Prices effective Thurs.. January 5 thru Wed..
&rW L1,1989/ 9"?"tV Rflhto reserved. Only
n Dade BrowantPalm Beach. Martin. St. Lucie.
Indian River and Okeechobee Counties.


I
Jewish Women Against Refusal
Friday, January 6, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 7
Jewish Women Against Refusal lay wreaths at the memorial of Babi-Yar, the site of mass
executions of Soviet Jews during WWII. At left is a Palm Beach County adopted community
refusenik, Inna Iqffe-Uspenskiy.
A Letter From Jewish Women Against Refusal
October, 1988
Our group was formed two years ago. During this time,
there have been many changes in the U.S.S.R. Some of our
friends, long-term refuseniks, part of them members of our
group, have received exit visas and left the country.
Nevertheless, to our great regret, there still remain many
refuseniks who have been waiting many long years for the
decision, and their situation is becoming more and more
grave.
The authorities continue to violate the rules they them-
selves have made, exposing refuseniks to arbitrariness and
lawlessness: long-term refuseniks are given new refusals for
many forthcoming years without any juridicial motivation;
consideration of the cases is being prolonged beyond any
determined time; family members, who have never come
across any secrecy clearance, are refused on this ground;
adult children are refused consideration of their case
separately from the family; there are cases when visas were
granted and withdrawn in a very insidious way. As before,
the mass media continues forming hostile public opinion
toward the "so called refuseniks."
We women, mothers and wives are greatly worried by the
situation with our children. Their lives are going on in an
abnormal moral climate. We are also worried by the
situation of old and sick people who form the highest risk
group, and by the forced professional degradation of the
refusenik majority.
The less the number of refuseniks who remain in the
country, the stronger and more merciless is the state press
upon them. We continue to remain victims of lawlessness
and arbitrariness, but as before, we refuse to reconcile with
it. We are going to continue our struggle by all possible legal
ways. Our aim is repatriation to Israel and liquidation of
the shameful phenomenon of refusal
A JCC Fundraiser / Open to the Public ^\
CASINC MM1
SATURDAY, JAN 14 / 8:30 PM
Games of Chance Music Snacks
Coffee & Dessert Cash Bar
PRIZE AUCTION
Use winnings to bid on fantastic items
(Beginning 11:30 PM)
$18 PRE-REGISTER / $23 AT DOOR
JACKETS REQUIRED
AT HOLIDAY INN AT THE TURNPIKE
Okeechobee Boulevard, West Palm Beach
Discover Five Star
extraordinary
Value in Israel

$33
ror Additional Information
689-7700
700 SPENCER DRIVE. WEST PALM BEACH. FL 33409
Per person in a double room.
$53 per single room.
Child in room free.
Price includes full
Israeli breakfast
15% service charge to be
. a*ted.
Of THI
PAIM IIACHIS
NOW OPEN FOR
ALL PROGRAMS
ON
NUTURING DEGREED TEACHERS
ACADEMICALLY AGE APPROPIATE ACTIVITIES
INNOVATIVE AND CREATIVE PROGRAMS
____________CALL GAIL KRESSAL
For additional information
689-7700
7a^PENCEr^PJVE^ESTPAL^EACK
Minimum of 7 nights or
more stay at either or
both hotels, valid until
February 28th 1989
* Rooms all beautifully
furnished.
* Color T.V. Video
individual heating
controls.
* Both hotels have free
entrance to heated
indoor pools.
In Jerusalem Free shuttle
to western wall.
Don! to misled by hoM
adverts with hidden
extras or required add ons.
Read the smaN print
Ramada hotels are best
value In Israel
Of tw
PMM If ACHIS
FL 33409
Contact your local
travel agent or
Ramada U.S A
Tt 1-800-228-9898, or
201-587-1414
Sl'C fOl tlOlllM'lf
[' Isi'iiel.
TO LIFE
CELEBRATE
UJA-FEDERATION SHABBAT
Each year synagogues across the county devote a
Shabbat to informing their congregants about the
programs and services of the Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County and its beneficiary agencies: the
Jewish Community Center, the Jewish Community Day
School, the Jewish Family and Children's Service and
Joseph L. Morse Geriatric Center, The Jewish Federa-
tion encourages you to attend the synagogue of your
choice.
JANUARY 6, 1989
Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg
Temple Beth Sholom
315 North "A" Street
Lake Worth, FL 33460
585-5020
Rabbi Howard Shapiro
Temple Israel
1901 North Flagler Drive
West Palm Beach, FL 33407
833-8421
Rabbi Randall J. Konigsburg
Temple Beth David
4657 Hood Road
Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33418
694-2350
JANUARY 13, 1989
Rabbi Joel L Levine
Temple Judea
100 N. Chillingworth Drive
West Palm Beach, FL 33409
471-1526
JANUARY 20, 1989
Rabbi Joseph Speiser
Golden Lakes Temple
1470 Golden Lakes Blvd.
West Palm Beach, FL 33411
689-9430
Rabbi Leonid Feldman
Temple Emanu-EI
190 N. County Road
Palm Beach, FL 33480
832-0804
Rabbi Morris Pickholz
Congregation B'nai Jacob
2177 So. Congress Avenue
West Palm Beach, FL 33406
433-5957
Rabbi Richard K. Rocklin
Lake Worth Jewish Center
4550 Jog Road
Lake Worth, FL 33463
967-3600
JANUARY 21, 1989
Rabbi Oscar M. Werner
Congregation Aitz Chaim
2518 N. Haverhill Road
West Palm Beach, FL 33417
686-5055
JANUARY 27, 1989
Rabbi Stefan J. Weinberg
Temple Beth Zion
129 Sparrow Drive
Royal Palm Beach, FL 33411
7988888
Rabbi Shloime Ezagui
Executive Director
Chabad House-Lubavitch
1867 N. Congress Avenue
West Palm Beach, FL 33401
641-6167
Rabbi Isaac Vander Walde
Congregation Anshei Sholom
5348 Grove Street
West Palm Beach, FL 33409
684-3212
JANUARY 28, 1989
Rabbi Alan L Cohen
Temple Beth-El
2815 North Flagler Drive
West Palm Beach, FL 33401
833-0339
FEBRUARY 10, 1989
Rabbi Joel Chazin
Congregation Beth Kodesh
501 N.E. 26th Avenue
Boynton Beach, FL 33435
586-9428
In honor of the 1989 Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County/United Jewish Appeal Campaign


Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, January 6, 1989
Alan Gordon, Ellen Gordon, Rhoda Weiner, Bernard Weiner.
Lee Mazer, Jerry Blonder, Dorothy Blonder, Dorothy Adler, Herbert Adler.
Sheila Engelstein, WD Campaign Chair, Harriet Miller, Ruth Wilensky, Alvin Wilensky.
COCK
RECEE
A'
L'ERMl
Over 60 members of the Golden Jubilee DinJ
ballroom in Palm Beach on Tuesday, December!
premier event, to be held on Sunday, January 29j
The purpose and plans for the Dinner/Dance as
discussion at the recent cocktail reception. The
function is the largest ever, 120 people, and incl
the county. Committee members will also serve al
J
he I
udJ
Pictured above (l-r) are the Golden Jubilee Chairs:
Ruth Abramson, Stephen Abramson. Not picture
Marvin Dekelboum, Elsie Dekelboum, Albert Finkelstein, Ann Finkelstein, Helen Hoffman
Arnold Hoffman. '
Richard Bernstein, Robin Bernstein, Nancy Atkin
lh.hu nm.r
3S


^
Friday, January 6, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 9
TAIL
fTION
r
TAGE
r Dance Committee filled the L'Ermitage
p, to discuss plans for the upcoming season
:11 as the role of the committee were topics of
ommittee that has been assembled for this
i representatives from Campaign affiliates in
hosts and hostesses for the evening.
t)aniel Honig, Diane Honig, Hermine Wiener,
is Morton Wiener.
Henry Taca, Rita Taca, Sandra Rosen, Marvin Rosen.
Rochelle Zitckerman, Lee Mazer, Irving Mazer, General Campaign Chair, Eileen Gold, Ronald
Gold.
Robert Belsky, Mindi Belsky, Arnold Grandberg, Sarah Grandberg, Gloria Phillips, Leonard
Phillips.
Norman Atkin.
Mortimer Weiss, Anne Weiss, Zelda Mason, Carole Koeppel, Joel Koeppel.
m**ii


Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, January 6, 1989
You' ve
Never Been
This Close To Israel
VISIT ISRAEL NOW TOUR'
THE PALM BEACH-ISRAEL CONNECTION
MARCH 29 APRIL 10, 1989
An unbelievable $1499.00 per/person (based on double occupancy).
An exceptional travel opportunity limited to the first 500 reservations, offering 5-Star
hotel accommodations throughout the tour...plus these outstanding features:
Round-trip West Palm Beach-Tel Aviv-
West Palm Beach ON EL AL
Daily breakfasts, gala banquets and
Shabbat dinners
Five full days sightseeing in deluxe
coaches
Private meeting with top Israeli leaders
Visit to a military base
Cruise on the Sea of Galilee
Optional tours available
All baggage transfers and entry fees
ABSOLUTELY NO SOLICITATION OF FUNDS
Your trip of a lifetime is available only through Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County.
Reservations will be taken on a first come/first served basis. Please call the Federation
office today!
Please send me more informa-
tion on the Visit Israel Now; Palm
Beach/Israel Connection Trip.
Name
Address
Phone _
JEWISH FEDERATION OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
832-2120
501 South Flagler Drive, Suite 305, West Palm Beach. Florida 33401-5988


Friday, January 6, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 11
B'NAI B'RITH
The next meeting of the
Royal Palm Beach Lodge
#3046 will be held on Wed-
nesday, Jan. 11 at 8 p.m. in
the Village Hall.
HADASSAH
Chai Chapter will hold a
White Elephant Sale and Flea
Market in the social hall of the
Challenger Country Club,
Lake Worth on January 26
from noon to 5 p.m.
Yovel Chapter will attend
the Miami Theatre of the Per-
forming Arts on Jan. 11 to see
"Les Miserable."
On Jan. 15, the Chapter is
planning a banquet for the
Children's Pavilion, Hadassah
Hospital, Israel at the Airport
Hilton Hotel at 5 p.m.
Tikvah Chapter will meet
January 16 at Congregation
Anshei Sholom at 12:30 p.m.
Coffee and cake will be served.
Edith Plotnick and Nettie
Granitz will entertain with
special stories.
Coming Events:
Jan. 15, Sunday Champagne
Brunch, "Dreamgirls" at Burt
Reynolds Theatre.
Jan. 25, HMO Luncheon at
the Royce Hotel, kosher meal
and entertainment.
Bar
Mitzvah
NA'AMAT USA
Ezrat Club will hold its gen-
eral meeting on Tuesday, Jan.
10, at noon, at the Beach
Bank, Military Trail and Gun
Club Road.
"A Dream, a Song, and
Hope," a slide show, will be
presented.
All members, friends, and
guests are invited.
NATIONAL COUNCIL OF
JEWISH WOMEN
Okeechobee Section will
have its membership meeting
on Thursday, Jan. 19, 12:30
p.m. at the American Bank,
West Gate. A Will Rogers
movie will be shown.
Coming Events:
Jan. 10, luncheon and card
party at Fountains View
Jan. 18, Matinee at Royal
Palm Dinner Theatre
Feb. 23, Annual Support
card party and luncheon
Palm Beach Section will
hold its next meeting on Wed-
nesday, Jan. 18 at the Royce
Hotel at 10 a.m.
David Haas
DAVID HAAS
David Louis Haas, son of
Lisa Haas of Palm Springs,
will be called to the Torah as a
Bar Mitzvah on Saturday,
Jan. 7 at Temple Judea. Rabbi
Joel Levine will officiate.
David is a seventh grade
student at Lake Worth Junior
High. He is an honor roll stu-
dent and participates in the
soccer team. He enjoys aero-
space technology. He will be
twinned with Danil Feign of
Russia, who was denied his
freedom to be called to the
Torah as a Bar Mitzvah.
There will be a performance
by apprentices from the Insti-
tute for Theatre Training. The
Institute is a non-profit corpor-
ation at the Burt Reynolds
Jupiter Theatre, which pro-
vides unique professional
training for college graduates
who wm also receive nine cre-
dits through the Florida State
University Continuing Educa-
tion program.
Palm Beach Section will
hold its Annual Support
Luncheon at the Breakers
Hotel on Feb. 8.
Main speaker for this affair
will be Susan Katz, National
V.P. of NCJW.
This function is held to raise
money for the many projects
and programs NCJW is tradi-
tionally known for.
The Palm Beach Section has
chosen to send the money we
raise this year to the Manof
Project, which is a home for
boys in trouble.
YOUNG SINGLES (20S & 30S)
Saturday, Jan. 7, 9 p.m. Start the New Year right at
Joel's place. Meet new friends and keep the old. Soda and
munchies served. Cost: $4.
Sunday, Jan. 8, 2 p.m. Meet at the Royal Poinciana
Playhouse for a scenic Dike ride around Palm Beach. Bring
your own bike or rent one nearby.
SINGLE PURSUITS (40-59)
Sunday, Jan. 8, at 12 noon. Meet at the front gate of the
Morikami Museum in Delray Beach (Morikami Rd., just off
Carter Road) for the Japanese New Year celebration.
Exhibitions of games, decorations, food, dance, and more
will be open to the public. There is no charge. Join us for
this unique afternoon.
Wed., Jan. 11, 7:30 p.m. The Culture club will meet at a
member's home. Join us and bring information concerning
events in the area. Refreshments available. Cost: $2.
SINGLES (20S-40S)
Wednesday, Jan. 11, 7:30 p.m. Meet at the Center
to hear Mr. Michael Hutt of AIPAC speaking on "Is
Arafat Calling for Israel's Suicide?" Join us for a contro-
versial and stimulating evening. Refreshments will be
served. Cost: $1.
SINGLE PARENT GROUP
Sat. Jan. 7, 7:30 p.m. Get together at Bonnie's home for
an evening of videos and fun. Bring your favorite snack to
munch on. Cost: $2. Optional baby sitting will be available
for children under 10 special videos for them at $2
extra per child.
For more information contact the JCC at 689-7700.
Generations of Jewish families
have enjoyed the wholesome goodness of high protein
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nutlike flavor. Chances are your grandmother made Kasha
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Limit one coupon per purchase.
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15* OFF


Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, January 6, 1989
Senior News
FROM THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
The Comprehensive Senior Service Center, through a
Federal Grant Title III of the Older Americans Act,
provides a variety of services to persons 60 years or
older, along with interesting and entertaining, educa-
tional and recreational programs. All senior activities
are conducted in compliance with Title VI of the Civil
Rights Act and Section 504 of the Vocational Rehabilita-
tion Act of 1973.
The Jewish Community Center, 700 Spencer Drive, in
West Palm Beach, is an active place for all Seniors. Hot
kosher meals are served every day and programs and
activities will be scheduled throughout the year.
KOSHER MEALS
Kosher lunches are served
Monday through Friday at
11:15. The three locations are:
JCC in West Palm Beach, 700
Spencer Drive; JCC in Boyn-
ton Beach, 501 N.E. 26th Ave-
nue; and JCC in Delray Beach,
16189 Carter Road.
Meet new friends while
enjoying delicious, nutritious
food along with planned activi-
ties everyday. Volunteers are
always needed. No fee is
required but contributions are
requested. Reservations re-
quired. Call Carol in West
Palm Beach at 689-7700, Julia
in Boynton Beach at 582-7360,
or Nancy in Delray Beach at
495-0806. For transportation
call Department of Senior Ser-
vices 627-5765.
HIGHLIGHTS OF
KOSHER LUNCH
CONNECTION FOR
JANUARY
IN WEST PALM BEACH
Friday, Jan. 6 Rabbi Joel
Chazin, Congregation Beth
Kodesh Sabbath Services
Monday, Jan. 9 Fred
Bauman Bingo
Tuesday, Jan. 10 Carolyn
Greene "Hospice Concept &
Services"
Wednesday, Jan. 11 Lisa
Gilders Blood Sugar Tests
Thursday, Jan. 12 Fred
Eisinger "Israel in 1988"
Friday, Jan. 13 Dr. Elliot
Schwartz, Jewish Federation
Sabbath Services
KOSHER HOME
DELIVERED MEALS
Are you homebound? Is your
neighbor homebound? Are you
unable to cook for yourself?
Have you just come home from
the hospital and have no way
to maintain your daily nutri-
tional requirements? The Jew-
ish Community Center's
Kosher Home Delivered Meals
Service is just for you!!!
This is a most essential ongo-
ing or short term service for
the homebound. No fee but
contributions requested. For
Boynton Beach, Lake Worth
or West Palm Beach call Carol
at 689-7700. In Delray Beach,
call Nancy at 495-0806.
JCC
TRANSPORTATION
SERVICE
The Jewish Community Cen-
ter takes persons to Nursing
Homes and Hospitals on Mon-
days and Fridays to visit loved
ones, to Day Care Centers and
to Jewish Community Center
programs, whenever possible.
Fee is $1 each one way trip.
Call Libby between 9:30 to
1:30 for information and reser-
vations. Persons needing
medical transportation
should call 627-5765. Depart-
ment of Senior Services.
CLASSES AND
ACTIVITIES
Adult Education Classes
The Jewish Community Cen-
ter is proud to offer classes
provided by Palm Beach Com-
munity College and Palm
Beach County School Board
Adult Education. Fees are
required for these classes
along with registration. Call
Louise at 689-7700 for infor-
mation.
A variety of classes will be
offered in January at the Jew-
ish Community Center.
Palm Beach County Adult
Education, School Board
You Deserve to Love Your-
self! Getting to know the per-
son who lives inside of you, a
smorgasbord of information.
Discussions regarding needs
and desires. Registration is
limited. Call Louise 689-7700.
Instructor: Lois Link, Ph.D.
Dates: Tuesdays, Jan. 10, 17,
24 and 31, 1989 at 10 a.m. at
J.C.C. Fee: $2 for the four
sessions.
Palm Beach Community
College, Adult Education
Planning Strategy For Qual-
ity Health Care. Making
informed decisions for afforda-
ble, accessible, quality health
care. Instructor: Gert Fried-
man. Dates: Thursdays, Jan. 5,
12, 19 and 26 at 1:30 at J.C.C.
Fee: $3. Call Louise at 689-
7700 for reservations.
Palm Beach Community
College, Adult Education
Exploring your needs. Learn
through practical skills and
techniques how to identify
your present needs. Reclaim
your right to have feelings, be
yourself, have a satisfactory
life, and grow. Classes at JCC.
Instructor: Faye Schecter.
Date: Wednesdays at 10 a.m.
on Jan. 11, 18, 25 and Feb. 1
and 8th. Fee: $2. Pre-
registration required to quar-
antee space. Call Louise at
689-7700.
OTHER CLASSES
AND ACTIVITIES
Fun With Yiddish Join
the many who enjoy a bit of
yiddishkait and humor every
Monday morning at 10 a.m. at
the JCC. Pauline Cohen is the
Group Coordinator. Presen-
ters: Leo Treem, David San-
dier, Pauline Cohen, Rose
Dunsky and others. Jan. 9th
Leader: Don Dacher.
Timely Topics: Ongoing
Mondays, following lunch at
JCC. Time: Lunch at 1:15
Program at 2. A stimulating
group discussing an exciting
variety of topics including cur-
rent events. Those interested
in lunch, please call for reser-
vations at 689-7700. Ask for
Rita, Senior Department.
Intermediate Bridge with
AI Parsont Basic bidding
and play on Wednesdays, at
1:30 p.m. at the JCC. Fee: JCC
member $2.50 per session,
non-member $3 per session.
Call Louise at 689-7700.
Speakers Club Ongoing
Thursdays at 10 a.m. at JCC.
For persons who wish to prac-
tice the art of public speaking
a great group.
JCC Thespians Popular
plays are being chosen for
rehearsal. Those interested in
becoming part of this theatre
group, please call Louise at
689-7700. Director: Carl Mar-
tin, former radio and stage
personality. Ongoing Fridays
starting from 10 to 12. No
fee, contributions requested.
Prime Time Singles The
monthly meeting for January
will be held at the Jewish
Community Center on Thurs-
day afternoon, Jan. 19th at
1:30 p.m. All Singles invited.
Call Sally at 478-9397 or Eve-
lyn at 686-6724 for informa-
tion about this active and
exciting Singles group.
JCC CULTURAL
CLUB NEWS
There will be a docent tour
on Tuesday, Jan. 10, at the
Boca Museum. We will be see-
ing recent works of the famous
American oil painter, Al Les-
lie. Mr. Leslie is known for his
huge canvases that are photo-
realistic. Call Louise at 689-
7700 for information and con-
firmation. Tour Guide: Sondra
Werbel. Fee: $8. includes
transportation.
Sun & Fun Day Cruise
Sponsored by the JCC. A trip
to nowhere with full cruise
amenities. Bus leaves at 8 a.m.
from Carteret Bank at C.V.
and returns to WPB at 6 p.m.
Call Sabina, chairperson of
Second Tuesday Council at
683-0852 or Blanche Silver,
Volunteer Travel Consultant
478-5450. Your check for $48
made out to the JCC is your
reservation! Make reserva-
tions early as space is limited!
Date: Thursday, Jan. 26.
Twilight Dining & Dancing
Enjoy an early evening
kosher dinner followed by
music and dancing before and
afterwards, coordinated by
our own Izzie Goldberg. Date:
Wednesday, Jan. 25 at 4:30 at
the JCC. No fee, contributions
requested. Pre-registration a
must! Call Louise at 689-7700.
AT YOUR SERVICE
The Jewish Community Cen-
ter provides by appointment:
Health Insurance Assistance
with Edie Reiter; Legal Aid by
Palm Beach County Legal Aid
Society; Home Financial Man-
agement with Herb Kirsh. Call
Louise for information at 689-
7700.
VOLUNTEER NEWS
"Hi-Neighbor" the very
special JCC Mitzvah Corps is a
group of persons reaching out
keeping in touch with our
homebound and others in
need. Join this dedicated
group of persons who enjoy
doing Mitzvahs. Call Ellie
Newcorn at 689-7700.
Volunteers Needed: Tele-
phone receptionists. Grand-
mas and Grandpas wanted
pre-school classroom aides for
2 to 4 year olds. Creativity
Crafts assistant for pre-school.
Yiddish instructor. Call Frieda
at 689-7700.
NEIGHBOR HELPING
NEIGHBOR
A consortium program with
Jewish Family and Children's
Service. Persons interested in
being trained to work in a new
Alzheimer's program a few
Jan. 6 Hadassah, Florida-Atlantic Region, Executive
Board Brandeis University Women Lake Worth,
University Speaker Luncheon Federation, Endowment
Meeting, 8:30 a.m.
Jan. 7 Federation, Young Adult Division, Campaign
Event, at Burt Reynolds Dinner Theatre, 7 p.m.
Jan. 8 Congregation Aitz Chaim Sisterhood, Mini
Luncheon/Card Party, 10:30 a.m.
Jan. 9 Federation, Women's Division, $365 Phon-A-
Thon, 5 p.m. Women's American ORT Fountains,
Luncheon/Opening Meeting National Council of Jewish
Women Palm Beach, Readers Group, 10 a.m. Jewish
Community Day School, board, 7:45 p.m. Women's
American ORT Palm Beach, board, 9:30 a.m. Federa-
tion, Central Planning & Allocations Committee, 5:30
p.m. Federation, Women's Division, Pacesetters'
Worker Training Meeting at the home of Shirlee
Blonder, 9:30 a.m. Federation, Young Adult Division
Social Committee Meeting, 7 p.m. Federation, Foun-
tains Parlor Meeting, 7:30 p.m. Federation,
Eastpointe mini-mission, 9 a.m. Federation, mini-
mission (Kleiner/Abramson Group) 9 a.m. Federation,
Business & Professional Men's Division, Breakfast, at
the Palm Hotel, 7:45 a.m.
Jan. 10 Federation, Chaplain aides, 2 p.m. Federa-
tion, Leadership Development Committee, 7:30 p.m.
Hadassah Henrietta Szold, board, 1 p.m. Temple Beth
Torah Sisterhood, 8 p.m. Yiddish Culture Group
Century Village, 10 a.m. American Jewish Congress,
board, 1 p.m. Temple Beth El, Study Group, noon
Women's American ORT West Palm Beach, 12:30 p.m.
Na'Amat USA Theodore Herzl, board, 10 a.m. B'nai
B'rith Century, 7:30 p.m. Temple Beth Zion, Executive
Board, 8 p.m. B'nai B rith Women Masada, board, 6:45
p.m. Hadassah Lee Vassil, board.
Jan. 11 National UJA $18,000 Event Lake Worth
Jewish Center Sisterhood, 12:30 p.m. B'nai B'rith
Yachad, 7:30 p.m. Hadassah Shalom, board, 1 p.m.
Holocaust Survivors of the Palm Beaches, 2:30 p.m.
Federation, Human Resource Development, Board
Development Meeting, 7:30 p.m.
Jan. 12 Temple Beth David Sisterhood, board, 8 p.m.
American Jewish Congress, 12:30 p.m. Na'Amat USA
Palm Beach Council, 10 a.m. Temple Beth El, Widows
and Widowers Support Group, 12:30 p.m. Morse Geria-
tric Center Women's Auxiliary, Executive Committee,
10:30 a.m. and board, 1:30 p.m. Federation, Campaign
Worker Training, 4 p.m.
For more information call the Federation, 832-2120.
MOSAIC Sunday, January 8, 11 a.m. WPTV
Channel 5, with host Barbara Gordon. Coverage of the
UJA Jubilee Mission to Israel, part 2.
L'CHAYIM Sunday, January 8, 7:30 a.m. WPBR
1340 AM with host Rabbi Mark S. Golub The Jewish
Listener's Digest, a radio magazine.
THE RABBI LEON FINK SHOW Sunday, January 8,2
p.m.-5 p.m. WPBR 1340 AM, with host Rabbi Leon Fink.
A Jewish talk show that features weekly guests and call-in
discussions.
TRADITION TIME Sunday, January 8, 11 p.m.
Monday-Wednesday, January 9-11, WCVG 1080 AM -
This two-hour Jewish entertainment show features Jewish
music, comedy, and news.
Sponsored by the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County.
hours a week at $4 per hour.
Call Barbara at JFCS 684-
1991.
CLASSES IN BOYNTON
The JCC will be providing a
variety of classes and pro-
grams at Congregation Beth
Kodesh along with the daily
hot Kosher lunch program.
-Quality Care & Medicine''
with Gert Friedman, Specialist
in disease prevention and well-
ness, from Palm Beach Com-
munity College. Directions and
choices available to you in
today's medical system. Dates:
Mondays at 9:30 to 11:30 a.m.
on January 9, 16, 23 and 30.
Fee: $2. Please call Julia for a
reservation at 582-7360.


Edna Hibel To Be Honored
At Temple Beth David
Friday, January 6, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 13
Edna Hibel, world renowned artist, will be honored at the Tem-
ple 's annual dinner dance, on Saturday evening, March 18, at the
Airport Hilton Hotel in West Palm Beach. Ms. Hibel has gener-
ously donated a valuable lithograph which urUX be raffled for $10
per ticket, or three for $25. The drawing will be held during the
Dinner Dance. A souvenir ad journal, also honoring Ms. Hibel,
will be published in conjunction with the dance and distributed to
dinner guests, members of the congregation and journal subscrib-
ers. Ms. Hibel has been instrumental in raising over three million
dollars for charitable and medical organizations around the
world. Among her many impressive contributions, was the dona-
tion in 1985 of the proceeds of the limited edition plate "Gizelle"
to the International Special Olympics and the National Commit-
tee, Arts for the handicapped in Washington, D.C. Other contri-
butions include the production of a Hadassah lithograph in 1981
to raise money for Hadassah chapters all over the world; and in
1972, a special lithograph for the March of Dimes. Pictured above
are: Edna Hibel (seated) with Lee Batterman, souvenir
journal co-chairperson and Charlotte Morpurgo, fund raising co-
chairperson.
ORT's Gala Golden Circle Luncheon
The North Palm Beach County Region of Women's American
ORT held its second gala Golden Circle Luncheon at Hunter's
Run in Boynton Beach Sunday, Dec. 18, 1988. Those attending
have pledged major contributions to the ORT capital funds
campaign. Seated (l-r): Fran Salloway, the guest speaker,
Southeast District Capital Funds co-chairman, Lilyan Jacobs, of
Royal Palm Beach, Mr. Salloway. Standing, Esther Barrish,
West Palm Beach, Irving Jacobs, Mickey Teltser, Atlantis,
Valerie and Steven Silverman, West Palm Beach. Women's
American ORT capital funds campaign raises monies for-the
building and refurbishing of vocational and technical schools in
Israel, Latin America, France, India and the U.S.A.
Scholar's
Weekend At
Emanu-El
Rabbi David Gordis will honor
Temple Emanu-El as the
Scholar-in-Residence for the
weekend of January 27-28,
1989. His father, Rabbi Robert
Gordis, author of the prayer
book used by many conserva-
tive Temples, including
Emanu-El, was Scholar-in-
Residence six years ago. Rabbi
David Gordis will develop the
theme: "The Jewish Condition:
Looking Into The Next
Decade." This year the Annual
Scholar'8 Weekend will honor
the Jewish Theological Semin-
ary of America and will high-
light the ninth season of the
Temple's Adult Education
Program. Scholar's Weekend
services are open to Temple
Emanu-El members and the
general public by advance res-
ervations only. For further
information, please contact the
Temple office.
Neo-Nazi
Tree Burning
By TAMAR LEVY
GENEVA (JTA) Neo-
Nazis are suspected of vandal-
izing trees planted in Basel
this year to mark the 40th
anniversary of Israel's inde-
pendence.
Twenty-five of the 40 cedars
of Lebanon were cut down.
The local Jewish community is
unsure whether the vandals
are Swiss or Germans who
crossed the nearby border
between Switzerland and
West Germany.
Israel Appoints New
Head Of Tourism
NEW YORK Raphael
Farber has been appointed to
the post of Consul and Tour-
ism Commissioner for Israel
with responsibilities for the
United States and Canada. Mr.
Farber brings many years of
experience to Israel's tourism
industry, and most recently
was Director General (Under
Secretary) of Israel's Ministry
of Tourism in Jerusalem. Mr.
Farber assumed this position
in 1981 at the age of 32,
making him Israel's youngest
Director General. He held this
position for seven years
longer than any of his pre-
decessors.
In building Israel's tour-
ism from North America, Mr.
Farber plans to underscore the
many vacation options that
Israel has to offer. "While
most Americans are aware of
the historical and religious
significance of Israel, many
are not aware of the modern
facilities that await them
the nine-hole golf course
within sight of Roman ruins,
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BY CANTOR
A5Mck
"p* pnon douM occ
PH Its* Tips
STRICTLY GLATT KOSHER
Religious A Cultural Programs Conducted
[pel by Rabbto Jfomt Hmch Mitowtte
For Information Reservations Call 1-531-3446
or Economy Travel 1-531-3447
or write Passover 89 Deauville P.O. Box 402868
Miami Beach. Florida 33140______________


Page 14 The Jewish Floridiah of Palm Beach County/Friday, January 6, 1989
Yv>*T shALo)S
Religious Directory
CONSERVATIVE
BOYNTON BEACH JEWISH CENTER-BETH KODESH: 501
NE 26 Avenue, Boynton Beach 33435. Phone 586-9428. Rabbi
Joel Chazin. Cantor Abraham Koster. Daily, 8:30 a.m. Sabbath
services, Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.
CONGREGATION ANSHE1 SHOLOM: 5348 Grove Street,
West Palm Beach 33417. Phone 684-3212. Office hours 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. Rabbi Isaac Vander Walde. Cantor Mordecai Spektor. Daily
services 8:30 a.m. and 5 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m. and 5:15 p.m.
GOLDEN LAKES TEMPLE: 1470 Golden Lakes Boulevard
West Palm Beach 33411. Phone 689-9430. Rabbi Joseph Speiser.
Daily services 8 a.m. Sabbath services Friday 8:15 p.m. Saturday
9 a.m. For times of evening services please call the Temple office.
LAKE WORTH JEWISH CENTER: 4550 Jog Road, Lake
Worth. Phone 967-3600. Rabbi Richard K. Rocklin. Cantor
Abraham Mehler. Services Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID: 4657 Hood Road, Palm Beach Gardens
33418. Phone 694-2350. Rabbi Randall J. Konigsburg. Cantor
Earl J. Rackoff. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m., Saturday 10
a.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 2815 No. Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach
33407. Phone 833-0339. Rabbi Alan L. Cohen. Cantor Norman
Brody. Sabbath services Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9:30 a.m.
Daily Minyan 8:15 a.m., Sunday and legal holidays 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 315 No. "A" Street, Lake Worth
33460. Phone 585-5020. Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg. Cantor
Howard Dardashti. Services Monday and Thursday, 8:15 a.m.
Friday evening, 8:15 p.m., Saturday, 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 224 NW Avenue G, Belle Glade
33430. Phone 996-3886. Services: Second Wednesday of every
month, 7:30 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH ZION: 129 Sparrow Drive, Royal Palm Beach
FL 33411. Phone 798-8888. Sabbath services Friday 8 p.m.,'
Saturday 9 a.m. Rabbi Stefan J. Weinberg.
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB: 2177 So. Congress Ave., West Palm
Beach 33406. Phone 433-5957. Sabbath services Friday 8 p.m.,
Saturday and holidays 9 a.m., Monday through Friday 9 a.m.
Rabbi Morris Pickholz. Cantor Andrew E. Beck.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL: 190 North County Road, Palm Beach
33480. Phone 832-0804. Rabbi Leonid Feldman. Cantor David
Feuer. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m.; Saturday 9:30 a.m. Daily
8:15 a.m.
TEMPLE TORAH: Lions Club, 3615 West Boynton Beach
Boulevard, Boynton Beach 33437. Mailing address: 9851D Mili-
tary Trail, Box 360091, Boynton Beach 33436. Phone 736-7687.
Cantor Alex Chapin. Sabbath Services Friday evening 8 p.m.;
Saturday 9 a.m.
TREASURE COAST JEWISH CENTER CONGREGATION
BETH ABRAHAM: 3998 SW Leighton Farms Road, Palm City
33490. Mailing address: P.O. Box 2996. Stuart 33495. Phone
287-8833. Services Friday evenings 8 p.m. and Saturday 10 a.m.
ORTHODOX
CHABAD HOUSE LUBAVITCH: 4623 Forest Hill Blvd.,
West Palm Beach, 108-3, 33415. Phone 641-6167. Rabbi Shlomo
Ezagui. Sabbath Services, Saturday, 10 a.m.
CONGREGATION AITZ CHAIM: 2518 N. HaverhUl Road, West
Palm Beach 33417. Phone 686-5055. Sabbath services 8:45 a.m.
and 7:30 p.m. Daily services 8:15 a.m. and 6:15 p.m. Rabbi Oscar
Werner.
REFORM
CONGREGATION BETH ISRAEL: 1390 SW Dorchester
Street, P.O. Box 857146, Port St. Lucie, FL 33452. Phone
335-7620. Friday night services 8 p.m., Saturday morning 10:30
a.m.
TEMPLE BETH AM: 759 Parkway Street, Jupiter. Phone
747-1109. Services Friday 7:45 p.m.
Student Rabbi Peter Schaktman.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 4600 Oleander Avenue, Fort Pierce, FL
34982. Phone 461-7428. Sabbath Services Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM: St. Helen's Parish Hall, 20th
Avenue and Victory Boulevard, Vero Beach 32960. Mailing
address: P.O. Box 2113, Vero Beach, FL 32961-2113. Rabbi Jay
R. Davis. Phone 1-569-4700.
TEMPLE BETH TORAH: 900 Big Blue Trace, West Palm
Beach, FL 33414. Phone 793-2700. Friday services 8:15 p.m.,
Saturday morning 10 a.m. Rabbi Steven R. Westman. Cantor
Elliot Rosenbaum.
TEMPLE ISRAEL: 1901 No. Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach
33407. Phone 833-8421. Rabbi Howard Shapiro. Cantor Stuart
Pittle. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE JUDEA: 100 Chillingworth Drive, West Palm Beach,
FL 33409. Rabbi Joel L. Levine. Cantor Anne Newman. Phone
471-1526.
Synagogue News
CONGREGATION
AITZ CHAIM
Mr. Jacob Nussbaum has
been elected president for the
year 1989.
Other officers elected
include Toby Lewis, First Vice
President; Nat Yudin, Second
Vice President; Ralph Klein,
Recording Secretary; Harry
Horn, Financial Secretary;
Sam Levin, Corresponding
Secretary; Herman Bernstein,
Treasurer; Harry Turbiner,
Honorary President.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID
Al Effrat of the American
Israel Public Affairs commit-
tee, will discuss the ISRAEL
ELECTION AND AMERI-
CAN JEWS" on Sunday,
Jan. 8 at 10 o'clock at the
Temple. A light breakfast will
be served at 9:15 a.m.
A course of Hebrew lessons
for beginners who have no
knowledge of Hebrew and
those who need a refresher in
Prayerbook Hebrew will be
taught on Monday evenings at
8 p.m., beginning on Jan. 9.
For further information,
please call the Temple office.
The Mens Club and Sister-
hood will sponsor a card party
on Tuesday, Jan. 10, 7:30 p.m.
at the Temple. There will be
poker, gin rummy, canasta,
mah jongg games and black
jack tables will also be avail-
able. Door prizes.
TEMPLE BETH-EL
On Jan. 22, at Senator Hall
Sisterhood will have a card
party. A mini lunch will be
served at noon. Admission is
$5.
Husbands and friends are
invited.
Reservations are necessary.
Obituaries
Checks should be made out to
Temple Beth-El Sisterhood
and mailed to Ada Fox, Chair-
person 214 Cambridge I, West
Palm Beach, Florida 33417.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
Sisterhood will hold its next
meeting on Monday, Jan. 16,
at 1 p.m.
The guest speaker will be
Dick Farrell, talk show host
for WJNO (AM) radio. He will
discuss the media and current
events. Guests are welcome.
Please contact the Temple
office. Refreshments will be
served, reservations are neces-
sary.
TEMPLE JUDEA
Sisterhood invites you and
your friends to a special cat-
ered card and game luncheon
on Jan. 10, at noon, at the
Temple, $7.50 donation.
FINKLE, Jacob, 76, of Lake Worth.
Menorah Gardens & Funeral Chap-
els, West Palm Beach.
LEVINE, Isadore, 93, of West Palm
Beach. Menorah Gardens & Funeral
Chapels, West Palm Beach.
MEHLMAN, Celia, 88 of Royal Palm
Beach. Menorah Gardens and Fun-
eral Chapels, West Palm Beach.
MERER, Muriel, 79, of West Palm
Beach. Riverside Memorial Guard-
ian Chapel, West Palm Beach.
MINTZER, Martin, of West Palm
Beach. Riverside Memorial Guard-
ian Chapel, West Palm Beach.
SCHWARTZ, Edith, 70, of Boynton
Beach. Menorah Gardens & Funeral
Chapels, West Palm Beach.
SIRKES, Rose, 83, of West Palm
Beach. Riverside Memorial Guard-
ian Chapel, West Palm Beach.
WINESTEIN, Regina, 86, of West
Palm Beach. Levitt-Weinstein
Guaranteed Security Plan Chapel,
West Palm Beach.
Candle lighting Time
Jan. 6 5:27 p.m.
Jan. 13 5:32 p.m.
mm
When you are gone... .
nothing mill make it better
pryowfamih
Nobody s ever ready to accept
losing a loved one. Iti a time of
deep rnourning; a time of numb-
ness. Certainty not the best time
to make difficult decisions.
But one
call today mill make it
'JOT theifl West Palm Beach: 689-8700
Boca/Deerfield: 427-6500
Ik time, take care of
i nowat todays
Hh The Guaranteed
fomUMKAVanstein.
riamfly needs us
jai of your pre-
it
GUARANTEED
SECURITY PLAN
Sharing the Wan
tmditum inftm


Friday, January 6, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 15
Abuse Hits (the Jewish) Home
Morse Receives Hibels
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
THE physical and emotional
abuse was to come only after
Donna had married.
At first, Donna (not her real
name) found her new husband
to be a gentleman: fluent in
many languages; handsome;
charismatic; and well-versed in
Torah.
Donna herself, 29 when she
accepted this man as her first
and only husband, says she
came from an Orthodox fam-
ily. Her mother had died of
cancer when she was 10.
Donna was raised by her
father. She entered a marriage
that was to last more than 13
years and produce four chil-
dren.
Three times Donna and her
children went to the Dade
County shelter for abused
women and their children. One
time, she says, she left home
with her children past mid-
night after a beating.
"They met my needs, but I
would have liked to have coun-
seling by someone religious at
the time," Donna recalls.
"Someone who is ultra-
Orthodox would not want to
even enter the place I was in."
BUT it was a safe haven,
and at the time and under the
circumstances, that was her
priority.
"A shelter has the legal
rights to keep the family with-
out the father knowing the
location or barging in," Donna
explained, contrasting the
shelter to a haven in the home
of a friend or relative.
Despite minor inconve-
niences, the "protection" was
the key.
"I feel we should have a
shelter for Jewish women,
even if they're not religious,"
said Donna. "Perhaps they
would feel more confident in
that environment, because
when my kids entered the shel-
ter for the first time, it was
terrible.
"But the only part we looked
at was the counselors who
were there on round-the-clock
shifts. We were always being
watched. If we left the shelter,
they had to know where we
were, what time we were
going to be back and how to
contact us. There was a cur-
few.
"They would take the chil-
dren on outings and tried to
make the stay pleasant. But I
think if we had a Jewish envi-
ronment, more women would
come forward knowing there's
shelter for them."
When Donna entered the
shelters, it was usually a last
resort. She claims her husband
would become violent and
physically abusive.
Of her marriage selection,
she says she was "vulnerable
... I learned in my home that
when you marry a man you try
Have we reaHy come
a long way, baby?
BBWt Women-i World
to get along. I'm not a sexy
lady. I'm not a night club
person. I don't smoke or
drink."
DONNA says she sought
rabbinical counseling and was
advised to stay in the marri-
age. She says she also went to
Jewish agencies for counsel-
ing, but was told her situation
at the time required more legal
assistance than counseling.
Her third and last trip to a
shelter occurred during Pas-
sover. She recalls how the
staff gave her $300 to get
paper plates, holiday food-
stuffs and paid for a separate
hotel room in order to accom-
modate her children.
FOR CONSERVATIVE SAVERS
AUSTRALIAN BANKS ARE
PAYING 11.250/0 ON CDs,
I GUARANTEED, AND YOUR |
CAPITAL WILL PROBABLY
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ROSE 24% AND IS
STILL RISING.
Call for tree report.
HERITAGE FINANCIAL
MM Villa La Jolla Dr.
Suits 1200
La Jolla, CA 92037
(M0) 373-2450
Donna now has received
both a civil divorce as well as a
bill of Jewish divorcement or a
get. She works at a supermar-
ket part-time and is taking
classes at night hoping to get a
more substantial job in the
health field. The case between
Donna and her husband is still
in the courts on issues of child
visitation and alimony.
She says food stamps help
the family and her children all
have received scholarships
from religious schools. Her
oldest son is studying to be a
rabbi at an out-of-town yeshiva
and works part-time as a
mashgiach, kashruth supervi-
sor, in the community which
assisted him as a youth. Her
younger daughters babysit to
make ends meet, she says.
Those two girls are attending
a religious day school on Miami
Beach. One son was graduated
from the same school.
DONNA says there is a "big
need" for Jewish shelters.
Aside from the staff, Donna
doesn't recall meeting any
other Jewish women the three
times she was in the shelter.
Is hers an infrequent case?
"It's not rare," Donna asserts.
"There are women who will
not come forward, mainly
because of religion. It's like a
shame to admit, God forbid,
your husband is a rabbi or
religious man. Why would he
do anything like that?"
II
A-AAbot Answerfone offers:
TELEPHONE ANSWERING SERVICE
|| BEEPER PAGING SERVICE
PRIVATE LINE SERVICE
MONITORING SERVICE
WAKE UP SERVICE MAIL SERVICE
and
"person to person service"
24 hours a day ___
New Morse Geriatric Center resident, Frieda Fryer, recently
donated to the Center two Hibel prints which had hung in her
former home. Both Drew Gackenheimer (left), Executive Director
of the Center, and Bennett Berman, President of the Morse Board,
expressed their pleasure with the prints. Berman commented,
"Since the Center opened five years ago, we have received several
fine pieces of original art and prints. We certainly appreciate
such gifts for both their aesthetic and monetary values. As we
move into our expanded Center, we are hoping additional fine art
donations will permit us to create a gallery for the pleasure of our
residents and visitors."
REGISTERED REAL ESTATE BROKER
Acre*geHomesLotsApartments*Income Property
232A Royal Palm Way Office: 655-7885
PALM BEACH. FLORIDA RES: 582-0184
'" "/"///ff /"/"'*"
A-AAbot Answerfone (305)**tli%l
213 N. Dbde Highway Lake Worth. FL 33460
TAX REFORM
What Has It Meant?
Many Americans have not seen the real impact of the Tax Reform Act of 1986.
Tax reform does not necessarily mean tax reduction. What made sense in theory
may have translated into an actual tax increase as many of those deductions
you used to take for granted are now gone.
Disappearing, especially for many middle and upper-middle income Ameri-
cans, are the following:
the two-earner deduction;
the IRA deduction, or a good portion of it;
the deduction for state and local sales taxes;
and increasingly large portion on consumer interest deductions; and
deductions for unreimbursed business and other miscellaneous
expenses that do not exceed 2% of adjusted gross income.
Put those decreased or eliminated deductions together with the increase in
tax on capital gain and you may very well have had a tax bill last April 15th that
caused you some concern...or even pain.
Tax Planning for the Future
Tax planning will now become an important part of many more people's
financial considerations. Questions of how to invest and, perhaps more
importantly, when to invest have critical tax consequences, even for those with
modest incomes. With a little foresight and careful planning, your tax bill on
April 15,1989 may indeed reflect the reduction you had hoped for but did not see
on April 15, 1988.
Keep It Simple
Fortunately, tax planning no longer consists of investing In shaky tax shelters
to seek elusive returns. Good planning for most people, can be done by
following two simple rules.
Defer or reduce taxable income, where possible, and
take your deductions, including charitable giving, as quickly as you can
and where they will do the most good.
To be continued in the next issue of the Floridian.
The Endowment Fund
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
501 South Flagler Drive, Suite 305
West Palm Beach, FL 33401
(407) 832-2120
Edward Baker
Endowment Director
Morris Rombro
Endowment Associate
THE ENDOWMENT FUND
of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County


Page 16 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, January 6, 1989
1
Shalom from Shapiro
STEVEN SHAPIRO
President
Jewish Community Center
of (he Palm Beaches
VOLUNTEERISM The concept of people entering or offering to
enter into any service, of his own free will.
One hundred years ago the early Jewish Community Centers, known
as Settlement Houses, were staffed primarily with volunteers. Today,
no JCC or T in the U.S. can function effectively without the gen-
erous help of its volunteers.
The U.S. Jewish Center movement has come a long way in one
hundred years, with JCCs or Ys in most major cities and in many
smaller towns as well. All JCCs are run by lay Boards of Directors
with committees composed of volunteers. Our JCC has many com-
mittees and many volunteers, but never enough to do the jobs that
need doing.
Within 24 months, we will be in our brand new building in our
brand new Jewish Campus on Military Trail. We will deliver twice
the services delivered today and most likely, we will have twice the
staff, as well. We will also need at least twice the number of avail-
able volunteers to help us deliver services.
One hundred years ago, Jewish Settlement Houses were respons-
ible for "Americanizing" European Jews. Today, part of the function
of a JCC is to help assure that we American Jews retain our cul-
tural heritage, lest our children and our children's children lose their
Jewish future. As Jews, it is our obligation to Jewish continuity to
serve the Jewish community in some volunteer capacity.
So please, call the JCC today and volunteer to help with any of
the hundreds of jobs needing to be done. Devote some of your time
to the Jewish Community Center; it's not just good for your people,
you'll find that it's also good for you.
OF THE
PALM BEACHES
THIS IS
ONLY A
PARTIAL
LISTING
OF JCC
MONTHLY
NEWS
FOR
MORE
DETAILS
OR
FACTS
ABOUT
THE
PALM
BEACH
JEWISH
COMMUNITY
CALL
689-7700
FOR A COMPLETE LISTING OF JCC PROGRAMS SEND FOR OUR MONTHLY UPDATE,
SENIOR UPDATE, SINGLES CONNECTION, OR MR&MRS CLUB NEWSLETTER
JCC CELEBRATES
ITS BAR MITZVAH
! %*mWamWm
North County's active Jewish community
swarmed over the Airport Hilton as hun-
dreds of JCC members and non-members
turned out in force to attend the JCCs 13th
Annual Dinner Dance. By all accounts, the
gala event held on Saturday, November
12th, was a smashing success, and
everyone is looking forward to next year's
event. -
Culture Foundation, Inc.
presents it s
4th ANNUAL ,
CANTORIAL CONCERT
W P B. Auditorium
Sunday, Feb. 26, at IP*
Featuring 4 Great Cantors
!, Zvee Aroni
.ma9V Aaron Bensoussan
en b. pure*"* -H
iwlsh Community Center
Call Angle at 689-7700
Loge, Orchestra $M
HUNDREDS ATTEND
CHANUKAHFEST/BOOK FAIR
Over 850 people attended the JCC
Chanukah Celebration at Camp Shalom
Family Park on Sunday, December
4.1988.
Patty Abramson, Chairperson of the event
and Vice President of the Jewish Communi-
ty Center was thoroughly pleased with the
turnout and the enthusiasm for the day. On
the outdoor stage, The Cantonal Concert
which was emceed by Michael Lifshitz,
coordinated by Karen Blum, and which in-
cluded the melodious voices of Cantors
Anne Newman, Norman Brody, Earl
Rackoff, Elliot Rosenbaum and the musical
accompaniment of Rabbi Steven Westman
was very well received. Parents and
children enjoyed the carnival games and
pony rides; the Chanukah Boutique. Jewish
Book Fair and Chanukah vendors provid-
ed excellent opportunities for browsing and
purchasing Chanukah presents.
It was a delightful community event.
' W 'A e
Torch carriers entering Camp Shalom
WATCH FOR THE 1989
JCC CAMP BROCHURE
Ready The First Of The Year!
ttfj&tf' BEST OF THE NORTH
'SV for 8th-11th graders
Summer adventure through the North, Nor-
theast, New England, Canada and
in-between.
A 26 Day Air Conditioned Bus Tour
June 19 July 14,1989
A fantastic, well planned and well super-
vised trip is planned this summer for JCC
teens entering 8th -11 th grade. The fee for
this 26 day trip, which includes transpor-
tation, lodging, admissions, and meals is
$1,475. The number of participants is
limited, so get your detailed brochure
today.
Call Jack Rosenbaum at 689-7700.
NEW
SINGLE PARENT GROUP
Do You Want To Share The
Experience Of Jewish Single Parenting?
Are You Looking For Enriching
Activities Such As:
A Parenting Support Group
Shabbat Dinner Holiday Celebrations
Educational Seminars
Cultural and Recreational Outings
You are invited to become part of a
developing vibrant program for single
parents that includes a wide variety of ac-
tivities with and without children.
For more information and upcoming events
call RUTH at 689-7700.
SENIOR SMARTS COMPETITION
JCC Contestants and Volunteer Staff are
participating in the First Senior Smarts
Academic Games Competition offered in
Palm Beach County to residents age 60
and over.
They are currently involved in qualifying
rounds from which a six person team four
team members and two alternates will be
selected.
The JCC Senior Smarts Team will play-off
against the Mae Volen Senior Center and
Palm Beach Gardens Dept. of Senior Ser-
vices teams on Thursday, Feb. 23,1989 at
the Mae Volen Center, Boca Raton.
Highest individual scorers at this event will
be invited to represent Palm Beach Coun-
ty at the March, 1989 state-wide
competition.

Senior Smarts Participants
-tSTiccp^"'
I fcatuhnjl
, esggsS
IcostPe'Pe^^^aoo.
Aovanced Tickets Tod*
1689-7700
13th MACCABIAH IN ISRAEL
Jewish athletes may apply for positions on
the USA MACCABIAH TEAM which will
compete in Israel this summer in July,
1989. There are still spots on the basket-
ball, fencing, gymnastics, judo, lawn bowl-
ing, rowing, shooting clay pidgeon and
pistol, squash, swiming,volleyball, water
polo, weightlifting, wrestling, and yachting
teams.
For applications and information call Jack
Rosenbaum at 689-7700 immediately.
WINTER WONDERLAND AT CAMP
SHALOM FAMILY PARK
SUNDAY. FEBRUARY 5, 1989
1:00 -5:00 P.M.
Great fun for everyone! TONS OF SNOW,
fabulous food, entertainment, games and
more! Bring the whole family, bring the
whole neighborhood, but don't forget your
mittens.
PARENTING CENTER NEWS
UPCOMING WORKSHOPS AT 45th ST.
HOW TO TALK SO CHILDREN
WILL LISTEN, HOW TO LISTEN
SO CHILDREN WILL TALK"
Take the struggle out of discipline and
create a peaceful home. Classes begin
Jan. 9th and run for 7 weeks on Monday
nights from 7:00 9:00 P.M.
Fee: JCC Members $30.00 (tod $10 book lee)
NON Members $35.00 (Incl. $10. book fee)
KOI RfJVA
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"SUNDAY AT TWO"
JCC Childrens Performing Arts Series
Presents
"THE SOMEDAY KNIGHT"
A Fractured Fairy Tale
Performed by Greystone Productions
Lunch Box Players at
Congregtion Aitz Chaim
2518 No. Haverhill Rd
(Opposite Century Village Entrance)
at 2:00 P.M.
SUNDAY, JANUARY 15, 1989
Ticket Prices: Adult Members $7.00
Non Members $8.00
Children Members $4.00
Non Members $5.00
Tickets can be purchased in advance or at
the door. For more information please call
Karen Blum at 6897700.
TREES FOR ISRAEL
Join our pre-schoolers in sending trees to
Israel. Each year, in honor of Tu B'Shvat
the JCC pre-schoolers send trees to Israel.
Each tree is $5.00. Call the Early Childhood
Office at 793-1884 if you would like to join us.
NOTE: Tu B'Shvat is January 21,1989
JCC THESPIANS IN REHEARSAL
This group which chooses popular plays for
rehearsal, practice and performance, is
directed by Carl Martin, former radio and
stage personality. The group meets on Fri-
day mornings at the JCC from 10:00
A.M. -12 Noon.
For more information call Louise at 689-7700.
CHAVERIM NEEDS VOLUNTEERS
CHAVERIM is the Jewish Community
Center's BIG FRIEND/LITTLE FRIEND
Program whereby youngsters of Single
Parent Families can be matched with
special adults who become another suppor-
tive and caring person in their lives. BIG
and LITTLES spend weekly time together,
engage in wonderful group activities in a
Jewish atmosphere and feel part of Center
Life.
New staffperson, Tom Marion is directing
this program For more information regar-
ding how to become a BIG or LITTLE
FRIEND, please call Tom at 689-7700.
Meet the Staff
Elie is responsible for
our Senior Outreach
Program. It's her func-
tion to go out into the
community to inform
people of available
senior programs. Her
bubbling enthusiasm
and ever-smiling face
have become a familar
fixture in county shopp-
linorj.Newcom'"9 malls "* condo
miniums. Elie is a
graduate of Rutgers University and Mont-
clair State Teacher's College, and she has
taught in both public and religious schools.
THE PLACE
mt for people m W4H mm
Join the JCC
OF THE PALM BEACHES
UN1IE0 WAV
7 ofWJfW
AGtNCV
Dtnehciiryl
Qtncy 0fW3WBH
FEDERATION
Of PAIM BEACH
COUNTY
Name______
Address
^Business No..
Home No_______________________________
Mike checks payable to trie Jewish Community Center ot the Palm Beaches he
and mail to 700 Spencer Drive. West Palm Beach. R 33409
/ wish to join the JCC
D Family $200 ? Single Parent Family $115
? Adult Couple $100 ? Single Adult $75 n
DSingle Senior $50
D I would like to volunteer my services to the JCC
r
BAR WIT7WAH YEAR JCC


Full Text
THE VOICE OP
THE JEWISH
COMMUNITY OF
PALM BEACH
COUNTY
Jewish flor idian
>^ W OF PALM BEACH COUNTY


Volume 15 Number 1
PALM BEACH, FLORIDA FRIDAY, JANUARY 6, 1989
fn
Price 40 Cents
Ten Most Significant Events
For American Jews In 1988
William Safire To
Speak At Major Gifts
New York Five of the
ten events most significant to
American Jews in 1988 had to
do with Israel and the Middle
East, according to the annual
compilation prepared by the
Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith. They included the
intifada, the "Who is a Jew"
controversy, and the U.S. deci-
sion to talk to the Palestinian
Liberation Organization.
The remaining five issues
were the growing menace of
neo-Nazi Skinheads, increased
manifestations of anti-Semi-
tism, U.S. passage of the Gen-
ocide Treaty, the increase in
Soviet Jewish emigration, and
the widespread observances of
the 50th anniversary of Kris-
tallnacht.
Israel's 40th anniversary.
Even with the serious prob-
lems facing Israel, it was a
cause for celebration.
The intifada. The up-
rising, which began in Decem-
ber 1987, has had a major
impact on all the parties to the
conflict Israel, Jordan, the
Palestinians.
The U.S. denial of a visa
to Yasir Arafat. Secretary of
State George P. Shultz stood
on principal in opposing the
Arafat visit despite the world
outcry.
The U.S. decision to talk
to the PLO. The U.S., deciding
that Yasir Arafat had met its
set of minimal standards for
talking with the PLO, decided
to do so while maintaining
America's commitment to dir-
ect negotiations, support for
Israel's security, and opposi-
tion to an imposed solution and
Inside
Cohen, Kaufman &
Kirk Head RPB...pge2
B&P women will learn
art of assertive
communication... Page 3
The re-Judaization of
Christianity.........Page 4
Golden Jubilee
Cocktail Reception at
I/Hermitage......Page 10
Abuse hits (the Jewish)
home....................Page 15
an independent Palestinian
state. Whether the PLO will
match words with deeds
including renunciation of its
Covenant and truly ending ter-
rorism remains to be seen.
The increase in Soviet
Jewish emigration. Glasnost,
openness, and perestroika,
restructuring, have had a posi-
tive impact on Soviet Jews.
The number permitted to leave
in 1988 increased 40 percent.
The growing menace of
neo-Nazi Skinheads. This new
breed of young extremists,
shaven-headed, wearing Nazi
insignia, preaching violence
against blacks, Jews and other
minorities, continued to grow
and is now evident in all parts
of the U.S. Their targeting of
vulnerable youth and alliance
with other hate groups are
additionally worrisome.
Increased manifestations
of anti-Semitism. ADL's 1988
annual audit of anti-Semitic
incidents in the previous year
documented a rise for the first
time after a five year down-
ward trend.
The "Who is a Jew" con-
troversy.. Ultra-Orthodox
demands for changes in
Israel's Law of Return could
not only affect some converts
to Judaism seeking citizenship
but also put in question the
legitimacy of Conservative and
Reform Judaism in Israeli
eyes. The issue has stirred the
American Jewish community
like few before it and Ameri-
can Jewish representations to
Israeli leaders have had a sig-
nificant impact.
U.S. passage of the Geno-
cide Treaty. Passage by the
Senate after so many years of
trying was testimony to the
work of one man William
Proxmire.
The 50th anniversary of
Kristallnacht. The widespread
observances of the event
which heralded the beginning
of the Holocaust give hope that
Kristallnacht will continue to
serve as a moral symbol and
lesson.
William Safire
William Safire, a man of
many careers and distinctions
will be the featured guest
speaker at the $25,000 plus
Major Gifts Dinner, given on
behalf of the 1989 Jewish Fed-
eration of Palm Beach
County/United Jewish Appeal
Campaign, Monday, January
23, 7 p.m., in Palm Beach.
In announcing the program
for the evening, Myron Nick-
man, Major Gifts Chairman
said, "William Safire has been
very successful in many types
of roles. His experiences as a
reporter, a politician and an
historian will allow him to give
us insight and understanding
during these momentous days.
We are very honored to have
him as our guest."
During his career, Safire
wrote a column for the New
York Herald Tribune and later
served as a correspondent for
New York radio and television
stations. His political writing
led him to win the Pulitzer
Prize for distinguished com-
mentary. Today, he writes a
syndicated column that is
widely distributed.
In the 1950's Safire worked
on the Eisenhower Presiden-
tial campaign. Later, he
became a senior speechwriter
for former President Nixon.
After he left that position, he
documented those years in his
book "Before The Fall," a his-
tory of the pre-Watergate
White House.
Safire has also written sev-
eral novels including "Full Dis-
closure," a best seller about a
President under fire. His lat-
est novel, "Freedom," is about
Abraham Lincoln and the Civil
War.
For more information, con-
tact Douglas Kleiner, Associ-
ate Director, Jewish Federa-
tion, 832-2120.
In Celebration Of UJA's 50th, Abramsons, Wieners
and Honigs To Chair Golden Jubilee
In celebration of the fiftieth
anniversary of the United
Jewish Appeal, this season's
premiere event of the 1989
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County/UJA Campaign
is the Golden Jubilee Dinner
Dance, to be held Sunday, Jan.
29, at the Breakers Hotel in
Palm Beach. A minimum Cam-
paign commitment of $5,000 is
required to attend.
This inaugural evening was
conceived to help celebrate
UJA's Jubilee anniversary and
to reach out to the Palm Beach
community to include them in
Continued on Page 6
Ruth Abramson
Stephen Abramson
Diane Honig
Morton Wiener


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